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Sanders’ critical judgement on migration show that he thinks people should stay settled. By staying settled, people have a chance to make a “home for [themselves].” Sanders uses words that create a negative connotation to exaggerate how great moving is in order to show that the idea is absurd. He says that people believe that if they stay in one place “[they’ll] die.” Death, of course, causes a drastic order of events because if a person doesn’t move, he isn’t going to die. He then moves on to say that Americans are “drunk on driving.” Sanders says this to show that people just want to get up and go all the time. Later in his passage, he uses historical issues to show that bad has come out of migrating. One of these is how when the “colonist” came they brought “slavery with them.” They also brought “small pox” and “Norway rats.” This shows that migrating doesn’t always bring happiness. In the beginning, Sanders uses parallel phrases to describe American migraters. He describes them as “rainbow-chasers [and] explorers.” Explorers always want to find something new, such as “a new stream.” Explorers are never happy with what’s “under [their] feet.” Because Sanders describes Americans as “rainbowchasers,” he is insinuating that what they are searching for is kind of absurd because it’s hard to find. In the end, Sanders juxtaposes ideas that contradict each other. He does this to prove that migrating is not better than staying put. Sanders argues with the fact that migrating is better than being rooted. He thinks that people are in better shape if they are rooted “in places” instead of in “ideas.”


Style Analysis Essay