Page 1

HMONG AMERICAN WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION

PhoReal! IN

V O L U M E

1 ,

I S S U E

THE

HMONG

2

LIFE

D E C E M B E R

1 ,

2 0 1 2

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Nkauj Hmoob Speak out

2

Nkauj Hmoob Speak out cont...

3

Teen Interview

4

Guest Speaker from Laos

5

S T O RY S K I RT

Delta Nraug Hmoob GroupHmoob Hmong Women’s Conference

6

Staff and Board Retreat

7

Courage Award Sexual Assault Program at HAWA Hmong Domestic Violence Helpline Volunteer HAWA Hat & T-Shirt for sale

8

Hmong Domestic Violence 24 Hour Helpline

Nkauj Hmoob Story Skirt was selected to be displayed at Warped Milwaukee 3rd Annual Fiber Arts Exhibition in the Jazz Gallery on the east side of Milwaukee for the whole month of November. The Exhibition is sponsored by ABK Weaving Center. Nkauj Hmoob along with 15 other artists displayed their handcrafted art. All items displayed was using fiber fabrics in their own creative ways, majority of the items are handmade by the artist. Nkauj Hmoob girls are pleased to have their story skirt displayed at the Gallery and to be able to experience and see different art fibers displayed along with their handmade skirt.

Editors for this edition includes: Mai Xia Lee Nkaujsua Xiong

PHOREAL!/IN

Thanks to Mai Kue Vang for putting the Story skirt together for Nkauj Hmoob.

THE

HMONG

LIFE

Mai Xia, Chee and Mai Kue standing in front of Story Skirt.

Story Skirt Muslin and Dye “During the Vietnam War, Hmong refugees documented the events of daily life at the time by using pictorial images and symbols. The women came together in communities to create large scale story clothes that were sometimes ten feet long. In doing so, it helped the women deal with the struggles of the time. Nkauj Hmoob is a youth group that comes together to make art that focuses on the contemporary concerns of Hmong youth in the urban Milwaukee Community. In “story Skirt,” we created symbols of the things that influence our identities and then incorporated them into the traditional Hmong skirt form. By coming together to create this piece of work, we learned more about ourselves and became closer to one another.

PAGE

1


Girls from Nkauj Hmoob Group speaks out As a new member The day I’ve join, “Nkauj Hmoob”, I knew that it’s going to be about Hmong people and our history. Even though, I’m new to this lovely group, I had told myself that this thing will help me learn more about my own culture. This group makes me feel confidence of myself and knowing that there’s more things to do out there, to learn new things and try new things. I volunteered to be part of this group because I want to represent my school Asian club and show my family, friends, and relatives that I will be successful in the future. I can say that volunteering had a big impact on people’s life and that you want to keep doing it in the future. I didn’t know what to expect from those ladies but when I got to know them, it makes me feel happy because we all can do lots of fun things together.

-Mai Ker Thao

My Years at HAWA’s Nkauj Hmoob Group By: Amy Vang During my years in HAWA, I have learned so much. Even the things I had never ever been able to learn. Through this program, I was able to share my thoughts and speak what I had trouble with. Either it was with education, parents, or other relationships. I especially love the girls, they are funny and lovable. We talk and share a lot of personal stories, but sometimes we can have our silent moments. I love the coordinators there too. Mai Xia is the group coordinator who gathers the girls together. She helps maintain the perfect mood and environment for us through the times when we are together. When I am alone with her I feel that I can connect with her, trust me she gives great advices. I would love to take this time and thank this program. It has helped me though my hard and easy paths. I recommend the Nkauj Hmoob group as the number one Hmong girls group in Milwaukee. Fun Activities & Field Trips with Nkauj Hmoob Teens @ HAWA

PHOREAL!/IN

THE

HMONG

LIFE

PAGE

2


The Stress of a Hmong Girl By: Rosie H.

Drawing by Chee Lor

As we grow up, our parents raise us, discipline us, and expect high expectations from us. They expect us to be a doctor, a dentist, a teacher, or work in any high paying job so that we will live a life not as hard as they lived. True, when they tell us these things, it sounds like an ambitious goal that we feel obligated to accomplish; but as time goes on we realize that the goals that they put in our minds is harder to achieve. It’s hard when you are expected to be a 4.0 student, or getting no lower than a 3.0 on your GPA. Especially when you are just not into school work and you don’t want to do your homework, and you don’t want to have to deal with the stress of overwhelming assignments and tests. Some parents understand and don’t push you to be someone you’re not, but other parents they push you farther because they know you can go that extra mile. As a Hmong daughter, it’s so hard to find time to study thoroughly and do your homework so you will receive an A+ on your assignments. As a Hmong girl, we have many duties that are expected to be finish. There’s babysitting, cleaning the house, cooking, setting the table, washing the dishes, doing the laundry, helping out at cousin’s houses, and so much more that sometimes you can’t even find the time to finish your assignments from school.

Social Anxiety By: Nancy Lor You may find this hard to believe, but I have a fear of meeting new people also known as social anxiety. I dislike making new friends and it’s not really my thing. The thought of having to make new friends scares me. I intentionally don’t leave a big impression on people the first time meeting them so I don’t have to meet them again. Social anxiety is not only being afraid of meeting new people, but also the thought of interacting with people around you. They fear that people are watching their every move and this makes them uncomfortable. When ask to speak in public, or to introduce themselves in a crowded room, they will try their best to avoid that situation. Surprisingly, social anxiety is the third largest psychological problem. No one knows how people have this fear. This fear has never been discussed in talk shows, the media, or the public because those who do have this symptom feel like they are the only ones who do. To add onto that, “social anxiety does not come and go like some other physical and psychological problems. If you have social anxiety, you have it every day for the rest of your life”. The only way to get rid of this fear is to have proper therapy which is more difficult than it sounds because social anxiety people have a hard time opening up and speaking their mind.

Drawing by Chee Lor

What people think of the Hmong Karen Yang Many of the people I interviewed had about the same thoughts about the Hmong people. There were a lot of positive and negative feedback. Many Hmong people strive for success, the Hmong people are awesome, we are also short, sporty, friendly and beautiful. those people also love the Hmong people was some of the positive thoughts. Some of the negative thoughts were that the Hmong are becoming more ghetto, the younger generation of Hmong are turning away from their culture, many of the Hmong like to gossip and tell lies, and they are also haters, self-centered and envious people. Hmong parents always want the best for their children because they didn’t have all the chances or opportunities that we have had here in America. Many people, not just the Hmong, think that the Hmong people are awesome and cool once you get to know them. Many of the Hmong people are short, sporty, friendly and beautiful. When a Hmong person is tall, that’s like the average or short height for other races. Hmong people like to go play sports and hang out with friends a lot. Most of the Hmong are also beautiful. “I love Hmong people.”Simon, Langston Examples that Hmong people are becoming more ghetto is that they are using more drugs and violence which is making the become messed up. The younger generation of Hmong people do not understand their own language because they have become too Americanized and a lot of them listen to Korean music. Some Hmong just like to gossip and tell lies. The Hmong people can also be very dramatic at unnecessary times. Wherebn b ever the Hmong people go, they just talk about other Hmong people. Along with these characteristics, the Hmong are also described as haters, self-centered, and envious of other Hmong. The Hmong show these traits by being mean to one another and not caring about others. There are some good qualities and bad qualities about the Hmong. In other words, the Hmong are just like every other race and just a little different but in a good way. PHOREAL!/IN

THE

HMONG

LIFE

PAGE

3


Interview by Chee Lor Name: Anonymous Race: Hmong Sex: Female Age: 17 years old Religion: Christian

How do you feel about your Hmong culture? I'm not too prideful in my culture because many people do shameful things to make us all as a whole look terribly bad, but I am forgiving and accepting to my culture because in every culture it's the same. Do your parents approve you dating other races? No, because they would like to be able to speak to my husband or boyfriend and they would also like for him to share the same values and beliefs as we do. Are your parents open to an American lifestyle? No, because they really want to preserve the Hmong culture and they feel that just because we are in America won't completely mean that we are American. They would like us to continue to remember that we are "Asian-American" so they have us speak to them in Hmong at home and English elsewhere needed, for example at school or public places where English is needed. How do you feel about interracial relationships? For example a Hmong and African American spouses? I feel that it is totally fine, because people have their own preferences and desires. But I know that it's a problem or issue throughout the world for people who disagree with interracial marriages, but I won't do it myself. How do you feel about homosexuals? I am a Christian, and in the Holy Bible, I shall not agree or abide by homosexuals, but growing up before knowing God, I always felt okay with it because people are free to do what they please to do and that had never been a problem to me. I think that elderly Hmong parents and grandparents would not agree to homosexuals because they've never seen such a thing when they were still residing in Thailand or Laos, but now that they're exposed to all the sins of the world, they see that it's disturbing. Do you think our generation is losing our Hmong culture? What ways can we prevent that? Yes I think that our generation is losing our Hmong culture because a lot of youths are more focused on their friends, parties, school, sports and working. Some youths don't even know how to speak Hmong because their parents don't teach them and spoke mostly English too. This causes a cycle and it'll keep running and sometime soon the Hmong culture may or may not become extinct. By preserving our culture and preventing extinction upon our culture, we need to bring the beauty of the Hmong people out more boldly and sternly. We can remind young parents to teach their children to speak Hmong and the Hmong culture at a young age so that they don't end up not knowing about the Hmong people and our language. PHOREAL!/IN

THE

HMONG

LIFE

PAGE

4


Guest Speaker from Vientiane, Laos comes to HAWA HAWA invited a special guest speaker Nou Lorbliayao who is the Project Manager from Vientiane, Laos to come to HAWA to talk about their program in Vientiane and what they are doing to help Hmong women and girls to be better self sufficient. Between 30-40 people attended the event at HAWA on November 13, 2012 and HAWA provided Pho for the audience. VivNcaug or Vivncaus, means sisterhood in the Hmong language. The program was initiated by women who are concerned about the limited educational and economic opportunities available to ethnic women in Laos. VivNcaug aims to create a world where women have the capacity, knowledge, skills, and power to influence and create their own happiness They focus on the following three components: Educational Development, Economic Empowerment & Healthy Lifestyles Promotion. If you want to know more about the program, check them out on Facebook!

DELTA (Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliance) also known as “Nraug Hmoob” The DELTA (Domestic Violence Prevention Enhancement and Leadership Through Alliance) program called Nraug Hmoob is a youth group for Hmong men. Nraug Hmoob consists of high school and college students in the Milwaukee area. The primary prevention focus for Nraug Hmoob is to “Bringing Families Together to Build Healthy Relationship.” Nraug Hmoob mission is to build strong Hmong male leaders that can create social change in their lives, at home, at work, and in the Hmong community. Nraug Hmoob meets for 5 sessions to learn about root causes of violence against women and children, domestic violence, domestic violence prevention, how violence is learned, and who can be an ally. The 5 sessions helps Hmong men to understand that domestic violence is a problem, rather than an expected and accepted form of behavior within a marriage or dating relationship. This program educates Hmong men to stop violent acts and hold each other accountable for one another’s actions in changing the social norms within the Hmong community. For more information or if you want to be involved in Nraug Hmoob, please contact: Shee Yee Chang! Email: sychang_hawa@yahoo.com or call HAWA

PHOREAL!/IN

THE

HMONG

LIFE

PAGE

5


Hmong Women’s Conference Hmong American Women’s Association had their first bi-annual Hmong Women’s Conference in Milwaukee. The conference was held at Mount Mary College on September 15, 2012. The conference was about Historical trauma within Hmong people. About 100 People came to the Conference to learn about Historical Trauma. HAWA’s second annual Conference will be in 2014. Hmong women’s conference on historical trauma: Hope for our future by healing the wounds of our past. HAWA’s Intern Nkauj Sua Xiong hand sketched HAWA’s logo on rocks.

Historical trauma is the cumulative emotional and psychological wounding over the lifespan and across

generations, originating from massive group trauma. When trauma is not dealt with in one generation, it must be dealt with in subsequent generations. Unresolved historical trauma can lead to issues such as domestic violence, family conflict, alcoholism, and drug abuse. The conference examine Hmong historical trauma, including the Secret War, and how it may relate to issues concerning Hmong women today. the life of Hmong women.

HAWA’s teen girls made centerpieces for the conference tables.

Picture below: HAWA staff, volunteers and facilitators

PHOREAL!/IN

THE

HMONG

LIFE

PAGE

6


HAWA Staff and Board Retreat in Summit, Wisconsin on October 1- 4, 2012

Va Yang with Lena C. Taylor (WI State Senator District 4) Every year, many individuals and organization in Wisconsin, through innovative programs determine to work for safety, empowerment and justice for victims of domestic abuse and their children. In recognizing these efforts, the Governor’s Council on Domestic Abuse gives out two awards, the Justice and Courage Award To End Domestic Violence. This year one of Hmong American Women’s Association employee “Va Yang” was given the Courage Award on October 12, 2012 at the Monona Terrace in Madison. _______________ “Courage Award” is to honor a survivor who has helped other victims and survivors through the promotion of greater self-determination and empowerment or has worked to raise community awareness of domestic violence.

Sexual Assault Program Sexual Assault is a "hidden" epidemic in the Hmong community, not only here in Milwaukee, but across the U.S. A taboo subject most of us were taught not to speak of therefore; perpetrators continue to thrive and victims/survivors pay the price for it. Something has to be done and that something is the Ntuj Tshiab Program here at HAWA. The program although currently in its infancy, I hope can shed light to the those who have been affected by Sexual Assault. I desire for all victims/ survivors to know they are not alone and help is available. For more information, you can contact me via email: jyang_hawa@yahoo.com or By phone: (414)342-0858.

Joua Yang, Ntuj Tshiab (Sexual Assault) Coordinator

PHOREAL!/IN

HMONG

THE

LIFE

PAGE

7


24 Hour Hmong Domestic Violence Helpline

Upcoming Events at HAWA   

HAWA Website Launch Party in February 2013

International Women’s Day Event on March 10, 2013 (HAWA collabo-

Empowerment Nights starts in March 19, 2013 rate with other agencies)

HAWA

Are you being…

HAT AND T-SHIRT FOR SALE Help support Hmong American Women’s Association by buying Women’s T-Shirts and Hats. If you would like to purchase one, please call Hmong American Women’s Association and pick one up. All proceeds goes towards HAWA’s programs and activities.

Hit, Kicked, or Slapped 

Called Names?

Accused of being unfaithful?  

Humiliated? Told to leave?

Locked out of the house or car?

Hats: adjustable YOU ARE NOT ALONE!

Women’s T-shirts size: S, M, L, XL Hat: $10.00

T-Shirt: $15.00

Call and we will help you…

Photo by A-Yin Thao

You don’t have to face your problems alone, Make the call… Toll Free:

1-877-740-4292 Free and Confidential If you or someone you know is being abused call the WI-Statewide Hmong Crisis Helpline. You will be connected with a Hmong Bilingual staff member to assist you. ________________________________ The Wisconsin Statewide Hmong domestic Violence Helpline is staffed by experiences professionals whom are fluent in both Hmong and English 24 hours a day, 7 days a week including holidays. The Hmong Domestic Violence Helpline staffs will be able to provide you with interventional, counseling services, support services and resources. The helpline help individuals who are facing life challenges or trauma as a result from domestic violence for Southeast Asian Victims throughout the state of Wisconsin.

Any questions, comments, or would like more information about HAWA, it’s programs, or want more of this Newsletter Edition, Please contact us.

7212 W. Fond Du Lac Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53218 Phone: 414-342-0858 Fax: 414-342-0773 Email: maixia_hawa@yahoo.com

Visit us at: www.hawamke.com PHOREAL!/IN

THE

HMONG

LIFE

OR

Facebook PAGE

8

Nkauj Hmoob Newsletter  

This is the second edition of Nkauj Hmoob Newsletter from Hmong American Women's Association.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you