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OK, you’ve been accepted to college, now to pay for it Kalman A. Chany Princeton Review Books Getting admitted to your choice college is only half the battle; the other half is figuring out how to pay for it. The competition for resources can be stiff, especially in tough economic times. Princeton Review shares tips on planning so that you can take advantage of financial aid. The most important rule? Start early. 1. Start researching aid possibilities sooner rather than later. The competition for aid increases when the economy is weak. Those who plan ahead for the aid process will do much better than those who procrastinate and miss deadlines. 2. Take steps that improve your aid eligibility. For example, if you have lost your job, you should avoid the temptation to spend any assets in your retirement plan. In addition to the likely early distribution penalties and additional income taxes, the higher income will reduce your aid eligibility. 3. Apply for financial aid no matter what your circumstances — flush or not. Applying by the priority deadlines, even if you think you won’t qualify, will help you if your finances take a turn for the worst. Some schools will only accept requests for reconsideration due to a decline in income from those students who filed for aid on time — even if they were turned down initially. 4. You should still not initially rule out any school as being too expensive. Many colleges — especially the private ones — have increased their aid budgets to attract applicants whose families are now more price resistant given the state of the economy. But have a back-up plan in case the aid is not enough to attend those pricier schools. Most likely this will mean also applying to a public institution in your home state and/or any school where the student can live at home instead of paying for room and board. 5. Pay less for a four-year degree. You can save on costs if the student attends a

community college for two years and then transfers to a pricier school for his or her remaining two years. However, be sure that the college to which the student plans to transfer will accept the credits from the community college. 6. Encourage your student to take as many AP courses as possible and to prep well for AP exams. High scores on AP exams can save considerably on college tuition. Many colleges award course credits for them, which can reduce the amount you need to pay in tuition. 7. Apply strategically to colleges. If you exceed the school’s admission criteria, you are much more likely to get a better aid package than a marginal applicant. Be sure to prep for the standardized tests such as the SAT or ACT, so that the student is more desirable. 8. Be realistic about how much debt the student can incur, given the starting salaries for his or her probable major and career path. 9. If you have to borrow, pursue federal loans first and avoid having the student take on private loans at all costs. 10. If your circumstances have a taken a turn for the worst, request additional aid. But expect that the college may require considerable supporting documentation. 11. In addition to your aid planning, focus on planning for the various education tax benefits you can claim. After all, a dollar you can save on your taxes is worth the same as getting an additional dollar in grant or scholarship aid. 12. Don’t put tuition on a credit card. This debt is more expensive than ever, given the recent changes to interest rates and other fees that many card issuers are now charging. You also want to be sure you avoid maxing out on your borrowing limit, just in case you need to use the card to pay for an unexpected emergency. (Excerpted from “Paying for College Without Going Broke: 2010 Edition” by Kalman A. Chany, Random House/Princeton Review Books, Published October 2009.)


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Services offered at MSU-Northern In order to help students enjoy the best possible college experience, Montana State University-Northern has a number of helpful services including: assistance with advising, tutoring for all students, and services for those with disabilities.

Student Union Building

A welcome from the Chancellor As we enter the start of another school term, who would have thought that Weird Al’s “Word Crimes” would have been so pivotal in emphasizing the importance of good grammar and correct English? That’s the great thing about education.  Opportunities are everywhere to be informed, enlightened, challenged and transformed.  These opportunities abound in the classrooms of the Hi-Line’s excellent schools — from kindergarten through college.  Vernon Howard, a lifelong observer of the human condition, has noted, “Always walk through life as if you have something new to learn, and you will.”  There is no time better than now for us all to continue our journey. James M. Limbaugh Chancellor, Montana State University-Northern

The Student Union Building, called the SUB, is the center of student life on campus. It is where people meet with friends, attend club meetings, eat and relax. Offices and services found in the SUB include: • Student Union Information Desk    • Bookstore    • KNMC radio station    • MSU-Northern Food Court    • Associated Students of MSU-Northern, ASMSU-N, offices    • Fireside Conference Room    • Crowley Conference Room, upstairs    • Art gallery, upstairs    • Fax machine, in the bookstore    • ID cards    • Fitness Center, basement    • Recreation Center, Pin-n-Cue    • ATM • Wireless Internet in the Ballroom, Fireside Room, Food Court and Rec. Center    • Student Health Service    • Student Activities office    • Housing office

SUB Food Court The SUB Food Court is the only eating facility on campus with service available to all students, faculty, staff and guests. The Food Court opens at 7 a.m. for breakfast and continues serving students throughout lunch and dinner. With a variety of selections including burgers, Mexican dishes, salad bar, cereal bar, dessert bar and beverage bar, there are choices sure to please everyone. The Food Court is open Monday through Friday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to   5 p.m. with a (limited weekend menu. Meal plans are included as a part of all students with residence hall housing contracts and are also available to students who do not reside on campus. Cash and credit cards are accepted in the dining room.  

   Academic advising

Student Health Center

Montana State University-Northern is committed to the fundamental principle that the university exists to serve the students. All efforts of the university are aimed toward enabling students to realize their full potential in whatever field of endeavor they attempt. Students may select or change their major or minor program at any time. New students at Montana State UniversityNorthern will work with the student success adviser, located in Cowan Hall Room 213, during their first semester at  Northern. The adviser will help students select appropriate classes and complete the registration process during that first semester. After their first semester of attendance at   Northern, students who have declared a major will be assigned to a faculty in the student’s major program area. The faculty adviser will explain university academic requirements and assist individuals in selecting courses that will help fulfill the steps necessary to satisfy graduation requirements. Students with questions about their majors are encouraged to contact their faculty adviser. A faculty signature or adviser PIN is also necessary before students can register for classes each semester. Students who remain undecided in their choice of degree program and students who are in the pre-nursing program will continue to receive advising from the student success adviser. In addition to assisting students in course selection, the adviser will guide undecided students in choosing a program of study.

The Student Health Center is a great resource for any health information a student may need. The Student Health Center is located in the SUB just off of the ball room and can be reached by phone at 2653599. It is staffed by a registered nurse and a nurse practitioner and offers health counseling, physical exams and immunizations. In order to promote health and well being throughout the year, the center sponsors several testing and information sessions on various topics such as AIDS, stress, pregnancy, fitness and diabetes. All students attending Northern are entitled to equal access to academic programs and services. By federal law, students with documented disabilities are entitled to reasonable accommodations in order to fully participate in the student experience. Students with disabilities are encouraged to advocate for themselves to the extent possible, and Disability Services provides support and assistance in determining what accommodations are best suited to each individual. To be eligible for these special services students with disabilities must provide the required documentation. For more informa-

Career Center Obtaining real world work experience is an important part of Northern’s educational programs. The Career Center, Cowan Hall Room 213, helps with this process by offering services such as assistance with resume writing and interviewing skills; offering listings for local, statewide, and national jobs and internships; and making cooperative education placements. Each year the center brings in employers that hire interviewing students for internships, full and part-time positions. For both on- and off-campus career opportunities, the Career Center should be the first stop.

tion and to register with Disability Services, students should contact the Learning Success Center in the library.

Student Support Services Student Support Services, a federally funded grant TRIO Program,Department of Education, is located in Room 211 of Cowan Hall and offers a host of personalized services. This federally funded support program is intended for students who meet one of the following criteria: • First-generation college student • Low income, and/or disabled.   The services provided include individual and group tutoring in the SSS Tutoring Computer Lab; personal and career counseling; transitional studies courses designed to promote better study skills and address life skills and career exploration, TRST 102— Study Skills, TRST 103—Transitional Life/ Career Exploration; and social/cultural events. The services mentioned are free to qualified students. The grant provides funding to serve 240 students attending Northern each year. Students are encouraged you to come into Cowan Hall Room 211 to apply for the Student Support Services program.


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Tricks, tips and takes for college freshmen Activities galore at MSU-Northern Dr. Brian Harke Dean of Students University of Southern California It's that time of year again when many students begin their first year of college. It's an exciting, but also a stressful time for many. To help, here are 21 tips I share with freshmen each year. I'm sure there are other ways to help ease the transition to college, but after years of watching and working with freshmen students, these stand out as some of the most important. 1. Go to as many orientations and Freshmen Welcome Week events as possible. The more you know about your college, the more at ease you'll feel. Freshmen Welcome Week activities give you a chance to meet people and new friends. Get out of your room and say hello to people. This is one of the few times in your life when everyone around you will also be looking to make friends. 2. Be patient with the idea of having a ro o m m a t e . Adjusting to sharing a room with a stranger can be overwhelming. Most likely, you will wind up being g o o d f r i e n d s w i t h yo u r r o o m m a t e. However, being best friends isn't a priority. Life will be easier if you set up some ground rules with your roommate from the beginning. Have conversations about cleaning, having friends over, respect for each other's space and sleep habits. Don't be afraid to speak up if something is bothering you. 3. Being homesick is OK. It's natural. It's good to text and have facetime with family members, but don't get caught behind the electronic curtain and forget to get out of your room. 4. Get involved. The sooner you get involved with groups or campus activities, the sooner the homesickness will go away. You'll feel connected and make new friends if you explore campus events, activity clubs, religious and philanthropic organizations. Do something besides just going to class, playing video games and thinking about home. 5. Be an advocate for yourself. If something is wrong, speak up. Unlike high school, you don't have teachers and parents watching out for you on a day-to-day

basis. You have to recognize when something is wrong, put together a plan to address it and then implement the plan. If you need help figuring out a plan, ask your Resident Advisor, Academic Advisor, roommate, trusted friend or faculty for advice. Try to use your parents as a back up to these other resources. 6. Get organized. In college, instructors give you a class syllabus for the year and expect you to be prepared for class. They won't remind you. Set up a system to keep track of what is due and when tests are scheduled. 7. Find a place and time to study. This may not be your dorm room or library. Find a place that works best for you to get your work done -- a place you can get away from daily distractions. Schedule the same time every day. I know many students that study a couple hours before dinner each night. That way, they have their evening free. 8. Meet with your instructors. Getting to know your instructor pays off in a couple ways. First, they are usually interesting people from whom you can learn a lot. They can also help you network. It's helpful to know your faculty especially if you run into problems in their class. Take advantage of their office hours. Remember to book an appointment early in the term. You don't need a problem to see them. Just stop by and introduce yourself and asked them about their background and how they got into their field. 9. Make friends with your academic advisor. This is your advocate for the next four years. Getting to know them and treating them respectfully will pay off if you hit a snag. 10. Make sure to have fun, but don't have too much fun. College is a balancing act. The best advice I can give is to study harder than you party, but don't get stuck behind a book on a Saturday night. 11. Take advantage of academic resources. Don't wait until you fall behind to find a tutor or study group. Most colleges have academic resources. Ask your advisor or faculty about them. 12. Make time for you. Make sure you schedule some time for yourself. Exercise; take a walk, get off campus. Time away

from day-to-day college life will do you wonders. 13. You don't need to rush to declare a major, and it's ok if you decide to switch. College is the time for you to discover what you like and what you are good at. Your interests may change as you take more classes. Don't let peer pressure force you into declaring a major if you aren't ready. Your parents will have opinions. Respect them, but in the end you have to do what feels right to you. 14. Become friends with people in your classes. They will become study buddies and can share notes with you if you miss a class. 15. Eat and sleep. You are now in charge of your schedule. Meals are up to you, as is your bedtime. Too often college students skip meals or don't eat healthy. Avoid the "freshman 15" by minimizing the midnight pizza runs. Try to eat some vegetables and fruit once a day. Sleep b e c o m e s a c o m m o d i t y a t c o l l e g e. Schedule it like you would your classes. Fight the urge to stay up until 2 a.m. talking, Facebooking or playing video games. Being tired for class creates issues that lead to lower grades and affects your mood. 16. Know what medical services are available on campus and use them. If you are sick, go to the doctor. If you get stressed out or have other issues, visit the counseling center. You will be surprised how many students take advantage of the counseling services. It's the new norm. 17. Don't procrastinate. If you wait until the night before something is due and you cram, you probably won't do well and will add a lot of stress to your life. Stay ahead of the game and study a bit every day so things don't come down to the last minute. 18. You will feel overwhelmed. There's a lot going on and you will get stressed out. It's natural. The important thing to know is that you are not the only one. Take a deep breath, slow down and put life back in order. You will be OK. Talk to your friends about it or visit the counseling center. Note: trying to decrease the overwhelmed feelings by drinking or doing

drugs may give the allusion of working temporarily, but the feeling will still be there in the morning, plus you'll have a hangover. Find your own coping techniques before you need them: meditation, exercise, alone time, etc. 19. You will get a bad grade. At some time in your academic career you will get a grade you don't like. This doesn't mean you are a failure. You simply didn't do well. Meet with your faculty to understand what didn't work and how you can avoid the issue in the future. Once again, be an advocate for yourself and find a solution to improve next time. 20. Find cheap text books. A single textbook can cost $75-$150. Some classes require multiple text books. Some students who spend close to $1,000 on textbooks each term. Good advice is to buy used text books online. You might also ask others in your dorm if they have the books and want to sell them to you. 21. Not every college student is a partier. Each year many freshmen share with me that they don't think they will fit in because they don't like to party or drink alcohol. Each year I share with them that there are a wide variety of people on campus and a group for everyone. Many students don't party or drink. Like-minded people tend to find each other on a college campus very easily. Don't be afraid to let people know you don't drink. Most students will respect your choice. There are a lot of social things to do that don't include alcohol. The last piece of advice I will give you is to take advantage of everything your college has to offer. Explore and try things you haven't done before. Learn about new cultures, study abroad, take road trips, have dinner with a faculty member, take a class you know nothing about, etc. This is the only time in your life where you will have so much time to explore and, occasionally, make mistakes. That is what college is all about: learning, exploring, making mistakes and growing. Be kind to yourself. Enjoy the next four years! (You can read more articles by Dr. Brian Harke at http://www.brinaharke.com.)

John Paul Schmidt jpschmidt@havredailynews.com Students returning to Montana State University-Northern or attending the college for the first time will be able to take part in many events throughout the semester, especially in the first week or so of school. “We’re trying a few new things to get the students in the residence halls to attend more activities,” said Denise Brewer, the director of student activities. Brewer said that throughout the year, there will be a competition between floors of the residence halls to see which floor has

the students who go to the most events. The prize for winning the competition will be a pizza party for the floor, Brewer said. “We have a lot of activities going on all the time,” Brewer said. She added that during the first 10 days of school, there will be something to do every day. The first Wednesday of every month will be Bingo night, where students will have a chance to win many random and gag prizes and have a chance to win the night’s grand prize, which in the past have been items like iPod docks and other larger more expensive items. There will also be a bowling league that the students can join. The league was previously held in the bowling alley in the base-

ment floor of the Student Union Building, but it will be held at Hi-Line Lanes this school year. A hike of Mount Otis in Beaver Creek Park will also be organized, as well as a canoe trip. In the winter, there will also be a ski trip to the Bear Paw Ski Bowl. Homecoming will be Sept. 22 and will include many activities and celebrations that week on campus. Sept. 24, the Be the One Barbecue will be held at the campus to commemorate the centennial year of Northern’s acceptance into existence. In 1913, state legislators passed legislation to create a university in north-central Montana. It passed by a single vote, hence “Be the One.” Brewer said this theme will run through activities throughout the year. These are just a few of the activities that

will be organized by Brewer and others at the university. Student Activities prints a schedule of events for the semester and distributes them in the SUB. “I think it’s important that if students come here … they should connect to Northern,” Brewer said. “There are all kinds of resources for them to be successful. They should get involved and meet amazing people.” Brewer said this year she hopes that students will increase their involvement in events on campus. The university clubs and organizations will have a fair at the SUB Sept. 4 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Anyone can join the clubs and the activities they take part of vary widely. “I encourage them to try everything at least once. Get out of your comfort zone,” she said.

Welcome to Northern dance There will be a Welcome to Northern Dance for all students Thursday, Aug. 28, in the Student Union Ballroom at 9 p.m. featur-

ing DJ Jim Branden “The Hit Man.” Refreshments and snacks will be provided.

Flag football rosters due Sept. 5 Te a m s n e e d to b e s i g n e d u p fo r Intramural/Rec 4-on-4 Flag Football by Fr i d ay, S e p t . 5 , 5 p . m . a t t h e S U B Information Desk. Play will begin Monday, Sept. 8, at 6 p.m.

on the SUB Lawn and continue Tuesday night at 6 p.m. Any individual who would like to be part of a team can let the Info Desk know, and a team can be put together. Call 265-3732 for more information.

Pin-n-Cue and Fitness Center hours The Pin-n-Cue and Fitness Center in the SUB will be open Monday through Friday

from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Want to be a college radio DJ? Northern's radio station, KNMC, is looking for more disc jockeys. Any students thinking of starting their own radio program need to attend the first KNMC DJ meeting to find out how to get

involved. This first meeting will be Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 5:30 p.m. in the S.U.B. Ballroom, Interested people can also call 265-3709 to see how to get involved.


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New employees at MSU-Northern Student Senate sworn in

Alyssa Frei is the new assistant certified athletic trainer. She recently finished her position as a graduate assistant athletic trainer at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion. While there, she obtained her Master's Degree in Education Administration. She also has her Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training from the University of Montana. ——— Amanda Lawyer (Meyer) is the new accounting clerk. Previously she worked as an assistant manager for South Side Bank in Peoria, Illinois, and an account manager with CDW in Chicago. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in organizational business management from Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois. ——— Arne Sippola is a new member of new Elementary Education Faculty. Arne was an associate professor of education at Winona State University in Winona, Minnesota. He has a doctorate in reading/language arts, K-12, from the University of Washington and graduate degrees in early childhood education from the University of Washington and special education from the University of Alaska, Southeast.

——— Bill Rugg is the new provost and vice chancellor of Academic Affairs. Previously he was the provost and vice president for academic affairs at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. He has his doctorate in higher education administration and student services from the University of Mississippi. ——— Carissa Brown is the new welding instructor. She has been working for Central Machine and Welding since receiving her welding technology associate degree from Helena College of the University of Montana. ——— Chad Spangler is a new member of the HP faculty. He has instructed sophomorelevel students in epidemiology at Carroll College and worked at St. Peter’s Hospital in Helena. He received his doctorate in public health from Walden University with an emphasis in epidemiology, a master's degree from The University of Montana in health promotion/psychology, and is a Northern alumnus. ——— Christian Rago is the new assistant men’s football coach.

——— Clara Osborne is the new catering supervisor. A student of Cut Bank High School and Stone Child College, she most recently has been employed at PJ’s Restaurant, where she gained six years food service experience. ——— Cody O’Neill is a new assistant men’s football coach. ——— Cristina Underwood is the new director of diversity awareness and multicultural programs. She holds a master’s degree in teaching English as a second language from Eastern Washington University and her undergraduate degree from Universidad LaSalle Laguna. She has extensive teaching experience including TESL and Spanish instruction. ——— David Bokor is the new residence life coordinator. He worked extensively in residence hall life as an undergraduate at Michigan Technological University, where he received a Bachelor of Scence in psychology and at Northern Michigan University. ——— David Hildebrand is the new maintenance supervisor. He has many years of experience in carpentry, small engine repair and construction, and an associate degree from Minot State University. ——— Emily Richmond is the new administrative associate III in the Student Union Building. A Havre High School graduate, she has eight years of experience in customer service, most recently at Tilleman Motors. ——— Gage Aker is the new assistant men’s basketball coach. ——— Gail Shatkus is the new member of the drafting technology faculty. She has a master’s degree in dducation from Ashland University and a Bachelor of Science in industrial education from Bowling Green State University. She most recently taught at Chester/Joplin-Inverness School District with 20 years of teaching experience and 10 years in the private sector. ——— Jamie Friedank is the new student success adviser. She has a Bachelor of Arts in

criminal justice from State University of New York at Albany, and an Master of Science in criminal justice from Niagara University. She has an extensive background in education and criminal justice, most recently at colleges and the Boys & Girls Clubs of America in Vermont. ——— Jan Starr is the new director of nursing. She comes to Northern with many years of experience in nursing education. She holds several degrees, including a Bachelor of Science in nursing from Indiana University, a Master of Science from New Mexico State University, an Master of Science in nursing from University of Texas El Paso and a doctoral degree from the American Institute of Holistic Theology. ——— Jillian Barber is a new accounting clerk. A Chinook High School graduate, she holds a Bachelor of Science in history and political studies from MSU-Billings. She most recently served as administrative associate for the Montana Environmental Training Center at Northern. ——— Joey Todd is the new health promotion faculty member. He has been employed at colleges in New Jersey for several years as instructor and admissions specialist. He received a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Temple University, a Master of Education from Montclair State University and is a doctoral candidate at Montclair State University in pedagogy and philosophy. ——— Josh Gomez is the new computer support specialist. He has over 14 years of experience in computer maintenance and operation, and most recently was employed at Office Equipment in Havre. ——— Karen Terrell is the new financial aide specialist. She has extensive experience with teaching, as well as working in the private sector and managing budgets. ——— Kevin Ruby is a new automotive/diesel faculty member. He received his Bachelor of Science in automotive services from Northern and has many years of automotive services experience as well as teaching automotive technology for the past eight years in Georgia.

Havre Daily News/John Paul Schmidt The new members of the Northern Student Senate were signed into office at the last senate meeting at the end of the 20132014 school year. From left, Program Councilor Sarah Peterson, Senators-at-large Eric Neal and Maure Murdock, Vice President Cory Buckley and President Andrew Potter raised their hands to take the oath of office in front of members of that year's senate members.

Steps to a successful education and career Director of University Relations Jim Potter said that there have been a number of improvements to the campus since the Spring semester ended. They have done a lot of work to the welding shop, as well as fixing steps and sidewalks, fixing the elevator in the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s Little Theatre in Cowan Hall, adding air conditioning to the bookstore and other general maintenance projects. “They’re also been working on advising and they’re improving that area,” Potter

said. They will also continue to host the Northern Community Choir and Northern C o m m u n i t y O r c h e s t r a t h i s ye a r, h e added. Anyone who is interested in either group can contact Potter at his office at 265-3727. “MAT will also continue to be housed here and do great shows,” Potter said. Potter said if he were to give incoming students any advice, it would be: “Go to class, do your homework and don’t tick off

the professor.” “If you do those three things, you’re going to be fine,” he added. He also said he always tells students, especially high school students going into college, that there are five things that need to happen in order to have a successful career: • Have something you love to do. • Gain the necessary skills to do what you want to do. • Be able to find someone who’s willing to pay you for what you want to do.

• Earn enough money to live the way you want to live. • Be able to work with the people you work with every day. “All five of those things have to come together for you to have a successful career,” Potter said, adding that college, especially Northern, is just the second step in the process. “It’s important to go to college to be able to better yourself,” Potter said. “It’s also to get a better job and do what you want to in life.”


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Michael Dean Ester presents a serious comedy event Comedian Michael Dean Ester explains "The Reason You Are Here" to MSUNorthern students Tuesday, Aug. 26, at 7 p.m. in the SUB Ballroom. Nominated "Comedian of the Year" by Campus Activities Magazine and "Performer

of the Year" by the Association for the Promotion of Campus Activities, Ester delivers punch lines and valuable advice, and his upbeat style encourages people to think while they laugh. His message is a simple one: People who

love what they do never have to work for a living. His career is living proof. Ester has appeared on NBC, E! E n t e r ta i n m e n t Te l ev i s i o n , N ew J o ke C i t y w i t h Ro b e r t K l e i n , a n d i n t h e movie "Senseless" with Marion Wayans

and David Spade. He is heard nationwide on XM Satellite Radio's Comedy Channel. This performance is sponsored by ASMSU-N Program Council and is free to students, faculty, staff and community.

Pickle Ball Tournament Scheduled The ASMSU-N Intramural & Recreation department will be hosting a Pickle Ball Tournament Wednesday, Aug. 27, at 6 p.m. at

the tennis courts on campus. Pickle Ball is played on a badmintonsized court, and the ball is served diagonally

and points are scored the same as tennis. The first side scoring eleven points and leading by at least two points wins. Sign up in

advance at the SUB Information Desk for each event. Participants will receive T-shirts, and winners will receive a prize.

Hiking and canoeing planned for students and faculty MSU-Northern Intramurals/Recreation will be sponsoring two fun-filled events Aug. 30 and Sept. 6 for students, faculty and staff to attend. Saturday, Aug. 30, a canoeing trip in the Bear Paw Mountains is scheduled with a

departure time of 1 p.m. Participants need to sign up at the SUB Information Desk by Friday, Sept. 5, by 5 p.m. Again, we will meet at the SUB Lobby to caravan out to the mountains for a day of canoeing, swimming, fishing for those with

a pole and a license, and a BBQ with all the fixings. Saturday, Sept. 6, at 9 a.m., a hike up infamous Mount Otis in Beaver Creek Park is planned. Those interested in attending must sign

up at the SUB Information desk by Friday, Sept. 5, by 5 p.m. The group will be meeting at the SUB Lobby at 9 a.m. and caravanning out to the mountains. Lunch and refreshments will be provided for those who attend.

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Kirk Olson is the new technical mathematics coordinator. He has been an instructor for the past few years at Northern, where he received his Bachelor of Science in math and biology. ——— LaVon Myers is a new admissions specialist. A 2014 graduate of MSU-Northern in health and physical education, he was a stand-out basketball player on the Lights squad and has worked at Wells Fargo Bank, Wolfers Restaurant and Master Sports. ——— Lindsey Brown is a new admissions specialist. She has worked in print journalism since obtaining a communications degree from the University of Miami in Coral Gables. She wants to promote the college and Havre so others will come to love it as she has. ——— Margaret Mahoney is a new criminal justice faculty member. She holds a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice from Eastern Kentucky University, a Master or Science in justice administration from the University of Louisville and is a doctoral candidate in criminology at the University of Delaware. She has several years of teaching as part of her educational path. ——— Mel Edwards is the new energy sector curriculum developer. She holds a degree in English and education from the State University of New York College at New Paltz, and a Master of Arts from East Tennessee State University in education: storytelling/reading. ——— Melissa Haymaker is the new cashier for food services. A Havre High School graduate, she has worked for more than seven years in food service, most recently at Northern Montana Hospital. ——— Michael Woronik is the new information management systems manager for the Computer Help Desk. He graduated from Havre High School and has strong computer maintenance and operation skills. He is a welcoming face at the Help Desk. ——— Nicole Yazzie is the new assistant women’s basketball coach and sports information director. ——— Rebecca Burnell is the new administration/human resources support staff. She is a Havre High School graduate and has attended MSU-Billings and Northern. She has extensive banking and customer service experience. ——— Terri Hildebrand is a new member of the biology faculty. She holds a Bachelor of Science in biology and math from Black Hills State University and a doctorate from the University of Kansas in botany. She was most recently an assistant professor of biology at Southern Utah University. ——— Va l R i d g e w a y i s t h e n ew C R R N Lewistown. Val has 30 years of experience as a nurse and received her nursing degree from Northern Montana College.

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Celebrate Homecoming Week at Montana State University-Northern Homecoming Week activities at Montana State University-Northern include:

Saturday, Sept. 20 • Festival Days Parade, 10 a.m.

Monday, Sept. 22 • Campus-wide door decorating competition — all day smudging and teepee raising ceremony starts at 10 a.m. • Tour of the Louis and Antoinette Hagener Museum of the Northern Montana Plains Indian starts at 11:30 a.m. to

Tuesday, Sept. 23 • Homecoming elections online, all day • Hello Walk painting, 1 to 4 p.m. • Lecture on current Indian issues, details be announced

Wednesday, Sept. 24 • Homecoming election online, all day, beadwork workshop and Indian taco sale, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Cowan Hall Room 308 • Be the One Barbecue 5 p.m. — SUB

Courtyard • Pie the Homecoming candidates, 6 p.m., — SUB Courtyard Thursday, Sept. 25 • Homecoming election online, all-day • Round dance and berry soup and bread, noon — SUB Ballroom • Bonfire and hot dogs, 9 p.m. — Physical Plant Friday, Sept. 26 • Second annual Glow Run 5K 8 p.m., meet at SUB Saturday, Sept. 27 • Lights football vs. Southern Oregon, 1 p.m. — Blue Pony Stadium • Homecoming Dance 9 p.m., SUB Ballroom Havre Daily News/File photo MSU-Northern athletes participate in the Havre Festival Days parade.


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Celebrate Homecoming Week at Montana State University-Northern Homecoming Week activities at Montana State University-Northern include:

Saturday, Sept. 20 • Festival Days Parade, 10 a.m.

Monday, Sept. 22 • Campus-wide door decorating competition — all day smudging and teepee raising ceremony starts at 10 a.m. • Tour of the Louis and Antoinette Hagener Museum of the Northern Montana Plains Indian starts at 11:30 a.m. to

Tuesday, Sept. 23 • Homecoming elections online, all day • Hello Walk painting, 1 to 4 p.m. • Lecture on current Indian issues, details be announced

Wednesday, Sept. 24 • Homecoming election online, all day, beadwork workshop and Indian taco sale, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Cowan Hall Room 308 • Be the One Barbecue 5 p.m. — SUB

Courtyard • Pie the Homecoming candidates, 6 p.m., — SUB Courtyard Thursday, Sept. 25 • Homecoming election online, all-day • Round dance and berry soup and bread, noon — SUB Ballroom • Bonfire and hot dogs, 9 p.m. — Physical Plant Friday, Sept. 26 • Second annual Glow Run 5K 8 p.m., meet at SUB Saturday, Sept. 27 • Lights football vs. Southern Oregon, 1 p.m. — Blue Pony Stadium • Homecoming Dance 9 p.m., SUB Ballroom Havre Daily News/File photo MSU-Northern athletes participate in the Havre Festival Days parade.


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Michael Dean Ester presents a serious comedy event Comedian Michael Dean Ester explains "The Reason You Are Here" to MSUNorthern students Tuesday, Aug. 26, at 7 p.m. in the SUB Ballroom. Nominated "Comedian of the Year" by Campus Activities Magazine and "Performer

of the Year" by the Association for the Promotion of Campus Activities, Ester delivers punch lines and valuable advice, and his upbeat style encourages people to think while they laugh. His message is a simple one: People who

love what they do never have to work for a living. His career is living proof. Ester has appeared on NBC, E! E n t e r ta i n m e n t Te l ev i s i o n , N ew J o ke C i t y w i t h Ro b e r t K l e i n , a n d i n t h e movie "Senseless" with Marion Wayans

and David Spade. He is heard nationwide on XM Satellite Radio's Comedy Channel. This performance is sponsored by ASMSU-N Program Council and is free to students, faculty, staff and community.

Pickle Ball Tournament Scheduled The ASMSU-N Intramural & Recreation department will be hosting a Pickle Ball Tournament Wednesday, Aug. 27, at 6 p.m. at

the tennis courts on campus. Pickle Ball is played on a badmintonsized court, and the ball is served diagonally

and points are scored the same as tennis. The first side scoring eleven points and leading by at least two points wins. Sign up in

advance at the SUB Information Desk for each event. Participants will receive T-shirts, and winners will receive a prize.

Hiking and canoeing planned for students and faculty MSU-Northern Intramurals/Recreation will be sponsoring two fun-filled events Aug. 30 and Sept. 6 for students, faculty and staff to attend. Saturday, Aug. 30, a canoeing trip in the Bear Paw Mountains is scheduled with a

departure time of 1 p.m. Participants need to sign up at the SUB Information Desk by Friday, Sept. 5, by 5 p.m. Again, we will meet at the SUB Lobby to caravan out to the mountains for a day of canoeing, swimming, fishing for those with

a pole and a license, and a BBQ with all the fixings. Saturday, Sept. 6, at 9 a.m., a hike up infamous Mount Otis in Beaver Creek Park is planned. Those interested in attending must sign

up at the SUB Information desk by Friday, Sept. 5, by 5 p.m. The group will be meeting at the SUB Lobby at 9 a.m. and caravanning out to the mountains. Lunch and refreshments will be provided for those who attend.

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Kirk Olson is the new technical mathematics coordinator. He has been an instructor for the past few years at Northern, where he received his Bachelor of Science in math and biology. ——— LaVon Myers is a new admissions specialist. A 2014 graduate of MSU-Northern in health and physical education, he was a stand-out basketball player on the Lights squad and has worked at Wells Fargo Bank, Wolfers Restaurant and Master Sports. ——— Lindsey Brown is a new admissions specialist. She has worked in print journalism since obtaining a communications degree from the University of Miami in Coral Gables. She wants to promote the college and Havre so others will come to love it as she has. ——— Margaret Mahoney is a new criminal justice faculty member. She holds a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice from Eastern Kentucky University, a Master or Science in justice administration from the University of Louisville and is a doctoral candidate in criminology at the University of Delaware. She has several years of teaching as part of her educational path. ——— Mel Edwards is the new energy sector curriculum developer. She holds a degree in English and education from the State University of New York College at New Paltz, and a Master of Arts from East Tennessee State University in education: storytelling/reading. ——— Melissa Haymaker is the new cashier for food services. A Havre High School graduate, she has worked for more than seven years in food service, most recently at Northern Montana Hospital. ——— Michael Woronik is the new information management systems manager for the Computer Help Desk. He graduated from Havre High School and has strong computer maintenance and operation skills. He is a welcoming face at the Help Desk. ——— Nicole Yazzie is the new assistant women’s basketball coach and sports information director. ——— Rebecca Burnell is the new administration/human resources support staff. She is a Havre High School graduate and has attended MSU-Billings and Northern. She has extensive banking and customer service experience. ——— Terri Hildebrand is a new member of the biology faculty. She holds a Bachelor of Science in biology and math from Black Hills State University and a doctorate from the University of Kansas in botany. She was most recently an assistant professor of biology at Southern Utah University. ——— Va l R i d g e w a y i s t h e n ew C R R N Lewistown. Val has 30 years of experience as a nurse and received her nursing degree from Northern Montana College.

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New employees at MSU-Northern Student Senate sworn in

Alyssa Frei is the new assistant certified athletic trainer. She recently finished her position as a graduate assistant athletic trainer at the University of South Dakota in Vermillion. While there, she obtained her Master's Degree in Education Administration. She also has her Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training from the University of Montana. ——— Amanda Lawyer (Meyer) is the new accounting clerk. Previously she worked as an assistant manager for South Side Bank in Peoria, Illinois, and an account manager with CDW in Chicago. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in organizational business management from Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, Illinois. ——— Arne Sippola is a new member of new Elementary Education Faculty. Arne was an associate professor of education at Winona State University in Winona, Minnesota. He has a doctorate in reading/language arts, K-12, from the University of Washington and graduate degrees in early childhood education from the University of Washington and special education from the University of Alaska, Southeast.

——— Bill Rugg is the new provost and vice chancellor of Academic Affairs. Previously he was the provost and vice president for academic affairs at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. He has his doctorate in higher education administration and student services from the University of Mississippi. ——— Carissa Brown is the new welding instructor. She has been working for Central Machine and Welding since receiving her welding technology associate degree from Helena College of the University of Montana. ——— Chad Spangler is a new member of the HP faculty. He has instructed sophomorelevel students in epidemiology at Carroll College and worked at St. Peter’s Hospital in Helena. He received his doctorate in public health from Walden University with an emphasis in epidemiology, a master's degree from The University of Montana in health promotion/psychology, and is a Northern alumnus. ——— Christian Rago is the new assistant men’s football coach.

——— Clara Osborne is the new catering supervisor. A student of Cut Bank High School and Stone Child College, she most recently has been employed at PJ’s Restaurant, where she gained six years food service experience. ——— Cody O’Neill is a new assistant men’s football coach. ——— Cristina Underwood is the new director of diversity awareness and multicultural programs. She holds a master’s degree in teaching English as a second language from Eastern Washington University and her undergraduate degree from Universidad LaSalle Laguna. She has extensive teaching experience including TESL and Spanish instruction. ——— David Bokor is the new residence life coordinator. He worked extensively in residence hall life as an undergraduate at Michigan Technological University, where he received a Bachelor of Scence in psychology and at Northern Michigan University. ——— David Hildebrand is the new maintenance supervisor. He has many years of experience in carpentry, small engine repair and construction, and an associate degree from Minot State University. ——— Emily Richmond is the new administrative associate III in the Student Union Building. A Havre High School graduate, she has eight years of experience in customer service, most recently at Tilleman Motors. ——— Gage Aker is the new assistant men’s basketball coach. ——— Gail Shatkus is the new member of the drafting technology faculty. She has a master’s degree in dducation from Ashland University and a Bachelor of Science in industrial education from Bowling Green State University. She most recently taught at Chester/Joplin-Inverness School District with 20 years of teaching experience and 10 years in the private sector. ——— Jamie Friedank is the new student success adviser. She has a Bachelor of Arts in

criminal justice from State University of New York at Albany, and an Master of Science in criminal justice from Niagara University. She has an extensive background in education and criminal justice, most recently at colleges and the Boys & Girls Clubs of America in Vermont. ——— Jan Starr is the new director of nursing. She comes to Northern with many years of experience in nursing education. She holds several degrees, including a Bachelor of Science in nursing from Indiana University, a Master of Science from New Mexico State University, an Master of Science in nursing from University of Texas El Paso and a doctoral degree from the American Institute of Holistic Theology. ——— Jillian Barber is a new accounting clerk. A Chinook High School graduate, she holds a Bachelor of Science in history and political studies from MSU-Billings. She most recently served as administrative associate for the Montana Environmental Training Center at Northern. ——— Joey Todd is the new health promotion faculty member. He has been employed at colleges in New Jersey for several years as instructor and admissions specialist. He received a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy from Temple University, a Master of Education from Montclair State University and is a doctoral candidate at Montclair State University in pedagogy and philosophy. ——— Josh Gomez is the new computer support specialist. He has over 14 years of experience in computer maintenance and operation, and most recently was employed at Office Equipment in Havre. ——— Karen Terrell is the new financial aide specialist. She has extensive experience with teaching, as well as working in the private sector and managing budgets. ——— Kevin Ruby is a new automotive/diesel faculty member. He received his Bachelor of Science in automotive services from Northern and has many years of automotive services experience as well as teaching automotive technology for the past eight years in Georgia.

Havre Daily News/John Paul Schmidt The new members of the Northern Student Senate were signed into office at the last senate meeting at the end of the 20132014 school year. From left, Program Councilor Sarah Peterson, Senators-at-large Eric Neal and Maure Murdock, Vice President Cory Buckley and President Andrew Potter raised their hands to take the oath of office in front of members of that year's senate members.

Steps to a successful education and career Director of University Relations Jim Potter said that there have been a number of improvements to the campus since the Spring semester ended. They have done a lot of work to the welding shop, as well as fixing steps and sidewalks, fixing the elevator in the Montana Actors’ Theatre’s Little Theatre in Cowan Hall, adding air conditioning to the bookstore and other general maintenance projects. “They’re also been working on advising and they’re improving that area,” Potter

said. They will also continue to host the Northern Community Choir and Northern C o m m u n i t y O r c h e s t r a t h i s ye a r, h e added. Anyone who is interested in either group can contact Potter at his office at 265-3727. “MAT will also continue to be housed here and do great shows,” Potter said. Potter said if he were to give incoming students any advice, it would be: “Go to class, do your homework and don’t tick off

the professor.” “If you do those three things, you’re going to be fine,” he added. He also said he always tells students, especially high school students going into college, that there are five things that need to happen in order to have a successful career: • Have something you love to do. • Gain the necessary skills to do what you want to do. • Be able to find someone who’s willing to pay you for what you want to do.

• Earn enough money to live the way you want to live. • Be able to work with the people you work with every day. “All five of those things have to come together for you to have a successful career,” Potter said, adding that college, especially Northern, is just the second step in the process. “It’s important to go to college to be able to better yourself,” Potter said. “It’s also to get a better job and do what you want to in life.”


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Tricks, tips and takes for college freshmen Activities galore at MSU-Northern Dr. Brian Harke Dean of Students University of Southern California It's that time of year again when many students begin their first year of college. It's an exciting, but also a stressful time for many. To help, here are 21 tips I share with freshmen each year. I'm sure there are other ways to help ease the transition to college, but after years of watching and working with freshmen students, these stand out as some of the most important. 1. Go to as many orientations and Freshmen Welcome Week events as possible. The more you know about your college, the more at ease you'll feel. Freshmen Welcome Week activities give you a chance to meet people and new friends. Get out of your room and say hello to people. This is one of the few times in your life when everyone around you will also be looking to make friends. 2. Be patient with the idea of having a ro o m m a t e . Adjusting to sharing a room with a stranger can be overwhelming. Most likely, you will wind up being g o o d f r i e n d s w i t h yo u r r o o m m a t e. However, being best friends isn't a priority. Life will be easier if you set up some ground rules with your roommate from the beginning. Have conversations about cleaning, having friends over, respect for each other's space and sleep habits. Don't be afraid to speak up if something is bothering you. 3. Being homesick is OK. It's natural. It's good to text and have facetime with family members, but don't get caught behind the electronic curtain and forget to get out of your room. 4. Get involved. The sooner you get involved with groups or campus activities, the sooner the homesickness will go away. You'll feel connected and make new friends if you explore campus events, activity clubs, religious and philanthropic organizations. Do something besides just going to class, playing video games and thinking about home. 5. Be an advocate for yourself. If something is wrong, speak up. Unlike high school, you don't have teachers and parents watching out for you on a day-to-day

basis. You have to recognize when something is wrong, put together a plan to address it and then implement the plan. If you need help figuring out a plan, ask your Resident Advisor, Academic Advisor, roommate, trusted friend or faculty for advice. Try to use your parents as a back up to these other resources. 6. Get organized. In college, instructors give you a class syllabus for the year and expect you to be prepared for class. They won't remind you. Set up a system to keep track of what is due and when tests are scheduled. 7. Find a place and time to study. This may not be your dorm room or library. Find a place that works best for you to get your work done -- a place you can get away from daily distractions. Schedule the same time every day. I know many students that study a couple hours before dinner each night. That way, they have their evening free. 8. Meet with your instructors. Getting to know your instructor pays off in a couple ways. First, they are usually interesting people from whom you can learn a lot. They can also help you network. It's helpful to know your faculty especially if you run into problems in their class. Take advantage of their office hours. Remember to book an appointment early in the term. You don't need a problem to see them. Just stop by and introduce yourself and asked them about their background and how they got into their field. 9. Make friends with your academic advisor. This is your advocate for the next four years. Getting to know them and treating them respectfully will pay off if you hit a snag. 10. Make sure to have fun, but don't have too much fun. College is a balancing act. The best advice I can give is to study harder than you party, but don't get stuck behind a book on a Saturday night. 11. Take advantage of academic resources. Don't wait until you fall behind to find a tutor or study group. Most colleges have academic resources. Ask your advisor or faculty about them. 12. Make time for you. Make sure you schedule some time for yourself. Exercise; take a walk, get off campus. Time away

from day-to-day college life will do you wonders. 13. You don't need to rush to declare a major, and it's ok if you decide to switch. College is the time for you to discover what you like and what you are good at. Your interests may change as you take more classes. Don't let peer pressure force you into declaring a major if you aren't ready. Your parents will have opinions. Respect them, but in the end you have to do what feels right to you. 14. Become friends with people in your classes. They will become study buddies and can share notes with you if you miss a class. 15. Eat and sleep. You are now in charge of your schedule. Meals are up to you, as is your bedtime. Too often college students skip meals or don't eat healthy. Avoid the "freshman 15" by minimizing the midnight pizza runs. Try to eat some vegetables and fruit once a day. Sleep b e c o m e s a c o m m o d i t y a t c o l l e g e. Schedule it like you would your classes. Fight the urge to stay up until 2 a.m. talking, Facebooking or playing video games. Being tired for class creates issues that lead to lower grades and affects your mood. 16. Know what medical services are available on campus and use them. If you are sick, go to the doctor. If you get stressed out or have other issues, visit the counseling center. You will be surprised how many students take advantage of the counseling services. It's the new norm. 17. Don't procrastinate. If you wait until the night before something is due and you cram, you probably won't do well and will add a lot of stress to your life. Stay ahead of the game and study a bit every day so things don't come down to the last minute. 18. You will feel overwhelmed. There's a lot going on and you will get stressed out. It's natural. The important thing to know is that you are not the only one. Take a deep breath, slow down and put life back in order. You will be OK. Talk to your friends about it or visit the counseling center. Note: trying to decrease the overwhelmed feelings by drinking or doing

drugs may give the allusion of working temporarily, but the feeling will still be there in the morning, plus you'll have a hangover. Find your own coping techniques before you need them: meditation, exercise, alone time, etc. 19. You will get a bad grade. At some time in your academic career you will get a grade you don't like. This doesn't mean you are a failure. You simply didn't do well. Meet with your faculty to understand what didn't work and how you can avoid the issue in the future. Once again, be an advocate for yourself and find a solution to improve next time. 20. Find cheap text books. A single textbook can cost $75-$150. Some classes require multiple text books. Some students who spend close to $1,000 on textbooks each term. Good advice is to buy used text books online. You might also ask others in your dorm if they have the books and want to sell them to you. 21. Not every college student is a partier. Each year many freshmen share with me that they don't think they will fit in because they don't like to party or drink alcohol. Each year I share with them that there are a wide variety of people on campus and a group for everyone. Many students don't party or drink. Like-minded people tend to find each other on a college campus very easily. Don't be afraid to let people know you don't drink. Most students will respect your choice. There are a lot of social things to do that don't include alcohol. The last piece of advice I will give you is to take advantage of everything your college has to offer. Explore and try things you haven't done before. Learn about new cultures, study abroad, take road trips, have dinner with a faculty member, take a class you know nothing about, etc. This is the only time in your life where you will have so much time to explore and, occasionally, make mistakes. That is what college is all about: learning, exploring, making mistakes and growing. Be kind to yourself. Enjoy the next four years! (You can read more articles by Dr. Brian Harke at http://www.brinaharke.com.)

John Paul Schmidt jpschmidt@havredailynews.com Students returning to Montana State University-Northern or attending the college for the first time will be able to take part in many events throughout the semester, especially in the first week or so of school. “We’re trying a few new things to get the students in the residence halls to attend more activities,” said Denise Brewer, the director of student activities. Brewer said that throughout the year, there will be a competition between floors of the residence halls to see which floor has

the students who go to the most events. The prize for winning the competition will be a pizza party for the floor, Brewer said. “We have a lot of activities going on all the time,” Brewer said. She added that during the first 10 days of school, there will be something to do every day. The first Wednesday of every month will be Bingo night, where students will have a chance to win many random and gag prizes and have a chance to win the night’s grand prize, which in the past have been items like iPod docks and other larger more expensive items. There will also be a bowling league that the students can join. The league was previously held in the bowling alley in the base-

ment floor of the Student Union Building, but it will be held at Hi-Line Lanes this school year. A hike of Mount Otis in Beaver Creek Park will also be organized, as well as a canoe trip. In the winter, there will also be a ski trip to the Bear Paw Ski Bowl. Homecoming will be Sept. 22 and will include many activities and celebrations that week on campus. Sept. 24, the Be the One Barbecue will be held at the campus to commemorate the centennial year of Northern’s acceptance into existence. In 1913, state legislators passed legislation to create a university in north-central Montana. It passed by a single vote, hence “Be the One.” Brewer said this theme will run through activities throughout the year. These are just a few of the activities that

will be organized by Brewer and others at the university. Student Activities prints a schedule of events for the semester and distributes them in the SUB. “I think it’s important that if students come here … they should connect to Northern,” Brewer said. “There are all kinds of resources for them to be successful. They should get involved and meet amazing people.” Brewer said this year she hopes that students will increase their involvement in events on campus. The university clubs and organizations will have a fair at the SUB Sept. 4 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Anyone can join the clubs and the activities they take part of vary widely. “I encourage them to try everything at least once. Get out of your comfort zone,” she said.

Welcome to Northern dance There will be a Welcome to Northern Dance for all students Thursday, Aug. 28, in the Student Union Ballroom at 9 p.m. featur-

ing DJ Jim Branden “The Hit Man.” Refreshments and snacks will be provided.

Flag football rosters due Sept. 5 Te a m s n e e d to b e s i g n e d u p fo r Intramural/Rec 4-on-4 Flag Football by Fr i d ay, S e p t . 5 , 5 p . m . a t t h e S U B Information Desk. Play will begin Monday, Sept. 8, at 6 p.m.

on the SUB Lawn and continue Tuesday night at 6 p.m. Any individual who would like to be part of a team can let the Info Desk know, and a team can be put together. Call 265-3732 for more information.

Pin-n-Cue and Fitness Center hours The Pin-n-Cue and Fitness Center in the SUB will be open Monday through Friday

from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Want to be a college radio DJ? Northern's radio station, KNMC, is looking for more disc jockeys. Any students thinking of starting their own radio program need to attend the first KNMC DJ meeting to find out how to get

involved. This first meeting will be Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 5:30 p.m. in the S.U.B. Ballroom, Interested people can also call 265-3709 to see how to get involved.


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Services offered at MSU-Northern In order to help students enjoy the best possible college experience, Montana State University-Northern has a number of helpful services including: assistance with advising, tutoring for all students, and services for those with disabilities.

Student Union Building

A welcome from the Chancellor As we enter the start of another school term, who would have thought that Weird Al’s “Word Crimes” would have been so pivotal in emphasizing the importance of good grammar and correct English? That’s the great thing about education.  Opportunities are everywhere to be informed, enlightened, challenged and transformed.  These opportunities abound in the classrooms of the Hi-Line’s excellent schools — from kindergarten through college.  Vernon Howard, a lifelong observer of the human condition, has noted, “Always walk through life as if you have something new to learn, and you will.”  There is no time better than now for us all to continue our journey. James M. Limbaugh Chancellor, Montana State University-Northern

The Student Union Building, called the SUB, is the center of student life on campus. It is where people meet with friends, attend club meetings, eat and relax. Offices and services found in the SUB include: • Student Union Information Desk    • Bookstore    • KNMC radio station    • MSU-Northern Food Court    • Associated Students of MSU-Northern, ASMSU-N, offices    • Fireside Conference Room    • Crowley Conference Room, upstairs    • Art gallery, upstairs    • Fax machine, in the bookstore    • ID cards    • Fitness Center, basement    • Recreation Center, Pin-n-Cue    • ATM • Wireless Internet in the Ballroom, Fireside Room, Food Court and Rec. Center    • Student Health Service    • Student Activities office    • Housing office

SUB Food Court The SUB Food Court is the only eating facility on campus with service available to all students, faculty, staff and guests. The Food Court opens at 7 a.m. for breakfast and continues serving students throughout lunch and dinner. With a variety of selections including burgers, Mexican dishes, salad bar, cereal bar, dessert bar and beverage bar, there are choices sure to please everyone. The Food Court is open Monday through Friday 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m. to   5 p.m. with a (limited weekend menu. Meal plans are included as a part of all students with residence hall housing contracts and are also available to students who do not reside on campus. Cash and credit cards are accepted in the dining room.  

   Academic advising

Student Health Center

Montana State University-Northern is committed to the fundamental principle that the university exists to serve the students. All efforts of the university are aimed toward enabling students to realize their full potential in whatever field of endeavor they attempt. Students may select or change their major or minor program at any time. New students at Montana State UniversityNorthern will work with the student success adviser, located in Cowan Hall Room 213, during their first semester at  Northern. The adviser will help students select appropriate classes and complete the registration process during that first semester. After their first semester of attendance at   Northern, students who have declared a major will be assigned to a faculty in the student’s major program area. The faculty adviser will explain university academic requirements and assist individuals in selecting courses that will help fulfill the steps necessary to satisfy graduation requirements. Students with questions about their majors are encouraged to contact their faculty adviser. A faculty signature or adviser PIN is also necessary before students can register for classes each semester. Students who remain undecided in their choice of degree program and students who are in the pre-nursing program will continue to receive advising from the student success adviser. In addition to assisting students in course selection, the adviser will guide undecided students in choosing a program of study.

The Student Health Center is a great resource for any health information a student may need. The Student Health Center is located in the SUB just off of the ball room and can be reached by phone at 2653599. It is staffed by a registered nurse and a nurse practitioner and offers health counseling, physical exams and immunizations. In order to promote health and well being throughout the year, the center sponsors several testing and information sessions on various topics such as AIDS, stress, pregnancy, fitness and diabetes. All students attending Northern are entitled to equal access to academic programs and services. By federal law, students with documented disabilities are entitled to reasonable accommodations in order to fully participate in the student experience. Students with disabilities are encouraged to advocate for themselves to the extent possible, and Disability Services provides support and assistance in determining what accommodations are best suited to each individual. To be eligible for these special services students with disabilities must provide the required documentation. For more informa-

Career Center Obtaining real world work experience is an important part of Northern’s educational programs. The Career Center, Cowan Hall Room 213, helps with this process by offering services such as assistance with resume writing and interviewing skills; offering listings for local, statewide, and national jobs and internships; and making cooperative education placements. Each year the center brings in employers that hire interviewing students for internships, full and part-time positions. For both on- and off-campus career opportunities, the Career Center should be the first stop.

tion and to register with Disability Services, students should contact the Learning Success Center in the library.

Student Support Services Student Support Services, a federally funded grant TRIO Program,Department of Education, is located in Room 211 of Cowan Hall and offers a host of personalized services. This federally funded support program is intended for students who meet one of the following criteria: • First-generation college student • Low income, and/or disabled.   The services provided include individual and group tutoring in the SSS Tutoring Computer Lab; personal and career counseling; transitional studies courses designed to promote better study skills and address life skills and career exploration, TRST 102— Study Skills, TRST 103—Transitional Life/ Career Exploration; and social/cultural events. The services mentioned are free to qualified students. The grant provides funding to serve 240 students attending Northern each year. Students are encouraged you to come into Cowan Hall Room 211 to apply for the Student Support Services program.


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OK, you’ve been accepted to college, now to pay for it Kalman A. Chany Princeton Review Books Getting admitted to your choice college is only half the battle; the other half is figuring out how to pay for it. The competition for resources can be stiff, especially in tough economic times. Princeton Review shares tips on planning so that you can take advantage of financial aid. The most important rule? Start early. 1. Start researching aid possibilities sooner rather than later. The competition for aid increases when the economy is weak. Those who plan ahead for the aid process will do much better than those who procrastinate and miss deadlines. 2. Take steps that improve your aid eligibility. For example, if you have lost your job, you should avoid the temptation to spend any assets in your retirement plan. In addition to the likely early distribution penalties and additional income taxes, the higher income will reduce your aid eligibility. 3. Apply for financial aid no matter what your circumstances — flush or not. Applying by the priority deadlines, even if you think you won’t qualify, will help you if your finances take a turn for the worst. Some schools will only accept requests for reconsideration due to a decline in income from those students who filed for aid on time — even if they were turned down initially. 4. You should still not initially rule out any school as being too expensive. Many colleges — especially the private ones — have increased their aid budgets to attract applicants whose families are now more price resistant given the state of the economy. But have a back-up plan in case the aid is not enough to attend those pricier schools. Most likely this will mean also applying to a public institution in your home state and/or any school where the student can live at home instead of paying for room and board. 5. Pay less for a four-year degree. You can save on costs if the student attends a

community college for two years and then transfers to a pricier school for his or her remaining two years. However, be sure that the college to which the student plans to transfer will accept the credits from the community college. 6. Encourage your student to take as many AP courses as possible and to prep well for AP exams. High scores on AP exams can save considerably on college tuition. Many colleges award course credits for them, which can reduce the amount you need to pay in tuition. 7. Apply strategically to colleges. If you exceed the school’s admission criteria, you are much more likely to get a better aid package than a marginal applicant. Be sure to prep for the standardized tests such as the SAT or ACT, so that the student is more desirable. 8. Be realistic about how much debt the student can incur, given the starting salaries for his or her probable major and career path. 9. If you have to borrow, pursue federal loans first and avoid having the student take on private loans at all costs. 10. If your circumstances have a taken a turn for the worst, request additional aid. But expect that the college may require considerable supporting documentation. 11. In addition to your aid planning, focus on planning for the various education tax benefits you can claim. After all, a dollar you can save on your taxes is worth the same as getting an additional dollar in grant or scholarship aid. 12. Don’t put tuition on a credit card. This debt is more expensive than ever, given the recent changes to interest rates and other fees that many card issuers are now charging. You also want to be sure you avoid maxing out on your borrowing limit, just in case you need to use the card to pay for an unexpected emergency. (Excerpted from “Paying for College Without Going Broke: 2010 Edition” by Kalman A. Chany, Random House/Princeton Review Books, Published October 2009.)


MSU-N Back to School 2014