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Montana Angus Tour


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Longest running Angus tour in the country comes to north-central Montana

number one state for the Angus breed, so it’s only logical that we do work hand in hand with our land grant university. So consequently, if we’re the leading seed stock state, wouldn’t it logically make sense that our university actually portray that in their animal breeding system as well?” The students, he said, will get hands on knowledge of and experience with the Angus breed before they go out into the real world which is, he said, dominated by Angus. The students will also benefit from networking with breeders and industry allies, direct access to

Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com The 44th Annual Montana Angus Tour came to north-central Montana last month to showcase area breeders of registered black Angus cattle to attendees from across the U.S. and into Canada, as well as giving breeders and cattle industry representatives an opportunity to network. “We’re the kick-off stop,” said Montana Angus Association member Kim Peterson, who is also on the Montana Stockgrowers Association board of directors and patriarch of Peterson Grain and Cattle north of Havre. The Peterson family hosted the first night of the Sept. 18-20 tour, including the Montana Angus Association’s annual membership meeting and banquet. Several Peterson bulls, cows, heifers and calves were on display along with those from Whistling Winds Angus from Hingham. The tour caravaned over three days from Havre to stops north of Havre and south in the Bear Paw Mountains, Turner to the north and east to Malta. Though the associations members, industry partners and guests got to see some of the facilities, “it’s mostly about the cattle,”

Havre Daily News/Pam Burke Kathy Creighton-Smith talks about the status of Montana Beef Council during the Montana Angus Association annual meeting hosted at Peterson Grain and Cattle north of Havre Sept. 18.

Havre Daily News/Pam Burke People on the 44th Annual Montana Angus Tour look over a herd of registered black Angus cattle at the embryo transfer business, Milk River Genetics, east of Havre Sept. 19. The Montana Angus Tour, the longest running Angus tour in the U.S., alternates locations around the seven Montana Angus Association regions each year. This year's north-central region tour, Sept. 18-20, showed attendees registered Angus across the area from Havre and Hingham to Chinook, the Bear Paw Mountains, Turnner and Malta.

more money,” Creighton-Smith said. She asked Montana Angus members to help spread the word to remind producers to sign the consent forms to keep the Montana Beef Council solvent until the lawsuit can be resolved. —— Two major economic opportunities for Montana cattle producers seem to be stalled out, at least for the moment. The deal being made with Montana Stockgrowers Association at the helm to sell Montana cattle to China is on hold until the tariff war is settled, and this seems to have put the proposed meat packing plant in Belt on the back burner as well. Bryan Ratzburg, owner of Bobcat Angus in Galata and member of the Montana Stockgrowers board, speaking as a private cattle producer and not on behalf of the Stockgrowers said “It’s all on hold because of the tariffs with the Chinese.” “Nothing’s going to happen on the Stockgrower’s deal until Trump gets the tariffs” straightened out,” he said, adding that there are no signs on the immediate horizon of this getting resolved, “but judging from Trump’s history it will get done.” The same problem has stalled out the meat packing plant, he said, which seems not to have garnered much significant opposition in the state. “It’ll be interesting when those lift. I think things will start rolling again,” he said. He and other producers at the Angus Tour said they saw huge potential if the meat packing plant and its needed feedlots got going. “We’re going to have to come up with a lot of animals to keep those full,” he added. If meat packing plant goes through, it will be a benefit not just to beef side, Darrell Stevenson, a board member for the Montana Angus Association, said, but especially to the feed grain industry which will have to produce enough feed for the beef, pork and lamb the facility expects to process. “Economically it could be a driver for all of the ag industry,” he added. —— A boon specifically to the Montana Angus producers, as well as the ag students at Montana State University in Bozeman, is a memorandum of understanding between Montana Angus Association and MSU to estab-

lish a 50-head herd of purebred black Angus cows on the university’s Bozeman Agricultural Research and Teaching Farm. “The Montana State University herd and the Extension herd have no Angus influence at this time,” Stevenson said, “whereas the Montana Angus Association and the breed — this is the seed stock capital of the world.” “Twenty percent of all Angus bulls sold in the United States as recorded by the American Angus Association are sold from Montana — one out of five bulls in the United States,” he added. “We are number one for registration, number one for performance data. We are the

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their experience, as well as internship possibilities with these people and organizations. The program will have access to the extensive American Angus Association database system, he said, and a five-member advisory council of Montana Angus Association members will be formed to help with the process and to create a longterm connection between the students and the industry. “I think it’s in the best case for the students,” he said, “to actually have fair exposure and practice with the dominant breed of the beef industry.”


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The state of the Angus state Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com An on-going lawsuit among cattlemen organizations and international tariff uncertainties are creating some uncertainty in the future of the state’s cattle industry, but Angus breeders have a big bright spot on the horizon. While producers at the Montana Angus Tour said cattle prices are decent this fall, they could be better should a few more points factors fall their way. Kathy Creighton-Smith, Montana Angus Association's representative on the Montana

Beef Council Board of Directors, talked during the Angus association’s annual meeting about the status of the R-CALF USA lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Beef Checkoff program takes $1 per head of cattle sold at market and that money is used to promote beef through education, research and promotion. Half of every dollar collected stays in the state in which the cattle were sold and the allocation of that money is overseen by that state’s beef council. Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America — or R-CALF USA — filed a lawsuit in spring of 2016 question-

ing the fact that half of the $1-per-head beef checkoff fee is given to the privately incorporated Montana Beef Council. Among R-CALF’s lawsuit claims is that the beef council has as members packing plants owned by foreign countries, therefore a foreign entity is being given a say over how taxpayer dollars are spent administered by a private corporation. The Montana Beef Council, Creighton-Smith said, on a normal year collects around $1.6 million in checkoff payments, and prior to the lawsuit that gave the Montana Beef Council $800,000 for activities in the state. The council, she added, also shared some of the money with

other beef councils that didn’t make as much, and to states among the seven that don’t have beef councils. Recent action by R-CALF has included another 13 state beef councils in the lawsuit. Since the suit, the only checkoff dollars the Montana Beef Council can receive, she said, are those from producers who have signed a consent form. “So instead of having $800,000 to promote beef we had $200,000. As it looks, we are spending our retained earnings to keep going, and Montana Beef Council will not exist after a certain amount of time because there will be no

Tour: History of performance is one of the market price drivers ■ Continued from page 6 nally meant to be.” So much emphasis is placed on the bull

market, largely because breeding can be a tough business for bulls, which are subject

to injury during the hormone-charged breeding seasons and a lot of wear-and-tear from miles walked among the herd during breeding, Houtzel said. “Another problem is that, after a while, if breeders are keeping replacement heifers then the bull becomes a liability because you don’t want to line breed,” he said, so the bulls are sold or butchered and replacements purchased. Houtzel said that some young bulls will sell for higher, but the average price range in the current market is $3,000 to $5,000. Part of what drives the market price for the sellers is a history of performance. “The best tool is the guys that are buying

the bulls,” Houtzel said. “If they’re working for them, they’ll keep coming back, and if they aren’t working for ’em, and big problems arise, then they’ll go elsewhere.” “You still have to have a good eye for cattle you, gotta know how to feed and raise and manage cattle, the data is an important part but there’s more to it than that,” Moczygemba said. Practical attention to these details is what helps improve the breed. “Typically black Angus will be the higher selling cattle. Buyers will look for that,” Davis said. “Buyers will look for reputation of herd, history, performance in the feedlot.”

www.havredailynews.com Peterson said. Montana breeds, registers and sells the most black Angus cattle of anywhere else in the world, several producers said, and that’s not an off-the-cuff brag. “Montana is our largest state as far as number of registrations goes, not largest number of members, but number of cattle registered, so it’s a very important state withing the association’s hierarchy,” Allen Moczygemba, CEO of American Angus Association, said before the annual state meeting. Among the 41 state Angus associations, with their 25,000 members in the U.S. and Canada, Montana’s is the oldest tour. “There is a long storied history here,” Moczygemba added. The tour, which runs in a rotation through the Montana Angus Association’s seven districts, took 200 registered attendees from 17 states and two provinces on nine stops which showcased bulls, cows, heifers and calves from 20 breeders, includig Peterson Grain and Cattle, Whistling Winds Angus, Milk River Genetics, South Boulder Angus Ranch, Baltrusch Angus Ranch, Nissen Angus, Schmitt Angus, MY Angus, Bar 9 Ranch, 4 Butte Cattle Co., Clear Creek Angus, Top Notch Angus, North Fork Angus, Shipwheel Cattle Co., Hould Angus, Louie Petrie Ranch, KelMcC Angus, Math Farms, Score Angus, C Bar Angus and Hinman Angus. The event also attracted local cattle producers as well as neighbors, family and friends beyond those who signed up for the tour and invited sponsors, said board mem-

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ber Klint Swanson, owner of Shipwheel Cattle Co. with his wife, Lori who coordinated the tour this year. He added that the dinner they held Sept. 19 at their ranch south of Chinook saw around 400 attendees. Amy Van Dyke-Crowder, executive a d m i n i s t ra to r fo r M o n ta n a A n g u s Association, said the 2019 tour will be in Missoula, Sept. 17-19, and will take in the Mission Valley, Bitterroot Valley and an area toward Drummond, all in the western region. Some of the ranches visited on the tours are flagship ranches that have been a part of the state’s cattle industry for many years or even generations, Van Dyke-Crowder said, but some of them are up-and-coming breeders, including several who participated in the north-central tour this year. “That was good to see,” she said, adding that no matter how long the breeder has been in business, “a lot can change in seven years, even in the cattle industry including breeder new bloodlines and such.”

Havre Daily News/Pam Burke Producers of registered black Angus cattle, industry partners and guests start to gather for the Montana Angus Association annual banquet held Sept. 18 at Peterson Grain and Cattle north of Havre.

Why Angus Belgrade Angus and past President of American Angus Association Bill Davis, who attended this year’s tour, said the black Angus is the premiere breed across the country with the largest national breed stock association and database of all breeds in world “There are good cattle in all breeds, but the Angus breed has done as much with herd selection tools for performance and carcass and tracking important traits,” he

said, adding that the data, including information such as birth and weaning weights, carcass information and more, has been an asset for the growing DNA database, as well. “Most of the primary work done with the genomic companies was done on Angus cattle because we had a database for them to fall back on,” he said. Moczygemba said the database is the more-scientific equivalent to the extensive questionnaire people fill out when they get a

DNA test for ancestry. The database tracks terminal traits on cattle sold to slaughter and maternal traits that measure qualities of the cows’ care for their young, and this information helps pinpoint traits and match them with DNA markers. American Angus Association runs about 160,000 DNA tests annually, he said. The DNA testing gives sellers and buyers 10 t o 3 0 p r o g e ny e q u i va l e n t d a t a ,

■ See Tour Page 6


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The Month in Weather: September Transition to Fall

was also recorded on Sept. 3, at 38 mph. As of press date, per the National Weather Service in Glasgow, the highest observed temSeptember tends to be a month of change perature for the month was 89 degrees on both for Montana. Both astronomical and meteoro- Sept. 3 and 10, and the lowest was 34 on Sept. logical fall began this month, and it sure began 21. The total liquid precipitation reported at to feel as such by the end of the month. The Glasgow was 1.14â&#x20AC;?, which was approximately ÂżUVWKDOIRI6HSWHPEHUVHHPHGWREHDFRQWLQX- 0.4â&#x20AC;? above normal. Over a 24-hour period, the ation of August, with warm temperatures and greatest precipitation total was 0.73â&#x20AC;?, which dry conditions. By around mid-month, a large occurred on Sept. 20. The overall mean temchange in the weather patterns over the region perature for the month was approximately 59 EURXJKWWHPSHUDWXUHVVLJQLÂżFDQWO\ORZHUWKDQ degrees, which was approximately 1 degree WKH ÂżUVW KDOI RI WKH PRQWK 7KHUH ZDV DOVR below normal. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor was VLJQLÂżFDQWO\ PRUH UDLQIDOO WKDQ 6HSWHPEHUÂśV released on Sept. 27. Abnormally dry conÂżUVWKDOI /RRNLQJIRUZDUGWRZDUGV2FWREHUFRQÂż- ditions continue for much of the area. Since dence in the trends for both temperatures and the last release on Sept. 20, there was some precipitation across northeast Montana again improvement in northern Phillips County and are mostly low. The Climate Prediction Center the northwestern corner of Valley County, forecast for October lays out equal chances for which eliminated the severe drought claseither above-or below-normal precipitation, VLÂżFDWLRQ0RGHUDWHGURXJKWVWLOOFRQWLQXHV and equal chances for both above-and below- for much of Phillips and Valley Counties, as well as southwestern Roosevelt County. normal temperatures. 7KH 86 'URXJKW 0RQLWRUÂśV UHSRUWLQJ Now looking back at September, as of press date, 13 days in the month saw at least feature offers producers an opportunity to a trace of reported precipitation, and two submit drought impact and condition reports. days saw at least a tenth of an inch of ac- The report allows producers to provide a cumulated precipitation. As for winds, six written description of drought impacts on days saw sustained winds greater than 25 livelihood, activities and are able to submit mph, and 16 days with winds greater than images that document the drought and its 20 mph. The highest sustained wind was impacts. To report drought conditions in reported at 31 mph and occurred on both the area, visit droughtreporter.unl.edu/subSept. 3 and 12, and the highest wind gust mitreport. MICHELLE BIGELBACH FOR FARM & RANCH

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Max Baucus CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 remembering that in dealing with China, the U.S. is dealing with a polar opposite form of government. In China, the communist party controls everything from the press to the markets. The party knows what levers to pull and what buttons to push to keep their people happy. The former Ambassador says there is a Faustian bargain in that country: if the people are happy, with their jobs and HFRQRP\WKH\ZRQÂśWTXHVWLRQWKHOHJLWLPDF\ of the party or government. They have total FRQWUROWRÂżJKW$PHULFDLQDWUDGHZDUJLYLQJ them an advantage, at least in the short term. ,Q$PHULFDLIIDUPHUVFDQÂśWVHOOWKHLUFURSV they will demand changes. But in China, if the SHRSOHDUHQÂśWKDSS\WKHJRYHUQPHQWKDVWKH ability to make them happy. The Chinese government wants their economy to keep growing, to keep their people happy, and to do so, they want to deal with the 86EXWWKH\ZDQWFRRSHUDWLRQ7KH\GRQÂśW ZDQWDWUDGHZDUEXWWKH\DOVRZRQÂśWEHSXVKHG around. Baucus points to history to understand the position of the Chinese government, going back to when China was an empire, to losing stature in the world and facing what they saw as humiliation and domination from other nations. The country is back, they have grown so much in a short period of time, and are very proud of who they are, with good reason. â&#x20AC;&#x153;China may be prouder of China than the U.S. is proud of the U.S.,â&#x20AC;? explained Baucus. On the U.S. side, the American public remains quite proud of its own unique history and institutions. Ambassador Baucus points out the upcoming midterm elections will have a direct impact on how the trade dispute plays out and how long it may take to see progress. China will wait to see if Republicans win elections and negotiations may depend on who gets elected stateside. But he cautions, after HOHFWLRQVLWWDNHVDZKLOHIRUHOHFWHGRIÂżFLDOV

Max Baucus to settle in and establish policy. He does, however, see this as an opportunity to advocate for improving American foreign policy. Pointing to the strength and depth of knowledge regarding Europe and Russia, and the corresponding presence in those regions, he states the U.S. is relatively weak on China. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Americans need to know and understand

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China better than we do.â&#x20AC;? Baucus maintains that enacting tariffs will hurt American workers and farmers. Further, a continuation or escalation of the trade dispute risks losing global markets. The U.S. has already lost a portion of the soybean market to Brazil. The Ambassador stresses that once a PDUNHWLVORVWLWLVGLIÂżFXOWWRJHWLWEDFN0RQ-

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com tanans may remember the pain of losing the Chinese barley market forever. Baucus uses WKH KLVWRULFDO H[DPSOH RI 3UHVLGHQW &DUWHUÂśV grain embargo against the Soviet Union as one example of the long-reaching effects of poor trade policy. Baucus warns that China will go elsewhere for their import needs. Indeed, the same day Baucus spoke with the Courier7LPHUHSRUWHGWKDW&KLQHVHRIÂżFLDOV at the annual meeting of the U.S. soybean export group in Kansas City, Mo., laid out how they plan to avoid the intended consequences of the trade dispute. Beyond looking to other countries, such as Brazil, for their soybeans, the Chinese will look to Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan as sources for alternative crops, VXFKDVSDOPPLOOUDSHVHHGVXQĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVHHG and other crops. In Montana, President of the Montana Grain Growers Association Michelle Erickson-Jones expressed frustration over the markets and the trade situation. Financial estimates from the organization for market losses due to the tariffs came down at 75 cents per bushel, while the aid package offered by the Trump administration is only offering wheat farmers up to 14 cents per bushel. She also noted China KDVQÂśW SXUFKDVHG DQ\ ZKHDW IURP 0RQWDQD since March. Baucus maintains the longer Trump pursues these tariffs, the more they hurt U.S. workers and farmers. Tariffs increase taxes on Americans. He points out America is not a mercantilist nation. There is an expectation for IDLUGHDOVDQGOHYHOSOD\LQJÂżHOGV$QGIDUPHUV would much prefer to sell their products over relying on federal assistance. Despite the hopes of American farmers and workers that there will be resolution soon to alleviate market concerns, the current situation here and abroad points to many more months of bluster and negotiations. Yet, Baucus is not FRPSOHWHO\GLVFRXUDJHGÂł,ÂśPDOZD\VKRSHIXO DOZD\VRSWLPLVWLFEXWULJKWQRZWRGD\,ÂśP not seeing anything out of China to indicate an end to this.â&#x20AC;?

Deadly Nightshade: Growing Concern Around Poisonous Weed A.J. ETHERINGTON FOR FARM & RANCH

COURESY PHOTO FROM NORTH CAROLINA EXTENSION OFFICE FOR THE FARM & RANCH

Pictured are the bell-like purple flowers and large bright berries, which are indicators of "deadly" Nightshade. Each portion of the plant; stem, leaf, and berry; are poisonous and have the potential to be deadly if ingested. Harm can be done to animals, pets, livestock and especially children.

Although less of an issue on pasturelands and in the country, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deadlyâ&#x20AC;? 1LJKWVKDGH $WURSD EHOODGRQQD  KDV EHcome a growing concern in urban areas of Northeast Montana, and its poisonous nature poses a risk to adults, children, pets, animals and in some cases livestock. According to Shelley Mills with the MSU-Extension Office in Glasgow, Mont., the weed has been spread as a contaminant in bird seed. This relation to bird feeders has made it a mostly urban issue,

at present, with the ability to spread. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is becoming more and more of a problem,â&#x20AC;? explained Mills adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the entirety of the plant is poisonous and deadly to include the leaves, stems and berries.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you have small children you need to get rid of it,â&#x20AC;? stated Mills. However, HUDGLFDWLQJ QLJKWVKDGH FDQ EH GLIÂżFXOW According to Mills, if you spray it you will likely kill every broadleaf plant in the area. The best method to get rid of the plant is to dig it out, but Mills cautioned WKDWURXWHFDQEHGLIÂżFXOWDVWKHSODQWLVD broad and extensive root system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dig it out, but you need to get the

whole root system or it will just grow back,â&#x20AC;? said Mills before adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;And wear gloves.â&#x20AC;? Even if not ingested, nightshade can cause irritation to the skin. The poison in nightshade, alkaloid solanine, ZRUNVE\FDXVLQJJDVWURLQWHVWLQDOLQĂ&#x20AC;DPmation and is potentially deadly to people and animals. The plant is recognizable for its attractiveness. Flowers are purple and it produces cherry-sized deep colored berULHV7KRVHEHUULHVFRQWULEXWHWRWKHSODQWVÂś spread as the non-indigenous plant attracts birds to eat the berries who then spread the seeds.

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Former Ambassador Baucus Talks China and Trade GWENDOLYNE HONRUD FOR FARM & RANCH In light of the ongoing trade dispute with China, the Courier arranged an interview with former Ambassador to China and Senator from Montana, Max Baucus. This interview was conducted an the afternoon of Sept, 4, the day federal aid became available to farmers impacted by the trade dispute. Max Baucus served as ambassador to China from February, 2014, through January, 2017, when the new administration installed their own appointment, which had him in China during the presidential election. During the administrative changeover Ambassador Baucus remained on the ground, giving him a unique opportunity to witness reactions from Chinese JRYHUQPHQWRIÂżFLDOVDQGJDXJHKRZWKHFRXQWU\PLJKWUHDFWWR$PHULFDÂśVQHZWUDGHSROLF\ The Ambassador speaks of the Chinese with respect, noting that Americans tend to think of themselves as very intelligent, perhaps more so than other cultures or countries. But, that type of thinking can be detrimental in underestimating the intellect of our global competitors. He says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Chinese are just as intelligent as us, and may be even more driven and focused.â&#x20AC;? This drive and focus allowed them, in responding to U.S. tariffs, to strategically target their retaliation on areas of America which supported President Trump, in a clear effort to make him feel more political pain, according to Baucus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;China is quite sophisticated about the American political process, and are becoming more so, even by the month.â&#x20AC;? Baucus described watching the growing understanding of WKHJRYHUQPHQWRIÂżFLDOVGXULQJWKHFDPSDLJQ season, how he could see the sophistication and knowledge growing month by month. In particular, when discussing what the United 6WDWHVÂśWUDGHSROLF\PLJKWORRNOLNHXQGHUWKH differing potential nominees, the Chinese grew PXFKPRUHVSHFLÂżFLQWKHLULQTXLULHV Baucus told the Courier he has two major SUREOHPVZLWK7UXPSÂśVDSSURDFKWRQHJRWLDtions with China. First, China is a protectionist QDWLRQZKLFKPDNHVLWGLIÂżFXOWIRU$PHULFDQ businesses in China. The Ambassador stresses the point, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enacting tariffs does not get to the heart of the problem, which is Chinese protectionist policies.â&#x20AC;? These unfair practices include intellectual property theft, currency manipulation, forcing businesses to turn over patented technology as a condition for doing business in China, and taking advantage of American businesses through manipulations of permits and approvals. Baucus states, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tariffs are not going to force China to back off pursuing economic growth.â&#x20AC;? As to his second concern, Baucus says the

administration cannot go about this unilaterDOO\ WKH 86 FDQQRWGR WKLVDORQH7UXPSÂśV approach has discombobulated the Chinese, which may work in business, as outlined in The Art of the Deal, but Baucus opines it does not work well with countries. He says the President likes a big splash and strong statements, but that he may have overstated his position. 3UHVLGHQW7UXPSZLOOÂżQGLWGLIÂżFXOWWREDFN down and save face. At the same time, the Chinese will also need to save face and will ÂżQGLWVLPLODUO\GLIÂżFXOWWRGHHVFDODWHÂł:HÂśUH not going to bully China. China is not going to bully us,â&#x20AC;? Baucus says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to work with our allies, in concert, cooperatively. We need to stand together to encourage change.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think Donald Trump is wrong with his America First policy, which is disengagement from international affairs, especially international economic affairs. We should lead,â&#x20AC;? asserts Baucus. He cited the decision to withdraw IURP WKH7UDQV3DFLÂżF 3DUWQHUVKLS 733  DV an example. Ambassador Baucus believes the 733WREHRQHRI$PHULFDÂśVPRVWLPSRUWDQW deals, showing that the United States would be present in the world. He asserts that when we pulled out of an agreement that improved standards of trade and labor production, the U.S. signaled to China and to Asia at large that we are disengaging and that withdrawal OHIWDYRLGZKLFK&KLQDLVQRZÂżOOLQJ&KLQD is attempting to convince other countries that the U.S. is an unreliable trading partner, where they are offering stability to potential allies. Baucus played a lead role in the creation of TPP during his time in the Senate and staunchly believes in the necessity of the 12-nation agreement between allies, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a big mistake to pull out of TPP. I think we QHHGWRUHQHJRWLDWH733,GRQÂśWFDUHZKDWLWÂśV called. The President could call it Trump PP for all the name matters. But the deal is good for $PHULFDDQGLWÂśVJRRGIRUWKHZRUOG´ Asked if he sees anything coming out of China right now as a cause for optimism, Ambassador Baucus says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not really, not yet.â&#x20AC;? In his view, the Chinese are befuddled and perplexed by Trump, which leads them to hesitate in regards to negotiations. They see the President changing positions, a split between what he says and what his administration says on trade and foreign policy. Baucus believes they will wait until after the midterm elections to see what effect will be had on U.S. policies, but that even after that, they will dig their heels in. He notes the Chinese are a proud people who play long ball. They are visionary and patient, even more so than the U.S. They KDYHDVWUDWHJLFSODQDQGZHGRQÂśW$QGWKH\ know that. Baucus highlighted the importance of See MAX BAUCUS Page 8

October 2018 October 2018

5 5

Glasgow Stockyards, Inc. Linda & Mark Nielsen, Owners Iva Murch, Manager 263-7529 Dean Barnes, Yard Manager 263-1175 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 783-7285

October November & December 2018 Schedule

October 2018 Thursday

SERVING AREA 2 LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS FOR 72 YEARS!

November 2018

1946 - 2018

(cont.)

Monday

4

Early Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

19

11

Early Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

Thursday

18

Dunbar Bros. & Friends 12th Annual Bred Heifer Auction, Galpin Angus Bull & Heifer Calves, Feeder Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

25

Feeder Special Featuring Red Angus Influence Feeders & All Class Cattle Auction

November 2018 Thursday

1

All Class Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

8

All Class Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

15

Angus Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

Math Farms Annual Bull and Female Auction. Selling 100 18-month old Angus bulls and 100 Angus Bred Heifers. Sale starts at 1 p.m.

22

)BQQZ5IBOLTHJWJOHo/P"VDUJPO

29

All Class Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

December 2018 Thursday

6

Big December Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

13

Annual Stock Cow & Bred Heifer Special & All Class Cattle Auction.

20

Last All Class Cattle Auction of 2018

27

Merry Christmas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; No Auction

228-9306

10#PYt(MBTHPX .5tHTJ!OFNPOUOFU www.glasgowstockyards.com 3OHDVHFDOOLQFRQVLJQPHQWVVREX\HUVFDQEHQRWLĂ&#x20AC;HG

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October 2018

FARM & RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com

Tour: Baltrusch: 'They're a kind of â&#x20AC;&#x153;set 'em and forget 'em" kind of cow' â&#x2013; Continued from page 3 Moczygemba said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started collecting data on our cattle back in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s,â&#x20AC;? he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so we have the largest beef cattle genetic database in the world, here in the U.S. Then we use that data to make breeding decisions and ultimately improve the quality of the cattle.â&#x20AC;? A typical sale catalog will have the tracked data for each individual registered animal, he added. While emphasis is placed on registered bull sales, in the end what the producers are trying to do is improve their cow herd by retaining better replacement heifers each

year, Dennis Houtzel, of South Boulder Angus near Chinook, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The beauty of the Angus cow is she can take dry leaf, sage brush anything and turn it into milk and meat, and a lot of the other breeds have a hard time doing that,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I appreciate the genetics and the evolution of the Angus breed,â&#x20AC;? Nate Baltrusch of Baltrusch Angus said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but I also feel that the cows gotta get it done. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a kind of â&#x20AC;&#x153;set â&#x20AC;&#x2122;em and forget â&#x20AC;&#x2122;emâ&#x20AC;? type of cow, and I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what the Angus breed was origi-

â&#x2013; See Tour Page 10

Havre Daily News/Pam Burke Members of the Montana Angus Association, industry partners and guests listen to opening remarks during the Montana Angus Tour stop at the Blaine County Fairgrounds Sept. 19, the second day of the tour. Schmitt Angus and Nissen Angus ranches brought registered black Angus bulls, cows, heifers and calves to the fairgrounds to show the products of their breeding programs. More than 200 people signed up for the tour and at each stop local ranchers, neighbors and family stopped to see the registered cattle and network.

Charles and Tami Good run the family wheat farm near Carter and own MaxAg of Montana. They have two sons, Jayden and Landon.

MFU works for family farms through legislation, education and cooperation. Just ask members Charles and Tami Good. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2.2 million farmers in the U.S. so anyway we can grow and band together to gain power or get a voice itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Charles Good

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

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October2018 2018 October

Fall and the Vastness of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Love Psalms, Psalm 103. Three times the vastness RI*RGÂśVORYHLVPHQWLRQHGDQGFRPSDUHGWR something that seems almost immeasurable As the summer days turn to fall, the grass WR RXU ÂżQLWH PLQGV 9HUVH  FRPSDUHV WKH begins to die, and, praise God, the rain arrives! vastness of his love to the distance between ,ÂśYHDOZD\VWKRXJKWRIIDOODVVXFKDUHOLHIDIWHU the heavens and the earth. Verse 12 tells us a hot summer. Especially when we get rain that that God loves us so much he removes our VLQWUDQVJUHVVLRQV ZKLFKLVZKDWVHSDUDWHVXV is so badly needed. Fall chores like preconditioning calves, IURP+LP DVIDUDVWKHHDVWWRWKHZHVW7KHQ preg-checking cows and hauling grain to the verse 17 uses â&#x20AC;&#x153;everlasting to everlastingâ&#x20AC;? to elevator commence. This last week we started VKRZXVWKHOLPLWOHVVQHVVRI*RGÂśVORYH â&#x20AC;&#x153;11 For as high as the heavens are gathering cows to precondition calves. We are so blessed to live where we do. We were above the earth, so great is his steadfast gathering on horseback in the riverbottom the love toward those who fear him; 12 as far day after we had gotten about an inch of rain. as the east is from the west, so far does Even though the ground was soaking up the he remove our transgressions from us. rain quickly, It was a bit muddy and slippery. 17 But the steadfast love of the Lord is from Yet, the beauty around us was breathtaking. everlasting to everlasting on those who fear The trees were dressed in colorful green and WKLVLVDUHYHUHQFHQRWDVFDUHGW\SHIHDU KLP yellow leaves and the other colors of the fallen DQGKLVULJKWHRXVQHVVWRFKLOGUHQÂśVFKLOGUHQ´ trees trunks, bushes, and grasses were deep- Psalms 103:11-12, 17 ESV Our wide open prairies in northeastern ened by being soaked with rain. Horseback riding that day was especially Montana sure paint an amazing picture of good for the soul. You could almost get lost vastness. You can see for miles. The big blue or at least turned around in that pasture, with Montana sky, stretching forever above us, its size, tightly grouped trees, and multitude feels limitless. ,VQÂśW LW DPD]LQJ WR VHH DQG HQMR\ *RGÂśV of current and old winding river beds. The vastness of it all is fantastic and awe inspiring. beauty and love all around us, while doing It reminded me of one of my favorite chores? ELIZABETH SHIPSTEAD FOR FARM & RANCH

NEW LISTING! Missouri River Breaks Ranch 10 miles from the Breaks, 4980 +/- acres of deeded pasture land along with 7909 +/- acres of BLM allotment, and 1,120 +/- acres of State leased ground. Ranch also has a house, Quonset, shop, and other outbuildings.

ODIN SHIPSTEAD/ FOR THE COURIER

Elizabeth Shipstead and her two-year-old Paint horse, Beau.

 ! D L O S

Call Koefod today for more information. Listing price $5,500,000



FOR SALE

1432 SQ FT PER UNIT

Ĺ&#x;Ţ



â&#x20AC;˘ Large Master  Suite   â&#x20AC;˘ 2 more bedrooms â&#x20AC;˘ Open floor plan  Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;[Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;

Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;[Ĺ&#x;

montanafarmersunion.com

Ĺ&#x;



Log on today www.koefod.com A fall chore that is now underway is separating cows and calves.

ODIN SHIPSTEAD/ FOR THE COURIER

Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;[Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;

 

 â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Car Garage   â&#x20AC;˘ Gas Fireplace â&#x20AC;˘  No Stairs

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Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x17E;[Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;



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64)7

64)7

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Find out more about our advocacy efforts and education programs at:

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6

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October 2018

FARM & RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com

Tour: Baltrusch: 'They're a kind of â&#x20AC;&#x153;set 'em and forget 'em" kind of cow' â&#x2013; Continued from page 3 Moczygemba said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started collecting data on our cattle back in the â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s,â&#x20AC;? he said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;so we have the largest beef cattle genetic database in the world, here in the U.S. Then we use that data to make breeding decisions and ultimately improve the quality of the cattle.â&#x20AC;? A typical sale catalog will have the tracked data for each individual registered animal, he added. While emphasis is placed on registered bull sales, in the end what the producers are trying to do is improve their cow herd by retaining better replacement heifers each

year, Dennis Houtzel, of South Boulder Angus near Chinook, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The beauty of the Angus cow is she can take dry leaf, sage brush anything and turn it into milk and meat, and a lot of the other breeds have a hard time doing that,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I appreciate the genetics and the evolution of the Angus breed,â&#x20AC;? Nate Baltrusch of Baltrusch Angus said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but I also feel that the cows gotta get it done. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a kind of â&#x20AC;&#x153;set â&#x20AC;&#x2122;em and forget â&#x20AC;&#x2122;emâ&#x20AC;? type of cow, and I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what the Angus breed was origi-

â&#x2013; See Tour Page 10

Havre Daily News/Pam Burke Members of the Montana Angus Association, industry partners and guests listen to opening remarks during the Montana Angus Tour stop at the Blaine County Fairgrounds Sept. 19, the second day of the tour. Schmitt Angus and Nissen Angus ranches brought registered black Angus bulls, cows, heifers and calves to the fairgrounds to show the products of their breeding programs. More than 200 people signed up for the tour and at each stop local ranchers, neighbors and family stopped to see the registered cattle and network.

Charles and Tami Good run the family wheat farm near Carter and own MaxAg of Montana. They have two sons, Jayden and Landon.

MFU works for family farms through legislation, education and cooperation. Just ask members Charles and Tami Good. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2.2 million farmers in the U.S. so anyway we can grow and band together to gain power or get a voice itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Charles Good

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

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October2018 2018 October

Fall and the Vastness of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Love Psalms, Psalm 103. Three times the vastness RI*RGÂśVORYHLVPHQWLRQHGDQGFRPSDUHGWR something that seems almost immeasurable As the summer days turn to fall, the grass WR RXU ÂżQLWH PLQGV 9HUVH  FRPSDUHV WKH begins to die, and, praise God, the rain arrives! vastness of his love to the distance between ,ÂśYHDOZD\VWKRXJKWRIIDOODVVXFKDUHOLHIDIWHU the heavens and the earth. Verse 12 tells us a hot summer. Especially when we get rain that that God loves us so much he removes our VLQWUDQVJUHVVLRQV ZKLFKLVZKDWVHSDUDWHVXV is so badly needed. Fall chores like preconditioning calves, IURP+LP DVIDUDVWKHHDVWWRWKHZHVW7KHQ preg-checking cows and hauling grain to the verse 17 uses â&#x20AC;&#x153;everlasting to everlastingâ&#x20AC;? to elevator commence. This last week we started VKRZXVWKHOLPLWOHVVQHVVRI*RGÂśVORYH â&#x20AC;&#x153;11 For as high as the heavens are gathering cows to precondition calves. We are so blessed to live where we do. We were above the earth, so great is his steadfast gathering on horseback in the riverbottom the love toward those who fear him; 12 as far day after we had gotten about an inch of rain. as the east is from the west, so far does Even though the ground was soaking up the he remove our transgressions from us. rain quickly, It was a bit muddy and slippery. 17 But the steadfast love of the Lord is from Yet, the beauty around us was breathtaking. everlasting to everlasting on those who fear The trees were dressed in colorful green and WKLVLVDUHYHUHQFHQRWDVFDUHGW\SHIHDU KLP yellow leaves and the other colors of the fallen DQGKLVULJKWHRXVQHVVWRFKLOGUHQÂśVFKLOGUHQ´ trees trunks, bushes, and grasses were deep- Psalms 103:11-12, 17 ESV Our wide open prairies in northeastern ened by being soaked with rain. Horseback riding that day was especially Montana sure paint an amazing picture of good for the soul. You could almost get lost vastness. You can see for miles. The big blue or at least turned around in that pasture, with Montana sky, stretching forever above us, its size, tightly grouped trees, and multitude feels limitless. ,VQÂśW LW DPD]LQJ WR VHH DQG HQMR\ *RGÂśV of current and old winding river beds. The vastness of it all is fantastic and awe inspiring. beauty and love all around us, while doing It reminded me of one of my favorite chores? ELIZABETH SHIPSTEAD FOR FARM & RANCH

NEW LISTING! Missouri River Breaks Ranch 10 miles from the Breaks, 4980 +/- acres of deeded pasture land along with 7909 +/- acres of BLM allotment, and 1,120 +/- acres of State leased ground. Ranch also has a house, Quonset, shop, and other outbuildings.

ODIN SHIPSTEAD/ FOR THE COURIER

Elizabeth Shipstead and her two-year-old Paint horse, Beau.

 ! D L O S

Call Koefod today for more information. Listing price $5,500,000



FOR SALE

1432 SQ FT PER UNIT

Ĺ&#x;Ţ



â&#x20AC;˘ Large Master  Suite   â&#x20AC;˘ 2 more bedrooms â&#x20AC;˘ Open floor plan  Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;[Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;

Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;[Ĺ&#x;

montanafarmersunion.com

Ĺ&#x;



Log on today www.koefod.com A fall chore that is now underway is separating cows and calves.

ODIN SHIPSTEAD/ FOR THE COURIER

Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;[Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;

 

 â&#x20AC;˘ 2 Car Garage   â&#x20AC;˘ Gas Fireplace â&#x20AC;˘  No Stairs

 Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x17E;[Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;

Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;[Ĺ&#x;

  Call   for more information!

JOSH SAND



Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x17E;[Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x;



 sparky@nemont.net â&#x20AC;˘ P:406-228-8333  

 

64)7

64)7

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Find out more about our advocacy efforts and education programs at:

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FARM FARM & &RANCH RANCH

October 2018 October 2018

Max Baucus CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5 remembering that in dealing with China, the U.S. is dealing with a polar opposite form of government. In China, the communist party controls everything from the press to the markets. The party knows what levers to pull and what buttons to push to keep their people happy. The former Ambassador says there is a Faustian bargain in that country: if the people are happy, with their jobs and HFRQRP\WKH\ZRQÂśWTXHVWLRQWKHOHJLWLPDF\ of the party or government. They have total FRQWUROWRÂżJKW$PHULFDLQDWUDGHZDUJLYLQJ them an advantage, at least in the short term. ,Q$PHULFDLIIDUPHUVFDQÂśWVHOOWKHLUFURSV they will demand changes. But in China, if the SHRSOHDUHQÂśWKDSS\WKHJRYHUQPHQWKDVWKH ability to make them happy. The Chinese government wants their economy to keep growing, to keep their people happy, and to do so, they want to deal with the 86EXWWKH\ZDQWFRRSHUDWLRQ7KH\GRQÂśW ZDQWDWUDGHZDUEXWWKH\DOVRZRQÂśWEHSXVKHG around. Baucus points to history to understand the position of the Chinese government, going back to when China was an empire, to losing stature in the world and facing what they saw as humiliation and domination from other nations. The country is back, they have grown so much in a short period of time, and are very proud of who they are, with good reason. â&#x20AC;&#x153;China may be prouder of China than the U.S. is proud of the U.S.,â&#x20AC;? explained Baucus. On the U.S. side, the American public remains quite proud of its own unique history and institutions. Ambassador Baucus points out the upcoming midterm elections will have a direct impact on how the trade dispute plays out and how long it may take to see progress. China will wait to see if Republicans win elections and negotiations may depend on who gets elected stateside. But he cautions, after HOHFWLRQVLWWDNHVDZKLOHIRUHOHFWHGRIÂżFLDOV

Max Baucus to settle in and establish policy. He does, however, see this as an opportunity to advocate for improving American foreign policy. Pointing to the strength and depth of knowledge regarding Europe and Russia, and the corresponding presence in those regions, he states the U.S. is relatively weak on China. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Americans need to know and understand

COURTESY PHOTO / FOR FARM & RANCH

China better than we do.â&#x20AC;? Baucus maintains that enacting tariffs will hurt American workers and farmers. Further, a continuation or escalation of the trade dispute risks losing global markets. The U.S. has already lost a portion of the soybean market to Brazil. The Ambassador stresses that once a PDUNHWLVORVWLWLVGLIÂżFXOWWRJHWLWEDFN0RQ-

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com tanans may remember the pain of losing the Chinese barley market forever. Baucus uses WKH KLVWRULFDO H[DPSOH RI 3UHVLGHQW &DUWHUÂśV grain embargo against the Soviet Union as one example of the long-reaching effects of poor trade policy. Baucus warns that China will go elsewhere for their import needs. Indeed, the same day Baucus spoke with the Courier7LPHUHSRUWHGWKDW&KLQHVHRIÂżFLDOV at the annual meeting of the U.S. soybean export group in Kansas City, Mo., laid out how they plan to avoid the intended consequences of the trade dispute. Beyond looking to other countries, such as Brazil, for their soybeans, the Chinese will look to Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan as sources for alternative crops, VXFKDVSDOPPLOOUDSHVHHGVXQĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVHHG and other crops. In Montana, President of the Montana Grain Growers Association Michelle Erickson-Jones expressed frustration over the markets and the trade situation. Financial estimates from the organization for market losses due to the tariffs came down at 75 cents per bushel, while the aid package offered by the Trump administration is only offering wheat farmers up to 14 cents per bushel. She also noted China KDVQÂśW SXUFKDVHG DQ\ ZKHDW IURP 0RQWDQD since March. Baucus maintains the longer Trump pursues these tariffs, the more they hurt U.S. workers and farmers. Tariffs increase taxes on Americans. He points out America is not a mercantilist nation. There is an expectation for IDLUGHDOVDQGOHYHOSOD\LQJÂżHOGV$QGIDUPHUV would much prefer to sell their products over relying on federal assistance. Despite the hopes of American farmers and workers that there will be resolution soon to alleviate market concerns, the current situation here and abroad points to many more months of bluster and negotiations. Yet, Baucus is not FRPSOHWHO\GLVFRXUDJHGÂł,ÂśPDOZD\VKRSHIXO DOZD\VRSWLPLVWLFEXWULJKWQRZWRGD\,ÂśP not seeing anything out of China to indicate an end to this.â&#x20AC;?

Deadly Nightshade: Growing Concern Around Poisonous Weed A.J. ETHERINGTON FOR FARM & RANCH

COURESY PHOTO FROM NORTH CAROLINA EXTENSION OFFICE FOR THE FARM & RANCH

Pictured are the bell-like purple flowers and large bright berries, which are indicators of "deadly" Nightshade. Each portion of the plant; stem, leaf, and berry; are poisonous and have the potential to be deadly if ingested. Harm can be done to animals, pets, livestock and especially children.

Although less of an issue on pasturelands and in the country, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deadlyâ&#x20AC;? 1LJKWVKDGH $WURSD EHOODGRQQD  KDV EHcome a growing concern in urban areas of Northeast Montana, and its poisonous nature poses a risk to adults, children, pets, animals and in some cases livestock. According to Shelley Mills with the MSU-Extension Office in Glasgow, Mont., the weed has been spread as a contaminant in bird seed. This relation to bird feeders has made it a mostly urban issue,

at present, with the ability to spread. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is becoming more and more of a problem,â&#x20AC;? explained Mills adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the entirety of the plant is poisonous and deadly to include the leaves, stems and berries.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you have small children you need to get rid of it,â&#x20AC;? stated Mills. However, HUDGLFDWLQJ QLJKWVKDGH FDQ EH GLIÂżFXOW According to Mills, if you spray it you will likely kill every broadleaf plant in the area. The best method to get rid of the plant is to dig it out, but Mills cautioned WKDWURXWHFDQEHGLIÂżFXOWDVWKHSODQWLVD broad and extensive root system. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dig it out, but you need to get the

whole root system or it will just grow back,â&#x20AC;? said Mills before adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;And wear gloves.â&#x20AC;? Even if not ingested, nightshade can cause irritation to the skin. The poison in nightshade, alkaloid solanine, ZRUNVE\FDXVLQJJDVWURLQWHVWLQDOLQĂ&#x20AC;DPmation and is potentially deadly to people and animals. The plant is recognizable for its attractiveness. Flowers are purple and it produces cherry-sized deep colored berULHV7KRVHEHUULHVFRQWULEXWHWRWKHSODQWVÂś spread as the non-indigenous plant attracts birds to eat the berries who then spread the seeds.

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Former Ambassador Baucus Talks China and Trade GWENDOLYNE HONRUD FOR FARM & RANCH In light of the ongoing trade dispute with China, the Courier arranged an interview with former Ambassador to China and Senator from Montana, Max Baucus. This interview was conducted an the afternoon of Sept, 4, the day federal aid became available to farmers impacted by the trade dispute. Max Baucus served as ambassador to China from February, 2014, through January, 2017, when the new administration installed their own appointment, which had him in China during the presidential election. During the administrative changeover Ambassador Baucus remained on the ground, giving him a unique opportunity to witness reactions from Chinese JRYHUQPHQWRIÂżFLDOVDQGJDXJHKRZWKHFRXQWU\PLJKWUHDFWWR$PHULFDÂśVQHZWUDGHSROLF\ The Ambassador speaks of the Chinese with respect, noting that Americans tend to think of themselves as very intelligent, perhaps more so than other cultures or countries. But, that type of thinking can be detrimental in underestimating the intellect of our global competitors. He says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Chinese are just as intelligent as us, and may be even more driven and focused.â&#x20AC;? This drive and focus allowed them, in responding to U.S. tariffs, to strategically target their retaliation on areas of America which supported President Trump, in a clear effort to make him feel more political pain, according to Baucus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;China is quite sophisticated about the American political process, and are becoming more so, even by the month.â&#x20AC;? Baucus described watching the growing understanding of WKHJRYHUQPHQWRIÂżFLDOVGXULQJWKHFDPSDLJQ season, how he could see the sophistication and knowledge growing month by month. In particular, when discussing what the United 6WDWHVÂśWUDGHSROLF\PLJKWORRNOLNHXQGHUWKH differing potential nominees, the Chinese grew PXFKPRUHVSHFLÂżFLQWKHLULQTXLULHV Baucus told the Courier he has two major SUREOHPVZLWK7UXPSÂśVDSSURDFKWRQHJRWLDtions with China. First, China is a protectionist QDWLRQZKLFKPDNHVLWGLIÂżFXOWIRU$PHULFDQ businesses in China. The Ambassador stresses the point, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enacting tariffs does not get to the heart of the problem, which is Chinese protectionist policies.â&#x20AC;? These unfair practices include intellectual property theft, currency manipulation, forcing businesses to turn over patented technology as a condition for doing business in China, and taking advantage of American businesses through manipulations of permits and approvals. Baucus states, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tariffs are not going to force China to back off pursuing economic growth.â&#x20AC;? As to his second concern, Baucus says the

administration cannot go about this unilaterDOO\ WKH 86 FDQQRWGR WKLVDORQH7UXPSÂśV approach has discombobulated the Chinese, which may work in business, as outlined in The Art of the Deal, but Baucus opines it does not work well with countries. He says the President likes a big splash and strong statements, but that he may have overstated his position. 3UHVLGHQW7UXPSZLOOÂżQGLWGLIÂżFXOWWREDFN down and save face. At the same time, the Chinese will also need to save face and will ÂżQGLWVLPLODUO\GLIÂżFXOWWRGHHVFDODWHÂł:HÂśUH not going to bully China. China is not going to bully us,â&#x20AC;? Baucus says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to work with our allies, in concert, cooperatively. We need to stand together to encourage change.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think Donald Trump is wrong with his America First policy, which is disengagement from international affairs, especially international economic affairs. We should lead,â&#x20AC;? asserts Baucus. He cited the decision to withdraw IURP WKH7UDQV3DFLÂżF 3DUWQHUVKLS 733  DV an example. Ambassador Baucus believes the 733WREHRQHRI$PHULFDÂśVPRVWLPSRUWDQW deals, showing that the United States would be present in the world. He asserts that when we pulled out of an agreement that improved standards of trade and labor production, the U.S. signaled to China and to Asia at large that we are disengaging and that withdrawal OHIWDYRLGZKLFK&KLQDLVQRZÂżOOLQJ&KLQD is attempting to convince other countries that the U.S. is an unreliable trading partner, where they are offering stability to potential allies. Baucus played a lead role in the creation of TPP during his time in the Senate and staunchly believes in the necessity of the 12-nation agreement between allies, â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a big mistake to pull out of TPP. I think we QHHGWRUHQHJRWLDWH733,GRQÂśWFDUHZKDWLWÂśV called. The President could call it Trump PP for all the name matters. But the deal is good for $PHULFDDQGLWÂśVJRRGIRUWKHZRUOG´ Asked if he sees anything coming out of China right now as a cause for optimism, Ambassador Baucus says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not really, not yet.â&#x20AC;? In his view, the Chinese are befuddled and perplexed by Trump, which leads them to hesitate in regards to negotiations. They see the President changing positions, a split between what he says and what his administration says on trade and foreign policy. Baucus believes they will wait until after the midterm elections to see what effect will be had on U.S. policies, but that even after that, they will dig their heels in. He notes the Chinese are a proud people who play long ball. They are visionary and patient, even more so than the U.S. They KDYHDVWUDWHJLFSODQDQGZHGRQÂśW$QGWKH\ know that. Baucus highlighted the importance of See MAX BAUCUS Page 8

October 2018 October 2018

5 5

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October November & December 2018 Schedule

October 2018 Thursday

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Thursday

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Dunbar Bros. & Friends 12th Annual Bred Heifer Auction, Galpin Angus Bull & Heifer Calves, Feeder Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

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Feeder Special Featuring Red Angus Influence Feeders & All Class Cattle Auction

November 2018 Thursday

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All Class Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

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All Class Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

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Angus Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

Math Farms Annual Bull and Female Auction. Selling 100 18-month old Angus bulls and 100 Angus Bred Heifers. Sale starts at 1 p.m.

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)BQQZ5IBOLTHJWJOHo/P"VDUJPO

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All Class Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

December 2018 Thursday

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Big December Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

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Annual Stock Cow & Bred Heifer Special & All Class Cattle Auction.

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Last All Class Cattle Auction of 2018

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Merry Christmas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; No Auction

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The Month in Weather: September Transition to Fall

was also recorded on Sept. 3, at 38 mph. As of press date, per the National Weather Service in Glasgow, the highest observed temSeptember tends to be a month of change perature for the month was 89 degrees on both for Montana. Both astronomical and meteoro- Sept. 3 and 10, and the lowest was 34 on Sept. logical fall began this month, and it sure began 21. The total liquid precipitation reported at to feel as such by the end of the month. The Glasgow was 1.14â&#x20AC;?, which was approximately ÂżUVWKDOIRI6HSWHPEHUVHHPHGWREHDFRQWLQX- 0.4â&#x20AC;? above normal. Over a 24-hour period, the ation of August, with warm temperatures and greatest precipitation total was 0.73â&#x20AC;?, which dry conditions. By around mid-month, a large occurred on Sept. 20. The overall mean temchange in the weather patterns over the region perature for the month was approximately 59 EURXJKWWHPSHUDWXUHVVLJQLÂżFDQWO\ORZHUWKDQ degrees, which was approximately 1 degree WKH ÂżUVW KDOI RI WKH PRQWK 7KHUH ZDV DOVR below normal. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor was VLJQLÂżFDQWO\ PRUH UDLQIDOO WKDQ 6HSWHPEHUÂśV released on Sept. 27. Abnormally dry conÂżUVWKDOI /RRNLQJIRUZDUGWRZDUGV2FWREHUFRQÂż- ditions continue for much of the area. Since dence in the trends for both temperatures and the last release on Sept. 20, there was some precipitation across northeast Montana again improvement in northern Phillips County and are mostly low. The Climate Prediction Center the northwestern corner of Valley County, forecast for October lays out equal chances for which eliminated the severe drought claseither above-or below-normal precipitation, VLÂżFDWLRQ0RGHUDWHGURXJKWVWLOOFRQWLQXHV and equal chances for both above-and below- for much of Phillips and Valley Counties, as well as southwestern Roosevelt County. normal temperatures. 7KH 86 'URXJKW 0RQLWRUÂśV UHSRUWLQJ Now looking back at September, as of press date, 13 days in the month saw at least feature offers producers an opportunity to a trace of reported precipitation, and two submit drought impact and condition reports. days saw at least a tenth of an inch of ac- The report allows producers to provide a cumulated precipitation. As for winds, six written description of drought impacts on days saw sustained winds greater than 25 livelihood, activities and are able to submit mph, and 16 days with winds greater than images that document the drought and its 20 mph. The highest sustained wind was impacts. To report drought conditions in reported at 31 mph and occurred on both the area, visit droughtreporter.unl.edu/subSept. 3 and 12, and the highest wind gust mitreport. MICHELLE BIGELBACH FOR FARM & RANCH

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The state of the Angus state Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com An on-going lawsuit among cattlemen organizations and international tariff uncertainties are creating some uncertainty in the future of the state’s cattle industry, but Angus breeders have a big bright spot on the horizon. While producers at the Montana Angus Tour said cattle prices are decent this fall, they could be better should a few more points factors fall their way. Kathy Creighton-Smith, Montana Angus Association's representative on the Montana

Beef Council Board of Directors, talked during the Angus association’s annual meeting about the status of the R-CALF USA lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Beef Checkoff program takes $1 per head of cattle sold at market and that money is used to promote beef through education, research and promotion. Half of every dollar collected stays in the state in which the cattle were sold and the allocation of that money is overseen by that state’s beef council. Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, United Stockgrowers of America — or R-CALF USA — filed a lawsuit in spring of 2016 question-

ing the fact that half of the $1-per-head beef checkoff fee is given to the privately incorporated Montana Beef Council. Among R-CALF’s lawsuit claims is that the beef council has as members packing plants owned by foreign countries, therefore a foreign entity is being given a say over how taxpayer dollars are spent administered by a private corporation. The Montana Beef Council, Creighton-Smith said, on a normal year collects around $1.6 million in checkoff payments, and prior to the lawsuit that gave the Montana Beef Council $800,000 for activities in the state. The council, she added, also shared some of the money with

other beef councils that didn’t make as much, and to states among the seven that don’t have beef councils. Recent action by R-CALF has included another 13 state beef councils in the lawsuit. Since the suit, the only checkoff dollars the Montana Beef Council can receive, she said, are those from producers who have signed a consent form. “So instead of having $800,000 to promote beef we had $200,000. As it looks, we are spending our retained earnings to keep going, and Montana Beef Council will not exist after a certain amount of time because there will be no

Tour: History of performance is one of the market price drivers ■ Continued from page 6 nally meant to be.” So much emphasis is placed on the bull

market, largely because breeding can be a tough business for bulls, which are subject

to injury during the hormone-charged breeding seasons and a lot of wear-and-tear from miles walked among the herd during breeding, Houtzel said. “Another problem is that, after a while, if breeders are keeping replacement heifers then the bull becomes a liability because you don’t want to line breed,” he said, so the bulls are sold or butchered and replacements purchased. Houtzel said that some young bulls will sell for higher, but the average price range in the current market is $3,000 to $5,000. Part of what drives the market price for the sellers is a history of performance. “The best tool is the guys that are buying

the bulls,” Houtzel said. “If they’re working for them, they’ll keep coming back, and if they aren’t working for ’em, and big problems arise, then they’ll go elsewhere.” “You still have to have a good eye for cattle you, gotta know how to feed and raise and manage cattle, the data is an important part but there’s more to it than that,” Moczygemba said. Practical attention to these details is what helps improve the breed. “Typically black Angus will be the higher selling cattle. Buyers will look for that,” Davis said. “Buyers will look for reputation of herd, history, performance in the feedlot.”

www.havredailynews.com Peterson said. Montana breeds, registers and sells the most black Angus cattle of anywhere else in the world, several producers said, and that’s not an off-the-cuff brag. “Montana is our largest state as far as number of registrations goes, not largest number of members, but number of cattle registered, so it’s a very important state withing the association’s hierarchy,” Allen Moczygemba, CEO of American Angus Association, said before the annual state meeting. Among the 41 state Angus associations, with their 25,000 members in the U.S. and Canada, Montana’s is the oldest tour. “There is a long storied history here,” Moczygemba added. The tour, which runs in a rotation through the Montana Angus Association’s seven districts, took 200 registered attendees from 17 states and two provinces on nine stops which showcased bulls, cows, heifers and calves from 20 breeders, includig Peterson Grain and Cattle, Whistling Winds Angus, Milk River Genetics, South Boulder Angus Ranch, Baltrusch Angus Ranch, Nissen Angus, Schmitt Angus, MY Angus, Bar 9 Ranch, 4 Butte Cattle Co., Clear Creek Angus, Top Notch Angus, North Fork Angus, Shipwheel Cattle Co., Hould Angus, Louie Petrie Ranch, KelMcC Angus, Math Farms, Score Angus, C Bar Angus and Hinman Angus. The event also attracted local cattle producers as well as neighbors, family and friends beyond those who signed up for the tour and invited sponsors, said board mem-

FARM & RANCH

October 2018

3

ber Klint Swanson, owner of Shipwheel Cattle Co. with his wife, Lori who coordinated the tour this year. He added that the dinner they held Sept. 19 at their ranch south of Chinook saw around 400 attendees. Amy Van Dyke-Crowder, executive a d m i n i s t ra to r fo r M o n ta n a A n g u s Association, said the 2019 tour will be in Missoula, Sept. 17-19, and will take in the Mission Valley, Bitterroot Valley and an area toward Drummond, all in the western region. Some of the ranches visited on the tours are flagship ranches that have been a part of the state’s cattle industry for many years or even generations, Van Dyke-Crowder said, but some of them are up-and-coming breeders, including several who participated in the north-central tour this year. “That was good to see,” she said, adding that no matter how long the breeder has been in business, “a lot can change in seven years, even in the cattle industry including breeder new bloodlines and such.”

Havre Daily News/Pam Burke Producers of registered black Angus cattle, industry partners and guests start to gather for the Montana Angus Association annual banquet held Sept. 18 at Peterson Grain and Cattle north of Havre.

Why Angus Belgrade Angus and past President of American Angus Association Bill Davis, who attended this year’s tour, said the black Angus is the premiere breed across the country with the largest national breed stock association and database of all breeds in world “There are good cattle in all breeds, but the Angus breed has done as much with herd selection tools for performance and carcass and tracking important traits,” he

said, adding that the data, including information such as birth and weaning weights, carcass information and more, has been an asset for the growing DNA database, as well. “Most of the primary work done with the genomic companies was done on Angus cattle because we had a database for them to fall back on,” he said. Moczygemba said the database is the more-scientific equivalent to the extensive questionnaire people fill out when they get a

DNA test for ancestry. The database tracks terminal traits on cattle sold to slaughter and maternal traits that measure qualities of the cows’ care for their young, and this information helps pinpoint traits and match them with DNA markers. American Angus Association runs about 160,000 DNA tests annually, he said. The DNA testing gives sellers and buyers 10 t o 3 0 p r o g e ny e q u i va l e n t d a t a ,

■ See Tour Page 6


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Longest running Angus tour in the country comes to north-central Montana

number one state for the Angus breed, so it’s only logical that we do work hand in hand with our land grant university. So consequently, if we’re the leading seed stock state, wouldn’t it logically make sense that our university actually portray that in their animal breeding system as well?” The students, he said, will get hands on knowledge of and experience with the Angus breed before they go out into the real world which is, he said, dominated by Angus. The students will also benefit from networking with breeders and industry allies, direct access to

Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com The 44th Annual Montana Angus Tour came to north-central Montana last month to showcase area breeders of registered black Angus cattle to attendees from across the U.S. and into Canada, as well as giving breeders and cattle industry representatives an opportunity to network. “We’re the kick-off stop,” said Montana Angus Association member Kim Peterson, who is also on the Montana Stockgrowers Association board of directors and patriarch of Peterson Grain and Cattle north of Havre. The Peterson family hosted the first night of the Sept. 18-20 tour, including the Montana Angus Association’s annual membership meeting and banquet. Several Peterson bulls, cows, heifers and calves were on display along with those from Whistling Winds Angus from Hingham. The tour caravaned over three days from Havre to stops north of Havre and south in the Bear Paw Mountains, Turner to the north and east to Malta. Though the associations members, industry partners and guests got to see some of the facilities, “it’s mostly about the cattle,”

Havre Daily News/Pam Burke Kathy Creighton-Smith talks about the status of Montana Beef Council during the Montana Angus Association annual meeting hosted at Peterson Grain and Cattle north of Havre Sept. 18.

Havre Daily News/Pam Burke People on the 44th Annual Montana Angus Tour look over a herd of registered black Angus cattle at the embryo transfer business, Milk River Genetics, east of Havre Sept. 19. The Montana Angus Tour, the longest running Angus tour in the U.S., alternates locations around the seven Montana Angus Association regions each year. This year's north-central region tour, Sept. 18-20, showed attendees registered Angus across the area from Havre and Hingham to Chinook, the Bear Paw Mountains, Turnner and Malta.

more money,” Creighton-Smith said. She asked Montana Angus members to help spread the word to remind producers to sign the consent forms to keep the Montana Beef Council solvent until the lawsuit can be resolved. —— Two major economic opportunities for Montana cattle producers seem to be stalled out, at least for the moment. The deal being made with Montana Stockgrowers Association at the helm to sell Montana cattle to China is on hold until the tariff war is settled, and this seems to have put the proposed meat packing plant in Belt on the back burner as well. Bryan Ratzburg, owner of Bobcat Angus in Galata and member of the Montana Stockgrowers board, speaking as a private cattle producer and not on behalf of the Stockgrowers said “It’s all on hold because of the tariffs with the Chinese.” “Nothing’s going to happen on the Stockgrower’s deal until Trump gets the tariffs” straightened out,” he said, adding that there are no signs on the immediate horizon of this getting resolved, “but judging from Trump’s history it will get done.” The same problem has stalled out the meat packing plant, he said, which seems not to have garnered much significant opposition in the state. “It’ll be interesting when those lift. I think things will start rolling again,” he said. He and other producers at the Angus Tour said they saw huge potential if the meat packing plant and its needed feedlots got going. “We’re going to have to come up with a lot of animals to keep those full,” he added. If meat packing plant goes through, it will be a benefit not just to beef side, Darrell Stevenson, a board member for the Montana Angus Association, said, but especially to the feed grain industry which will have to produce enough feed for the beef, pork and lamb the facility expects to process. “Economically it could be a driver for all of the ag industry,” he added. —— A boon specifically to the Montana Angus producers, as well as the ag students at Montana State University in Bozeman, is a memorandum of understanding between Montana Angus Association and MSU to estab-

lish a 50-head herd of purebred black Angus cows on the university’s Bozeman Agricultural Research and Teaching Farm. “The Montana State University herd and the Extension herd have no Angus influence at this time,” Stevenson said, “whereas the Montana Angus Association and the breed — this is the seed stock capital of the world.” “Twenty percent of all Angus bulls sold in the United States as recorded by the American Angus Association are sold from Montana — one out of five bulls in the United States,” he added. “We are number one for registration, number one for performance data. We are the

October 2018

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their experience, as well as internship possibilities with these people and organizations. The program will have access to the extensive American Angus Association database system, he said, and a five-member advisory council of Montana Angus Association members will be formed to help with the process and to create a longterm connection between the students and the industry. “I think it’s in the best case for the students,” he said, “to actually have fair exposure and practice with the dominant breed of the beef industry.”


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