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12 May 2014 12 2014 May 2014 12May

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SageGrouse Grouse Sage CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11

National FFA Scholarships Awarded Local Students National FFA Scholarships Awarded to to Local Students

The National FFA Organization awarded $2,000 John Deere Company/Farm The National FFA Organization awarded $2,000 John Deere Company/Farm Equipment Sales, Inc. scholarships to 4 local students. These scholarships Equipment Sales, Inc. scholarships to 4 local students. These scholarships are from and John Deere Company through a special are from and John Deere Company through a special project of the National FFA Foundation. project of the National FFA Foundation.

the large birds an almost regal look to their the large birds an almost regal look to their surroundings. surroundings. The plan that awaits a signature for the The plan that awaits a signature for the CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 state of Montana might bring controversy to state of Montana might bring controversy to developing industry and challenges to farmers tion, in Northeastern Montana there seems to developing industry and challenges to farmers tion, in Northeastern Montana there seems to looking to expand their croplands. While the be a cohesion of agencies and land owners looking to expand their croplands. While the be a cohesion of agencies and land owners issues seem complex, there is simplicity in the looking for answers to protect the bird and issues seem complex, there is simplicity in the looking for answers to protect the bird and life of the bird that has caused a lot of attenkeep them of the endangered species list. life of the bird that has caused a lot of attenkeep them of the endangered species list. While no answer may be swift and sure, Landowners, like Stoneberg, might get up tion.tion. While no answer may be swift and sure, Landowners, like Stoneberg, might get up the minds of many working at daybreak to go look at what may be a rare the minds of many havehave beenbeen working on aon a at daybreak to go look at what may be a rare permanent solution. sight to much of the world. Through binocupermanent solution. sight to much of the world. Through binocu“Working landowners be crucial standing a gravel he can “Working withwith landowners will will be crucial larslars standing on aon gravel roadroad he can keepkeep a a in the future,” Henry said. “It’s the bigger count of the populations near his ranch. Listencount of the populations near his ranch. Listen- in the future,” Henry said. “It’s the bigger picture.” watching mating ritual gives picture.” ing ing andand watching the the mating ritual thatthat gives

Brady Johnson of the Hinsdale FFA. Brady Johnson of the Hinsdale HSHS FFA. Johnson plans to use the funds to pursue a degree Johnson plans to use the funds to pursue a degree at at Montana State University -Bozeman. Montana State University -Bozeman. Nicole Kirby Medicine Lake FFA. Nicole Kirby of of thethe Medicine Lake HSHS FFA. Kirby plans to use the funds to pursue a degree Kirby plans to use the funds to pursue a degree at at Miles Community College (MT). Miles Community College (MT). Haley Lund Divide FFA. Haley Lund of of thethe Divide Co Co HSHS FFA. Lund plans to use the funds to pursue a degree Lund plans to use the funds to pursue a degree at at University of North Dakota. University of North Dakota. Ciara Sorum Divide FFA. Ciara Sorum of of thethe Divide Co Co HSHS FFA. Sorum plans to use the funds to pursue a degree Sorum plans to use the funds to pursue a degree at at Williston State College (ND). Williston State College (ND). These scholarships of 1,781 awarded through National Organization’s These scholarships areare 4 of4 1,781 awarded through the the National FFAFFA Organization’s scholarship program year. Currently, sponsors contribute more scholarship program thisthis year. Currently, 126126 sponsors contribute more thanthan $2.2 million to support scholarships students. years, scholarships $2.2 million to support scholarships for for students. For For 30 30 years, scholarships havehave been made available through funding secured by the National Foundation. been made available through funding secured by the National FFAFFA Foundation. This generous funding comes from individuals, businesses corporate sponsors This generous funding comes from individuals, businesses andand corporate sponsors to encourage excellence enable students to pursue their educational goals. to encourage excellence andand enable students to pursue their educational goals. Scholarship recipients were selected from 6,315 applicants across country. Scholarship recipients were selected from 6,315 applicants fromfrom across the the country. Selections were based applicant's leadership, academic record, other Selections were based on on thethe applicant's leadership, academic record, FFAFFA andand other school community activities, supervised agricultural or work experience school andand community activities, supervised agricultural or work experience in agricultural education future goals. in agricultural education andand future goals. National Organization provides leadership, personal growth career TheThe National FFAFFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth andand career success training through agricultural education to 579,678 student members success training through agricultural education to 579,678 student members in in grades 7- 12 belong to one of 7,570 local chapters throughout U.S., grades 7- 12 whowho belong to one of 7,570 local FFAFFA chapters throughout the the U.S., Puerto Rico Virgin Islands. Puerto Rico andand thethe Virgin Islands.

About National Organization About National FFAFFA Organization

National Organization is a national organization of 579,678 student members as of part of 7,570 FFA chapters The The National FFA FFA Organization is a national youthyouth organization of 579,678 student members as part 7,570 local local FFA chapters allstates, 50 states, Puerto andVirgin the Virgin Islands. The mission FFA mission to make a positive difference the of lives of students in allin50 Puerto RicoRico and the Islands. The FFA is to is make a positive difference in theinlives students by developing potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. by developing theirtheir potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. The The National Organization operates a federal charter granted by81st the 81st United Congress it is an integral National FFA FFA Organization operates underunder a federal charter granted by the United StatesStates Congress and itand is an integral part part of public instruction in agriculture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction foras FFA of public instruction in agriculture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction for FFA a as a service to state and local agricultural education programs. For more, visitNational the National FFA Organization at FFA.org, service to state and local agricultural education programs. For more, visit the FFA Organization onlineonline at FFA.org, on on Facebook, Twitter and offi thecial offiNational cial National FFA Organization Facebook, Twitter and the FFA Organization blog.blog.

Sage SageGrouse GrouseComplexities Complexities

About National FFAFFA Foundation About National Foundation

The The National FFA FFA Foundation builds partnerships with with industry, education, government, otherother foundations and individuals National Foundation builds partnerships industry, education, government, foundations and individuals to secure financial resources that that recognize FFA member achievements, develop student leaders and support the future of to secure financial resources recognize FFA member achievements, develop student leaders and support the future of agricultural education. Governed by a by 19-member boardboard of trustees comprised of educators, business leaders, individual donors agricultural education. Governed a 19-member of trustees comprised of educators, business leaders, individual donors and and FFA FFA alumni, the foundation is a separately-registered nonprofi t organization. AboutAbout 82 percent of every dollardollar received by theby the alumni, the foundation is a separately-registered nonprofi t organization. 82 percent of every received foundation supports FFA members and agricultural education opportunities. foundation supports FFA members and agricultural education opportunities. For more, visit visit FFA.org/Give. For more, FFA.org/Give.

BoxBox 31 31 1-866-528-2141 1-866-528-2141 Glasgow, MTMT 59230 CellCell Glasgow, 59230 406-236-1577 406-236-1577 406-228-2141 406-228-4144 FaxFax 406-228-2141 406-228-4144 www.hilineford.com www.hilineford.com

In Glasgow In Glasgow 54275 HWYHWY 2 East 54275 2 East Glasgow, MT 59230 Glasgow, MT 59230 406-228-2496 406-228-2496

In Plentywood In Culbertson In Plentywood In Culbertson 804804 EastEast 1st Ave 21 West 2nd 2nd St. St. 1st Ave 21 West Plentywood, MT 59254 MT 59218 Plentywood, MT 59254 Culbertson, Culbertson, MT 59218 406-765-1531 406-787-6201 406-765-1531 406-787-6201

In Circle In Circle Hwy Hwy 200 200 East East Circle, MT 59215 Circle, MT 59215 406-485-2145 406-485-2145

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YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH – YOUR AG AG MONTHLY. YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH – YOUR MONTHLY.

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1. Be aware of the agencies and resources 1. Be aware of the agencies and resources available in your community - what services available in your community - what services they offer and what their limitations are. they offer and what their limitations are. Listen for2014 signs and symptoms that May Listen for2014 signs and symptoms that May 2222.2.person May the or 2014 family needs help which you the person or family needs help which you can’t provide, i.e., ďŹ nancial, legal or personal can’t provide, i.e., ďŹ nancial, legal or personal counseling. counseling. 3. Assess what agency or community re3. Assess what agency or community resource would be most appropriate to address source would be most appropriate to address the person’s (or family’s) problems. the person’s (or family’s) problems. 4. Discuss the referral with the person or 4. Discuss the referral with the person or family (“It sounds/looks like you are feeling family (“It sounds/looks like you are feeling _____. I think _____ could help you deal with _____. I think _____ could help you deal with your situation.â€?) your situation.â€?) 5. Explore the individual’s or family’s will5. Explore the individual’s or family’s will-

r o r F o s F Us lll U a p l o C a p r o C C r see C p l u s l P u r ur P d C o p r o u o C Y r o Y e Seeed l i S l O i & O riceess & Pric P

• Who will be the person for you to contact • Who will be the person for you to contact later if necessary? later if necessary? Hi-Line • What will be the cost of the service (at • What will be the costHi-Line ofHi-Line the service (at fee/sliding scale)? fee/sliding scale)? • Do you need to do anything else to com• Do you need to do anything else to complete the referral? plete the referral? 7. Make sure the person or family and refer7. Make sure the person or family and referral agency connect and get together. Make one ral agency connect and get together. Make one or more follow-up contacts with the agency if or more follow-up contacts with the agency if called for by the situation. called for by the situation. Roubie Younkin, an MSU Extension Roubie Younkin, an MSU Extension agent in Valley County, compiled this reagent in Valley County, compiled this report from Extension sources. She can be port from Extension sources. She can be reached at (406)228-6239 or ryounkin@ reached at (406)228-6239 or ryounkin@ valleycountymt.net. valleycountymt.net.

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11 11 11

May 2014 2014 May May 2014

Sage Grouse Grouse Sage CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

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t'FSUJMJ[FS • t'FSUJMJ[FS Grain Feed Seed Fertilizer t"H$IFNJDBMT ••t"H$IFNJDBMT Fertilizer Glasgow Stockyards, Stockyards, Inc. Inc. Glasgow Ag Chemicals Chemicals t1FUSPMFVN ••t1FUSPMFVN Ag Linda & Mark Nielsen, S A âœŻ Linda & Mark Nielsen, 2014 Petroleum S A Owners âœŻ 2014 t#VZJOH ••t#VZJOH Petroleum Owners P L Iva Murch, Manager Iva Murch, Manager Spring // Summer Summer L F 68PY ! 263-7529 Spring ••DeanBuying Buying & .FSDIBOEJTJOH(SBJO 263-7529 F 68 Y ! Barnes, Yard Manager & .FSDIBOEJTJOH(SBJO Dean Barnes, Yard Manager Schedule 1946 - 2014 263-1175 Schedule 1946 - 2014 Merchandising Grain 263-1175 t"HSPOPNJTU4FSWJDFT Ed Hinton, Auctioneer Merchandising Grain t"HSPOPNJTU4FSWJDFT Ed Hinton, Auctioneer May –– June June –– July July 783-7285 May 783-7285 •• Agronomist Agronomist Services Services June 2014 May 2014 May 2014

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In Glasgow see In Plentywood see In Culbertson see In Circle see In Glasgow see In Plentywood see In Culbertson In Circle Sheena, Derrick, or Danielle Bob, Darvin, or Dennis Todd or Kylesee Justin, Dustinsee or Kyle Sheena, Derrick, or Danielle Bob, Darvin, or Dennis Todd or Kyle Justin, Dustin or Kyle 54275 HWY 2 East 804 East 1st Ave. 21 West 2nd St. Hwy 200 East 54275 HWY East 804 East 1st 21 West 2nd Hwy 200 East Glasgow, MT.259230 Plentywood, MT.Ave. 59254 Culbertson, MT. St. 59218 Circle, MT 59215 Glasgow, MT. 59230 Plentywood, MT. 59254 Culbertson, MT. 59218 Circle, MT 59215 1-406-228-2496 1-406-765-1531 1-406-787-6201 1-406-485-2145 1-406-228-2496 1-406-765-1531 1-406-787-6201 1-406-485-2145

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 “In the state of Montana, 64 percent of sage “In the state of Montana, 64 percent of sage grouse are on private lands, around 7 percent grouse are on private lands, around 7 percent are on state lands,� Wightman said. are on state lands,� Wightman said. The plan that many people from different The plan that many people from different agencies, appointed by the governor, has finally agencies, appointed by the governor, has finally been drafted and has been waiting on the final been drafted and has been waiting on the final approval and signature of Gov. Bullock. Wightapproval and signature of Gov. Bullock. Wightman said the idea of the plan is to allow some man said the idea of the plan is to allow some authority to help with the issues of the sage authority to help with the issues of the sage grouse, one of those being the loss of habitat. grouse, one of those being the loss of habitat. Some of the loss is from crop land developSome of the loss is from crop land development, and other areas from gas and oil development, and other areas from gas and oil development in Montana. Areas like Nevada have lost ment in Montana. Areas like Nevada have lost much of the habitat due to heavy fire seasons. much of the habitat due to heavy fire seasons. John Carlson, who is a native of Glasgow John Carlson, who is a native of Glasgow and works for the Beauru of Land Manageand works for the Beauru of Land Management (BLM), explained that a lot of public ment (BLM), explained that a lot of public comments and groundwork went into the plan comments and groundwork went into the plan that went to the governor’s office. Carlson that went to the governor’s office. Carlson is a biologist who has watched the birds. He is a biologist who has watched the birds. He explained that the birds like open country and explained that the birds like open country and very little disturbances. The need for sagebrush very little disturbances. The need for sagebrush is imperative for their survival. is imperative for their survival. “We need to figure out ways to work “We need to figure out ways to work cooperatively,� Carlson said. “Grazing land cooperatively,� Carlson said. “Grazing land compatible with sage grouse and looking for compatible with sage grouse and looking for good land management practices.� good land management practices.� Carlson explained that currently energy Carlson explained that currently energy development was causing more issues locally development was causing more issues locally and that the unique bird often leaves areas with and that the unique bird often leaves areas with disturbances in the landscape. The birds tend disturbances in the landscape. The birds tend to fluctuate a lot on their own depending on to fluctuate a lot on their own depending on weather and reproduction season. Carlson feels weather and reproduction season. Carlson feels that what is going on in the local area with the that what is going on in the local area with the cooperation of BLM, FWP and land owners cooperation of BLM, FWP and land owners has already helped to protect what is already has already helped to protect what is already here in Northeastern Montana. He explained here in Northeastern Montana. He explained that the area is one of the best grassland bird that the area is one of the best grassland bird complexes in North America. complexes in North America. “Many of the landowners are proud to have “Many of the landowners are proud to have this bird on their land,� Carlson said. this bird on their land,� Carlson said. While the plan hasn’t been signed or finalWhile the plan hasn’t been signed or finalized, it could mean an extra few steps in develized, it could mean an extra few steps in development. Building projects might need to be reopment. Building projects might need to be reviewed before a permit is released. This might viewed before a permit is released. This might limit new structures on landscape. Wightman limit new structures on landscape. Wightman explained that much of the private landowners explained that much of the private landowners wouldn’t necessarily be effected. The might wouldn’t necessarily be effected. The might look at an area of impact and require developlook at an area of impact and require developers to reclaim areas to ensure habitat is restored ers to reclaim areas to ensure habitat is restored or replaced after a disturbance. The plan would or replaced after a disturbance. The plan would allow Montana to keep management authority allow Montana to keep management authority in some areas, and it would show that the state in some areas, and it would show that the state is willing to step up to protect the sage grouse. is willing to step up to protect the sage grouse. “Land owners are also concerned about “Land owners are also concerned about regulation and what might happen if the bird regulation and what might happen if the bird is listed,� Wightman said. “While southern is listed,� Wightman said. “While southern Phillips County and Valley County are some of Phillips County and Valley County are some of the best sage grouse land, the whole West will the best sage grouse land, the whole West will be looked at.� be looked at.� One thing that most likely will not be imOne thing that most likely will not be impacted are the ranchers. Wightman explained pacted are the ranchers. Wightman explained that while grazing posed some concern, the that while grazing posed some concern, the FWP actually feels that grazing is actually FWP actually feels that grazing is actually good for the sage grouse. Currently a research good for the sage grouse. Currently a research project near the Roundup area has been trackproject near the Roundup area has been tracking grazing strategies to help both cattle and ing grazing strategies to help both cattle and

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knowledge, further said that she beliewed FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH knowledge, further said that she beliewed FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH “conservation programs will be a large part What’s going to happen with the Farm “conservation programs will be a large part What’s going to happen with the Farm of the cuts, with reductions in Conservation Bill and the Department of Labor’s overof the cuts, with reductions in Conservation Bill and the Department of Labor’s overReserve Program land. There is land in CRP reach on “child laborâ€? were hot topics www.havredailynews.com Reserve Program land. There is land in CRP reach on “child laborâ€? were hot topics www.havredailynews.com that isn’twww.havredailynews.com erodible and should not even be during the Montana Farm Bureau Conventhat isn’t erodible and should not even be during the Montana Farm Bureau Convenpart of the program. There may be some cuts tion Nov. 6-9 in Missoula. American Farm part of the program. There may be some cuts tionagreed Nov. 6-9 Missoula. Farm Henry thatinPolicy ranchers on American grazing systems in working lands programs. Right now there Bureau Public Director Mary Kay Henry agreed that Policy ranchers on grazing systems in working lands programs. Right now there Public Director Mary Kay thatBureau rest and rotate have been making a good are 23 conservation programs; Farm Bureau Thatcher covered the ever-changing inforthatThatcher rest and rotate have been making a good are 23 conservation programs; Farm Bureau covered the inforimpact. Heabout explained thatever-changing the three-pasture has long been a proponent of combining mation the Farm Bill. impact. He explained that the three-pasture has long been a proponent of combining mation about theworks Farm Bill. rest-rotation system best. Ranchers have some of them. I suspect that when the dust Although the works so-called congressional rest-rotation system best. Ranchers have some of them. I suspect that when the dust Although the so-called congressional also“Super been making their fences more visible for clears, there will be ďŹ ve or less programs.â€? Committeeâ€? after the convention also“Super been making their fences more visible for clears, there will be ďŹ ve or less programs.â€? Committeeâ€? after the convention thefailed sage grouse to up helpwith avoid impacts. UnfortuThatcher explained a proposal for comto come a deďŹ cit reduction thefailed sage grouse to up helpwith avoiddeďŹ cit impacts. UnfortuThatcher explained a proposal for comtoimpacts come reduction nately the to all theaits habitat, throughout modity programs, noting that with the cuts, planthe asimpacts some expected, earlier idea to cut nately to all the habitat, throughout modity programs, noting that with the cuts, as some expected,most its earlier idea to cut theplan U.S.billion and Canada likely affect if it’s done right, there can still be a safety $23 out ofwill the most USDA budget drew the$23 U.S.billion and Canada likely affect if it’s done right, there can still be a safety out ofwill the USDA budget drew ranchers and farmers locally. net for agriculture. comments from Thatcher. ranchers and farmers locally. net for agriculture. comments Thatcher. “Overall thefrom Montana sage grouse Another topic of discussion was the De“Agriculture is deďŹ nitely goingare to doing be tak“Overall the Montana sage grouse are Another topic of discussion was the De“Agriculture is habitat deďŹ nitely going to doing be tak- partment of Labor’s proposed restrictions on well. have share a large protected ingWe a good of cuts,â€?that she issaid. “Howpartment of Labor’s proposed restrictions on well. have share a largeofhabitat protected ingWe a good cuts,â€?that she issaid. “Howchildren working in agriculture. Under the pretty well. numbers falling ever, it’sThe better to dealhave withbeen this now in in this children working in agriculture. Under the pretty well. numbers falling ever, it’sThe better to dealhave withbeen this now in in this proposed rules, youth under the age of 16 committee than waiting other areas,â€? Henry said. until next year.â€? proposed rules,and youth visit under the age ofus 16 committee than waiting until next year.â€? other areas,â€? Henry said. Stopnot with would notby be able to do any labor on a farm Thatcher, her comments With 11 statesbasing and Canada involved,on current would by and visit with be able to do any labor on aus farm Thatcher, her comments With 11 statesbasing and Canada involved,on current Stop numbers of the bird can’t be focused to one about your Spring Needs numbers of the bird can’t be focused to one about your Spring Needs area. Henry said there wasn’t much of a change area. Henry said there wasn’t much of a change Fertilizers in numbers locally, but with the sage grouse ** Fertilizers in numbers locally, but with the sage grouse territory as a whole, concerns began to arise Soil Sampling Sampling territory as a whole, concerns began to arise ** Soil quickly. quickly. *Chemicals While hunting still continues for the birds, *Chemicals While hunting still continues for the birds, Henry said less than 2 percent are harvested. *Seed & & Seed Seed Treatments Treatments Henry said less than 2 percent are harvested. *Seed He said those birds would die in winter or He said those birds would die in winter or We are are your your dealer dealer for for from predators during a season, so the continWe from predators during a season, so the continued hunting of the bird hasn’t really made an seed corn corn & & alfalfa alfalfa ued hunting of the bird hasn’t really made an seed impact on the population. Š – Round-Up Ready Varieties – impact on the population. – Round-Up ReadyŠ Varieties – Henry said another possibility of loss in Henry said another possibility of loss in CHEVROLET numbers could be due to West Nile Virus. CHEVROLET numbers could be due to West Nile Virus. While there hasn’t been any documentation While there hasn’t been any documentation on the virus in the birds, most likely there’s an on the virus in the birds, most likely there’s anConvenient Location. All In One impact. Landowners could bring dead birds in Glasgow – 228-2571 228-2571 All In One Location. impact. Landowners could bring dead birds inConvenient Glasgow – for testing but many times440 the Hwy FWP2 doesn’t see ~440Across W ~ Glasgow from Fairgrounds Sales: Gilbert – – 263-2571 263-2571 Highway #2 W. • Glasgow for testing GMC but many times440 the Hwy FWP2 doesn’t see ~440Across W ~ Glasgow from Fairgrounds Sales: Gilbert Highway W. • Glasgow GMC any specimens come in to test. Across from Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 ~ 1-800-255-1472 ~ #2 406-228-4381 any specimens come in to test. Across from Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 ~ 1-800-255-1472 ~ 406-228-4381 406-228-9326 Josh – 785-7006 WhileCertiďŹ ed it seems like many of theFamily factors of by the Newton owned Boys Josh – 785-7006 406-228-9326 WhileCertiďŹ ed it seems like many of theFamily factors of 1-800-255-1472 •Boys 406-228-4381 owned by the Newton Service loweringService number of the sage grouse is in quesYour Customer OwnedRent Co-op A Car 1-800-255-1472 •or 406-228-4381 Auto Parts & Repair Center See Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny Ted Family owned by the Newton Boys lowering number ofParts the sage grouse is in quesYour Customer OwnedRent Co-op A Car Auto & Repair Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny or Ted Boys Family owned by the Newton CONTINUED ON PAGE 12See Center CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

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the sage grouse. Several ranchers signed up the sage grouse. Several ranchers signed up through the NRCS (Natural Resources Conserthrough the NRCS (Natural Resources Conservation Services) sage grouse initiative program. vation Services) sage grouse initiative program. Wightman said the program has been successWightman said the program has been successful and many of the private land owners have ful and many of the private land owners have been working to help the sage grouse. been working to help the sage grouse. Ron Stoneberg, a local rancher who retired Ron Stoneberg, a local rancher who retired after over 30 years of work for the FWP as a after over 30 years of work for the FWP as a wildlife biologist, agreed that grazing seems to wildlife biologist, agreed that grazing seems to help the sage grouse. Ranch life seems to help help the sage grouse. Ranch life seems to help provide the birds with water, flattened grass provide the birds with water, flattened grass area for dancing grounds and less predators in area for dancing grounds and less predators in the area to kill off the birds. the area to kill off the birds. Stoneberg remembers years of counting the Stoneberg remembers years of counting the sage grouse and keeping records on the birds sage grouse and keeping records on the birds for the FWP. He has several dancing grounds for the FWP. He has several dancing grounds located near and on his ranch. He explained located near and on his ranch. He explained that predators like golden eagles, foxes and that predators like golden eagles, foxes and ground squirrels are a big issue when it comes ground squirrels are a big issue when it comes to the survival of the birds. Weather also afto the survival of the birds. Weather also affects how the birds survive; severe drought fects how the birds survive; severe drought and harsh winters can take a toll on the bird and harsh winters can take a toll on the bird population. population. “They are actually long living birds if they “They are actually long living birds if they survive,� Stoneberg said. survive,� Stoneberg said. He said the birds historically were thick in He said the birds historically were thick in the area. Some locals ate sage grouse. They the area. Some locals ate sage grouse. They were hunted more frequently in the past, when were hunted more frequently in the past, when Stoneberg said there was less vegetation and Stoneberg said there was less vegetation and more birds. more birds. The sage grouse forages on the ground, and The sage grouse forages on the ground, and are unable to eat and digest hard seeds. So they are unable to eat and digest hard seeds. So they mostly feed on sagebrush and small insects and mostly feed on sagebrush and small insects and other plants. They nest on the ground under other plants. They nest on the ground under sagebrush and grass patches where the eggs sagebrush and grass patches where the eggs and chicks can remain hidden from their prey. and chicks can remain hidden from their prey. They almost need a balance of habitat, weather They almost need a balance of habitat, weather and lack of prey for numbers to increase. and lack of prey for numbers to increase. In the local area, the sage grouse haven’t In the local area, the sage grouse haven’t seen a large drop in numbers. Stoneberg seen a large drop in numbers. Stoneberg explained that some years are just better than explained that some years are just better than others for the bird population. His belief is that others for the bird population. His belief is that the bird doesn’t deserve as much attention, that the bird doesn’t deserve as much attention, that it’s not hunted nearly as often anymore. He it’s not hunted nearly as often anymore. He said that without the help of some of the local said that without the help of some of the local ranchers the birds might not be flourishing as ranchers the birds might not be flourishing as well. well. Glasgow Wildlife Biologist for FWP Drew Glasgow Wildlife Biologist for FWP Drew

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SoybeanGrowers GrowersCan Can Soybean RequestReferendum Referendum Request

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Hinsdale nature photographer Mona Doebler spotted this sage grouse, along with those pictured pages and southwest Hinsdale nature photographer Mona Doebler spotted this sage grouse, along with those pictured onon pages 1111 and 12,12, southwest ofof Hinsdale during their mating seasonin in late April a few years ago. COvER PHOTO: Glasgow Courier reporter Bonnie Davidson recently Hinsdale during their mating season late April a few years ago. COvER PHOTO: Glasgow Courier reporter Bonnie Davidson recently photographed a group birds sage grouse dancing grounds near Lard Creek southern valley County. photographed a group ofof thethe birds onon sage grouse dancing grounds near Lard Creek in in southern valley County.

OMPLEXSSOLUTIONS OLUTIONSFFOR ORSSIMPLE IMPLEBBIRD IRD CCOMPLEX LandownersHave HaveSignificant SignificantRole RoleInInFuture FutureOf OfSage SageGrouse Grouse Landowners

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BONNIE DAvIDsON BYBY BONNIE DAvIDsON THE GLAsGOw COURIER THE GLAsGOw COURIER sun barely rising distance, hehe sun is is barely rising inin thethe distance, sky covered hues purple, thethe sky covered inin hues ofof purple, pink and blues. been a brisk and pink and blues. It’sIt’s been a brisk and cold spring in Montana, but in the middle of cold spring in Montana, but in the middle of sagebrush and grasslands something pecuthethe sagebrush and grasslands something pecudraws attention. liarliar draws attention. almost like sound water dropping It’sIt’s almost like thethe sound ofof water dropping into a pond. A slight whooping sound with into a pond. A slight whooping sound with a pop, followed quiet winds grassa pop, followed byby thethe quiet winds ofof thethe grassland. The sound part elegant display land. The sound is is part ofof anan elegant display ofof color and feathers hopes attracting a mate. color and feathers inin hopes ofof attracting a mate. The sage grouse has been minds The sage grouse has been onon thethe minds and tongues many living Western and tongues ofof many living inin thethe Western United States. The unique bird has declined United States. The unique bird has declined numbers gradually over years. The inin numbers gradually over thethe years. The Montana Hi-Line has been lucky to see Montana Hi-Line has been lucky to see thethe

birds continue their mating ritual, and several birds continue their mating ritual, and several dancing grounds are still active in the later dancing grounds are still active in the later part mating season this April. The mating part ofof mating season this April. The mating grounds, known dancing grounds, draw grounds, known asas dancing grounds, draw many large birds fairly ground. many ofof thethe large birds outout toto fairly flatflat ground. Their preference is to something with a little Their preference is to something with a little less cover show their bulging yellow sacs less cover toto show offoff their bulging yellow sacs their neck. onon their neck. You might wonder what makes these birds You might wonder what makes these birds unique, other than their mating dance. These unique, other than their mating dance. These birds largest grouse North America. birds areare thethe largest grouse inin North America. They also more heavily reliant their They areare also more heavily reliant onon their habitat and unable adapt changing landhabitat and unable toto adapt toto changing landscapes. Wildlife and land management teams scapes. Wildlife and land management teams have begun their counting and recording have begun their counting and recording ofof thethe sage grouse population this season. They look sage grouse population this season. They look number males during their dance, forfor thethe number ofof males during their dance, and the number of females they’re attracting. and the number of females they’re attracting.

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Populations counted three times a season Populations areare counted three times inin a season to get an average. The counts nationwide, and to get an average. The counts nationwide, and through areas Canada, have been low. through areas inin Canada, have been low. Around year 2000, local Fish, WildAround thethe year 2000, thethe local Fish, Wildand Parks (FWP) started have concerns lifelife and Parks (FWP) started toto have concerns about numbers dropping. Catherine Wightman, about numbers dropping. Catherine Wightman, a wildlife biologist FWP headquarters, a wildlife biologist forfor thethe FWP headquarters, has been involved with sage grouse has been involved with thethe sage grouse forfor past several years. She explained that thethe past several years. She explained that thethe local agency came up with a management local agency came up with a management and conservation plan 2005. That plan gave and conservation plan inin 2005. That plan gave more than 200 pages that described habitat more than 200 pages that described thethe habitat requirements, recommendations improve requirements, recommendations toto improve sage grouse populations and things avoid. sage grouse populations and things toto avoid. While that plan was developed several While that plan was developed byby several partners and agencies, it didn’t really give any partners and agencies, it didn’t really give any authority protect sage grouse. last authority toto protect thethe sage grouse. InIn thethe last decade the potential for the bird to be listed decade the potential for the bird to be listed asas endangered species has grown. bird anan endangered species has grown. If If thethe bird were listed, it could mean purchase were toto bebe listed, it could mean thethe purchase habitat land, stop any further agriculofof habitat land, thethe stop toto any further agriculture development and many restrictions that ture development and many restrictions that could cause problems local economies and could cause problems onon local economies and access some local public lands. access toto some ofof thethe local public lands. Wightman explained that most Wightman explained that most ofof thethe Western states have listed determinations and Western states have listed determinations and plans help sage grouse survive. The plans toto help thethe sage grouse survive. The states need have these listed determinations states need toto have these listed determinations 2015, decision listing bird byby 2015, asas thethe decision forfor listing thethe bird will be made in 2016. That led Montana Gov. will be made in 2016. That led Montana Gov. Steve Bullock sign executive order Steve Bullock toto sign anan executive order toto create a council that would address issues create a council that would address thethe issues – and find a plan Montana that might help – and find a plan forfor Montana that might help focus on what kinds of regulations might actufocus on what kinds of regulations might actually help bird, without hurting public. ally help thethe bird, without hurting thethe public. CONTINUED PAGE CONTINUED ONON PAGE 1111

FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH The Valley County Farm The Valley County Farm Service Agency reminds Service Agency reminds Hi-Line growers that U.S. Hi-Line growers that thethe U.S. Department Agriculture Department ofof Agriculture will offer soybean producers will offer soybean producers opportunity request thethe opportunity toto request aa referendum Soybean referendum onon thethe Soybean Promotion and Research Promotion and Research Order, authorized under Order, asas authorized under Soybean Promotion, thethe Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Research, and Consumer Information Act. Information Act. The Request ReferThe Request forfor Referendum will conducted endum will bebe conducted at at USDA's county FSA offices. USDA's county FSA offices. eligible participate, ToTo bebe eligible toto participate, producers must certify and producers must certify and provide documentation that provide documentation that shows that they produced soyshows that they produced soybeans and paid assessment beans and paid anan assessment soybeans during onon thethe soybeans during thethe pe-period Jan. 2012, through riod ofof Jan. 1, 1, 2012, through Dec. 2013. Dec. 31,31, 2013. Beginning May 5 and Beginning May 5 and continuing through May continuing through May 30,30, 2014, producers may obtain 2014, producers may obtain a form mail, fax, a form byby mail, fax, oror inin person from FSA county person from thethe FSA county offices. Forms may also offices. Forms may also bebe obtained internet obtained viavia thethe internet at at www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ SoybeaninformationontheSoySoybeaninformationontheSoybeanRequestforReferendum beanRequestforReferendum

during same time period. during thethe same time period. Individual producers and Individual producers and other producer entities may other producer entities may request a referendum request a referendum at at thethe county FSA office where their county FSA office where their administrative farm records administrative farm records maintained. areare maintained. For producer parFor thethe producer notnot participating FSA programs, ticipating inin FSA programs, opportunity request thethe opportunity toto request a referendum will proa referendum will bebe provided county FSA office vided at at thethe county FSA office where producer owns where thethe producer owns oror rents land. Completed forms rents land. Completed forms and supporting documentaand supporting documentation must returned tion must bebe returned toto thethe appropriate county FSA office appropriate county FSA office person later byby faxfax oror inin person nono later than close business May than close ofof business May 2014; returned 30,30, 2014; oror if if returned byby mail, must postmarked mail, must bebe postmarked byby midnight May 2014, and midnight May 30,30, 2014, and received county FSA received inin thethe county FSA office close business office byby close ofof business onon June 2014. June 5, 5, 2014. USDA will conduct USDA will conduct aa referendum least perreferendum if if at at least 1010 percent nation’s 569,998 cent ofof thethe nation’s 569,998 soybean producers support soybean producers support aa referendum. referendum. Not more than one-fifth Not more than one-fifth producers who support ofof thethe producers who support having a referendum can having a referendum can bebe from any one state. from any one state.

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treatedtotoa ahorse horseparade paradefolfoltreated lowed Miles City Ranch lowed byby thethe Miles City Ranch Rodeo Saturday. Rodeo onon Saturday. The opening general The opening ofofthethe general session Friday will include session Friday will include anan address president address byby thethe president ofof thethe National Cattlemen’s Beef AsNational Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Bob McCan. ranch sociation, Bob McCan. AA ranch tour will follow. tour will follow. Moredetails: details:406-442406-442More 3420 3420

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Changes coming in farm programs FSA says regs being set, deadlines and enrollments will be announced Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com After a more-than two-year delay, farmers and ranchers finally have some certainty on what federal programs they can expect for the next five years — kind of. The 2012 Farm Bill finally was passed and signed into law early this year after two years of extensions. Congress and President Barack Obama approved some major changes in prog ra m s, b u t t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency says Havre Daily News/File photo A Hi-Line farmer harvests wheat in 2008. The new Farm Bill replaces direct payments and counter-cyclical payments with two new risk-management programs, Price Loss Coverage and Agricultural Risk Coverage.

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First Kentucky hemp crop in decades set for planting BRUCE SCHREINER Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky's first industrial hemp crop in decades will start going into the ground next month now that the pipeline for shipping seeds into the state is opening up to allow the experimental plantings, state Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said Tuesday. Comer said he expects the first batches of hemp seeds to arrive in coming days at the state Agriculture Department at Frankfort. "We're rapidly approaching a crucial time for the seeds to be put in the ground," he said by phone. So far, eight pilot projects are planned statewide as part of a small-scale reintroduction to gauge the versatile crop's potential in the marketplace and as a money maker for farmers. The first planting is scheduled for May 16 in Rockcastle County, said Comer's chief of staff, Holly Harris VonLuehrte. "Hopefully we can get enough seeds to have credible research data gathered by this fall," Comer said. "And next year, hopefully we'll have enough seeds to have several processors in the state and several farmers under contract growing it." Hemp production was banned decades ago when the federal government classified the crop as a controlled substance related to marijuana. Hemp and marijuana are the same species, Cannabis sativa. Hemp has a negligible amount of THC, the psychoactive compound that gives marijuana users a high. The crop's comeback gained a foothold with passage of the new federal farm bill. It allows state agriculture departments to designate hemp pilot projects for research in states that already allow the growing of hemp. Kentucky lawmakers passed legislation last year that allowed hemp to be reintroduced, if the federal government allows its production.

Once the farm bill allowed the experimental plantings, the next challenge was getting hemp seed into the state. Comer said Tuesday his staff has "gone through every level of federal bureaucracy you can go through to get those seeds in." U.S. Border Patrol officials have been cooperative as Comer's office worked to develop a supply route to bring in hemp seeds, VonLuehrte said. The initial seeds are coming from Canada and Italy, Comer said. State agriculture officials have helped match farmers with researchers for the pilot hemp projects. Some hemp grown will be sold for commercial uses after the fall harvest to help determine the crop's marketability, VonLuehrte said. Some hemp will be grown purely for research, she said. One pilot project in Fayette County will focus on hemp's potential in medicine, she said. Gov. Steve Beshear recently signed into law a bill that allows doctors at two Kentucky research hospitals to prescribe cannabidiol to treat patients. Several universities are participating in the hemp projects, also aimed at answering basic production questions for a crop that once thrived in Kentucky. "It's going to answer every question that a prospective farmer ... would want to know," Comer said. "What's the optimum date to plant? Which variety of seed grows best on which soil? What type of farm equipment does it take to harvest this hemp?" Comer sees hemp as a way to boost Kentucky's economy, especially in rural areas, through crop production, processing and manufacturing. Hemp was historically used for rope but has many other uses: clothing and mulch from the fiber; hemp milk and cooking oil from the seeds, and soap and lotions. The next goal will be to win congressional approval to deregulate hemp, he said. "We're hopeful that after a year or two, that it can be deregulated and treated like any other agricultural crop," Comer said.

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US sides with man on Roosevelt ranch proposal JAMES MacPHERSON Associated Press BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The U.S. Fo re s t S e r v i c e s i d e d M o n d ay w i t h a Montana businessman who wants to mine gravel near a scenic Badlands ranch in we s t e r n N o r t h D a ko ta w h e re fo r m e r P r e s i d e n t T h e o d o r e Ro o s eve l t o n c e grazed cattle and on land that other gove r n m e n t a g e n c i e s a n d c o n s e r va t i o n groups have hailed as the "cradle of conservation." Forest Service district ranger Ron Jablonski said the agency determined that the project about 25 miles north of Medora poses no significant environmental impact. Roger Lothspeich, of Miles City, Mont., and his fiancee, Peggy Braunberger, have spent most of the last decade proving they

own the right to remove gravel and other surface minerals at the 5,200-acre ranch near Medora. The proposed 25-acre site is about a mile from Roosevelt's historic ranch cabin. The couple signed an agreement in July 2012 with the U.S. Forest Service to work out an exchange for other federal land or mineral rights at a different location. But Lothspeich told The Associated Press on Monday that the government has taken too long to find him land. "They don't have any land for me to swap, so I'm going to mine my gravel," he said. "I've got to get a return on my investment." Lothspeich wants to take advantage of the growing demand for rock and gravel needed for roads and other projects in North Dakota's booming oil patch.

"Gravel is like gold right now in North Dakota," he said. Jablonski has said Lothspeich's mine plan addresses air and water quality concerns, impact on wildlife, and other issues such as noise and dust. "Our decision space is not very big on this," Jablonski said. "This man's got rights." The Forest Service purchased the ranch next to Theodore Roosevelt's Elkhorn Ranch site from brothers Kenneth, Allan and Dennis Eberts and their families in 2007. It cost $5.3 million, with $4.8 million coming from the federal government and $500,000 from conservation groups. The purchase did not include mineral rights. More than 50 wildlife and conservation groups, including the Boone and Crockett Club started by Roosevelt himself, pressed

Congress to approve the purchase. Roosevelt, who was president from 1901 to 1909, set aside millions of acres for national forests and wildlife refuges during his administration. He spent more than three years in the North Dakota Badlands in the 1880s. The Ebertses had bought the ranch where Roosevelt ran his cattle and half the mineral rights from the Connell family in 1993 for $800,000. Lothspeich, who grew up near the ranch before moving to Montana, bought the other half of the mineral rights from the Connells at an undisclosed price, knowing the government had not obtained them in the Eberts deal. Jablonski said his agency has since identified more than 40 other people who have mineral rights in the area and could potentially develop them.

Oklahoma farmers asked to avoid plowing fields OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The president of the Oklahoma Association of Conservation Districts is urging farmers to think twice before plowing their fields this

spring and consider alternatives to cultivating the soil. Ongoing drought in Oklahoma and Southern Plains creates the risk of dust

storms and wind erosion that could be worsened by plowing, association president Kim Farber said. "We all know wind erosion is a constant concern in Oklahoma," Farber said in a news release. " W i th the c o m i ng s um m e r m o n t h s being the hottest and typically driest of the year and with the national weather service already issuing blowing dust warnings for areas of the state as far east as Kingfisher and Garfield Counties, we have to be careful that we not open ourselves up to the specter of soil loss and dust storms due to the volatile mixture of high velocity winds and dry soils," he said. The most recent U.S. Drought Monitor re p o r t s h owe d t h e we s t e r n t h i rd o f Oklahoma in exceptional or extreme drought, the two most severe categories. Farber said wheat crops that farmers are considering abandoning could be declared a total loss by crop insurance adjusters and that farmers looking to start their spring

crops should consider alternative cultivation methods such as no-till or minimum-till farming, which he says can save money by reducing fuel costs and helping the soil hold more water. Farmer Joe Kelly, who grows cotton and wheat on about 3,000 acres near Altus, said Tuesday that no-till farming is not only less expensive, it is a better production technique. "I use it on about 90 percent of my wheat ground, and on my cotton ground, all of it's no-till," Kelly said. "Moisture conservation right now is the biggest deal. We're in a drought, a terrible drought in southwest Oklahoma, the only wheat I'll cut this year will be no-till." Farber said farmers must consider not only their current crops, but the future as well. "The bottom line is that we all need to think before we plow this year and make sure we aren't opening ourselves up to major soil erosion problems," he said.

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details still are forthcoming, including when enrollment and deadlines will be set for many of the programs, with some exceptions. Kent Politsch, FSA chief of public affairs in Washington, D.C., said the agency staff members are working to write the rules and regulations implementing the programs and develop the software to administer them, and is hoping to have a schedule of target dates and deadlines out by summer and early fall. “There are a number of things on the horizon,” he said. The programs have two exceptions on that schedule. FSA opened livestock disaster assistance, which had been on hold since 2011, for enrollment April 15. Politsch also said that, with contracts for almost 2 million acres of land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program expiring by this fall, CRP probably will be rolled out faster. “Keep your eyes out in mid-May for CRP,” he said.

Two years of delay The bill was caught up in the perceived gridlock in Washington for more than two years. In June 2012, the U.S. Senate passed a farm bill to take effect at the start of the funding year in October. The House of Representatives never brought that bill up for a vote, and the Republican leadership didn’t bring up its bill the House agriculture committee crafted, with people speculating the leadership wanted to avoid a contentious debate over food programs also included in the bill. For decades, nutrition programs including SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, has been tied to the agriculture bill. The nutrition programs are tied in to the ag programs try to raise support in urban areas for the bill. The Senate again passed a Farm Bill in June 2013, and it again stalled in the House. The House passed, on a party-line vote with no Democrats and not all Republicans in favor, its own version in July, which included splitting the nutrition programs out to be considered in a separate bill. The Senate then amended the House bill, replacing it with its own, passed the amended House version and sent it back — starting months of negotiations to resolve the differ-

Havre Daily News/File photo Cattle graze in a Hi-Line field in 2007. The new Farm Bill brings back livestock disaster programs that had lapsed in 2011, with enrollment opening April 15 of this year. ences including the House again combining the nutrition programs with the ag programs.. The biggest difference in the bills was the SNAP nutrition program, with the House bill cutting the program $39 billion over 10 years compared to the Senate cutting $3.9 million. The conference committee filed its report Jan. 27, and the House passed it 251-166 Jan 29 and the Senate passed it 68-32 Feb. 4. Obama signed the bill Feb. 7, setting five years of programs again in place.

■ Continued on page 6

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Farm program changes

The bill eliminates, consolidates or replaces many programs in previous farm bills, and also cuts the 10-year budget for SNAP by $8.6 billion. Congressional Budget Office estimates that the bill will, over the next 10 years, would spend $956 billion with $756 billion of that in nutrition programs, which would reduce the nation’s deficits by $16.6 billion from 2014 to 2023. The bill eliminates two long-standing programs, the direct payment program and the countercyclical programs and sets a limit of $900,000 adjusted gross income for eligibility Ryan McCormick, past president of the Montana Grain Growers Association, said in a meeting about the farm bill in March that the association didn’t support eliminating the direct payment program, which provides guaranteed payments to producers but had to accept the cut as part of negotiations. U.S. Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., a Big Sandy-area farmer, said in a press conference in March that the bill helped cut costs while protecting Montana farmers and ranchers. “The best thing is, it beefs up crop insurance in a big, big way,” he said. “I don’t

want any government subsidies when times are good.” But, Tester said, when times are bad, such as in times of drought, some insurance is “very, very important.” The bill is a little different way of doing business, Tester said, including the elimination of direct payments, which has made some people unhappy That is part of dealing with the federal deficit and the national debt, he said. “We have to make the government lean and mean,” he said.

Insurance options, CRP, change, continue

Replacing programs, styles of administration

The bill also continues crop insurance, with some changes. That includes expanding the Noninsured Crop Asistance Program, which provides coverage for weather-related losses when crop insurance is not available, and a new

The direct and countercyclical programs have been replaced by new options, with another set of options within one of those, but the choice will last the five-year life of the bill. Producers can elect to enroll their farm number — producers can have different numbers designating tracts on their farm — and must enroll each section in the same program but can have different selections on the different tracts. In the price loss coverage election, payments are made to farmers when the effective price of a covered commodity drops

Take to the Air New York Take to the air with Triangle Mobile’s nationwide calling service. Experience the freedom that comes from being able to call anyone, anywhere, at any time. Whether you’re traveling the Hi-Line or on vacation in New York City, you can depend on Triangle to keep you covered. Take to the air with Triangle Mobile’s Don’t be grounded by your Experience wireless plan. nationwide calling service. theTake freedom to air with Triangle thatthecomes from being Mobile. able to call anyone, anywhere, at any time. Whether you’re traveling the Hi-Line or on vacation in New York City, you can depend on Triangle to keep you covered. Don’t be grounded by your wireless plan. Take to the air with Triangle Mobile.

May 2014

below the set price. The payment is equal to 85 percent of the base acres of the covered crop and the price difference between effective price and the reference price. In the Agricultural Risk Coverage, the payment is made when the actual revenue is less than the guaranteed revenue, but the producer has to decide whether to use a county-based figure or individual figures. For each farm, the producer has to decide whether to use the individual arc, which will enroll all commodities on the farm, or PLC and County ARC. If PLC and County ARC are used, the producer has to enroll base acres on the farm either in PLC or Country ARC. The elections will stay in place for the 2014-2018 crop years, an FSA fact sheet says.

Continued from page 5

Changes to programs, cuts in the budget

7

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1.855.332.1221

/TriangleMobile

www.itsTriangleMobile.com

@TriangleMobile

FARM & RANCH program, the Supplemental Coverage Option, which provides additional area-based insurance coverage in combination with traditional crop insurance policies. Another big change is in CRP, although previous changes may make it somewhat moot. The cap on the national amount of land enrolled in CRP will gradually be cut from its current limit of 32 million acres to 24 million in the 2017 and 2018 crop years. A good chunk of land in north-central Montana already has been coming out of CRP, as a combination of high commodity prices and increased requirements with decreased payments persuading farmers to put the land back in active production. The 2014 Farm Bill also allows producers a chance to use an “early out” provision to leave CRP contracts but only in 2015. It also continues the Transition Incentive Program allowing transitioning land enrolled in CRP to a beginning or socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher, adding military veterans to the class of people to whom the land can transition. To read more, go online to the Farm Bill home page at http://www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/ fbapp?area=home&subject=landing&topic=l anding.

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FARM & RANCH

May 2014

www.havredailynews.com

Farm program changes

The bill eliminates, consolidates or replaces many programs in previous farm bills, and also cuts the 10-year budget for SNAP by $8.6 billion. Congressional Budget Office estimates that the bill will, over the next 10 years, would spend $956 billion with $756 billion of that in nutrition programs, which would reduce the nation’s deficits by $16.6 billion from 2014 to 2023. The bill eliminates two long-standing programs, the direct payment program and the countercyclical programs and sets a limit of $900,000 adjusted gross income for eligibility Ryan McCormick, past president of the Montana Grain Growers Association, said in a meeting about the farm bill in March that the association didn’t support eliminating the direct payment program, which provides guaranteed payments to producers but had to accept the cut as part of negotiations. U.S. Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., a Big Sandy-area farmer, said in a press conference in March that the bill helped cut costs while protecting Montana farmers and ranchers. “The best thing is, it beefs up crop insurance in a big, big way,” he said. “I don’t

want any government subsidies when times are good.” But, Tester said, when times are bad, such as in times of drought, some insurance is “very, very important.” The bill is a little different way of doing business, Tester said, including the elimination of direct payments, which has made some people unhappy That is part of dealing with the federal deficit and the national debt, he said. “We have to make the government lean and mean,” he said.

Insurance options, CRP, change, continue

Replacing programs, styles of administration

The bill also continues crop insurance, with some changes. That includes expanding the Noninsured Crop Asistance Program, which provides coverage for weather-related losses when crop insurance is not available, and a new

The direct and countercyclical programs have been replaced by new options, with another set of options within one of those, but the choice will last the five-year life of the bill. Producers can elect to enroll their farm number — producers can have different numbers designating tracts on their farm — and must enroll each section in the same program but can have different selections on the different tracts. In the price loss coverage election, payments are made to farmers when the effective price of a covered commodity drops

Take to the Air New York Take to the air with Triangle Mobile’s nationwide calling service. Experience the freedom that comes from being able to call anyone, anywhere, at any time. Whether you’re traveling the Hi-Line or on vacation in New York City, you can depend on Triangle to keep you covered. Take to the air with Triangle Mobile’s Don’t be grounded by your Experience wireless plan. nationwide calling service. theTake freedom to air with Triangle thatthecomes from being Mobile. able to call anyone, anywhere, at any time. Whether you’re traveling the Hi-Line or on vacation in New York City, you can depend on Triangle to keep you covered. Don’t be grounded by your wireless plan. Take to the air with Triangle Mobile.

May 2014

below the set price. The payment is equal to 85 percent of the base acres of the covered crop and the price difference between effective price and the reference price. In the Agricultural Risk Coverage, the payment is made when the actual revenue is less than the guaranteed revenue, but the producer has to decide whether to use a county-based figure or individual figures. For each farm, the producer has to decide whether to use the individual arc, which will enroll all commodities on the farm, or PLC and County ARC. If PLC and County ARC are used, the producer has to enroll base acres on the farm either in PLC or Country ARC. The elections will stay in place for the 2014-2018 crop years, an FSA fact sheet says.

Continued from page 5

Changes to programs, cuts in the budget

7

Hi-Line

1.855.332.1221

/TriangleMobile

www.itsTriangleMobile.com

@TriangleMobile

FARM & RANCH program, the Supplemental Coverage Option, which provides additional area-based insurance coverage in combination with traditional crop insurance policies. Another big change is in CRP, although previous changes may make it somewhat moot. The cap on the national amount of land enrolled in CRP will gradually be cut from its current limit of 32 million acres to 24 million in the 2017 and 2018 crop years. A good chunk of land in north-central Montana already has been coming out of CRP, as a combination of high commodity prices and increased requirements with decreased payments persuading farmers to put the land back in active production. The 2014 Farm Bill also allows producers a chance to use an “early out” provision to leave CRP contracts but only in 2015. It also continues the Transition Incentive Program allowing transitioning land enrolled in CRP to a beginning or socially disadvantaged farmer or rancher, adding military veterans to the class of people to whom the land can transition. To read more, go online to the Farm Bill home page at http://www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/ fbapp?area=home&subject=landing&topic=l anding.

www.havredailynews.com


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www.havredailynews.com

US sides with man on Roosevelt ranch proposal JAMES MacPHERSON Associated Press BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The U.S. Fo re s t S e r v i c e s i d e d M o n d ay w i t h a Montana businessman who wants to mine gravel near a scenic Badlands ranch in we s t e r n N o r t h D a ko ta w h e re fo r m e r P r e s i d e n t T h e o d o r e Ro o s eve l t o n c e grazed cattle and on land that other gove r n m e n t a g e n c i e s a n d c o n s e r va t i o n groups have hailed as the "cradle of conservation." Forest Service district ranger Ron Jablonski said the agency determined that the project about 25 miles north of Medora poses no significant environmental impact. Roger Lothspeich, of Miles City, Mont., and his fiancee, Peggy Braunberger, have spent most of the last decade proving they

own the right to remove gravel and other surface minerals at the 5,200-acre ranch near Medora. The proposed 25-acre site is about a mile from Roosevelt's historic ranch cabin. The couple signed an agreement in July 2012 with the U.S. Forest Service to work out an exchange for other federal land or mineral rights at a different location. But Lothspeich told The Associated Press on Monday that the government has taken too long to find him land. "They don't have any land for me to swap, so I'm going to mine my gravel," he said. "I've got to get a return on my investment." Lothspeich wants to take advantage of the growing demand for rock and gravel needed for roads and other projects in North Dakota's booming oil patch.

"Gravel is like gold right now in North Dakota," he said. Jablonski has said Lothspeich's mine plan addresses air and water quality concerns, impact on wildlife, and other issues such as noise and dust. "Our decision space is not very big on this," Jablonski said. "This man's got rights." The Forest Service purchased the ranch next to Theodore Roosevelt's Elkhorn Ranch site from brothers Kenneth, Allan and Dennis Eberts and their families in 2007. It cost $5.3 million, with $4.8 million coming from the federal government and $500,000 from conservation groups. The purchase did not include mineral rights. More than 50 wildlife and conservation groups, including the Boone and Crockett Club started by Roosevelt himself, pressed

Congress to approve the purchase. Roosevelt, who was president from 1901 to 1909, set aside millions of acres for national forests and wildlife refuges during his administration. He spent more than three years in the North Dakota Badlands in the 1880s. The Ebertses had bought the ranch where Roosevelt ran his cattle and half the mineral rights from the Connell family in 1993 for $800,000. Lothspeich, who grew up near the ranch before moving to Montana, bought the other half of the mineral rights from the Connells at an undisclosed price, knowing the government had not obtained them in the Eberts deal. Jablonski said his agency has since identified more than 40 other people who have mineral rights in the area and could potentially develop them.

Oklahoma farmers asked to avoid plowing fields OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The president of the Oklahoma Association of Conservation Districts is urging farmers to think twice before plowing their fields this

spring and consider alternatives to cultivating the soil. Ongoing drought in Oklahoma and Southern Plains creates the risk of dust

storms and wind erosion that could be worsened by plowing, association president Kim Farber said. "We all know wind erosion is a constant concern in Oklahoma," Farber said in a news release. " W i th the c o m i ng s um m e r m o n t h s being the hottest and typically driest of the year and with the national weather service already issuing blowing dust warnings for areas of the state as far east as Kingfisher and Garfield Counties, we have to be careful that we not open ourselves up to the specter of soil loss and dust storms due to the volatile mixture of high velocity winds and dry soils," he said. The most recent U.S. Drought Monitor re p o r t s h owe d t h e we s t e r n t h i rd o f Oklahoma in exceptional or extreme drought, the two most severe categories. Farber said wheat crops that farmers are considering abandoning could be declared a total loss by crop insurance adjusters and that farmers looking to start their spring

crops should consider alternative cultivation methods such as no-till or minimum-till farming, which he says can save money by reducing fuel costs and helping the soil hold more water. Farmer Joe Kelly, who grows cotton and wheat on about 3,000 acres near Altus, said Tuesday that no-till farming is not only less expensive, it is a better production technique. "I use it on about 90 percent of my wheat ground, and on my cotton ground, all of it's no-till," Kelly said. "Moisture conservation right now is the biggest deal. We're in a drought, a terrible drought in southwest Oklahoma, the only wheat I'll cut this year will be no-till." Farber said farmers must consider not only their current crops, but the future as well. "The bottom line is that we all need to think before we plow this year and make sure we aren't opening ourselves up to major soil erosion problems," he said.

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May 2014

details still are forthcoming, including when enrollment and deadlines will be set for many of the programs, with some exceptions. Kent Politsch, FSA chief of public affairs in Washington, D.C., said the agency staff members are working to write the rules and regulations implementing the programs and develop the software to administer them, and is hoping to have a schedule of target dates and deadlines out by summer and early fall. “There are a number of things on the horizon,” he said. The programs have two exceptions on that schedule. FSA opened livestock disaster assistance, which had been on hold since 2011, for enrollment April 15. Politsch also said that, with contracts for almost 2 million acres of land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program expiring by this fall, CRP probably will be rolled out faster. “Keep your eyes out in mid-May for CRP,” he said.

Two years of delay The bill was caught up in the perceived gridlock in Washington for more than two years. In June 2012, the U.S. Senate passed a farm bill to take effect at the start of the funding year in October. The House of Representatives never brought that bill up for a vote, and the Republican leadership didn’t bring up its bill the House agriculture committee crafted, with people speculating the leadership wanted to avoid a contentious debate over food programs also included in the bill. For decades, nutrition programs including SNAP, formerly known as food stamps, has been tied to the agriculture bill. The nutrition programs are tied in to the ag programs try to raise support in urban areas for the bill. The Senate again passed a Farm Bill in June 2013, and it again stalled in the House. The House passed, on a party-line vote with no Democrats and not all Republicans in favor, its own version in July, which included splitting the nutrition programs out to be considered in a separate bill. The Senate then amended the House bill, replacing it with its own, passed the amended House version and sent it back — starting months of negotiations to resolve the differ-

Havre Daily News/File photo Cattle graze in a Hi-Line field in 2007. The new Farm Bill brings back livestock disaster programs that had lapsed in 2011, with enrollment opening April 15 of this year. ences including the House again combining the nutrition programs with the ag programs.. The biggest difference in the bills was the SNAP nutrition program, with the House bill cutting the program $39 billion over 10 years compared to the Senate cutting $3.9 million. The conference committee filed its report Jan. 27, and the House passed it 251-166 Jan 29 and the Senate passed it 68-32 Feb. 4. Obama signed the bill Feb. 7, setting five years of programs again in place.

■ Continued on page 6

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Changes coming in farm programs FSA says regs being set, deadlines and enrollments will be announced Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com After a more-than two-year delay, farmers and ranchers finally have some certainty on what federal programs they can expect for the next five years — kind of. The 2012 Farm Bill finally was passed and signed into law early this year after two years of extensions. Congress and President Barack Obama approved some major changes in prog ra m s, b u t t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f Agriculture’s Farm Service Agency says Havre Daily News/File photo A Hi-Line farmer harvests wheat in 2008. The new Farm Bill replaces direct payments and counter-cyclical payments with two new risk-management programs, Price Loss Coverage and Agricultural Risk Coverage.

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First Kentucky hemp crop in decades set for planting BRUCE SCHREINER Associated Press LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky's first industrial hemp crop in decades will start going into the ground next month now that the pipeline for shipping seeds into the state is opening up to allow the experimental plantings, state Agriculture Commissioner James Comer said Tuesday. Comer said he expects the first batches of hemp seeds to arrive in coming days at the state Agriculture Department at Frankfort. "We're rapidly approaching a crucial time for the seeds to be put in the ground," he said by phone. So far, eight pilot projects are planned statewide as part of a small-scale reintroduction to gauge the versatile crop's potential in the marketplace and as a money maker for farmers. The first planting is scheduled for May 16 in Rockcastle County, said Comer's chief of staff, Holly Harris VonLuehrte. "Hopefully we can get enough seeds to have credible research data gathered by this fall," Comer said. "And next year, hopefully we'll have enough seeds to have several processors in the state and several farmers under contract growing it." Hemp production was banned decades ago when the federal government classified the crop as a controlled substance related to marijuana. Hemp and marijuana are the same species, Cannabis sativa. Hemp has a negligible amount of THC, the psychoactive compound that gives marijuana users a high. The crop's comeback gained a foothold with passage of the new federal farm bill. It allows state agriculture departments to designate hemp pilot projects for research in states that already allow the growing of hemp. Kentucky lawmakers passed legislation last year that allowed hemp to be reintroduced, if the federal government allows its production.

Once the farm bill allowed the experimental plantings, the next challenge was getting hemp seed into the state. Comer said Tuesday his staff has "gone through every level of federal bureaucracy you can go through to get those seeds in." U.S. Border Patrol officials have been cooperative as Comer's office worked to develop a supply route to bring in hemp seeds, VonLuehrte said. The initial seeds are coming from Canada and Italy, Comer said. State agriculture officials have helped match farmers with researchers for the pilot hemp projects. Some hemp grown will be sold for commercial uses after the fall harvest to help determine the crop's marketability, VonLuehrte said. Some hemp will be grown purely for research, she said. One pilot project in Fayette County will focus on hemp's potential in medicine, she said. Gov. Steve Beshear recently signed into law a bill that allows doctors at two Kentucky research hospitals to prescribe cannabidiol to treat patients. Several universities are participating in the hemp projects, also aimed at answering basic production questions for a crop that once thrived in Kentucky. "It's going to answer every question that a prospective farmer ... would want to know," Comer said. "What's the optimum date to plant? Which variety of seed grows best on which soil? What type of farm equipment does it take to harvest this hemp?" Comer sees hemp as a way to boost Kentucky's economy, especially in rural areas, through crop production, processing and manufacturing. Hemp was historically used for rope but has many other uses: clothing and mulch from the fiber; hemp milk and cooking oil from the seeds, and soap and lotions. The next goal will be to win congressional approval to deregulate hemp, he said. "We're hopeful that after a year or two, that it can be deregulated and treated like any other agricultural crop," Comer said.

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SoybeanGrowers GrowersCan Can Soybean RequestReferendum Referendum Request

MONA DOEBLER / FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH MONA DOEBLER / FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

Hinsdale nature photographer Mona Doebler spotted this sage grouse, along with those pictured pages and southwest Hinsdale nature photographer Mona Doebler spotted this sage grouse, along with those pictured onon pages 1111 and 12,12, southwest ofof Hinsdale during their mating seasonin in late April a few years ago. COvER PHOTO: Glasgow Courier reporter Bonnie Davidson recently Hinsdale during their mating season late April a few years ago. COvER PHOTO: Glasgow Courier reporter Bonnie Davidson recently photographed a group birds sage grouse dancing grounds near Lard Creek southern valley County. photographed a group ofof thethe birds onon sage grouse dancing grounds near Lard Creek in in southern valley County.

OMPLEXSSOLUTIONS OLUTIONSFFOR ORSSIMPLE IMPLEBBIRD IRD CCOMPLEX LandownersHave HaveSignificant SignificantRole RoleInInFuture FutureOf OfSage SageGrouse Grouse Landowners

TT

BONNIE DAvIDsON BYBY BONNIE DAvIDsON THE GLAsGOw COURIER THE GLAsGOw COURIER sun barely rising distance, hehe sun is is barely rising inin thethe distance, sky covered hues purple, thethe sky covered inin hues ofof purple, pink and blues. been a brisk and pink and blues. It’sIt’s been a brisk and cold spring in Montana, but in the middle of cold spring in Montana, but in the middle of sagebrush and grasslands something pecuthethe sagebrush and grasslands something pecudraws attention. liarliar draws attention. almost like sound water dropping It’sIt’s almost like thethe sound ofof water dropping into a pond. A slight whooping sound with into a pond. A slight whooping sound with a pop, followed quiet winds grassa pop, followed byby thethe quiet winds ofof thethe grassland. The sound part elegant display land. The sound is is part ofof anan elegant display ofof color and feathers hopes attracting a mate. color and feathers inin hopes ofof attracting a mate. The sage grouse has been minds The sage grouse has been onon thethe minds and tongues many living Western and tongues ofof many living inin thethe Western United States. The unique bird has declined United States. The unique bird has declined numbers gradually over years. The inin numbers gradually over thethe years. The Montana Hi-Line has been lucky to see Montana Hi-Line has been lucky to see thethe

birds continue their mating ritual, and several birds continue their mating ritual, and several dancing grounds are still active in the later dancing grounds are still active in the later part mating season this April. The mating part ofof mating season this April. The mating grounds, known dancing grounds, draw grounds, known asas dancing grounds, draw many large birds fairly ground. many ofof thethe large birds outout toto fairly flatflat ground. Their preference is to something with a little Their preference is to something with a little less cover show their bulging yellow sacs less cover toto show offoff their bulging yellow sacs their neck. onon their neck. You might wonder what makes these birds You might wonder what makes these birds unique, other than their mating dance. These unique, other than their mating dance. These birds largest grouse North America. birds areare thethe largest grouse inin North America. They also more heavily reliant their They areare also more heavily reliant onon their habitat and unable adapt changing landhabitat and unable toto adapt toto changing landscapes. Wildlife and land management teams scapes. Wildlife and land management teams have begun their counting and recording have begun their counting and recording ofof thethe sage grouse population this season. They look sage grouse population this season. They look number males during their dance, forfor thethe number ofof males during their dance, and the number of females they’re attracting. and the number of females they’re attracting.

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Populations counted three times a season Populations areare counted three times inin a season to get an average. The counts nationwide, and to get an average. The counts nationwide, and through areas Canada, have been low. through areas inin Canada, have been low. Around year 2000, local Fish, WildAround thethe year 2000, thethe local Fish, Wildand Parks (FWP) started have concerns lifelife and Parks (FWP) started toto have concerns about numbers dropping. Catherine Wightman, about numbers dropping. Catherine Wightman, a wildlife biologist FWP headquarters, a wildlife biologist forfor thethe FWP headquarters, has been involved with sage grouse has been involved with thethe sage grouse forfor past several years. She explained that thethe past several years. She explained that thethe local agency came up with a management local agency came up with a management and conservation plan 2005. That plan gave and conservation plan inin 2005. That plan gave more than 200 pages that described habitat more than 200 pages that described thethe habitat requirements, recommendations improve requirements, recommendations toto improve sage grouse populations and things avoid. sage grouse populations and things toto avoid. While that plan was developed several While that plan was developed byby several partners and agencies, it didn’t really give any partners and agencies, it didn’t really give any authority protect sage grouse. last authority toto protect thethe sage grouse. InIn thethe last decade the potential for the bird to be listed decade the potential for the bird to be listed asas endangered species has grown. bird anan endangered species has grown. If If thethe bird were listed, it could mean purchase were toto bebe listed, it could mean thethe purchase habitat land, stop any further agriculofof habitat land, thethe stop toto any further agriculture development and many restrictions that ture development and many restrictions that could cause problems local economies and could cause problems onon local economies and access some local public lands. access toto some ofof thethe local public lands. Wightman explained that most Wightman explained that most ofof thethe Western states have listed determinations and Western states have listed determinations and plans help sage grouse survive. The plans toto help thethe sage grouse survive. The states need have these listed determinations states need toto have these listed determinations 2015, decision listing bird byby 2015, asas thethe decision forfor listing thethe bird will be made in 2016. That led Montana Gov. will be made in 2016. That led Montana Gov. Steve Bullock sign executive order Steve Bullock toto sign anan executive order toto create a council that would address issues create a council that would address thethe issues – and find a plan Montana that might help – and find a plan forfor Montana that might help focus on what kinds of regulations might actufocus on what kinds of regulations might actually help bird, without hurting public. ally help thethe bird, without hurting thethe public. CONTINUED PAGE CONTINUED ONON PAGE 1111

FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH The Valley County Farm The Valley County Farm Service Agency reminds Service Agency reminds Hi-Line growers that U.S. Hi-Line growers that thethe U.S. Department Agriculture Department ofof Agriculture will offer soybean producers will offer soybean producers opportunity request thethe opportunity toto request aa referendum Soybean referendum onon thethe Soybean Promotion and Research Promotion and Research Order, authorized under Order, asas authorized under Soybean Promotion, thethe Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Research, and Consumer Information Act. Information Act. The Request ReferThe Request forfor Referendum will conducted endum will bebe conducted at at USDA's county FSA offices. USDA's county FSA offices. eligible participate, ToTo bebe eligible toto participate, producers must certify and producers must certify and provide documentation that provide documentation that shows that they produced soyshows that they produced soybeans and paid assessment beans and paid anan assessment soybeans during onon thethe soybeans during thethe pe-period Jan. 2012, through riod ofof Jan. 1, 1, 2012, through Dec. 2013. Dec. 31,31, 2013. Beginning May 5 and Beginning May 5 and continuing through May continuing through May 30,30, 2014, producers may obtain 2014, producers may obtain a form mail, fax, a form byby mail, fax, oror inin person from FSA county person from thethe FSA county offices. Forms may also offices. Forms may also bebe obtained internet obtained viavia thethe internet at at www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ www.ams.usda.gov/AMSv1.0/ SoybeaninformationontheSoySoybeaninformationontheSoybeanRequestforReferendum beanRequestforReferendum

during same time period. during thethe same time period. Individual producers and Individual producers and other producer entities may other producer entities may request a referendum request a referendum at at thethe county FSA office where their county FSA office where their administrative farm records administrative farm records maintained. areare maintained. For producer parFor thethe producer notnot participating FSA programs, ticipating inin FSA programs, opportunity request thethe opportunity toto request a referendum will proa referendum will bebe provided county FSA office vided at at thethe county FSA office where producer owns where thethe producer owns oror rents land. Completed forms rents land. Completed forms and supporting documentaand supporting documentation must returned tion must bebe returned toto thethe appropriate county FSA office appropriate county FSA office person later byby faxfax oror inin person nono later than close business May than close ofof business May 2014; returned 30,30, 2014; oror if if returned byby mail, must postmarked mail, must bebe postmarked byby midnight May 2014, and midnight May 30,30, 2014, and received county FSA received inin thethe county FSA office close business office byby close ofof business onon June 2014. June 5, 5, 2014. USDA will conduct USDA will conduct aa referendum least perreferendum if if at at least 1010 percent nation’s 569,998 cent ofof thethe nation’s 569,998 soybean producers support soybean producers support aa referendum. referendum. Not more than one-fifth Not more than one-fifth producers who support ofof thethe producers who support having a referendum can having a referendum can bebe from any one state. from any one state.

Holdonontotoyour yourhats hatsand and Hold kickupupyour yourheels heelsforforthe the kick 130thMontana MontanaStockgrowers Stockgrowers 130th Association Mid-Year Meeting Association Mid-Year Meeting MilesCity CityononJune June13-14. 13-14. ininMiles This year’s event will highThis year’s event will bebe highlighted amazing concert lighted byby anan amazing concert Fridaynight nightfeaturing featuring The ononFriday The Bellamy Brothers and Copper Bellamy Brothers and Copper Mountain Band. Mountain Band. Mid-Year attendees will Mid-Year attendees will bebe

treatedtotoa ahorse horseparade paradefolfoltreated lowed Miles City Ranch lowed byby thethe Miles City Ranch Rodeo Saturday. Rodeo onon Saturday. The opening general The opening ofofthethe general session Friday will include session Friday will include anan address president address byby thethe president ofof thethe National Cattlemen’s Beef AsNational Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Bob McCan. ranch sociation, Bob McCan. AA ranch tour will follow. tour will follow. Moredetails: details:406-442406-442More 3420 3420

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1. Be aware of the agencies and resources 1. Be aware of the agencies and resources available in your community - what services available in your community - what services they offer and what their limitations are. they offer and what their limitations are. Listen for2014 signs and symptoms that May Listen for2014 signs and symptoms that May 2222.2.person May the or 2014 family needs help which you the person or family needs help which you can’t provide, i.e., ďŹ nancial, legal or personal can’t provide, i.e., ďŹ nancial, legal or personal counseling. counseling. 3. Assess what agency or community re3. Assess what agency or community resource would be most appropriate to address source would be most appropriate to address the person’s (or family’s) problems. the person’s (or family’s) problems. 4. Discuss the referral with the person or 4. Discuss the referral with the person or family (“It sounds/looks like you are feeling family (“It sounds/looks like you are feeling _____. I think _____ could help you deal with _____. I think _____ could help you deal with your situation.â€?) your situation.â€?) 5. Explore the individual’s or family’s will5. Explore the individual’s or family’s will-

r o r F o s F Us lll U a p l o C a p r o C C r see C p l u s l P u r ur P d C o p r o u o C Y r o Y e Seeed l i S l O i & O riceess & Pric P

• Who will be the person for you to contact • Who will be the person for you to contact later if necessary? later if necessary? Hi-Line • What will be the cost of the service (at • What will be the costHi-Line ofHi-Line the service (at fee/sliding scale)? fee/sliding scale)? • Do you need to do anything else to com• Do you need to do anything else to complete the referral? plete the referral? 7. Make sure the person or family and refer7. Make sure the person or family and referral agency connect and get together. Make one ral agency connect and get together. Make one or more follow-up contacts with the agency if or more follow-up contacts with the agency if called for by the situation. called for by the situation. Roubie Younkin, an MSU Extension Roubie Younkin, an MSU Extension agent in Valley County, compiled this reagent in Valley County, compiled this report from Extension sources. She can be port from Extension sources. She can be reached at (406)228-6239 or ryounkin@ reached at (406)228-6239 or ryounkin@ valleycountymt.net. valleycountymt.net.

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11 11 11

May 2014 2014 May May 2014

Sage Grouse Grouse Sage CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

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In Glasgow see In Plentywood see In Culbertson see In Circle see In Glasgow see In Plentywood see In Culbertson In Circle Sheena, Derrick, or Danielle Bob, Darvin, or Dennis Todd or Kylesee Justin, Dustinsee or Kyle Sheena, Derrick, or Danielle Bob, Darvin, or Dennis Todd or Kyle Justin, Dustin or Kyle 54275 HWY 2 East 804 East 1st Ave. 21 West 2nd St. Hwy 200 East 54275 HWY East 804 East 1st 21 West 2nd Hwy 200 East Glasgow, MT.259230 Plentywood, MT.Ave. 59254 Culbertson, MT. St. 59218 Circle, MT 59215 Glasgow, MT. 59230 Plentywood, MT. 59254 Culbertson, MT. 59218 Circle, MT 59215 1-406-228-2496 1-406-765-1531 1-406-787-6201 1-406-485-2145 1-406-228-2496 1-406-765-1531 1-406-787-6201 1-406-485-2145

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10 “In the state of Montana, 64 percent of sage “In the state of Montana, 64 percent of sage grouse are on private lands, around 7 percent grouse are on private lands, around 7 percent are on state lands,� Wightman said. are on state lands,� Wightman said. The plan that many people from different The plan that many people from different agencies, appointed by the governor, has finally agencies, appointed by the governor, has finally been drafted and has been waiting on the final been drafted and has been waiting on the final approval and signature of Gov. Bullock. Wightapproval and signature of Gov. Bullock. Wightman said the idea of the plan is to allow some man said the idea of the plan is to allow some authority to help with the issues of the sage authority to help with the issues of the sage grouse, one of those being the loss of habitat. grouse, one of those being the loss of habitat. Some of the loss is from crop land developSome of the loss is from crop land development, and other areas from gas and oil development, and other areas from gas and oil development in Montana. Areas like Nevada have lost ment in Montana. Areas like Nevada have lost much of the habitat due to heavy fire seasons. much of the habitat due to heavy fire seasons. John Carlson, who is a native of Glasgow John Carlson, who is a native of Glasgow and works for the Beauru of Land Manageand works for the Beauru of Land Management (BLM), explained that a lot of public ment (BLM), explained that a lot of public comments and groundwork went into the plan comments and groundwork went into the plan that went to the governor’s office. Carlson that went to the governor’s office. Carlson is a biologist who has watched the birds. He is a biologist who has watched the birds. He explained that the birds like open country and explained that the birds like open country and very little disturbances. The need for sagebrush very little disturbances. The need for sagebrush is imperative for their survival. is imperative for their survival. “We need to figure out ways to work “We need to figure out ways to work cooperatively,� Carlson said. “Grazing land cooperatively,� Carlson said. “Grazing land compatible with sage grouse and looking for compatible with sage grouse and looking for good land management practices.� good land management practices.� Carlson explained that currently energy Carlson explained that currently energy development was causing more issues locally development was causing more issues locally and that the unique bird often leaves areas with and that the unique bird often leaves areas with disturbances in the landscape. The birds tend disturbances in the landscape. The birds tend to fluctuate a lot on their own depending on to fluctuate a lot on their own depending on weather and reproduction season. Carlson feels weather and reproduction season. Carlson feels that what is going on in the local area with the that what is going on in the local area with the cooperation of BLM, FWP and land owners cooperation of BLM, FWP and land owners has already helped to protect what is already has already helped to protect what is already here in Northeastern Montana. He explained here in Northeastern Montana. He explained that the area is one of the best grassland bird that the area is one of the best grassland bird complexes in North America. complexes in North America. “Many of the landowners are proud to have “Many of the landowners are proud to have this bird on their land,� Carlson said. this bird on their land,� Carlson said. While the plan hasn’t been signed or finalWhile the plan hasn’t been signed or finalized, it could mean an extra few steps in develized, it could mean an extra few steps in development. Building projects might need to be reopment. Building projects might need to be reviewed before a permit is released. This might viewed before a permit is released. This might limit new structures on landscape. Wightman limit new structures on landscape. Wightman explained that much of the private landowners explained that much of the private landowners wouldn’t necessarily be effected. The might wouldn’t necessarily be effected. The might look at an area of impact and require developlook at an area of impact and require developers to reclaim areas to ensure habitat is restored ers to reclaim areas to ensure habitat is restored or replaced after a disturbance. The plan would or replaced after a disturbance. The plan would allow Montana to keep management authority allow Montana to keep management authority in some areas, and it would show that the state in some areas, and it would show that the state is willing to step up to protect the sage grouse. is willing to step up to protect the sage grouse. “Land owners are also concerned about “Land owners are also concerned about regulation and what might happen if the bird regulation and what might happen if the bird is listed,� Wightman said. “While southern is listed,� Wightman said. “While southern Phillips County and Valley County are some of Phillips County and Valley County are some of the best sage grouse land, the whole West will the best sage grouse land, the whole West will be looked at.� be looked at.� One thing that most likely will not be imOne thing that most likely will not be impacted are the ranchers. Wightman explained pacted are the ranchers. Wightman explained that while grazing posed some concern, the that while grazing posed some concern, the FWP actually feels that grazing is actually FWP actually feels that grazing is actually good for the sage grouse. Currently a research good for the sage grouse. Currently a research project near the Roundup area has been trackproject near the Roundup area has been tracking grazing strategies to help both cattle and ing grazing strategies to help both cattle and

Hi-Line Hi-Line Hi-Line

knowledge, further said that she beliewed FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH knowledge, further said that she beliewed FOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH “conservation programs will be a large part What’s going to happen with the Farm “conservation programs will be a large part What’s going to happen with the Farm of the cuts, with reductions in Conservation Bill and the Department of Labor’s overof the cuts, with reductions in Conservation Bill and the Department of Labor’s overReserve Program land. There is land in CRP reach on “child laborâ€? were hot topics www.havredailynews.com Reserve Program land. There is land in CRP reach on “child laborâ€? were hot topics www.havredailynews.com that isn’twww.havredailynews.com erodible and should not even be during the Montana Farm Bureau Conventhat isn’t erodible and should not even be during the Montana Farm Bureau Convenpart of the program. There may be some cuts tion Nov. 6-9 in Missoula. American Farm part of the program. There may be some cuts tionagreed Nov. 6-9 Missoula. Farm Henry thatinPolicy ranchers on American grazing systems in working lands programs. Right now there Bureau Public Director Mary Kay Henry agreed that Policy ranchers on grazing systems in working lands programs. Right now there Public Director Mary Kay thatBureau rest and rotate have been making a good are 23 conservation programs; Farm Bureau Thatcher covered the ever-changing inforthatThatcher rest and rotate have been making a good are 23 conservation programs; Farm Bureau covered the inforimpact. Heabout explained thatever-changing the three-pasture has long been a proponent of combining mation the Farm Bill. impact. He explained that the three-pasture has long been a proponent of combining mation about theworks Farm Bill. rest-rotation system best. Ranchers have some of them. I suspect that when the dust Although the works so-called congressional rest-rotation system best. Ranchers have some of them. I suspect that when the dust Although the so-called congressional also“Super been making their fences more visible for clears, there will be ďŹ ve or less programs.â€? Committeeâ€? after the convention also“Super been making their fences more visible for clears, there will be ďŹ ve or less programs.â€? Committeeâ€? after the convention thefailed sage grouse to up helpwith avoid impacts. UnfortuThatcher explained a proposal for comto come a deďŹ cit reduction thefailed sage grouse to up helpwith avoiddeďŹ cit impacts. UnfortuThatcher explained a proposal for comtoimpacts come reduction nately the to all theaits habitat, throughout modity programs, noting that with the cuts, planthe asimpacts some expected, earlier idea to cut nately to all the habitat, throughout modity programs, noting that with the cuts, as some expected,most its earlier idea to cut theplan U.S.billion and Canada likely affect if it’s done right, there can still be a safety $23 out ofwill the most USDA budget drew the$23 U.S.billion and Canada likely affect if it’s done right, there can still be a safety out ofwill the USDA budget drew ranchers and farmers locally. net for agriculture. comments from Thatcher. ranchers and farmers locally. net for agriculture. comments Thatcher. “Overall thefrom Montana sage grouse Another topic of discussion was the De“Agriculture is deďŹ nitely goingare to doing be tak“Overall the Montana sage grouse are Another topic of discussion was the De“Agriculture is habitat deďŹ nitely going to doing be tak- partment of Labor’s proposed restrictions on well. have share a large protected ingWe a good of cuts,â€?that she issaid. “Howpartment of Labor’s proposed restrictions on well. have share a largeofhabitat protected ingWe a good cuts,â€?that she issaid. “Howchildren working in agriculture. Under the pretty well. numbers falling ever, it’sThe better to dealhave withbeen this now in in this children working in agriculture. Under the pretty well. numbers falling ever, it’sThe better to dealhave withbeen this now in in this proposed rules, youth under the age of 16 committee than waiting other areas,â€? Henry said. until next year.â€? proposed rules,and youth visit under the age ofus 16 committee than waiting until next year.â€? other areas,â€? Henry said. Stopnot with would notby be able to do any labor on a farm Thatcher, her comments With 11 statesbasing and Canada involved,on current would by and visit with be able to do any labor on aus farm Thatcher, her comments With 11 statesbasing and Canada involved,on current Stop numbers of the bird can’t be focused to one about your Spring Needs numbers of the bird can’t be focused to one about your Spring Needs area. Henry said there wasn’t much of a change area. Henry said there wasn’t much of a change Fertilizers in numbers locally, but with the sage grouse ** Fertilizers in numbers locally, but with the sage grouse territory as a whole, concerns began to arise Soil Sampling Sampling territory as a whole, concerns began to arise ** Soil quickly. quickly. *Chemicals While hunting still continues for the birds, *Chemicals While hunting still continues for the birds, Henry said less than 2 percent are harvested. *Seed & & Seed Seed Treatments Treatments Henry said less than 2 percent are harvested. *Seed He said those birds would die in winter or He said those birds would die in winter or We are are your your dealer dealer for for from predators during a season, so the continWe from predators during a season, so the continued hunting of the bird hasn’t really made an seed corn corn & & alfalfa alfalfa ued hunting of the bird hasn’t really made an seed impact on the population. Š – Round-Up Ready Varieties – impact on the population. – Round-Up ReadyŠ Varieties – Henry said another possibility of loss in Henry said another possibility of loss in CHEVROLET numbers could be due to West Nile Virus. CHEVROLET numbers could be due to West Nile Virus. While there hasn’t been any documentation While there hasn’t been any documentation on the virus in the birds, most likely there’s an on the virus in the birds, most likely there’s anConvenient Location. All In One impact. Landowners could bring dead birds in Glasgow – 228-2571 228-2571 All In One Location. impact. Landowners could bring dead birds inConvenient Glasgow – for testing but many times440 the Hwy FWP2 doesn’t see ~440Across W ~ Glasgow from Fairgrounds Sales: Gilbert – – 263-2571 263-2571 Highway #2 W. • Glasgow for testing GMC but many times440 the Hwy FWP2 doesn’t see ~440Across W ~ Glasgow from Fairgrounds Sales: Gilbert Highway W. • Glasgow GMC any specimens come in to test. Across from Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 ~ 1-800-255-1472 ~ #2 406-228-4381 any specimens come in to test. Across from Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 ~ 1-800-255-1472 ~ 406-228-4381 406-228-9326 Josh – 785-7006 WhileCertiďŹ ed it seems like many of theFamily factors of by the Newton owned Boys Josh – 785-7006 406-228-9326 WhileCertiďŹ ed it seems like many of theFamily factors of 1-800-255-1472 •Boys 406-228-4381 owned by the Newton Service loweringService number of the sage grouse is in quesYour Customer OwnedRent Co-op A Car 1-800-255-1472 •or 406-228-4381 Auto Parts & Repair Center See Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny Ted Family owned by the Newton Boys lowering number ofParts the sage grouse is in quesYour Customer OwnedRent Co-op A Car Auto & Repair Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny or Ted Boys Family owned by the Newton CONTINUED ON PAGE 12See Center CONTINUED ON PAGE 12

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the sage grouse. Several ranchers signed up the sage grouse. Several ranchers signed up through the NRCS (Natural Resources Conserthrough the NRCS (Natural Resources Conservation Services) sage grouse initiative program. vation Services) sage grouse initiative program. Wightman said the program has been successWightman said the program has been successful and many of the private land owners have ful and many of the private land owners have been working to help the sage grouse. been working to help the sage grouse. Ron Stoneberg, a local rancher who retired Ron Stoneberg, a local rancher who retired after over 30 years of work for the FWP as a after over 30 years of work for the FWP as a wildlife biologist, agreed that grazing seems to wildlife biologist, agreed that grazing seems to help the sage grouse. Ranch life seems to help help the sage grouse. Ranch life seems to help provide the birds with water, flattened grass provide the birds with water, flattened grass area for dancing grounds and less predators in area for dancing grounds and less predators in the area to kill off the birds. the area to kill off the birds. Stoneberg remembers years of counting the Stoneberg remembers years of counting the sage grouse and keeping records on the birds sage grouse and keeping records on the birds for the FWP. He has several dancing grounds for the FWP. He has several dancing grounds located near and on his ranch. He explained located near and on his ranch. He explained that predators like golden eagles, foxes and that predators like golden eagles, foxes and ground squirrels are a big issue when it comes ground squirrels are a big issue when it comes to the survival of the birds. Weather also afto the survival of the birds. Weather also affects how the birds survive; severe drought fects how the birds survive; severe drought and harsh winters can take a toll on the bird and harsh winters can take a toll on the bird population. population. “They are actually long living birds if they “They are actually long living birds if they survive,� Stoneberg said. survive,� Stoneberg said. He said the birds historically were thick in He said the birds historically were thick in the area. Some locals ate sage grouse. They the area. Some locals ate sage grouse. They were hunted more frequently in the past, when were hunted more frequently in the past, when Stoneberg said there was less vegetation and Stoneberg said there was less vegetation and more birds. more birds. The sage grouse forages on the ground, and The sage grouse forages on the ground, and are unable to eat and digest hard seeds. So they are unable to eat and digest hard seeds. So they mostly feed on sagebrush and small insects and mostly feed on sagebrush and small insects and other plants. They nest on the ground under other plants. They nest on the ground under sagebrush and grass patches where the eggs sagebrush and grass patches where the eggs and chicks can remain hidden from their prey. and chicks can remain hidden from their prey. They almost need a balance of habitat, weather They almost need a balance of habitat, weather and lack of prey for numbers to increase. and lack of prey for numbers to increase. In the local area, the sage grouse haven’t In the local area, the sage grouse haven’t seen a large drop in numbers. Stoneberg seen a large drop in numbers. Stoneberg explained that some years are just better than explained that some years are just better than others for the bird population. His belief is that others for the bird population. His belief is that the bird doesn’t deserve as much attention, that the bird doesn’t deserve as much attention, that it’s not hunted nearly as often anymore. He it’s not hunted nearly as often anymore. He said that without the help of some of the local said that without the help of some of the local ranchers the birds might not be flourishing as ranchers the birds might not be flourishing as well. well. Glasgow Wildlife Biologist for FWP Drew Glasgow Wildlife Biologist for FWP Drew

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National FFA Scholarships Awarded Local Students National FFA Scholarships Awarded to to Local Students

The National FFA Organization awarded $2,000 John Deere Company/Farm The National FFA Organization awarded $2,000 John Deere Company/Farm Equipment Sales, Inc. scholarships to 4 local students. These scholarships Equipment Sales, Inc. scholarships to 4 local students. These scholarships are from and John Deere Company through a special are from and John Deere Company through a special project of the National FFA Foundation. project of the National FFA Foundation.

the large birds an almost regal look to their the large birds an almost regal look to their surroundings. surroundings. The plan that awaits a signature for the The plan that awaits a signature for the CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11 state of Montana might bring controversy to state of Montana might bring controversy to developing industry and challenges to farmers tion, in Northeastern Montana there seems to developing industry and challenges to farmers tion, in Northeastern Montana there seems to looking to expand their croplands. While the be a cohesion of agencies and land owners looking to expand their croplands. While the be a cohesion of agencies and land owners issues seem complex, there is simplicity in the looking for answers to protect the bird and issues seem complex, there is simplicity in the looking for answers to protect the bird and life of the bird that has caused a lot of attenkeep them of the endangered species list. life of the bird that has caused a lot of attenkeep them of the endangered species list. While no answer may be swift and sure, Landowners, like Stoneberg, might get up tion.tion. While no answer may be swift and sure, Landowners, like Stoneberg, might get up the minds of many working at daybreak to go look at what may be a rare the minds of many havehave beenbeen working on aon a at daybreak to go look at what may be a rare permanent solution. sight to much of the world. Through binocupermanent solution. sight to much of the world. Through binocu“Working landowners be crucial standing a gravel he can “Working withwith landowners will will be crucial larslars standing on aon gravel roadroad he can keepkeep a a in the future,” Henry said. “It’s the bigger count of the populations near his ranch. Listencount of the populations near his ranch. Listen- in the future,” Henry said. “It’s the bigger picture.” watching mating ritual gives picture.” ing ing andand watching the the mating ritual thatthat gives

Brady Johnson of the Hinsdale FFA. Brady Johnson of the Hinsdale HSHS FFA. Johnson plans to use the funds to pursue a degree Johnson plans to use the funds to pursue a degree at at Montana State University -Bozeman. Montana State University -Bozeman. Nicole Kirby Medicine Lake FFA. Nicole Kirby of of thethe Medicine Lake HSHS FFA. Kirby plans to use the funds to pursue a degree Kirby plans to use the funds to pursue a degree at at Miles Community College (MT). Miles Community College (MT). Haley Lund Divide FFA. Haley Lund of of thethe Divide Co Co HSHS FFA. Lund plans to use the funds to pursue a degree Lund plans to use the funds to pursue a degree at at University of North Dakota. University of North Dakota. Ciara Sorum Divide FFA. Ciara Sorum of of thethe Divide Co Co HSHS FFA. Sorum plans to use the funds to pursue a degree Sorum plans to use the funds to pursue a degree at at Williston State College (ND). Williston State College (ND). These scholarships of 1,781 awarded through National Organization’s These scholarships areare 4 of4 1,781 awarded through the the National FFAFFA Organization’s scholarship program year. Currently, sponsors contribute more scholarship program thisthis year. Currently, 126126 sponsors contribute more thanthan $2.2 million to support scholarships students. years, scholarships $2.2 million to support scholarships for for students. For For 30 30 years, scholarships havehave been made available through funding secured by the National Foundation. been made available through funding secured by the National FFAFFA Foundation. This generous funding comes from individuals, businesses corporate sponsors This generous funding comes from individuals, businesses andand corporate sponsors to encourage excellence enable students to pursue their educational goals. to encourage excellence andand enable students to pursue their educational goals. Scholarship recipients were selected from 6,315 applicants across country. Scholarship recipients were selected from 6,315 applicants fromfrom across the the country. Selections were based applicant's leadership, academic record, other Selections were based on on thethe applicant's leadership, academic record, FFAFFA andand other school community activities, supervised agricultural or work experience school andand community activities, supervised agricultural or work experience in agricultural education future goals. in agricultural education andand future goals. National Organization provides leadership, personal growth career TheThe National FFAFFA Organization provides leadership, personal growth andand career success training through agricultural education to 579,678 student members success training through agricultural education to 579,678 student members in in grades 7- 12 belong to one of 7,570 local chapters throughout U.S., grades 7- 12 whowho belong to one of 7,570 local FFAFFA chapters throughout the the U.S., Puerto Rico Virgin Islands. Puerto Rico andand thethe Virgin Islands.

About National Organization About National FFAFFA Organization

National Organization is a national organization of 579,678 student members as of part of 7,570 FFA chapters The The National FFA FFA Organization is a national youthyouth organization of 579,678 student members as part 7,570 local local FFA chapters allstates, 50 states, Puerto andVirgin the Virgin Islands. The mission FFA mission to make a positive difference the of lives of students in allin50 Puerto RicoRico and the Islands. The FFA is to is make a positive difference in theinlives students by developing potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. by developing theirtheir potential for premier leadership, personal growth and career success through agricultural education. The The National Organization operates a federal charter granted by81st the 81st United Congress it is an integral National FFA FFA Organization operates underunder a federal charter granted by the United StatesStates Congress and itand is an integral part part of public instruction in agriculture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction foras FFA of public instruction in agriculture. The U.S. Department of Education provides leadership and helps set direction for FFA a as a service to state and local agricultural education programs. For more, visitNational the National FFA Organization at FFA.org, service to state and local agricultural education programs. For more, visit the FFA Organization onlineonline at FFA.org, on on Facebook, Twitter and offi thecial offiNational cial National FFA Organization Facebook, Twitter and the FFA Organization blog.blog.

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About National FFAFFA Foundation About National Foundation

The The National FFA FFA Foundation builds partnerships with with industry, education, government, otherother foundations and individuals National Foundation builds partnerships industry, education, government, foundations and individuals to secure financial resources that that recognize FFA member achievements, develop student leaders and support the future of to secure financial resources recognize FFA member achievements, develop student leaders and support the future of agricultural education. Governed by a by 19-member boardboard of trustees comprised of educators, business leaders, individual donors agricultural education. Governed a 19-member of trustees comprised of educators, business leaders, individual donors and and FFA FFA alumni, the foundation is a separately-registered nonprofi t organization. AboutAbout 82 percent of every dollardollar received by theby the alumni, the foundation is a separately-registered nonprofi t organization. 82 percent of every received foundation supports FFA members and agricultural education opportunities. foundation supports FFA members and agricultural education opportunities. For more, visit visit FFA.org/Give. For more, FFA.org/Give.

BoxBox 31 31 1-866-528-2141 1-866-528-2141 Glasgow, MTMT 59230 CellCell Glasgow, 59230 406-236-1577 406-236-1577 406-228-2141 406-228-4144 FaxFax 406-228-2141 406-228-4144 www.hilineford.com www.hilineford.com

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