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Winter hit in February Temps from 44-degree high to 41-below-zero low in seven days Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com A f t e r fa l l - l i ke we a t h e r i n December and January into the start of February, agriculture producers got a hit of real winter through most of last month. Temperatures hit highs of 44 degrees and 42 degrees in Havre Feb. 1 and 2, respectively, then dropped to a high of 1 degree above zero Feb. 3 — the last time the high was above zero in Havre until Feb. 13, when it hit a balmy 3 degrees. While the record for February was not complete at the time of this article’s writing, Feb. 26, it looked guaranteed that the average temperature was close to a new record for lows —  not the coldest month,

which was in the benchmark year of 1936 when the average temperature for the entire month was minus 12.8 degrees, but nearly guaranteed to take second. The year that had held that dubious honor, 1887, recorded an average temperature of minus 4.9 degrees. As of Feb. 25, Havre had an average of minus 6.7 degrees for February, with more cold predicted through the end of the week and into March. The third-coldest February on record was in 1891, with a comparatively warm average of minus 0.2. The temperatures are far below the norm, National Weather Service meteorologist Paul Nutter of Great Falls said. The average high for Havre on Feb. 26 is 37 degrees above zero, and the average low 13 degrees — also above zero. And the snow fell in February, as well, though not like in the nearrecord year of 2018.

Havre Daily News/Ryan Berry Cattle graze in the snow Friday south of Havre.

www.havredailynews.com

FARM & RANCH Fundraiser Proceeds Proceeds from all four events in this fourweek period will go toward MSU-Northern R o d e o s c h o l a r s h i p s a n d e x p e n s e s, Kallenberger said. “One-hundred percent of the money we make goes, number one, for scholarships and, number two, for travel and for stock and things like that, expenses,” he said. “But first and foremost it’s for scholarships.” The team maintains some roping and rough stock during the school year for practice and the university pays expenses such as

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson The PRCA Extreme Bares & Broncs Challenge will be March 29-30 in Havre. 6:30 and breakaway roping after the last team finishes. Concessions will be sold at the arena. Youth Basketball The Sunday Youth Basketball Shootout is the only non-horse competition the teams are hosting as a fundraiser this spring, but it will give girls in third through eighth grades a chance to play some 5-on-5 basketball. This one-day round robin competition will be held at Northern’s Armory Gymnasium starting at 8 a.m., and gives each team three games for $150 per team entry fee. Admission is $5. Teams will be broken into three divisions — 3rd-4th Grade; 5th-6th Grade; and 7th-8th Grade — and they need to pre-register by contacting Kallenberger at 945-1329. PRCA Action The showcase event will be the PRCA Extreme Bares and Broncs Challenge set for March 29-30 in the Bigger Better Barn, Kallenberger said, adding that this competition will replace their annual BullDazzle fundraising event. “It’s going to have the same feel as the BullDazzle,” he said, “but bigger.” While the rough stock rides start at 7:30 p.m. each night, the spectator action begins at 6:30 p.m. with bidding in a Calcutta, Kallenberger said, and both evenings will include food and beer concessions, a big screen TV and a fully heated barn. Pre-sold tickets are $18 each and tickets at the door will be $20, but youth 10 and under will get in free, he added. Tickets can be purchased at Independence Bank, Stockman Bank and Norman’s Ranch and Sportswear, as well as from any Northern Rodeo member. Prize money from the rodeo, which has a $10,000 added payout for each event, will count toward the 2019 National Finals Rodeo and Rookie of the Year Standings for the competitors. PRCA cardholders can sign up from noon March 18 to noon March 19. “Some of the top bareback and saddle bronc riders in the world should be in Havre,” Kallenberger said. Open Rodeo The 2019 Spring Open Rodeo is set for April 6 at 6 p.m. at the Bigger Better Barn. Admission is $5 per adult and youth under 18 get in free. Food and beer concessions will be

available. Events will include bareback, saddle bronc, bull riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, ladies breakaway roping, goat tying, barrel racing and team roping. The first round of team roping will start at 2 p.m. with the top 10 competing in the night show, and if slack is needed for the barrel racing, it will start at 4:30 p.m. Entry information can be found on the MSU Northern Rodeo Facebook page or by contacting Kallenberger at 945-1329 or douglas.kallenberger@msun.edu.

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gas and hotel while the teams are on the road for competition in their Big Sky Region. Eight colleges and universities in Montana and Northwest College in Powell, Wyoming comprise the region. Top qualifiers also travel to the College National Finals Rodeo in Casper, Wyoming, which will be June 7-15 this year. After working these fundraising events, the Northern Rodeo men’s and women’s teams will be heading to the 2019 MSU Spring Rodeo at the Brick Breeden Fieldhouse in Bozeman April 11-14.


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MSU-Northern Rodeo Montana State University-Northern Rodeo teams will be hosting a variety of events in Havre — including a new PRCA-sanctioned rodeo — leading up to the teams’ participation in the annual spring rodeo in Bozeman. Roping Friday Night Roping Jackpot will kick off the events this Friday at the Bigger Better Barn on the Great Northern Fairgrounds with open team roping and breakaway roping. “We’re hoping the weather cooperates,” Northern’s head coach Doug Kallenberger said, because the event will only be held if the temperature is at least 20 degrees Fahrenheit.

The $50 entry gets team ropers two entries in a #12 equalizer pick-one, draw-one format, which means each roper gets one run with their choice of partner and one with a partner drawn from the entrants. Breakaway ropers will pay $20 for two head, and payout will be on a two-head average. With no pre-registration requirements, cashonly entry begins at 5:30 p.m., team roping at

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson MSU-Northern Rodeo is hosting its first PRCA Extreme Bares & Broncs as its premiere rodeo fundraiser this year in place of its annual BullDazzle event.

Winter: Nutter: 'We're just going to have to keep watching, day to day' n Continued from page 6 hay earlier, with the mild December and January, but will likely have to buy more now. He said the weather last year was hard to deal with, and the summer wasn’t very good, either. It was too dry, McCracken said. “I guess that’s part of living in the state,” he said. You play with the hand you get dealt.” He said he saw on AccuWeather that that service expects the weather to warm up in early to mid-March. “Everybody will feel good about that,” McCracken said. “This weather is not much fun for anybody, no matter what you do.”

Cold to continue or not? Contrasting forecasts are out for a few weeks out as of the writing of this article. In fact, AccuWeather predicts a high of 23 by March 7 and 34 degrees by March 8 and highs in the 30s and 40s in the days following. It predicts a low of minus 5 March 6 but has the lows rising up to mostly the teens and even 20s thereafter. Weather Channel is not as optimistic. The high it predicts March 7 is 11 degrees with a low of minus 6, and highs in the teens and lows still below zero through March 12. National Weather Service meteorologist

Paul Nutter in Great Falls said Feb. 26 that the mass of cold air hanging over Montana — and most of the nation — is not likely to be gone in early March. 
 “I have forecast with overnight lows below zero through the forecast period, through March 6,” he said. “There is no break through the entire official forecast period.” And it isn’t just for Montana. “What’s interesting about this outlook is, for March 5 to March 11 there is a 90 percent chance to remain below average,” he said.

“That covers the entire contiguous lower 48 states” with the exception of parts of Arizona, New Mexico and Florida. He said further into March, what will happen is less clear, although warmer sunlight and longer days should break the large, cold weather pattern. The data available indicates this part of north-central Montana should have about equal chances to have above-normal or below-normal temperatures, Nutter said. “We’re just going to have to keep watching, day to day,” he said.

Havre Daily News/Ryan Berry Cattle graze in the snow at a ranch along U.S. Highway 87 Tuesday south of Havre. During the brutal winter last year, February shattered snowfall records by the 19th of the month, with a new record of 32.6 inches. Although no more snow fell during the month, it was enough to beat the record set in 1977-78 at 18.6 inches. Through Feb. 25 this year, Havre saw 16 inches of snow with a slight chance of snow

predicted through the end of the last week of February. A mild start to winter The wintry February weather followed a December that regularly saw highs in the 40s and 50s and an average temperature for

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Havre Daily News/Ryan Berry Cattle graze in the snow at a ranch along U.S. Highway 87 Tuesday south of Havre.

Winter: McCracken: 'It's just cold' n Continued from page 5 Havre of 26.8 degrees. The normal average for Havre in December is 19.1 degrees. December saw 1.3 inches of snow at the Havre reporting station, compared to a normal snowfall of 7.4 inches. January saw a bit more snow — 6.8 inches compared to a normal average for Havre of 7.1 inches — but the weather in the area continued to be warm, including highs still hitting the 40s and 50s in the early part of the month. The average temperature for Havre this January was 24.6 degrees, compared to a normal average of 18 degrees.

Cold in the calving season Although it doesn’t compare to the monthslong deluge of snow and cold in the 2017-18 winter, the last month has made the year rougher for livestock. Kelly McCracken, owner of KalMcC Angus out of Turner, said he has just started calving. The cold makes it harder on the livestock but ranchers just have to deal with it, he said. “It’s just cold,” he said, adding, “It just takes a lot of feed.” McCracken said he was doing all right for

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Havre Daily News/Ryan Berry Cattle graze in the snow at a ranch along U.S. Highway 87 Tuesday south of Havre.

Winter: McCracken: 'It's just cold' n Continued from page 5 Havre of 26.8 degrees. The normal average for Havre in December is 19.1 degrees. December saw 1.3 inches of snow at the Havre reporting station, compared to a normal snowfall of 7.4 inches. January saw a bit more snow — 6.8 inches compared to a normal average for Havre of 7.1 inches — but the weather in the area continued to be warm, including highs still hitting the 40s and 50s in the early part of the month. The average temperature for Havre this January was 24.6 degrees, compared to a normal average of 18 degrees.

Cold in the calving season Although it doesn’t compare to the monthslong deluge of snow and cold in the 2017-18 winter, the last month has made the year rougher for livestock. Kelly McCracken, owner of KalMcC Angus out of Turner, said he has just started calving. The cold makes it harder on the livestock but ranchers just have to deal with it, he said. “It’s just cold,” he said, adding, “It just takes a lot of feed.” McCracken said he was doing all right for

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MSU-Northern Rodeo Montana State University-Northern Rodeo teams will be hosting a variety of events in Havre — including a new PRCA-sanctioned rodeo — leading up to the teams’ participation in the annual spring rodeo in Bozeman. Roping Friday Night Roping Jackpot will kick off the events this Friday at the Bigger Better Barn on the Great Northern Fairgrounds with open team roping and breakaway roping. “We’re hoping the weather cooperates,” Northern’s head coach Doug Kallenberger said, because the event will only be held if the temperature is at least 20 degrees Fahrenheit.

The $50 entry gets team ropers two entries in a #12 equalizer pick-one, draw-one format, which means each roper gets one run with their choice of partner and one with a partner drawn from the entrants. Breakaway ropers will pay $20 for two head, and payout will be on a two-head average. With no pre-registration requirements, cashonly entry begins at 5:30 p.m., team roping at

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson MSU-Northern Rodeo is hosting its first PRCA Extreme Bares & Broncs as its premiere rodeo fundraiser this year in place of its annual BullDazzle event.

Winter: Nutter: 'We're just going to have to keep watching, day to day' n Continued from page 6 hay earlier, with the mild December and January, but will likely have to buy more now. He said the weather last year was hard to deal with, and the summer wasn’t very good, either. It was too dry, McCracken said. “I guess that’s part of living in the state,” he said. You play with the hand you get dealt.” He said he saw on AccuWeather that that service expects the weather to warm up in early to mid-March. “Everybody will feel good about that,” McCracken said. “This weather is not much fun for anybody, no matter what you do.”

Cold to continue or not? Contrasting forecasts are out for a few weeks out as of the writing of this article. In fact, AccuWeather predicts a high of 23 by March 7 and 34 degrees by March 8 and highs in the 30s and 40s in the days following. It predicts a low of minus 5 March 6 but has the lows rising up to mostly the teens and even 20s thereafter. Weather Channel is not as optimistic. The high it predicts March 7 is 11 degrees with a low of minus 6, and highs in the teens and lows still below zero through March 12. National Weather Service meteorologist

Paul Nutter in Great Falls said Feb. 26 that the mass of cold air hanging over Montana — and most of the nation — is not likely to be gone in early March. 
 “I have forecast with overnight lows below zero through the forecast period, through March 6,” he said. “There is no break through the entire official forecast period.” And it isn’t just for Montana. “What’s interesting about this outlook is, for March 5 to March 11 there is a 90 percent chance to remain below average,” he said.

“That covers the entire contiguous lower 48 states” with the exception of parts of Arizona, New Mexico and Florida. He said further into March, what will happen is less clear, although warmer sunlight and longer days should break the large, cold weather pattern. The data available indicates this part of north-central Montana should have about equal chances to have above-normal or below-normal temperatures, Nutter said. “We’re just going to have to keep watching, day to day,” he said.

Havre Daily News/Ryan Berry Cattle graze in the snow at a ranch along U.S. Highway 87 Tuesday south of Havre. During the brutal winter last year, February shattered snowfall records by the 19th of the month, with a new record of 32.6 inches. Although no more snow fell during the month, it was enough to beat the record set in 1977-78 at 18.6 inches. Through Feb. 25 this year, Havre saw 16 inches of snow with a slight chance of snow

predicted through the end of the last week of February. A mild start to winter The wintry February weather followed a December that regularly saw highs in the 40s and 50s and an average temperature for

■ Winter continued on page 6

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Winter hit in February Temps from 44-degree high to 41-below-zero low in seven days Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com A f t e r fa l l - l i ke we a t h e r i n December and January into the start of February, agriculture producers got a hit of real winter through most of last month. Temperatures hit highs of 44 degrees and 42 degrees in Havre Feb. 1 and 2, respectively, then dropped to a high of 1 degree above zero Feb. 3 — the last time the high was above zero in Havre until Feb. 13, when it hit a balmy 3 degrees. While the record for February was not complete at the time of this article’s writing, Feb. 26, it looked guaranteed that the average temperature was close to a new record for lows —  not the coldest month,

which was in the benchmark year of 1936 when the average temperature for the entire month was minus 12.8 degrees, but nearly guaranteed to take second. The year that had held that dubious honor, 1887, recorded an average temperature of minus 4.9 degrees. As of Feb. 25, Havre had an average of minus 6.7 degrees for February, with more cold predicted through the end of the week and into March. The third-coldest February on record was in 1891, with a comparatively warm average of minus 0.2. The temperatures are far below the norm, National Weather Service meteorologist Paul Nutter of Great Falls said. The average high for Havre on Feb. 26 is 37 degrees above zero, and the average low 13 degrees — also above zero. And the snow fell in February, as well, though not like in the nearrecord year of 2018.

Havre Daily News/Ryan Berry Cattle graze in the snow Friday south of Havre.

www.havredailynews.com

FARM & RANCH Fundraiser Proceeds Proceeds from all four events in this fourweek period will go toward MSU-Northern R o d e o s c h o l a r s h i p s a n d e x p e n s e s, Kallenberger said. “One-hundred percent of the money we make goes, number one, for scholarships and, number two, for travel and for stock and things like that, expenses,” he said. “But first and foremost it’s for scholarships.” The team maintains some roping and rough stock during the school year for practice and the university pays expenses such as

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson The PRCA Extreme Bares & Broncs Challenge will be March 29-30 in Havre. 6:30 and breakaway roping after the last team finishes. Concessions will be sold at the arena. Youth Basketball The Sunday Youth Basketball Shootout is the only non-horse competition the teams are hosting as a fundraiser this spring, but it will give girls in third through eighth grades a chance to play some 5-on-5 basketball. This one-day round robin competition will be held at Northern’s Armory Gymnasium starting at 8 a.m., and gives each team three games for $150 per team entry fee. Admission is $5. Teams will be broken into three divisions — 3rd-4th Grade; 5th-6th Grade; and 7th-8th Grade — and they need to pre-register by contacting Kallenberger at 945-1329. PRCA Action The showcase event will be the PRCA Extreme Bares and Broncs Challenge set for March 29-30 in the Bigger Better Barn, Kallenberger said, adding that this competition will replace their annual BullDazzle fundraising event. “It’s going to have the same feel as the BullDazzle,” he said, “but bigger.” While the rough stock rides start at 7:30 p.m. each night, the spectator action begins at 6:30 p.m. with bidding in a Calcutta, Kallenberger said, and both evenings will include food and beer concessions, a big screen TV and a fully heated barn. Pre-sold tickets are $18 each and tickets at the door will be $20, but youth 10 and under will get in free, he added. Tickets can be purchased at Independence Bank, Stockman Bank and Norman’s Ranch and Sportswear, as well as from any Northern Rodeo member. Prize money from the rodeo, which has a $10,000 added payout for each event, will count toward the 2019 National Finals Rodeo and Rookie of the Year Standings for the competitors. PRCA cardholders can sign up from noon March 18 to noon March 19. “Some of the top bareback and saddle bronc riders in the world should be in Havre,” Kallenberger said. Open Rodeo The 2019 Spring Open Rodeo is set for April 6 at 6 p.m. at the Bigger Better Barn. Admission is $5 per adult and youth under 18 get in free. Food and beer concessions will be

available. Events will include bareback, saddle bronc, bull riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, ladies breakaway roping, goat tying, barrel racing and team roping. The first round of team roping will start at 2 p.m. with the top 10 competing in the night show, and if slack is needed for the barrel racing, it will start at 4:30 p.m. Entry information can be found on the MSU Northern Rodeo Facebook page or by contacting Kallenberger at 945-1329 or douglas.kallenberger@msun.edu.

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gas and hotel while the teams are on the road for competition in their Big Sky Region. Eight colleges and universities in Montana and Northwest College in Powell, Wyoming comprise the region. Top qualifiers also travel to the College National Finals Rodeo in Casper, Wyoming, which will be June 7-15 this year. After working these fundraising events, the Northern Rodeo men’s and women’s teams will be heading to the 2019 MSU Spring Rodeo at the Brick Breeden Fieldhouse in Bozeman April 11-14.


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