Page 1

12

Hi-Line

FARM & RANCH

December 2016

www.havredailynews.com

CALVING

MADE EASY

with WiFi connected Barn Cameras

The future of ag trade and the TPP

“ Thanks to

Triang

le, the new ca meras re alre are ady ma easier.T king ca hey ar lving e awes have h ome! W ad the ish we m 20 y would ears ag o! install

ed & a

- Justin

Call & ask

r about oru as! Barn Came

1.800.332.1201 | itstriangle.com

Miller,

Gildfor

d, MT


2

Hi-Line

December 2016

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Losing Trans-Pacific Partnership may not be best for Montana ag Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com The Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement between the United States and 11 other Pacific Rim nations is unlikely to be ratified during the lame duck session or after President-elect Donald Trump takes office, and this is not necessarily a good thing for agriculture producers in Montana and the U.S., some ag and economics experts in the U.S. say. “Agriculture played very little if any role in the calculus of the politics in the election,” Vince Smith, professor of economics at Montana State University’s Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics, said. Trump said Nov. 21 that one of his first actions in office will be to withdraw the United States from the TPP which he slammed as a “disaster” during his campaign. As of print deadline, he had not named a secretary of state, only that he had narrowed his choice down to four candidates. The TPP, which would have been a landmark international trade deal for President Barack Obama, became a hot topic during the 2016 presidential election campaign. N e i t h e r t h e Re p u b l i c a n Tr u m p n o r Democratic candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton supported the potential deal as they courted the vote from industry-based states with high electoral votes. n Continued on page 3

Combines line up on a field of harvested grain in western Hill County.

Havre Daily News/File photo

11

Hi-Line

December 2016

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Retired couple returns to Indiana to farm
 CAROL KUGLER The (Bloomington) Herald-Times SPENCER, Ind. (AP) — When most people retire, they expect to relax a little, take on fewer daily chores and have fewer responsibilities. That’s not what happened for Jerry and Paula Perron, owners of Bittersweet Farm in Owen County. The couple moved to the area from Denver, Colorado, after owning and operating the Brain Workout Center for 17 years. “When I turned 75, I told Paula, I’m done,” Jerry told The (Bloomington) Herald-Times recently while walking in the grassy fields of the 17-acre farm. That was in 2011, when the couple moved to Indiana onto the farm they say is “a little bit of heaven on Earth.” Jerry considers himself a Midwesterner even though he spent time in Colorado. The couple actually met while living in Sherman, Texas, and raised their children in Elkhart before moving to Colorado. They knew they would eventually return to the Midwest and decided to try farming for the first time in their lives. Bittersweet Farm has chickens, turkeys, hogs and dogs, but they’re not the usual types. Visitors will be welcomed to the farm by their white, shaggy-haired dog Jackie. She’s a Maremma sheepdog, a livestock guard dog indigenous to central Italy and known for protecting sheep from wolves. Jackie protects the Perrons’ hogs and fowl from coyotes. The Perrons first raised Finn sheep along with guinea fowl and heritage turkeys. Currently, they don’t have any sheep on their farm because the breed they had were high maintenance. Because they enjoyed raising sheep, they are now looking at a couple of heritage species that would be hardier.

He’s going to be a problem.

Paula Perron Co-owner Bittersweet Farm Owen County, Indiana

The couple now raise heritage hogs, both American guinea and mulefoot hogs. The American guinea hogs were once on the critical list because there were fewer than 100 guinea hogs in the United States. But enough people have begun raising the hogs that now the species is no longer in danger of disappearing. “There are a lot more (American guinea hogs) than there were just five years ago,” Jerry said. He’s quick to point out that the breed, which came to the U.S. from West Africa in the 1800s, almost disappeared during the Civil War, when soldiers from both sides ate and killed so many of the hogs. The Perrons first purchased Fred, Ethel and Emma from a farm in northern Indiana. “They rode in my car in a little crate,” Paula said while looking out across the pasture at them. Another hog, Julie the Mulie, is another breed, a mulefoot hog, so named because its feet are one hoof, not the split, cloven hoof of most pigs. She’s a little “shy,” according to her owners, and is currently nursing seven piglets after she was bred to an American guinea hog. All the piglets are also mulefoot, and follow their mother through the woods on one side of the Perrons’ property. In a nearby pasture, 6-week-old piglets lie

in fresh straw as sun shines down on them. “Their personalities are wonderful,” Paula said, surveying the brood from the other side of a fence. “The guinea hogs love to have their bellies rubbed, and behind their ears, too.” “Hello, girls,” Paula calls out to four black pigs in another part of the pasture. Three American guinea pigs and one mulefoot-cross pig that approach the couple, sniffing and giving soft grunts as a welcome. Each one touches noses with Jackie the dog, who sniffs each back. The couple haven’t named these hogs, because they are going to be sold for meat. Traveling to another pasture, the Perrons look out over the barrows, or castrated male pigs, and their American guinea boars. The barrows and boars are munching on grass tufts in the pasture. Seeing the Perrons, most walk over toward the fence, emitting grunts of welcome. “Hello, Phineas,” Paula calls to the main boar, still eating grass a distance away. When the barrows reach between 215 and 250 pounds, they are ready for market. “We sell some to the local restaurants,” Jerry said. “We also sell them to private individuals,” Paula added. Recently, they had a chef from a local restaurant come out to pick his next hog, who will soon be large enough for market. The meat of the American guinea hog is different from what most people purchase in the grocery store. The meat is red and has a different taste since the hogs are grass-fed. Because the hogs are active, the meat is also well marbled. “The meat just melts in your mouth,” Paula said. American guinea hogs are known as lard hogs and that, according to Paula, is why they were popular in the 1800s. She renders lard and uses it to make pie crusts.

TPP: Bacus: 'What incentive would they have to come back?' n Continued from page 10 The TPP agreement would not go into effect until February 2018 if it were ratified, and it will likely take several years for countries to negotiate an alternative, whether it’s RCEP or, as British News Source and Japan Times suggested, the TPP countries be renegotiated without the U.S. Plus, Rispens said, a lot of what has driven cattle and grain prices so low this year is the strength of the U.S. dollar relative to the rest of the world. It’s the long-term ramifications that could cause problems.

“This agreement had the potential to really help international trade on the Pacific Rim and in the long-term it does have the possibility of benefiting this area, but right now we just can’t see past the strength of the U.S. dollar,” he said. “Other things being equal, you certainly don’t want to disadvantage your exporters,” Smith said. Raska and Bacus said their respective ag lobbying organizations will continue to educate the Trump administration and push Congress to ratify the TPP trade agreement.

“You can take those steps forward; you can always come back and make improvements along the way, but by walking away completely you lose that opportunity, you lose that ability to go in and make touch ups,” Bacus said. “We’re basically telling these trade partners ‘we don’t want to do business with you.’ And what incentive would they have to come back to the table after we’ve already negotiated this for the last five years?” he added. “So if it’s not TPP, then what other agreements are readily available?”

While the Perrons freely approach most of their livestock, they are a little cautious with their barrows and boar. They are more careful after Jerry was attacked by the boar named Fred. “His first attack was his head on my shin bone,” Jerry said. Jerry quickly put a board between the boar and himself. “We did a dance for about 10 or 15 minutes while Paula got some food to distract him,” he said. That was the end for Fred. Now Phineas is the principal boar on the farm. In the fall and the spring, he mates with certain females, spending time in the girls’ pastures. “The ladies don’t let him eat so much,” Paula said. “The boys let him.” So, once Phineas has completed his task, he’s back in with the boys. The Perrons also had a flock of turkeys to show visitors. There was one tom — TomTom — a broad-breasted bronze turkey, and three hens. “He’s going to be a problem,” Paula said, half under her breath. The tom and hens were Thanksgiving dinner for the Perrons, who celebrated it with their family. Paula’s concern was the fact that TomTom was too big to fit into a single pan. The tom they harvested for last year’s feast dressed out at 32 pounds. But, alas, TomTom dressed out at 26½ pounds. The hens were 22 to 24 pounds each, so the Perrons decided to eat a hen or two this holiday instead of TomTom, who will be saved for another meal.


10

Hi-Line

December 2016

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

TPP: China’s large economy attractive, but dealing with its government is not n Continued from page 6 40 percent would see significant reductions or elimination. Countries that have signed the TPP agreement -- U.S., Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Brunei, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, Chile and Peru -- collectively account for about 40 percent of world trade. For an example, Bacus said, Japan, the leading importer of U.S. beef with $1.5 billion per year, levies a 38.5 percent tariff on imported beef. “Under the Trans-Pacific Partnership that tariff rate would go from 38 ½ to 9 percent. The problem is that without the Trans-Pacific Partnership we are going to stay at 38 ½ percent,” he said, and this will equate to a significant loss in revenue and eventually business. “We’re going to lose that to other countries who are striking trade agreements with Japan and with the other TPP countries,” he added, “so while it sounds good to bash the Trans-Pacific Partnership on the campaign trail, in reality it would be a great disservice, it would be huge to the U.S. beef industry not to have it.” To be implemented, the TPP has to be ratified by at least six countries that account for 85 percent of the group’s economic output by February 2018. Taiwan, the Philippines, Columbia, Thailand, Laos, Indonesia, Cambodia, Bangladesh and India also have expressed interest in joining, but without the two major economic forces — the U.S. and Japan — on board, the agreement will be terminated. The Japanese Diet, the country’s equivalent to the U.S. Congress, has already taken the first steps at ratifying the trade agreement. Japan Times reported Nov. 23 that Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe had invested political capitol to get ratification pushed quickly through the Diet’s Lower House despite opposition from his country’s farmers and medical lobby. Abe, the first foreign diplomat to meet with Trump, asked the Diet’s Upper House to extend its session for two weeks in December, in part to get final ratification of the TPP, Japan Times said Nov. 28. In a year when U.S. grain prices, like cattle prices, have plummeted to less than half from 2015, the possibility of benefits from the TPP were encouraging, Lola Raska, executive vice president of the Montana Grain Growers Association, said, especially since Montana grain naturally heads to the northwest for export to Pacific Rim countries. “It included the countries that are both our most important customers and our most important competitors, so TPP was going to be good for Montana agriculture, and we’re very concerned about the direction,” Raska said. “We grow a high volume and have a low population and we need overseas trade agreements, foreign trade agreements in order to market our commodities,” she added. “So we’re very dependent on trade agreements and we were very supportive of TPP, and it doesn’t look like that’s going to be brought up now in the lame duck and President-elect Trump has been very vocal in his opposition to TPP.” A significant worry for U.S. producers is that without the U.S.-led TPP, other trade

agreements will be made but without the U.S. included and without the U.S. setting standards in the agreement. And if the U.S. signed into any agreements after they were made, producers would have to meet those standards. The TPP would have brought all member countries’ ag safety standards into alignment, Les Rispens, Hill County Farm Service Agency executive director, said, including helping standardize a grading system for grain quality and creating common language definitions for ag products. This standardization applies to other agrelated issues from labor standards to veterinary inspections of cattle, Bacus said. “We’re not lowering our standards to accommodate them,” he added, “We’re making everybody else play by our rules.” With the increasing globilization of trade, both Smith and Bacus said, countries are looking to make trade agreements and other countries in the TPP will be looking to expand bilateral trade negotiations with Europe into something like the TPP, and start negotiations with China, which was never included in TPP talks. Any trade deals with European countries will likely include their strict regulations against genetically modified products and for increased veterinary inspection and farm-tofork tracking of meat animals — what Bacus called “a lot of non-science-based and protectionist rules that restrict imports.” News reports in the U.S., Britain and Japan are saying that China is already pushing its Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership — a 16-nation trade agreement with 10 Southeast Asia nations and six other countries, including Japan and Australia — that was shelved when many of those countries turned to TPP talks about five years ago. Japan Times reports that the first RCEP talks are set for Dec. 2 and that Peru and Chile have asked to be included. Organizations in the U.S. that oppose the TPP, as varied as the Sierra Club and the AFL-CIO, outline talking points similar to those heard from individuals, both private and political — including that it gives too many rights to corporations including the ability to influence or bypass U.S. regulations through private tribunals; it lacks protections for the environment such as the curbing illegal timber and wildlife trade, halting fracking and enforcing environmentally safe manufacturing; and it allows for outsourcing of jobs, services and banking, including to nonTPP compliant nations like China. One major complaint, and not just in the U.S., about the whole process was that much of the negotiations were not open to the public, yet representatives from numerous major international corporations were called in to closed-door meetings to contribute to the talks. Some reports put the number at 600 corporations. Little of the complaints, though, have had anything to do with agriculture, and some aspects of the trade agreement aren’t about trade, labor or economics at all. “The concern, the broader geopolitical concern is whether the U.S. — from a political and strategic and defense perspective — is really wise to withdraw from the TPP to

3

Hi-Line

December 2016

“Both (Donald Trump) and Hillary Clinton in their campaigns were trying to appeal to workers in industries in Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania where those industries competed with imports from other countries,” Smith said, and this antitrade rhetoric strongly appealed to the people in those states who feel that their jobs have been lost due to liberal trade relationships. But in Montana, he said, where about 80 percent of agricultural production is sold in the market place, better access to markets and lower tariffs in Pacific Rim nations is crucial. Lobbying organizations for the beef and grain industries have similar messages. “The Trans-Pacific Patrnership is one of the greatest trade agreements that can be attributed to the ag industry,” Kent Bacus, director of International Trade for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, said. “The benefits we would receive from this are tremendous because it levels the playing field in the leading export markets.” About 18,000 tariffs would be lowered or eliminated with implementation of the TPP agreement. U.S. beef, poultry and dairy exports, as well as grain and other crops such as soybeans, which are all taxed up to

n Continued on page 6 Havre Daily News/File photo Wheat grows in a Hill County field.

Havre Daily News/File photo Cattle await weighing in the Hill County Scale Association facility. entered office skeptical about big trade deals before later changing their minds. “What happens to every president is that they realize that trade is a very important tool in U.S. diplomacy,” he said. Smith said now seems to be an era with an increasing push for globalization bringing about coalitions such as the European Union and trade agreements as large as the TPP, there is a counter push for nationalism bringing responses such as Britain leaving the EU and Trump winning the presidential election while promising to extract the U.S. from the TPP and possibly the North American Free Trade Agreement which has fostered trade between the U.S., Canada and Mexico since 1994. The long-term and short-term effects of Agriculture and economy experts said that pulling out of the TPP will have little to no effect on the economy in the short term.

n Continued to page 11

www.havredailynews.com

TPP: Partnership would reduce ag tariffs in foreign countries, some significantly n Continued from page 2

create a vacuum where longtime allies may form relationships with China on trade rather than the U.S.,” Smith said. “The (related) concern is about a variety of strategic and military issues, for example control of the South China Seas.” Smith added that common sense and history suggest that despite the attractiveness of China’s large economy, the TPP countries, especially Japan, will be careful in making trade agreements with China. “Everybody would like access to the Chinese market, it’s 1.3 billion people who now have per capita incomes of 8 to 10 thousand dollars a year, so that’s a lot of economy and a lot of market for people’s products,” he said. “On the other hand, trading with China means you’re trading with the central government quite often, or agencies that are closely tied to the central government.” Despite the attractiveness of tapping China’s economy news media is reporting that member nations are still holding out hope that Trump will come around. CNN Money reported Edward Alden, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, saying previous U.S. presidents

FARM & RANCH


44

Hi-Line Hi-Line

www.glasgowcourier.com FARM & www.glasgowcourier.com FARM & RANCH RANCH Farm Service Agency Extends Voting What do “low cost� Deadline for County Committee Elections

December 2016 December 2016

ag suppliers

REALLY do for you?

When You Buy From Us, We Give You Added Value! Let's Work Together

We Can Only Continue To Provide Service In Our Communities If YOU Support Those Services! After The Initial Saleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; WHAT Is Your 'LVFRXQW6XSSOLHU2ÍżHULQJ<RX"

When you buy your chemical & fertilizer from us we can help you with . . . â&#x20AC;˘ Crop Scouting â&#x20AC;˘ Weed IdentiďŹ cation Services â&#x20AC;˘ Soil Analysis â&#x20AC;˘ Crop Spraying â&#x20AC;˘ Application Recommendations â&#x20AC;˘ Fertilizer Application â&#x20AC;˘ And Much More

We Have . . . A Full Agronomy StaďŹ&#x20AC; Available

To All Of Our Patrons Across Our Trade Area

The People, The Know How And The Products To Cover All Your Needs . . .

:H2ÍžHU0DQ\6HUYLFHVWR2XU&XVWRPHUV â&#x20AC;˘ On Farm Tire Service â&#x20AC;˘ Shop Services & Minor Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Oil & Filters â&#x20AC;˘ Feed (Crystalyx) â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Care Items â&#x20AC;˘ Fencing Equipment

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Bulk Fuel Delivery Tires - Batteries - Brakes 24 Hour Gas & Fuel Oxygen/Acetylene Tanks Full-Line Hardware Store

:H$OVR2ÍżHU)XOO&RPPRGLW\0DUNHWLQJ

Value Added Services . . . Use them to your advantage and maximize your yields!

Are You Getting This Kind Of Value Where You Buy?

!

Plus, if you pay in advance, earn a 6% premium Or 6% discount for cash at time of purchase!

$% #"%%ch%% ur Butte 487-2741

474-2231

893-4398

724-3353

762-3231

783-5519

JENNIFER COLE / FOR FARM AND RANCH The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Montana Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director Bruce Nelson, today announced that the deadline to submit ballots for the 2016 County Committee Elections has been extended to ensure farmers and ranchers have sufďŹ cient time to vote. Eligible voters now have until Dec. 13, 2016, to return ballots to their local FSA ofďŹ ces. Producers who have not received their ballot should pick one up at their local FSA ofďŹ ce. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re extending the voting deadline to Dec. 13 to give farmers and ranchers a few additional days to get their ballots in,â&#x20AC;? Nelson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I urge all eligible producers, especially minorities and women, to get involved and make a real difference in their communities by voting in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elections. This is your opportunity to have a say in how federal programs are delivered in your county.â&#x20AC;? FSA has modiďŹ ed the ballot, making it easily identiďŹ able and less likely to be overlooked. Ballots returned by mail must be postmarked no later than Dec. 13, 2016. Newly elected committee members will take ofďŹ ce Jan. 1, 2017. Nearly 7,700 FSA County Committee members serve FSA ofďŹ ces nationwide. Each committee has three to 11 elected members who serve three-year terms of ofďŹ ce. One-third of county committee seats are up for election each year. County committee members apply their knowledge and judgment to help FSA make important decisions on its commodity support, conservation, indemnity, disaster and emergency programs. Producers must participate or cooperate in

In like a lamb, out like a lion - the autumnal days of early November gave way to snow at the end of the month. Across the state, most of November was mild during the daytime, with cool nights and relatively little precipitation. It was also the fourth warmest November on record for our readership area. A storm system arrived in the Dakotas early this week and brushed our readership area with bands of snow and sometimes ice. Reports from weather watchers measured the deepest snow of 7 inches in Western Richland County. In Plentywood, 3 inches were seen, and 2 miles south of Sidney received 1 inch. 2.5 in Glendive, and Glasgow got only a trace of snow. Paul Douglas of the Minneapolis StarTribune has this to share about simplifying

December 2016 2016 December

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Historic Lows in Beef Prices, Ranchers Seek Solutions

an FSA program to be eligible to vote in the County Committee election. Approximately 1.5 million producers are currently eligible to vote. Farmers and ranchers who supervise and conduct the farming operations of an entire farm, but are not of legal voting age, also may be eligible to vote. For more information, visit the FSA website at www.fsa.usda.gov/elections. You may also contact your local USDA service center or FSA ofďŹ ce. Visit ofďŹ ces.usda.gov to ďŹ nd an FSA ofďŹ ce near you. USDA works to strengthen and support American agriculture, an industry that supports one in 11 American jobs, provides American consumers with more than 80 percent of the food we consume, ensures that Americans spend less of their paychecks at the grocery store than most people in other countries and supports markets for homegrown renewable energy and materials. Since 2009, USDA has provided $5.6 billion in disaster relief to farmers and ranchers; expanded risk management tools with products like Whole Farm Revenue Protection; and helped farm businesses grow with $36 billion in farm credit. The department has engaged its resources to support a strong next generation of farmers and ranchers by improving access to land and capital; building new markets and market opportunities; and extending new conservation opportunities. USDA has developed new markets for rural-made products, including more than 2,700 bio-based products through USDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bio-Preferred program; and invested $64 billion in infrastructure and community facilities to help improve the quality of life in rural America. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/results.

The Month in Weather GINEVRA KIRKLAND / FOR FARM & RANCH

99

Hi-Line Hi-Line

the snow prediction scheme. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My favorite college professor told us to â&#x20AC;&#x153;forget about inchesâ&#x20AC;?, since we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t predict snow down to the inch, and instead classify storms into 3 categories: nuisance (enough to coat roads and sidewalks but travel isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t impacted too badly), plowable (just as the word implies, enough snow to shovel, scrape and plow) and crippling (where everything stops - trafďŹ c is paralyzed and business pretty much shuts down).â&#x20AC;? The National Weather Service reports that a cold front is expected Sunday (Dec. 4) during the day with possible snow. Following that, an arctic blast is expected early next week, with temperatures expected to drop to below zero by Wednesday morning (Dec. 7). For the latest, please check the NWS website at www. wrh.noaa.gov/ggw/ or call the NWS Glasgow ofďŹ ce 24/7 at 406-228-2850.

SEAN R HEAVEY / FOR FARM & RANCH

The Younkin family moves cattle between pastures located south of Hinsdale in early November. A.J. ETHERINGTON FOR FARM AND RANCH Historic declines in beef prices in the country have left a sizable shortfall in the operations of many Montana ranchers this year. Beef prices have fallen in recent months to all-time lows, and, statewide, beef raisers are seeking answers and solutions. In a Nov. 18 article from the Missoulian, Bill Bullard of the Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen prices collapse the way they are collapsing now.â&#x20AC;? Due to the devastating effects of current beef prices on ranchers, and despite a reduction in prices for consumers at the grocery store, Bullardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

organization has called for a federal investigation into possible price-ďŹ xing among meatpackers. Area ranching experts cite a boom-bust cycle that began with a record-setting boom in 2014, where cattle prices hit all-time highs. A drop in production due to harsh droughts in the country led to a shortage of supply, and resulted in recordsetting prices. The boom caused an expansion in production capability by ranchers. In time, the subsequent over-production sent prices falling through the ďŹ&#x201A;oor. According to cattle price reports and the Missoulian, more than 18 months ago beef was fetching $2.50 to $2.75 a pound. Current prices have fallen to $1.10 to $1.30 per pound, causing an almost 60

percent decline in value. According to Dan Pocha of Pocha Ranch, the break-even price for his cattle operation would have to be $1.65 per pound, leaving an obviously large gap for Montana ranchers to ďŹ ll. The USDA reports that the retail equivalent value of the U.S. beef industry is $105 billion, making it one of the largest segments of the U.S. economy. In Montana, the Missoulian reports, agriculture is the largest industry in the state, generating more than $4.2 billion with 2.6 million head of cattle taking up a large section of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. Despite the decline in beef prices being paid to ranchers by meatpackers, consumers are still paying the same prices they paid in 2014 at the grocery store. This

has caused Bullard to cry foul and call for a Government Accountability OfďŹ ce investigation of the four largest meatpacking companies in the country. Bullard told the Missoulian, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Basic supply and demand does not account for how far the prices have fallen for cattle.â&#x20AC;? The trend is not isolated to Montana with reports out of Texas and South Dakota showing a similar boom, build-up, and bust cycles with the same consequences. In an article about the Texas bust written in October, Bloomberg reported that prices will likely continue to fall until 2019, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture projects a 5.2 percent increase in beef production this year and a 3.4 percent increase in 2017 to a ďŹ ve-year high.

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA


88

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM FARM & &RANCH RANCH

December 2016 December 2016

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Valley County 4-H Honors '4-H Week Baby' ROUBIE YOUNKIN, MSU EXTENSION FOR FARM & RANCH

Kai Marcia, daughter of Jackson and Andrea Farr, was recognized as the 2016 4-H Week Baby during Valley County 4-H Awards Day Nov. 6. Kai was born Oct. 8, during National 4-H Week. 4-H Week began as an effort by 4-H members from across the nation to prepare for national defense during World War II. Following Pearl Harbor, it was decided to postpone holding the National 4-H Camp in Washington D.C. until the cessation of hostilities. The Ohio 4-H took the lead and the idea met with favorable response by state leaders across the country. As a result, the Federal Extension Service initiated National 4-H Mobilization Week across the nation, which was observed annually in 1942, 1943 and 1944. Every year since, it has been observed as National 4-H Week. The focus during National 4-H Mobilization Week was on encouraging 4-H members to produce foods needed by rural men and women in the armed services and enlisting as many young people (eligible for membership) as possible in all rural areas, particularly those living on farms, in some phase of the 4-H Club war program. During this same period, (mid-40s) a National 4-H Achievement Week was celebrated in

CHRIS CHRISTENSEN / FOR FARM & RANCH

Valley County ranchers in action south of the Missouri River in early November.

SY Clearstone CL2 Winter Wheat for Montana

SY Wolf

Decade

The New Top Performer

MSU/NDSU Release

Âť New high yielding two-gene herbicide tolerant variety

Âť Later maturity, good protein and excellent winterhardiness

SY Wolf

Control Weeds Before They Overwinter

AP503 CL2

Âť Good yields under 2015 disease pressure Âť Excels in heavy residue

CLEARFIELD* Production System Âť Proven winterhardiness

406-747-5217 | 406-489-0165 Cell Winter Wheat for Montana

Clearfield is a trademark of BASF. Š2002 BASF Corporation. All rights reserved. Always read and follow label directions.

PVPA 1994â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Unauthorized propagation PVPA 1994â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Unauthorized propagation prohibited. Plant variety protection granted or prohibited. Plant variety protection granted or applied for Syngenta varieties. applied for Syngenta varieties.

November. This was a time to promote 4-H by emphasizing the accomplishments of that year and to recruit new members and leaders and plan for the next year. After the war, the purpose of the week centered on: acquainting the public with the new, enlarged 4-H program, and the many ways young people may take part; encouraging more youth to join 4-H; urging more men and women to volunteer as 4-H leaders; recognizing parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; contribution to 4-H and strengthen their cooperation; and reporting the yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-H accomplishments as well as planning for the year ahead. In the early years, National 4-H Week was held in the spring. As of 1968, National 4-H Week is observed the first full week of October, starting on the first Sunday. It may have been at the time of this change over of dates that the National 4-H Achievement Week became a part of National 4-H Week. 4-H, The name and emblem: The 4-H clover represents the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus on head, heart, hands, and health. It is a well-known symbol of more than a century of 4-H achievement. The 4-H pledge: "I pledge my head to clearer thinking, my heart to greater loyalty, my hands to larger service, and my health to better livingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for my club, my community, my country, and my world."

Armbrister Advocates Sustainable Farming GEORGIE KUCZYK FOR FARM AND RANCH Alternative Energy Resources Organization (AERO) is working to link people, sustainable agriculture and energy solution, and Patti Armbrister of Hinsdale is leading the way for Northeastern Montanans. On Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, Armbrister will be conducting a Meet Up at the Milk River Activity Center in Glasgow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My goal of the meet-up is to ďŹ nd people to network with and help each other to become more sustainable,â&#x20AC;? said Armbrister. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sustainable in growing local foods, helping farmers and ranchers to adopt regenerative practices, homeowners to grow food in their yards rather than waste water etc., and more.â&#x20AC;? The Meet Up will include information about growing, eating, and extending the growing season for local foods, utilizing com-

munity gardens, cover crops, recycling and regenerative farming and ranching. The purpose of AERO is to bring people together to discover what people are doing in the area, evolving around local foods and sustainable living, and the plan is to develop ways that we can learn from each other, and ďŹ gure out what it is people want or need to learn about the subject matter. AERO is also proactive in offering local meetings, ďŹ eld days, workshops, and more, in an effort to provide education about resources and options available to Eastern Montana communities. For more information about the upcoming Meet Up or AERO, contact Patti Armbrister at 406 648-7400 or agrarinfoodweb@gmail. com. You can also look them up on facebook: www.facebook.com/AgrarianFoodWeb/

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

55

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & RANCH FARM & RANCH

December 2016 December 2016

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

NEWTON MOTORS, INC. NEW & USED TRUCKS AND CARS All In One Convenient Location

440 Highway 2 West â&#x20AC;˘ Glasgow â&#x20AC;˘ Across from the Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 â&#x20AC;˘ 406-228-4381 â&#x20AC;˘ 1-800-255-1472 Family owned by the Newton Boys! Rent A Car See Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny or Ted!

GINEVRA KIRKLAND / FOR FARM & RANCH

Area ranchers ship calves in Hinsdale south of the Milk River bridge on Nov. 26.

When You Come to My House

ELIZABETH SHIPSTEAD / FOR FARM & RANCH I was planning to go visit a friend and she said something along the lines of : â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just overlook the chaos and the mess.â&#x20AC;? I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell you how many times Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard or said a statement such as that. All too often, feelings of guilt well up if our house is not picture-perfect and we make apologetic comments for our well-loved homes. Homes that house a busy and engaged family. It started me thinking. What would people see when they came to my house? Would they really see the dirt and chaos that stands out so blatantly to me? What would I want them to see? When you come to my houseâ&#x20AC;Ś Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice a myriad of vehicles, which are in various states of use and usefulness. It may seem like a lot of vehicles, trailers, and equipment to have around the yard, but each one has its place and serves a purpose. Many are integral in making our agricultural lifestyle work. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see a ďŹ&#x201A;ower bed and garden, both of which probably contain more weeds than ďŹ&#x201A;owers or veggies depending on the time of year. The veggies and flowers brighten our day and fill our freezer but the struggle to balance all the items on the to-do list often means leaving some things undone. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be met by an overly-friendly, jumping with excitement, yellow lab that always shares her unconditional love with those she meets. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never met an enemy unless itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wild animal that gets too close to the house. If you consider yourself one of these creatures youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in trouble! If not, and you are in need of extra joy and kisses, consider yourself in the right place! As you are welcomed into our entryway, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll noticed boots covered in mud and other organic matter. They should be on the rack behind the door, but I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t promise anything. Because, most often, they are thrown off in haste by their wearers as they come into the house with the anticipation of being greeted with love and admiration, a warm and inviting meal, and comfortable chairs to sink into and enjoying some family time. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice on our entry coat rack, which was crafted with love and care, there are a multitude of ball caps from various farming entities. The caps have been worn, sweated in, and worn

out by a hard-working, family loving, usually exhausted, traditional, loyal and faithful husband and father. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also ďŹ nd different bags for different occasions. A bag full of toys, an extra pair of underwear and pants, and wipes for what should have been a â&#x20AC;&#x153;short tripâ&#x20AC;?. These different bags are a necessity when our girls need to entertain themselves in the back seat of a pick up or in the sleeper of the semi, while mom and dad work cows, run the combine, empty trucks, haul hay, or whatever other farm task needs to be done. You will notice that there are stains on our kitchen carpet. Some of those stains were made by our budding artists whose canvasses cannot always contain their creativity. Some stains have been created by eggs and other food that have been dropped by little hands in their attempt to help cook meals. The other stains, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a clue where they came from, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve earned their place too. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably have to step over toys: a favorite animal, the latest beaded necklace project, dress-up outďŹ ts, and puzzle pieces. These tell a story too. T h e s t o r y o f d e v e l o p m e n t , j o y, and the growing pains of learning to share and play nicely with a sibling. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably see several well-intentioned, half-started projects. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t from lack of trying or laziness, but of the overwhelming and unplanned-for things that pop up and need to be completed right then and there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somedayâ&#x20AC;? is a word used frequently and this family has decided that the most important priorities are faith, family and farm. The perfect garden/playhouse shed, renovated room, and/or deck can wait! When you come to my house youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see my familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story. A story full of hard work, determination, love and faith. I hope youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll feel welcomed as a friend, part of the family, a sense of higher purpose, and an understanding of what really matters. I hope you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind the overly energetic, welcoming dog, the stains in the carpet, and the toys you have to step over. Because someday those things will fade, but what will last, will be the memories that we made and the friendship we shared!

Glasgow Stockyards, Inc. Linda & Mark Nielsen, Owners Iva Murch, Manager 263-7529 Dean Barnes, Yard Manager 263-1175 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 783-7285

SERVING AREA December â&#x153;Ż LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS January FOR 71 YEARS! February 1946 - 2017 2016-2017 Schedule

December 2016 Thursday

1 8 15 22 29

Thursday

Big December Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction Annual Stock Cow & Bred Heifer Special & All Class Cattle Auction Last All Class Cattle Auction of 2016

12

Monthly Stock Cow & Bred Heifer Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

19

Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

26

All Class Cattle Auction

February 2017

Merry Christmas - No Auction

Thursday

Happy New Year - No Auction

January 2017 Thursday

5

January 2017 (cont.)

Annual New Year Feeder Classic & All Class Cattle Auction

228-9306

10#PYt(MBTHPX .5 HTJ!OFNPOUOFUtXXXHMBTHPXTUPDLZBSETDPN

2

Big Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

9

UI8JUULPQQ"OHVT"VDUJPO  Monthly Stock Cow & Bred Heifer Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

16

Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

23

All Class Cattle Auction

Please call in consignments so buyers can be notiďŹ ed

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA


6 6

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & & RANCH RANCH FARM

December2016 2016 December

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

JAMES WALLING / FOR FARM & RANCH

Hinsdale Public Schools' FFA chapter participates in a CSA-style educational model. Educator Patti Armbrister will be teaching a class on the subject on Jan. 11 at the Milk River Activity Center. See full story, Page 8.

Quarter page ad for Havre - Stockman Bank

Welcome Kaare Engebretson

to our Lending Team!

Kaare Engebretson Ag & Commercial Lender

Born and raised on the Hi Line, Kaare knows and understands farming and ranching. Put his expertise to work for you! Call Kaare at 265-3801 or stop by.

2017 Expedition with up to $5,250 cash off OAC or $3,250 cash and 0% for 60 months OAC. Units in stock Box 31 Glasgow, MT 59230 406-228-2141

324 3rd Ave Havre: 265-3800

stockmanbank.com ©2016 Stockman Bank | Member FDIC

1-866-528-2141 406-236-1577 Cell 406-228-4144 Fax

www.hilineford.com

Quality at a Fair Price

7

Hi-Line

December 2016

FARM & RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com


6 6

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & & RANCH RANCH FARM

December2016 2016 December

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

JAMES WALLING / FOR FARM & RANCH

Hinsdale Public Schools' FFA chapter participates in a CSA-style educational model. Educator Patti Armbrister will be teaching a class on the subject on Jan. 11 at the Milk River Activity Center. See full story, Page 8.

Quarter page ad for Havre - Stockman Bank

Welcome Kaare Engebretson

to our Lending Team!

Kaare Engebretson Ag & Commercial Lender

Born and raised on the Hi Line, Kaare knows and understands farming and ranching. Put his expertise to work for you! Call Kaare at 265-3801 or stop by.

2017 Expedition with up to $5,250 cash off OAC or $3,250 cash and 0% for 60 months OAC. Units in stock Box 31 Glasgow, MT 59230 406-228-2141

324 3rd Ave Havre: 265-3800

stockmanbank.com ©2016 Stockman Bank | Member FDIC

1-866-528-2141 406-236-1577 Cell 406-228-4144 Fax

www.hilineford.com

Quality at a Fair Price

7

Hi-Line

December 2016

FARM & RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com


88

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM FARM & &RANCH RANCH

December 2016 December 2016

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Valley County 4-H Honors '4-H Week Baby' ROUBIE YOUNKIN, MSU EXTENSION FOR FARM & RANCH

Kai Marcia, daughter of Jackson and Andrea Farr, was recognized as the 2016 4-H Week Baby during Valley County 4-H Awards Day Nov. 6. Kai was born Oct. 8, during National 4-H Week. 4-H Week began as an effort by 4-H members from across the nation to prepare for national defense during World War II. Following Pearl Harbor, it was decided to postpone holding the National 4-H Camp in Washington D.C. until the cessation of hostilities. The Ohio 4-H took the lead and the idea met with favorable response by state leaders across the country. As a result, the Federal Extension Service initiated National 4-H Mobilization Week across the nation, which was observed annually in 1942, 1943 and 1944. Every year since, it has been observed as National 4-H Week. The focus during National 4-H Mobilization Week was on encouraging 4-H members to produce foods needed by rural men and women in the armed services and enlisting as many young people (eligible for membership) as possible in all rural areas, particularly those living on farms, in some phase of the 4-H Club war program. During this same period, (mid-40s) a National 4-H Achievement Week was celebrated in

CHRIS CHRISTENSEN / FOR FARM & RANCH

Valley County ranchers in action south of the Missouri River in early November.

SY Clearstone CL2 Winter Wheat for Montana

SY Wolf

Decade

The New Top Performer

MSU/NDSU Release

Âť New high yielding two-gene herbicide tolerant variety

Âť Later maturity, good protein and excellent winterhardiness

SY Wolf

Control Weeds Before They Overwinter

AP503 CL2

Âť Good yields under 2015 disease pressure Âť Excels in heavy residue

CLEARFIELD* Production System Âť Proven winterhardiness

406-747-5217 | 406-489-0165 Cell Winter Wheat for Montana

Clearfield is a trademark of BASF. Š2002 BASF Corporation. All rights reserved. Always read and follow label directions.

PVPA 1994â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Unauthorized propagation PVPA 1994â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Unauthorized propagation prohibited. Plant variety protection granted or prohibited. Plant variety protection granted or applied for Syngenta varieties. applied for Syngenta varieties.

November. This was a time to promote 4-H by emphasizing the accomplishments of that year and to recruit new members and leaders and plan for the next year. After the war, the purpose of the week centered on: acquainting the public with the new, enlarged 4-H program, and the many ways young people may take part; encouraging more youth to join 4-H; urging more men and women to volunteer as 4-H leaders; recognizing parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; contribution to 4-H and strengthen their cooperation; and reporting the yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 4-H accomplishments as well as planning for the year ahead. In the early years, National 4-H Week was held in the spring. As of 1968, National 4-H Week is observed the first full week of October, starting on the first Sunday. It may have been at the time of this change over of dates that the National 4-H Achievement Week became a part of National 4-H Week. 4-H, The name and emblem: The 4-H clover represents the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focus on head, heart, hands, and health. It is a well-known symbol of more than a century of 4-H achievement. The 4-H pledge: "I pledge my head to clearer thinking, my heart to greater loyalty, my hands to larger service, and my health to better livingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for my club, my community, my country, and my world."

Armbrister Advocates Sustainable Farming GEORGIE KUCZYK FOR FARM AND RANCH Alternative Energy Resources Organization (AERO) is working to link people, sustainable agriculture and energy solution, and Patti Armbrister of Hinsdale is leading the way for Northeastern Montanans. On Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017, Armbrister will be conducting a Meet Up at the Milk River Activity Center in Glasgow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My goal of the meet-up is to ďŹ nd people to network with and help each other to become more sustainable,â&#x20AC;? said Armbrister. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sustainable in growing local foods, helping farmers and ranchers to adopt regenerative practices, homeowners to grow food in their yards rather than waste water etc., and more.â&#x20AC;? The Meet Up will include information about growing, eating, and extending the growing season for local foods, utilizing com-

munity gardens, cover crops, recycling and regenerative farming and ranching. The purpose of AERO is to bring people together to discover what people are doing in the area, evolving around local foods and sustainable living, and the plan is to develop ways that we can learn from each other, and ďŹ gure out what it is people want or need to learn about the subject matter. AERO is also proactive in offering local meetings, ďŹ eld days, workshops, and more, in an effort to provide education about resources and options available to Eastern Montana communities. For more information about the upcoming Meet Up or AERO, contact Patti Armbrister at 406 648-7400 or agrarinfoodweb@gmail. com. You can also look them up on facebook: www.facebook.com/AgrarianFoodWeb/

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

55

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & RANCH FARM & RANCH

December 2016 December 2016

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

NEWTON MOTORS, INC. NEW & USED TRUCKS AND CARS All In One Convenient Location

440 Highway 2 West â&#x20AC;˘ Glasgow â&#x20AC;˘ Across from the Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 â&#x20AC;˘ 406-228-4381 â&#x20AC;˘ 1-800-255-1472 Family owned by the Newton Boys! Rent A Car See Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny or Ted!

GINEVRA KIRKLAND / FOR FARM & RANCH

Area ranchers ship calves in Hinsdale south of the Milk River bridge on Nov. 26.

When You Come to My House

ELIZABETH SHIPSTEAD / FOR FARM & RANCH I was planning to go visit a friend and she said something along the lines of : â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just overlook the chaos and the mess.â&#x20AC;? I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell you how many times Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard or said a statement such as that. All too often, feelings of guilt well up if our house is not picture-perfect and we make apologetic comments for our well-loved homes. Homes that house a busy and engaged family. It started me thinking. What would people see when they came to my house? Would they really see the dirt and chaos that stands out so blatantly to me? What would I want them to see? When you come to my houseâ&#x20AC;Ś Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice a myriad of vehicles, which are in various states of use and usefulness. It may seem like a lot of vehicles, trailers, and equipment to have around the yard, but each one has its place and serves a purpose. Many are integral in making our agricultural lifestyle work. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see a ďŹ&#x201A;ower bed and garden, both of which probably contain more weeds than ďŹ&#x201A;owers or veggies depending on the time of year. The veggies and flowers brighten our day and fill our freezer but the struggle to balance all the items on the to-do list often means leaving some things undone. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be met by an overly-friendly, jumping with excitement, yellow lab that always shares her unconditional love with those she meets. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never met an enemy unless itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wild animal that gets too close to the house. If you consider yourself one of these creatures youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in trouble! If not, and you are in need of extra joy and kisses, consider yourself in the right place! As you are welcomed into our entryway, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll noticed boots covered in mud and other organic matter. They should be on the rack behind the door, but I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t promise anything. Because, most often, they are thrown off in haste by their wearers as they come into the house with the anticipation of being greeted with love and admiration, a warm and inviting meal, and comfortable chairs to sink into and enjoying some family time. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice on our entry coat rack, which was crafted with love and care, there are a multitude of ball caps from various farming entities. The caps have been worn, sweated in, and worn

out by a hard-working, family loving, usually exhausted, traditional, loyal and faithful husband and father. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also ďŹ nd different bags for different occasions. A bag full of toys, an extra pair of underwear and pants, and wipes for what should have been a â&#x20AC;&#x153;short tripâ&#x20AC;?. These different bags are a necessity when our girls need to entertain themselves in the back seat of a pick up or in the sleeper of the semi, while mom and dad work cows, run the combine, empty trucks, haul hay, or whatever other farm task needs to be done. You will notice that there are stains on our kitchen carpet. Some of those stains were made by our budding artists whose canvasses cannot always contain their creativity. Some stains have been created by eggs and other food that have been dropped by little hands in their attempt to help cook meals. The other stains, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a clue where they came from, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve earned their place too. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably have to step over toys: a favorite animal, the latest beaded necklace project, dress-up outďŹ ts, and puzzle pieces. These tell a story too. T h e s t o r y o f d e v e l o p m e n t , j o y, and the growing pains of learning to share and play nicely with a sibling. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll probably see several well-intentioned, half-started projects. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t from lack of trying or laziness, but of the overwhelming and unplanned-for things that pop up and need to be completed right then and there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somedayâ&#x20AC;? is a word used frequently and this family has decided that the most important priorities are faith, family and farm. The perfect garden/playhouse shed, renovated room, and/or deck can wait! When you come to my house youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see my familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story. A story full of hard work, determination, love and faith. I hope youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll feel welcomed as a friend, part of the family, a sense of higher purpose, and an understanding of what really matters. I hope you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind the overly energetic, welcoming dog, the stains in the carpet, and the toys you have to step over. Because someday those things will fade, but what will last, will be the memories that we made and the friendship we shared!

Glasgow Stockyards, Inc. Linda & Mark Nielsen, Owners Iva Murch, Manager 263-7529 Dean Barnes, Yard Manager 263-1175 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 783-7285

SERVING AREA December â&#x153;Ż LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS January FOR 71 YEARS! February 1946 - 2017 2016-2017 Schedule

December 2016 Thursday

1 8 15 22 29

Thursday

Big December Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction Annual Stock Cow & Bred Heifer Special & All Class Cattle Auction Last All Class Cattle Auction of 2016

12

Monthly Stock Cow & Bred Heifer Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

19

Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

26

All Class Cattle Auction

February 2017

Merry Christmas - No Auction

Thursday

Happy New Year - No Auction

January 2017 Thursday

5

January 2017 (cont.)

Annual New Year Feeder Classic & All Class Cattle Auction

228-9306

10#PYt(MBTHPX .5 HTJ!OFNPOUOFUtXXXHMBTHPXTUPDLZBSETDPN

2

Big Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

9

UI8JUULPQQ"OHVT"VDUJPO  Monthly Stock Cow & Bred Heifer Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

16

Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction

23

All Class Cattle Auction

Please call in consignments so buyers can be notiďŹ ed

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA


44

Hi-Line Hi-Line

www.glasgowcourier.com FARM & www.glasgowcourier.com FARM & RANCH RANCH Farm Service Agency Extends Voting What do â&#x20AC;&#x153;low costâ&#x20AC;? Deadline for County Committee Elections

December 2016 December 2016

ag suppliers

REALLY do for you?

When You Buy From Us, We Give You Added Value! Let's Work Together

We Can Only Continue To Provide Service In Our Communities If YOU Support Those Services! After The Initial Saleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; WHAT Is Your 'LVFRXQW6XSSOLHU2ÍżHULQJ<RX"

When you buy your chemical & fertilizer from us we can help you with . . . â&#x20AC;˘ Crop Scouting â&#x20AC;˘ Weed IdentiďŹ cation Services â&#x20AC;˘ Soil Analysis â&#x20AC;˘ Crop Spraying â&#x20AC;˘ Application Recommendations â&#x20AC;˘ Fertilizer Application â&#x20AC;˘ And Much More

We Have . . . A Full Agronomy StaďŹ&#x20AC; Available

To All Of Our Patrons Across Our Trade Area

The People, The Know How And The Products To Cover All Your Needs . . .

:H2ÍžHU0DQ\6HUYLFHVWR2XU&XVWRPHUV â&#x20AC;˘ On Farm Tire Service â&#x20AC;˘ Shop Services & Minor Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Oil & Filters â&#x20AC;˘ Feed (Crystalyx) â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Care Items â&#x20AC;˘ Fencing Equipment

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Bulk Fuel Delivery Tires - Batteries - Brakes 24 Hour Gas & Fuel Oxygen/Acetylene Tanks Full-Line Hardware Store

:H$OVR2ÍżHU)XOO&RPPRGLW\0DUNHWLQJ

Value Added Services . . . Use them to your advantage and maximize your yields!

Are You Getting This Kind Of Value Where You Buy?

!

Plus, if you pay in advance, earn a 6% premium Or 6% discount for cash at time of purchase!

$% #"%%ch%% ur Butte 487-2741

474-2231

893-4398

724-3353

762-3231

783-5519

JENNIFER COLE / FOR FARM AND RANCH The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Montana Farm Service Agency (FSA) Executive Director Bruce Nelson, today announced that the deadline to submit ballots for the 2016 County Committee Elections has been extended to ensure farmers and ranchers have sufďŹ cient time to vote. Eligible voters now have until Dec. 13, 2016, to return ballots to their local FSA ofďŹ ces. Producers who have not received their ballot should pick one up at their local FSA ofďŹ ce. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re extending the voting deadline to Dec. 13 to give farmers and ranchers a few additional days to get their ballots in,â&#x20AC;? Nelson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I urge all eligible producers, especially minorities and women, to get involved and make a real difference in their communities by voting in this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elections. This is your opportunity to have a say in how federal programs are delivered in your county.â&#x20AC;? FSA has modiďŹ ed the ballot, making it easily identiďŹ able and less likely to be overlooked. Ballots returned by mail must be postmarked no later than Dec. 13, 2016. Newly elected committee members will take ofďŹ ce Jan. 1, 2017. Nearly 7,700 FSA County Committee members serve FSA ofďŹ ces nationwide. Each committee has three to 11 elected members who serve three-year terms of ofďŹ ce. One-third of county committee seats are up for election each year. County committee members apply their knowledge and judgment to help FSA make important decisions on its commodity support, conservation, indemnity, disaster and emergency programs. Producers must participate or cooperate in

In like a lamb, out like a lion - the autumnal days of early November gave way to snow at the end of the month. Across the state, most of November was mild during the daytime, with cool nights and relatively little precipitation. It was also the fourth warmest November on record for our readership area. A storm system arrived in the Dakotas early this week and brushed our readership area with bands of snow and sometimes ice. Reports from weather watchers measured the deepest snow of 7 inches in Western Richland County. In Plentywood, 3 inches were seen, and 2 miles south of Sidney received 1 inch. 2.5 in Glendive, and Glasgow got only a trace of snow. Paul Douglas of the Minneapolis StarTribune has this to share about simplifying

December 2016 2016 December

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Historic Lows in Beef Prices, Ranchers Seek Solutions

an FSA program to be eligible to vote in the County Committee election. Approximately 1.5 million producers are currently eligible to vote. Farmers and ranchers who supervise and conduct the farming operations of an entire farm, but are not of legal voting age, also may be eligible to vote. For more information, visit the FSA website at www.fsa.usda.gov/elections. You may also contact your local USDA service center or FSA ofďŹ ce. Visit ofďŹ ces.usda.gov to ďŹ nd an FSA ofďŹ ce near you. USDA works to strengthen and support American agriculture, an industry that supports one in 11 American jobs, provides American consumers with more than 80 percent of the food we consume, ensures that Americans spend less of their paychecks at the grocery store than most people in other countries and supports markets for homegrown renewable energy and materials. Since 2009, USDA has provided $5.6 billion in disaster relief to farmers and ranchers; expanded risk management tools with products like Whole Farm Revenue Protection; and helped farm businesses grow with $36 billion in farm credit. The department has engaged its resources to support a strong next generation of farmers and ranchers by improving access to land and capital; building new markets and market opportunities; and extending new conservation opportunities. USDA has developed new markets for rural-made products, including more than 2,700 bio-based products through USDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bio-Preferred program; and invested $64 billion in infrastructure and community facilities to help improve the quality of life in rural America. For more information, visit www.usda.gov/results.

The Month in Weather GINEVRA KIRKLAND / FOR FARM & RANCH

99

Hi-Line Hi-Line

the snow prediction scheme. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My favorite college professor told us to â&#x20AC;&#x153;forget about inchesâ&#x20AC;?, since we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t predict snow down to the inch, and instead classify storms into 3 categories: nuisance (enough to coat roads and sidewalks but travel isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t impacted too badly), plowable (just as the word implies, enough snow to shovel, scrape and plow) and crippling (where everything stops - trafďŹ c is paralyzed and business pretty much shuts down).â&#x20AC;? The National Weather Service reports that a cold front is expected Sunday (Dec. 4) during the day with possible snow. Following that, an arctic blast is expected early next week, with temperatures expected to drop to below zero by Wednesday morning (Dec. 7). For the latest, please check the NWS website at www. wrh.noaa.gov/ggw/ or call the NWS Glasgow ofďŹ ce 24/7 at 406-228-2850.

SEAN R HEAVEY / FOR FARM & RANCH

The Younkin family moves cattle between pastures located south of Hinsdale in early November. A.J. ETHERINGTON FOR FARM AND RANCH Historic declines in beef prices in the country have left a sizable shortfall in the operations of many Montana ranchers this year. Beef prices have fallen in recent months to all-time lows, and, statewide, beef raisers are seeking answers and solutions. In a Nov. 18 article from the Missoulian, Bill Bullard of the Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never seen prices collapse the way they are collapsing now.â&#x20AC;? Due to the devastating effects of current beef prices on ranchers, and despite a reduction in prices for consumers at the grocery store, Bullardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

organization has called for a federal investigation into possible price-ďŹ xing among meatpackers. Area ranching experts cite a boom-bust cycle that began with a record-setting boom in 2014, where cattle prices hit all-time highs. A drop in production due to harsh droughts in the country led to a shortage of supply, and resulted in recordsetting prices. The boom caused an expansion in production capability by ranchers. In time, the subsequent over-production sent prices falling through the ďŹ&#x201A;oor. According to cattle price reports and the Missoulian, more than 18 months ago beef was fetching $2.50 to $2.75 a pound. Current prices have fallen to $1.10 to $1.30 per pound, causing an almost 60

percent decline in value. According to Dan Pocha of Pocha Ranch, the break-even price for his cattle operation would have to be $1.65 per pound, leaving an obviously large gap for Montana ranchers to ďŹ ll. The USDA reports that the retail equivalent value of the U.S. beef industry is $105 billion, making it one of the largest segments of the U.S. economy. In Montana, the Missoulian reports, agriculture is the largest industry in the state, generating more than $4.2 billion with 2.6 million head of cattle taking up a large section of the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. Despite the decline in beef prices being paid to ranchers by meatpackers, consumers are still paying the same prices they paid in 2014 at the grocery store. This

has caused Bullard to cry foul and call for a Government Accountability OfďŹ ce investigation of the four largest meatpacking companies in the country. Bullard told the Missoulian, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Basic supply and demand does not account for how far the prices have fallen for cattle.â&#x20AC;? The trend is not isolated to Montana with reports out of Texas and South Dakota showing a similar boom, build-up, and bust cycles with the same consequences. In an article about the Texas bust written in October, Bloomberg reported that prices will likely continue to fall until 2019, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture projects a 5.2 percent increase in beef production this year and a 3.4 percent increase in 2017 to a ďŹ ve-year high.

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH â&#x20AC;&#x201C; THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA


10

Hi-Line

December 2016

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

TPP: China’s large economy attractive, but dealing with its government is not n Continued from page 6 40 percent would see significant reductions or elimination. Countries that have signed the TPP agreement -- U.S., Japan, Malaysia, Vietnam, Singapore, Brunei, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Mexico, Chile and Peru -- collectively account for about 40 percent of world trade. For an example, Bacus said, Japan, the leading importer of U.S. beef with $1.5 billion per year, levies a 38.5 percent tariff on imported beef. “Under the Trans-Pacific Partnership that tariff rate would go from 38 ½ to 9 percent. The problem is that without the Trans-Pacific Partnership we are going to stay at 38 ½ percent,” he said, and this will equate to a significant loss in revenue and eventually business. “We’re going to lose that to other countries who are striking trade agreements with Japan and with the other TPP countries,” he added, “so while it sounds good to bash the Trans-Pacific Partnership on the campaign trail, in reality it would be a great disservice, it would be huge to the U.S. beef industry not to have it.” To be implemented, the TPP has to be ratified by at least six countries that account for 85 percent of the group’s economic output by February 2018. Taiwan, the Philippines, Columbia, Thailand, Laos, Indonesia, Cambodia, Bangladesh and India also have expressed interest in joining, but without the two major economic forces — the U.S. and Japan — on board, the agreement will be terminated. The Japanese Diet, the country’s equivalent to the U.S. Congress, has already taken the first steps at ratifying the trade agreement. Japan Times reported Nov. 23 that Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe had invested political capitol to get ratification pushed quickly through the Diet’s Lower House despite opposition from his country’s farmers and medical lobby. Abe, the first foreign diplomat to meet with Trump, asked the Diet’s Upper House to extend its session for two weeks in December, in part to get final ratification of the TPP, Japan Times said Nov. 28. In a year when U.S. grain prices, like cattle prices, have plummeted to less than half from 2015, the possibility of benefits from the TPP were encouraging, Lola Raska, executive vice president of the Montana Grain Growers Association, said, especially since Montana grain naturally heads to the northwest for export to Pacific Rim countries. “It included the countries that are both our most important customers and our most important competitors, so TPP was going to be good for Montana agriculture, and we’re very concerned about the direction,” Raska said. “We grow a high volume and have a low population and we need overseas trade agreements, foreign trade agreements in order to market our commodities,” she added. “So we’re very dependent on trade agreements and we were very supportive of TPP, and it doesn’t look like that’s going to be brought up now in the lame duck and President-elect Trump has been very vocal in his opposition to TPP.” A significant worry for U.S. producers is that without the U.S.-led TPP, other trade

agreements will be made but without the U.S. included and without the U.S. setting standards in the agreement. And if the U.S. signed into any agreements after they were made, producers would have to meet those standards. The TPP would have brought all member countries’ ag safety standards into alignment, Les Rispens, Hill County Farm Service Agency executive director, said, including helping standardize a grading system for grain quality and creating common language definitions for ag products. This standardization applies to other agrelated issues from labor standards to veterinary inspections of cattle, Bacus said. “We’re not lowering our standards to accommodate them,” he added, “We’re making everybody else play by our rules.” With the increasing globilization of trade, both Smith and Bacus said, countries are looking to make trade agreements and other countries in the TPP will be looking to expand bilateral trade negotiations with Europe into something like the TPP, and start negotiations with China, which was never included in TPP talks. Any trade deals with European countries will likely include their strict regulations against genetically modified products and for increased veterinary inspection and farm-tofork tracking of meat animals — what Bacus called “a lot of non-science-based and protectionist rules that restrict imports.” News reports in the U.S., Britain and Japan are saying that China is already pushing its Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership — a 16-nation trade agreement with 10 Southeast Asia nations and six other countries, including Japan and Australia — that was shelved when many of those countries turned to TPP talks about five years ago. Japan Times reports that the first RCEP talks are set for Dec. 2 and that Peru and Chile have asked to be included. Organizations in the U.S. that oppose the TPP, as varied as the Sierra Club and the AFL-CIO, outline talking points similar to those heard from individuals, both private and political — including that it gives too many rights to corporations including the ability to influence or bypass U.S. regulations through private tribunals; it lacks protections for the environment such as the curbing illegal timber and wildlife trade, halting fracking and enforcing environmentally safe manufacturing; and it allows for outsourcing of jobs, services and banking, including to nonTPP compliant nations like China. One major complaint, and not just in the U.S., about the whole process was that much of the negotiations were not open to the public, yet representatives from numerous major international corporations were called in to closed-door meetings to contribute to the talks. Some reports put the number at 600 corporations. Little of the complaints, though, have had anything to do with agriculture, and some aspects of the trade agreement aren’t about trade, labor or economics at all. “The concern, the broader geopolitical concern is whether the U.S. — from a political and strategic and defense perspective — is really wise to withdraw from the TPP to

3

Hi-Line

December 2016

“Both (Donald Trump) and Hillary Clinton in their campaigns were trying to appeal to workers in industries in Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania where those industries competed with imports from other countries,” Smith said, and this antitrade rhetoric strongly appealed to the people in those states who feel that their jobs have been lost due to liberal trade relationships. But in Montana, he said, where about 80 percent of agricultural production is sold in the market place, better access to markets and lower tariffs in Pacific Rim nations is crucial. Lobbying organizations for the beef and grain industries have similar messages. “The Trans-Pacific Patrnership is one of the greatest trade agreements that can be attributed to the ag industry,” Kent Bacus, director of International Trade for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, said. “The benefits we would receive from this are tremendous because it levels the playing field in the leading export markets.” About 18,000 tariffs would be lowered or eliminated with implementation of the TPP agreement. U.S. beef, poultry and dairy exports, as well as grain and other crops such as soybeans, which are all taxed up to

n Continued on page 6 Havre Daily News/File photo Wheat grows in a Hill County field.

Havre Daily News/File photo Cattle await weighing in the Hill County Scale Association facility. entered office skeptical about big trade deals before later changing their minds. “What happens to every president is that they realize that trade is a very important tool in U.S. diplomacy,” he said. Smith said now seems to be an era with an increasing push for globalization bringing about coalitions such as the European Union and trade agreements as large as the TPP, there is a counter push for nationalism bringing responses such as Britain leaving the EU and Trump winning the presidential election while promising to extract the U.S. from the TPP and possibly the North American Free Trade Agreement which has fostered trade between the U.S., Canada and Mexico since 1994. The long-term and short-term effects of Agriculture and economy experts said that pulling out of the TPP will have little to no effect on the economy in the short term.

n Continued to page 11

www.havredailynews.com

TPP: Partnership would reduce ag tariffs in foreign countries, some significantly n Continued from page 2

create a vacuum where longtime allies may form relationships with China on trade rather than the U.S.,” Smith said. “The (related) concern is about a variety of strategic and military issues, for example control of the South China Seas.” Smith added that common sense and history suggest that despite the attractiveness of China’s large economy, the TPP countries, especially Japan, will be careful in making trade agreements with China. “Everybody would like access to the Chinese market, it’s 1.3 billion people who now have per capita incomes of 8 to 10 thousand dollars a year, so that’s a lot of economy and a lot of market for people’s products,” he said. “On the other hand, trading with China means you’re trading with the central government quite often, or agencies that are closely tied to the central government.” Despite the attractiveness of tapping China’s economy news media is reporting that member nations are still holding out hope that Trump will come around. CNN Money reported Edward Alden, a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations, saying previous U.S. presidents

FARM & RANCH


2

Hi-Line

December 2016

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Losing Trans-Pacific Partnership may not be best for Montana ag Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com The Trans-Pacific Partnership trade agreement between the United States and 11 other Pacific Rim nations is unlikely to be ratified during the lame duck session or after President-elect Donald Trump takes office, and this is not necessarily a good thing for agriculture producers in Montana and the U.S., some ag and economics experts in the U.S. say. “Agriculture played very little if any role in the calculus of the politics in the election,” Vince Smith, professor of economics at Montana State University’s Department of Agricultural Economics and Economics, said. Trump said Nov. 21 that one of his first actions in office will be to withdraw the United States from the TPP which he slammed as a “disaster” during his campaign. As of print deadline, he had not named a secretary of state, only that he had narrowed his choice down to four candidates. The TPP, which would have been a landmark international trade deal for President Barack Obama, became a hot topic during the 2016 presidential election campaign. N e i t h e r t h e Re p u b l i c a n Tr u m p n o r Democratic candidate and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton supported the potential deal as they courted the vote from industry-based states with high electoral votes. n Continued on page 3

Combines line up on a field of harvested grain in western Hill County.

Havre Daily News/File photo

11

Hi-Line

December 2016

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Retired couple returns to Indiana to farm
 CAROL KUGLER The (Bloomington) Herald-Times SPENCER, Ind. (AP) — When most people retire, they expect to relax a little, take on fewer daily chores and have fewer responsibilities. That’s not what happened for Jerry and Paula Perron, owners of Bittersweet Farm in Owen County. The couple moved to the area from Denver, Colorado, after owning and operating the Brain Workout Center for 17 years. “When I turned 75, I told Paula, I’m done,” Jerry told The (Bloomington) Herald-Times recently while walking in the grassy fields of the 17-acre farm. That was in 2011, when the couple moved to Indiana onto the farm they say is “a little bit of heaven on Earth.” Jerry considers himself a Midwesterner even though he spent time in Colorado. The couple actually met while living in Sherman, Texas, and raised their children in Elkhart before moving to Colorado. They knew they would eventually return to the Midwest and decided to try farming for the first time in their lives. Bittersweet Farm has chickens, turkeys, hogs and dogs, but they’re not the usual types. Visitors will be welcomed to the farm by their white, shaggy-haired dog Jackie. She’s a Maremma sheepdog, a livestock guard dog indigenous to central Italy and known for protecting sheep from wolves. Jackie protects the Perrons’ hogs and fowl from coyotes. The Perrons first raised Finn sheep along with guinea fowl and heritage turkeys. Currently, they don’t have any sheep on their farm because the breed they had were high maintenance. Because they enjoyed raising sheep, they are now looking at a couple of heritage species that would be hardier.

He’s going to be a problem.

Paula Perron Co-owner Bittersweet Farm Owen County, Indiana

The couple now raise heritage hogs, both American guinea and mulefoot hogs. The American guinea hogs were once on the critical list because there were fewer than 100 guinea hogs in the United States. But enough people have begun raising the hogs that now the species is no longer in danger of disappearing. “There are a lot more (American guinea hogs) than there were just five years ago,” Jerry said. He’s quick to point out that the breed, which came to the U.S. from West Africa in the 1800s, almost disappeared during the Civil War, when soldiers from both sides ate and killed so many of the hogs. The Perrons first purchased Fred, Ethel and Emma from a farm in northern Indiana. “They rode in my car in a little crate,” Paula said while looking out across the pasture at them. Another hog, Julie the Mulie, is another breed, a mulefoot hog, so named because its feet are one hoof, not the split, cloven hoof of most pigs. She’s a little “shy,” according to her owners, and is currently nursing seven piglets after she was bred to an American guinea hog. All the piglets are also mulefoot, and follow their mother through the woods on one side of the Perrons’ property. In a nearby pasture, 6-week-old piglets lie

in fresh straw as sun shines down on them. “Their personalities are wonderful,” Paula said, surveying the brood from the other side of a fence. “The guinea hogs love to have their bellies rubbed, and behind their ears, too.” “Hello, girls,” Paula calls out to four black pigs in another part of the pasture. Three American guinea pigs and one mulefoot-cross pig that approach the couple, sniffing and giving soft grunts as a welcome. Each one touches noses with Jackie the dog, who sniffs each back. The couple haven’t named these hogs, because they are going to be sold for meat. Traveling to another pasture, the Perrons look out over the barrows, or castrated male pigs, and their American guinea boars. The barrows and boars are munching on grass tufts in the pasture. Seeing the Perrons, most walk over toward the fence, emitting grunts of welcome. “Hello, Phineas,” Paula calls to the main boar, still eating grass a distance away. When the barrows reach between 215 and 250 pounds, they are ready for market. “We sell some to the local restaurants,” Jerry said. “We also sell them to private individuals,” Paula added. Recently, they had a chef from a local restaurant come out to pick his next hog, who will soon be large enough for market. The meat of the American guinea hog is different from what most people purchase in the grocery store. The meat is red and has a different taste since the hogs are grass-fed. Because the hogs are active, the meat is also well marbled. “The meat just melts in your mouth,” Paula said. American guinea hogs are known as lard hogs and that, according to Paula, is why they were popular in the 1800s. She renders lard and uses it to make pie crusts.

TPP: Bacus: 'What incentive would they have to come back?' n Continued from page 10 The TPP agreement would not go into effect until February 2018 if it were ratified, and it will likely take several years for countries to negotiate an alternative, whether it’s RCEP or, as British News Source and Japan Times suggested, the TPP countries be renegotiated without the U.S. Plus, Rispens said, a lot of what has driven cattle and grain prices so low this year is the strength of the U.S. dollar relative to the rest of the world. It’s the long-term ramifications that could cause problems.

“This agreement had the potential to really help international trade on the Pacific Rim and in the long-term it does have the possibility of benefiting this area, but right now we just can’t see past the strength of the U.S. dollar,” he said. “Other things being equal, you certainly don’t want to disadvantage your exporters,” Smith said. Raska and Bacus said their respective ag lobbying organizations will continue to educate the Trump administration and push Congress to ratify the TPP trade agreement.

“You can take those steps forward; you can always come back and make improvements along the way, but by walking away completely you lose that opportunity, you lose that ability to go in and make touch ups,” Bacus said. “We’re basically telling these trade partners ‘we don’t want to do business with you.’ And what incentive would they have to come back to the table after we’ve already negotiated this for the last five years?” he added. “So if it’s not TPP, then what other agreements are readily available?”

While the Perrons freely approach most of their livestock, they are a little cautious with their barrows and boar. They are more careful after Jerry was attacked by the boar named Fred. “His first attack was his head on my shin bone,” Jerry said. Jerry quickly put a board between the boar and himself. “We did a dance for about 10 or 15 minutes while Paula got some food to distract him,” he said. That was the end for Fred. Now Phineas is the principal boar on the farm. In the fall and the spring, he mates with certain females, spending time in the girls’ pastures. “The ladies don’t let him eat so much,” Paula said. “The boys let him.” So, once Phineas has completed his task, he’s back in with the boys. The Perrons also had a flock of turkeys to show visitors. There was one tom — TomTom — a broad-breasted bronze turkey, and three hens. “He’s going to be a problem,” Paula said, half under her breath. The tom and hens were Thanksgiving dinner for the Perrons, who celebrated it with their family. Paula’s concern was the fact that TomTom was too big to fit into a single pan. The tom they harvested for last year’s feast dressed out at 32 pounds. But, alas, TomTom dressed out at 26½ pounds. The hens were 22 to 24 pounds each, so the Perrons decided to eat a hen or two this holiday instead of TomTom, who will be saved for another meal.


12

Hi-Line

FARM & RANCH

December 2016

www.havredailynews.com

CALVING

MADE EASY

with WiFi connected Barn Cameras

The future of ag trade and the TPP

“ Thanks to

Triang

le, the new ca meras re alre are ady ma easier.T king ca hey ar lving e awes have h ome! W ad the ish we m 20 y would ears ag o! install

ed & a

- Justin

Call & ask

r about oru as! Barn Came

1.800.332.1201 | itstriangle.com

Miller,

Gildfor

d, MT

Hi-Line Farm & Ranch - December 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you