Page 1

12

Hi-Line

August 2018

FARM & RANCH

Field to trailer: Eight trucks were used to haul cattle that day ■ Continued from page A1 Photo above Jeremy Couch, a truck driver hauling cattle that day, stands on railings in his trailer as cattle, walking under him, are herded aboard for transportation from the Waids' ranch to a feed lot in Colorado. Another important function of weighing the cattle is to let truckers know how many cattle they can fit on their trailers legally since states have hauling weight restrictions of around 100,000 pounds. “Most trucks weigh 32,000 pounds which gives us 60-or-so-thousand pounds to use,” said Billmayer. “Now this can differ between trucks, depending on the number of axles they have and on the state laws. But the general rule of thumb is that the more axles you have, the more cattle you can carry.” In order to ship all the cattle eight trucks were brought to the Waids' ranch

that day. Each truck, holding on average 60 head of cattle, took roughy 30 minutes to fill. The process of getting cattle on the trailers involves breaking down the total number of cattle to be loaded onto the trailer into groups that can fit the various compartments in those trailers. The inside of a livestock trailer contains trap doors and walls that slide and fall to give a trucker the ability to distribute the cattle evenly and safely into the available spaces of the two levels. Even with the trap doors it is not an easy task. Being confined in a space barely 10 feet across and less then 7 feet tall with an animal that weighs hundreds of pounds more than you can lead to some serious injury if the trucker is not careful.

www.havredailynews.com

Field to trailer


2

Hi-Line

August 2018

FARM & RANCH

Hi-Line

www.havredailynews.com

A photo essay: Local yearling operation ships cattle

www.havredailynews.com

FARM & RANCH Cattle dogs also can help keep production costs down because their cost and upkeep is less than an employee.

Ryan Welch photos@havredailynews.com

Photo below Stacey Waid records the weight of the steers in groups of about 16 as she receives the data from the scale's display to her right. The weight data of the steers helps the buyer confirm the true weight of the cattle, which need to meet a weight range at the time of sale. Growth, weight and profit go hand and hand on the ranch. “Any day that the cattle is not growing is

This month's article is a photo essay of the Waid Ranch's yearling operation in the Bear Paw Mountains. Lon and Stacey Waid have been raising yearlings since 2003, the year that a drought caused them to switch their operation from cow-calf to yearlings. Photo on the right Stacey Waid rides her horse rounding up cattle from a pasture on the Waids' land the morning of July 9. Six more riders were also working to move the herd of nearly 600 steers that day to their stockyards for shipping. For their yearling operation, the Waids buy young cattle at roughly 500 pounds and sell them at around 900 pounds, averaging a gain of about two pounds each day. They grow the cattle in their background lots, where feed and water intake can be monitored and controlled, and in their pastures. This process is important, said Darrin Boss, superintendent of the Northern Agriculture Research Center, because it allows cattle to grow into a size that has ideal muscle mass before they are moved to a feed lot where the meat is marbled.

Photo above Lon Waid, using cattle dogs, drives cattle branded with the Waids' brand, after they were sorted by the buyer, toward a scale in the Waids' stockyard. Moving cattle in a stockyard can prove challenging for even the most veteran ranch-

er due to the tight space and random movements of the cattle when stressed. To help combat this the Waids use cattle dogs. “A good (cattle) dog can take the place of two or three ranchers,” said Lon Waid. “They can get to places that a rancher and a horse would have trouble getting to and they’re pretty fast.”

August 2018

11

a day that is hindering potential profits when it comes time to sell,” said Boss. Maintaining that constant growth, around two pounds a day according to Stacy Waid, is one of the main challenges when it comes to a yearling operation. Cattle, much like people, eat at different rates and different amounts which, over time, can lead to an imbalance in a herd if not managed carefully. "If the animal gets too big, it can start to force out the others in the group when it comes to feeding," Lon Waid said. This can lead to the larger animal growing faster and the smaller animal growing slower, both of which can mess with profits.

■ See Field to trailer Page 12


10

Hi-Line

August 2018

FARM & RANCH

Hi-Line

www.havredailynews.com

www.havredailynews.com

FARM & RANCH

August 2018

3

Field to trailer: Cattle buyers can help keep the ag production process local ■ Continued from page 3

Photo on the right Buyer Mark Billmayer sorts cattle based on weight while Loy Waid, 16, waits behind him, helping Billmayer when needed. “Lon wanted to sell the heavier end of the cattle pulled in from the field and so I was pulling out cattle that weighted less since not all the cattle from the field were going onto the trucks that day,” said Billmayer in an interview a week after Waids' shipping date. A buyer fills an important role when dealing with cattle. Along with being the point of contact for those buying and selling cattle, they also are the ones who help visibly inspect the livestock to make sure each head of cattle is the agreed upon weight and that any signs of injury are noted. What is also worth mentioning is that it is the buyer who helps keep things local when moving cattle around. For example the cattle on the Waid Ranch came from ranches in Blaine, Hill and Liberty county. This keeps costs lower for transporting and helps stimulate local economy.

Photo above Jack Soloman, a neighbor who was helping move cattle, rounds up steers after they broke through a fence on the Waids' ranch. While most times rounding up cattle is relatively straight forward, it is when things go wrong that shows how much more work is involved in cattle handling and production. The Waids used seven riders, each on horseback, along with a couple experienced cattle dogs to drive the steers into the stockyard. Following the lead of Lon Waid, the cattle were moved mostly by the presence of the riders and dogs, however, the vocal cues and physical force were sometimes needed for

the more stubborn steers. This was often the case when pushing the herd through vegetation and water since the cows could easily spread. Another issue that arose while moving the second herd was that group mentality can easily lead the cattle to doing things against the handlers' direction. Such was the case that lead to a group of steers breaking the fence after cattle at the front of the herd became confused where to go, causing those behind to get further confused and so on, until some of the steers opted to take a route out through the fence.

■ See Field to trailer Page 10


44

Hi-Line Hi-Line

August2018 2018 August

What do “low cost� ag suppliers

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

REALLY do for you?

When You Buy From Us, We Give You Added Value! Let's Work Together

We Can Only Continue To Provide Service In Our Communities If YOU Support Those Services! After The Initial Saleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; WHAT Is Your 'LVFRXQW6XSSOLHU2ÍżHULQJ<RX"

When you buy your chemical & fertilizer from us we can help you with . . . Â&#x2021;&URS6FRXWLQJ Â&#x2021;:HHG,GHQWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ6HUYLFHV  Â&#x2021;6RLO$QDO\VLV Â&#x2021;&URS6SUD\LQJ  Â&#x2021;$SSOLFDWLRQ5HFRPPHQGDWLRQV Â&#x2021;)HUWLOL]HU$SSOLFDWLRQ â&#x20AC;˘ And Much More

We Have . . . $)XOO$JURQRP\6WDÍż$YDLODEOH

7R$OO2I2XU3DWURQV$FURVV2XU7UDGH$UHD

The People, The Know How And The Products To Cover All Your Needs . . .

     

:H2ÍžHU0DQ\6HUYLFHVWR2XU&XVWRPHUV Â&#x2021;2Q)DUP7LUH6HUYLFH Â&#x2021;6KRS6HUYLFHV 0LQRU5HSDLUV Â&#x2021;2LO )LOWHUV Â&#x2021;)HHG &U\VWDO\[  Â&#x2021;/DZQ&DUH,WHPV Â&#x2021;)HQFLQJ(TXLSPHQW

Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

%XON)XHO'HOLYHU\ 7LUHV%DWWHULHV%UDNHV +RXU*DV )XHO 2[\JHQ$FHW\OHQH7DQNV )XOO/LQH+DUGZDUH6WRUH

:H$OVR2ÍżHU)XOO&RPPRGLW\0DUNHWLQJ

Value Added Services . . . Use them to your advantage and maximize your yields!

Are You Getting This Kind Of Value Where You Buy?

!

Plus, if you pay in advance, earn a 6% premium Or 6% discount for cash at time of purchase!

Scobey â&#x20AC;˘ Flaxville â&#x20AC;˘ Peerless â&#x20AC;˘ Richland â&#x20AC;˘ Opheim â&#x20AC;˘ Four Buttes 487-2741

474-2231

893-4398

724-3353

762-3231

783-5519

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

White House Announces $12 Billion in Trade War Aid to Farmers the $12 billion value by a full $1 billion. Should trade relations not improve, the damOn Tuesday, the Trump administration ages will continue to accrue; according to announced a $12 billion plan to assist researchers at the University of Illinois and American farmers and ranchers coping with Ohio State University, Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25% tariff on American soybeans could cost a mid-size Ilan escalating global trade war. 7KHSODQZLOOSULPDULO\EHQHÂżWIDUPHUV linois farm 87% of its income and $500,000 who grow soy, corn, sorghum, wheat, cot- of the operationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s net worth. National Farmers Union President Roger ton, dairy, and pork, all of which have been heavily targeted by international tariffs, Johnson expressed appreciation for the decialthough producers of other commodities sion to provide farmers with much-needed may be eligible for assistance as well. The assistance, but called the plan a â&#x20AC;&#x153;short-term government will allocate assistance through Âż[ WR D ORQJWHUP SUREOHP´$ RQHWLPH three programs authorized by the Com- payment does not address the potentially PRGLW\ &UHGLW &RUSRUDWLRQ &&&  HLWKHU permanent loss of key export markets and through direct payments or by purchasing sustained low prices. He urged the adminand redistributing surpluses. The plan also istration to â&#x20AC;&#x153;develop a support mechanism includes a provision that would develop and WKDW ZLOO PLWLJDWH WKH VLJQLÂżFDQW GDPDJH WKDW LV EHLQJ LQĂ&#x20AC;LFWHGXSRQ RXU PRVW YLWDO expand export markets. Though farmers affected by retaliatory LQWHUQDWLRQDO PDUNHWV IRU \HDUV WR FRPH´ tariffs are in great need of assistance, this and recommend that they work with Conplan will only put a small dent in the overall gress to â&#x20AC;&#x153;ensure farm bill programs provide GDPDJH LQ -XQH DORQH WKH ÂżQDQFLDO ORVV enough assistance to farmers when markets to soy, corn, and wheat farmers exceeded FROODSVH´ FOR FARM & RANCH

Document the Drought: USDA U.S. Drought Monitor Offers Producers a Voice USDA FARM AGENCY FOR FARM & RANCH The U.S. Drought Monitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reporting feature offers producers an opportunity to submit drought impact and condition reports. The USDA, in partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, produced the U.S. Drought Monitor to include a reporting feature that allows producers to report local drought impacts and conditions. The report allows producers to: Provide a written description of drought impacts on livelihood, activities, etc.; Select categories to show losses and gains as a result of the drought;

Report on the duration of drought event; Select Affected Places â&#x20AC;&#x201C; geographic areas ranging from an entire state to a small area within a state; Submit images that document the drought and its impact; Provide contact information (includes DQRSWLRQWRNHHSLQIRUPDWLRQFRQÂżGHQWLDO  The reporting tool for producers to record the effects of the drought can be accessed at the following link: droughtreporter.unl.edu/ submitreport/. 0RUHLQIRUPDWLRQLQFOXGLQJVWDWHVSHFLÂżF drought impact maps can be found on the U. S. Drought Monitor page: droughtmonitor. unl.edu/CurrentMap/StateDroughtMonitor. aspx?MT.

www.glasgowcourier.com Sign up for your FREE Trial Subscription

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

August August2018 2018

WANTED ARTICLES, IDEAS, TOPICS OF INTEREST RELATED TO AGRICULTURE

Advertise in the Farm and Ranch reaching across the Hi-Line for just $15.00 a column inch! Sponsor the weekly Glasgow Courier's Agriculture & Livestock page for $8.00 a column inch! The Glasgow Courier would like to invite you to share articles, ideas, and topics of interest related to agriculture. We have recently added an agriculture and livestock page to the paper which we are excited to fill with content that interests our readers. We also have this monthly publication, the Farm and Ranch, and we would love to have your ideas on these pages!

We want to hear from you! Call us at 406-228-9301 Email us at courier@nemont.net Find us at 341 3rd Ave South, Glasgow, Mt.

99


88

August2018 2018 August

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM FARM & &RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Farm Bill Goes to House-Senate Conference

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

USDA will not open a general signup this year, however, a one-year extension will be offered to existing CRP participants As part of a 33-year effort to protect with expiring CRP contracts of 14 years or sensitive lands and improve water quality less. Producers eligible for an extension will and wildlife habitat on private lands, the receive a letter with more information. Additionally, FSA established new rank86 'HSDUWPHQW RI$JULFXOWXUH 86'$  will resume accepting applications for the ing criteria for CRP Grasslands. To guarvoluntary Conservation Reserve Program antee all CRP grasslands offers are treated equally, applicants who previously applied &53  Eligible farmers, ranchers, and private will be asked to reapply using the new landowners can sign up at their local Farm ranking criteria. Producers with pending 6HUYLFH$JHQF\ )6$ RI¿FHEHWZHHQ-XQH applications will receive a letter providing 4 and Aug. 17. FSA stopped accepting ap- the options. In return for enrolling land in CRP, plications last fall for the CRP continuous signup (excluding applications for the Con- USDA, through FSA on behalf of the Comservation Reserve Enhancement Program PRGLW\&UHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQ &&& SURYLGHV &5(3  DQG &53 JUDVVODQGV  7KLV SDXVH participants with annual rental payments and allowed USDA to review available acres cost-share assistance. Landowners enter into and avoid exceeding the 24 million-acre contracts that last between 10 and 15 years. CRP cap set by the 2014 Farm Bill. New CRP pays producers who remove sensitive limited practice availability and short sign lands from production and plant certain up period helps ensure that landowners with grasses, shrubs and trees that improve water the most sensitive acreage will enroll in the quality, prevent soil erosion and increase program and avoid unintended competition wildlife habitat. The new changes to CRP do not impact with new and beginning farmers seeking leases. CRP enrollment currently is about the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, a related program offered by CCC 22.7 million acres. For this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signup, limited priority and state partners. Producers wanting to apply for the CRP practices are available for continuous enrollment. They include grassed waterways, continuous signup or CRP grasslands should ¿OWHUVWULSVULSDULDQEXIIHUVZHWODQGUHVWRUD- contact their USDA service center. To locate tion and others. FSA will use updated soil \RXUORFDO)6$RI¿FHYLVLWZZZIDUPHUV rental rates to make annual rental payments, gov. More information on CRP can be found UHÃ&#x20AC;HFWLQJFXUUHQWYDOXHV,WZLOOQRWRIIHULQ- at www.fsa.usda.gov/crp. centive payments as part of the new signup.

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE!

$25.00!

College Students 3 Months $10.50 6 Months $21.00 9 Months $31.50

Online Subscription Only 1 year subscription $35 2 year subscription $69 3 year subscription $102

The Glasgow Courier Serving Proudly As The Voice Of Valley County Since 1913

341 Third Ave. South, Glasgow, MT 59230 â&#x20AC;¢ www.glasgowcourier.com/subscribe â&#x20AC;¢ 406-228-9301

_________________________ City, State, Zip ________________ Phone or Email _______________ Payment must accompany this form. Offer good from Aug. 1-31, 2018. Offer applies to new and renewal customers.

The Month in Weather: Below Normal Precipitation Continues Across Region H[SODLQVWKHORZFRQ¿GHQFH,W¶VDZDLWDQGVHH approach to see what Mother Nature will bring. Looking back at July, as of press date, eight days in the month saw at least a trace July is typically a month in which quite a of reported precipitation, and three days saw bit of rainfall occurs, as it is one of the stronger at least a tenth of an inch of accumulated months for severe weather. But, for most of the precipitation. As for winds, 10 days saw susregion, outside of a couple of rainfall events, tained winds greater than 25 mph, and 18 days much of the month was characterized by hot with winds greater than 20 mph. The highest and dry conditions. Many locations across the sustained wind was reported at 41 mph and region continue to be behind normal for the occurred on July 3, and the highest wind month, and even now behind normal for the gust was also recorded on July 3, at 51 mph. As of press date, per the National Weather year in terms of precipitation. /RRNLQJ IRUZDUG WRZDUGV$XJXVW FRQ¿- Service in Glasgow, the highest observed dence in the trends for both temperatures and temperature for the month was 100 degrees precipitation across northeast Montana again on both July 6 and 10, and the lowest was is low. The Climate Prediction Center forecast 48 on July 4. The total liquid precipitation OD\VRXW³(TXDO&KDQFHV´IRUERWKDERYHRU UHSRUWHG DW *ODVJRZ ZDV ´ ZKLFK ZDV below-temperatures and precipitation, which See WEATHER Page 7 MICHELLE BIGELBACH FARM AND RANCH

55

NEW & USED TRUCKS AND CARS

USDA FARM SERVICE AGENCY FOR FARM & RANCH

The U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate have decided to take their disparate versions of farm bills to conference. The effort will attempt to reconcile the differences between the two bills. Namely the conferees will need to bring together differences in the Sustenance Nutritional Assistance Program, differences in conservation programs and gaps in spending and funding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We see this Farm Bill as pivotal for building a sturdier ladder of opportunity in $PHULFD´+RXVH6SHDNHU3DXO5\DQVDLGLQ DSUHVVUHOHDVHSXWRXWE\KLVRI¿FH³:LWKDOO this momentum in our economy, there could not be a better time to help more people move from welfare to work. This is a chance to close the skills gap, better equip our workforce, and COURIER FILE PHOTO / FOR FARM & RANCH support much-needed development in rural Two young boys show off their fair entries at the Northeast Montana Fair. Fair season is upon us in northcentral and northeastern Montana. communities. I look forward to working with Chairman Conaway and all of these lawmakers RQWKHVHYLWDOUHIRUPV´ The primary difference between the two bills is the House versionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mandate that reFLSLHQWVRI61$3EHQH¿WVZRXOGEHUHTXLUHG to work at least 20 hours a week or take Mail or Bring in this coupon for vocational training in order to qualify for the a year subscription for only program. Democrats and some republicans, especially in the Senate, are opposed to such a mandate which they feel would cause many to be bucked from the program and suffer undue hardship. An amendment to add similar language to the Senate version of the farm bill did not Name _____________________ Out of County / In Montana Out of State - National make it out of committee and it is unclear In Valley County: if the measure would pass conference with 3 Months $12.50 3 Months $15 3 Months $11.25 the Senate. Republican lawmakers hope the _________________________ 6 Months $24 6 Months $29 6 Months $21.50 change would incentivize moving Americans 1 year subscription $46 1 year subscription $56 1 year subscription $41 from welfare to work as employers struggle 2 year subscription $91 2 year subscription $111 Address ____________________ 2 year subscription $81 WR¿QGQHZHPSOR\HHVDFFRUGLQJWRDUHOHDVH 3 year subscription $135 by House Republicans. 3 year subscription $165 3 year subscription $120

August 2018 August 2018

NEWTON MOTORS, INC.

Continuous Conservation Reserve Program Enrollment

A.J. ETHERINGTON FOR FARM & RANCH

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING THE HI-LINE FARM & RANCH THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Hi-Line Hi-Line

All In One Convenient Location

440 Highway 2 West â&#x20AC;¢ Glasgow â&#x20AC;¢ Across from the Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 â&#x20AC;¢ 406-228-4381 â&#x20AC;¢ 1-800-255-1472 Family owned by the Newton Boys! Rent A Car Come in and see Doug, Terry, or Ted!

Glasgow Stockyards, Inc. Linda & Mark Nielsen, Owners Iva Murch, Manager 263-7529 Dean Barnes, Yard Manager 263-1175 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 783-7285

August, SERVING AREA 2 September LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS & October 2018 FOR 72 YEARS! 1946 - 2018 Schedule

August 2018 Thursday

September 2018 Thursday

2

NO AUCTION

9

All Class Cattle Auction

13

5IFUI#JH'BMM:FBSMJOH$MBTTJD & All Class Cattle Auction

16

NO AUCTION

20

23

Early Yearling & All Class Cattle Auction

5IF0OFBOE0OMZ4IFFQ"VDUJPOPG & All Class Cattle Auction

27

All Class Cattle Auction

30

NO AUCTION

228-9306

10#PYt(MBTHPX .5 HTJ!OFNPOUOFU XXXHMBTHPXTUPDLZBSETDPN

6

All Class Cattle Auction

October 2018 Thursday

4

All Class Cattle Auction

11

All Class Cattle Auction

3OHDVHFDOOLQFRQVLJQPHQWVVREX\HUVFDQEHQRWLÃ&#x20AC;HG

FOR SALE: 40-foot Dry Van Trailer. Good rubber, for storage. Could be delivered. $3,500. Northstar Portable Livestock Scale. Rolling doors on each end of scale, Gallagher smart scale reader, easy to operate. Can be set up and ready to go in 10 minutes. Weighed only 200 head. $3,000. 1995 Chevy 1-ton Dually. 454, auto transmission overdrive, 5th wheel ball. Runs great. $2,000. Call Roger at 406-263-2400


66

August 2018 August 2018

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM FARM & &RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

4H: The Journey Toward Positive Youth Development ROUBIE YOUNKIN FOR FARM & RANCH

ROUBIE YOUNKIN / FOR FARM & RANCH

Blaire Westby (l), Tatum Nyquist (c) and Kohl Kittleson (r) paint the Lynn Cornwell Memorial Show Ring at the Valley County Fairgrounds in preparation for the fair.

The sun is just peaking over the horizon as a sleepy 12 year leads his steer to the wash rack. He ties the animal using a quick release knot taught to him by his father, who was taught E\KLVIDWKHU$ÂłMHUN´NQRWZLOOFRPHXQWLHG quickly and easily when the tail of the rope is pulled and is ideal for tying animals who sometimes must be quickly untied for safety reasons. This is just one of many lessons learned by a 4-H member and just one project experience in the journey toward positive youth development. It is that time of year when a year of diligence, hard work, frustrating lessons and the sweet taste of success all come together. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair time! With it comes a wave of green as members proudly exhibit their projects ranging from robotics to baking to welding, woodworking and theatre arts. It is the culmination of early mornings packing feed buckets and late nights in the calving barn. It is taking the SHUIHFWDQJHOIRRGFDNHIURPWKHRYHQÂżQDOO\ programming that Lego robot (with a mind of LWVRZQ WRWXUQLQDFLUFOHDQGZKLVWOHZKHQ it stops. It is welding an even bead, sewing a VWUDLJKWVHDPDQGÂżQDOO\FDSWXULQJWKHHYHQLQJ sunset with a photograph. 4-H is about having fun â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but being responsible. It is about self discovery and sharing knowledge with others. It is living and learning, setting goals and working toward them. It is about knowing where you are going but never forgetting where you have been. 4-H exposes young people to the big world outside their local community. It takes kids places they have only imagined. Through WKHLU H[SHULHQFHV WKH\ JDLQ WKH FRQÂżGHQFH to believe in themselves. They become effective communicators, become empowered to forage a commitment to become part of a meaningful change in their community. 4-H cultivates young people to become leaders in DÂłUHYROXWLRQRIUHVSRQVLELOLW\´ You can tell how powerful an experience is by what is carried on with you. From ribbons and quilting pieces to memories and skills that will last a lifetime, 4-H experiences remain a part of everyone involved. 4-H experiences can teach youth about being a good winner but more importantly to be a good loser. Kids learn not just from their triumphs but also through trials, heartaches, and disappointments while completing their SURMHFWV7UDYHOLQJWKHÂłSDWKWRWKHIDLU´FDQEH a bumpy road scattered with potholes, hazards See 4H JOURNEY Page 7

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

4H Journey

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & & RANCH FARM RANCH

August 2018 August 2018

77

ing together side by side to accomplish goals. It is a tapestry of colors and experiences combining arts, crafts, horticulture, livestock, cookCONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 ing, science, camping, and community service and slippery slopes. Livestock projects involve all in one umbrella of youth development. It all began with the seed of an idea 1902. not just the commitment of time but also a ÂżQDQFLDOLQYHVWPHQW$FKLOGÂśVHQWLUHVDYLQJV Heartland America needed folks to embrace may be tied up in the purchase of a steer and the advances in agriculture but leaders with open minds, strong hearts and willing hands literally tons of feed. Then without warning, those highest aspirations are dashed when the were not in abundance. Luckily kids were. animal gets sick and dies. What we see enter- By empowering the next generation to lead, ing the show ring is only part of the story, the 4-H took root and grew and grew and grew. It learning experience is the rest. Animals get JUHZNLGVZKRDUHFRQÂżGHQWDQGVWURQJ+ developed kids who were curious enough to sick; members treat and care for them. Horses become lame; members learn remedies for DVNTXHVWLRQVDQGFDSDEOHHQRXJKWRÂżQGWKH treatment. Pottery creations break, coffee is answer. They will stick with a job until the job spilled on a potential prize winning quilt, cook- gets done, they know how to work with others ies burn, crops fail and grasshoppers annihilate and know how to take the lead when needed. So this year, as you walk through the exa gardening project. Everything does NOT hibits at the fair, or stop to watch members always come up roses in the 4-H experience. 4-H is about more than exhibiting at fairs washing their lamb, think about the rest of and living a life in agriculture. It is like the the story. The one about raising blue ribbon little clay pot made in 4-H afterschool program. kids not just blue ribbon exhibits. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all -XVWDVWKDWSRWZDVVKDSHGJOD]HGDQGÂżUHG about selling a lamb or winning ribbons or 4-H shapes the lives of youth. Leadership trophies. These youth will become the leaders skills are learned by attending club meetings, of tomorrow and we are all supporting these ROUBIE YOUNKIN / FOR FARM & RANCH KROGLQJRIÂżFHVPDVWHULQJKRZWRHIIHFWLYHO\ youth as they travel down that bumpy road to The Lucky Clovers from Nashua's 4-H show off the first aid kits they made to share with area farmers and reach the pinnacle of success â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;To Make the run a meeting and honing public speaking ranchers. The group decided to work with local Glasgow implement dealers to distribute first aid kits to area skills. 4-H enhances the importance of work- %HVW%HWWHU´ farmers who may be in need of them.

Weather CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

A.J. ETHERINGTON / FOR FARM & RANCH

Rainstorms over fields near Whitewater, Mont. in early July. Despite rainshowers precipitation levels remain below normal in parts of the region.

approximately ´ EHORZ QRUPDO 2YHU D 24-hour period, the greatest precipitation WRWDOZDV´ZKLFKRFFXUUHGRQ-XO\ The overall mean temperature for the month was approximately 74 degrees, which was approximately 4 degrees above normal. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor was released on July 19. The majority of the changes across the northeast have come in terms of the eastward extent of Abnormally Dry Conditions. New areas of Moderate Drought have popped up in the far northwest corner of Montana. Currently, approximately SHUFHQWRIWKHVWDWHLVFODVVL¿HGDVDWOHDVW Abnormally Dry and seven percent of the state is in at least a Moderate Drought. For the region, moderate drought conditions remain in Phillips County. Abnormally Dry conditions reaches just as far as western Roosevelt County and up to far western Sheridan County, thanks in part to the precipitation that occurred during July. Parts of far southern Valley County have been taken out of the Abnormally Dry Condition designation. The state drought advisory committee is looking for feedback from folks involved ZLWK WKH DJULFXOWXUH LQGXVWU\ 6SHFL¿FDOO\ these folks are looking to hear from those directly involved in operations where drought is affecting them and to know what conditions are like currently across the region. This is being conducted through a survey that goes to the Montana Drought Monitor Reporter. The link for the survey is at:survey123.arcgis.com/share/6c9679697b 104ccdbde2d52f64f8adb2.


66

August 2018 August 2018

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM FARM & &RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

4H: The Journey Toward Positive Youth Development ROUBIE YOUNKIN FOR FARM & RANCH

ROUBIE YOUNKIN / FOR FARM & RANCH

Blaire Westby (l), Tatum Nyquist (c) and Kohl Kittleson (r) paint the Lynn Cornwell Memorial Show Ring at the Valley County Fairgrounds in preparation for the fair.

The sun is just peaking over the horizon as a sleepy 12 year leads his steer to the wash rack. He ties the animal using a quick release knot taught to him by his father, who was taught E\KLVIDWKHU$ÂłMHUN´NQRWZLOOFRPHXQWLHG quickly and easily when the tail of the rope is pulled and is ideal for tying animals who sometimes must be quickly untied for safety reasons. This is just one of many lessons learned by a 4-H member and just one project experience in the journey toward positive youth development. It is that time of year when a year of diligence, hard work, frustrating lessons and the sweet taste of success all come together. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fair time! With it comes a wave of green as members proudly exhibit their projects ranging from robotics to baking to welding, woodworking and theatre arts. It is the culmination of early mornings packing feed buckets and late nights in the calving barn. It is taking the SHUIHFWDQJHOIRRGFDNHIURPWKHRYHQÂżQDOO\ programming that Lego robot (with a mind of LWVRZQ WRWXUQLQDFLUFOHDQGZKLVWOHZKHQ it stops. It is welding an even bead, sewing a VWUDLJKWVHDPDQGÂżQDOO\FDSWXULQJWKHHYHQLQJ sunset with a photograph. 4-H is about having fun â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but being responsible. It is about self discovery and sharing knowledge with others. It is living and learning, setting goals and working toward them. It is about knowing where you are going but never forgetting where you have been. 4-H exposes young people to the big world outside their local community. It takes kids places they have only imagined. Through WKHLU H[SHULHQFHV WKH\ JDLQ WKH FRQÂżGHQFH to believe in themselves. They become effective communicators, become empowered to forage a commitment to become part of a meaningful change in their community. 4-H cultivates young people to become leaders in DÂłUHYROXWLRQRIUHVSRQVLELOLW\´ You can tell how powerful an experience is by what is carried on with you. From ribbons and quilting pieces to memories and skills that will last a lifetime, 4-H experiences remain a part of everyone involved. 4-H experiences can teach youth about being a good winner but more importantly to be a good loser. Kids learn not just from their triumphs but also through trials, heartaches, and disappointments while completing their SURMHFWV7UDYHOLQJWKHÂłSDWKWRWKHIDLU´FDQEH a bumpy road scattered with potholes, hazards See 4H JOURNEY Page 7

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

4H Journey

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & & RANCH FARM RANCH

August 2018 August 2018

77

ing together side by side to accomplish goals. It is a tapestry of colors and experiences combining arts, crafts, horticulture, livestock, cookCONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 ing, science, camping, and community service and slippery slopes. Livestock projects involve all in one umbrella of youth development. It all began with the seed of an idea 1902. not just the commitment of time but also a ÂżQDQFLDOLQYHVWPHQW$FKLOGÂśVHQWLUHVDYLQJV Heartland America needed folks to embrace may be tied up in the purchase of a steer and the advances in agriculture but leaders with open minds, strong hearts and willing hands literally tons of feed. Then without warning, those highest aspirations are dashed when the were not in abundance. Luckily kids were. animal gets sick and dies. What we see enter- By empowering the next generation to lead, ing the show ring is only part of the story, the 4-H took root and grew and grew and grew. It learning experience is the rest. Animals get JUHZNLGVZKRDUHFRQÂżGHQWDQGVWURQJ+ developed kids who were curious enough to sick; members treat and care for them. Horses become lame; members learn remedies for DVNTXHVWLRQVDQGFDSDEOHHQRXJKWRÂżQGWKH treatment. Pottery creations break, coffee is answer. They will stick with a job until the job spilled on a potential prize winning quilt, cook- gets done, they know how to work with others ies burn, crops fail and grasshoppers annihilate and know how to take the lead when needed. So this year, as you walk through the exa gardening project. Everything does NOT hibits at the fair, or stop to watch members always come up roses in the 4-H experience. 4-H is about more than exhibiting at fairs washing their lamb, think about the rest of and living a life in agriculture. It is like the the story. The one about raising blue ribbon little clay pot made in 4-H afterschool program. kids not just blue ribbon exhibits. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t all -XVWDVWKDWSRWZDVVKDSHGJOD]HGDQGÂżUHG about selling a lamb or winning ribbons or 4-H shapes the lives of youth. Leadership trophies. These youth will become the leaders skills are learned by attending club meetings, of tomorrow and we are all supporting these ROUBIE YOUNKIN / FOR FARM & RANCH KROGLQJRIÂżFHVPDVWHULQJKRZWRHIIHFWLYHO\ youth as they travel down that bumpy road to The Lucky Clovers from Nashua's 4-H show off the first aid kits they made to share with area farmers and reach the pinnacle of success â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;To Make the run a meeting and honing public speaking ranchers. The group decided to work with local Glasgow implement dealers to distribute first aid kits to area skills. 4-H enhances the importance of work- %HVW%HWWHU´ farmers who may be in need of them.

Weather CONTINUED FROM PAGE 5

A.J. ETHERINGTON / FOR FARM & RANCH

Rainstorms over fields near Whitewater, Mont. in early July. Despite rainshowers precipitation levels remain below normal in parts of the region.

approximately ´ EHORZ QRUPDO 2YHU D 24-hour period, the greatest precipitation WRWDOZDV´ZKLFKRFFXUUHGRQ-XO\ The overall mean temperature for the month was approximately 74 degrees, which was approximately 4 degrees above normal. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor was released on July 19. The majority of the changes across the northeast have come in terms of the eastward extent of Abnormally Dry Conditions. New areas of Moderate Drought have popped up in the far northwest corner of Montana. Currently, approximately SHUFHQWRIWKHVWDWHLVFODVVL¿HGDVDWOHDVW Abnormally Dry and seven percent of the state is in at least a Moderate Drought. For the region, moderate drought conditions remain in Phillips County. Abnormally Dry conditions reaches just as far as western Roosevelt County and up to far western Sheridan County, thanks in part to the precipitation that occurred during July. Parts of far southern Valley County have been taken out of the Abnormally Dry Condition designation. The state drought advisory committee is looking for feedback from folks involved ZLWK WKH DJULFXOWXUH LQGXVWU\ 6SHFL¿FDOO\ these folks are looking to hear from those directly involved in operations where drought is affecting them and to know what conditions are like currently across the region. This is being conducted through a survey that goes to the Montana Drought Monitor Reporter. The link for the survey is at:survey123.arcgis.com/share/6c9679697b 104ccdbde2d52f64f8adb2.


88

August2018 2018 August

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM FARM & &RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Farm Bill Goes to House-Senate Conference

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

USDA will not open a general signup this year, however, a one-year extension will be offered to existing CRP participants As part of a 33-year effort to protect with expiring CRP contracts of 14 years or sensitive lands and improve water quality less. Producers eligible for an extension will and wildlife habitat on private lands, the receive a letter with more information. Additionally, FSA established new rank86 'HSDUWPHQW RI$JULFXOWXUH 86'$  will resume accepting applications for the ing criteria for CRP Grasslands. To guarvoluntary Conservation Reserve Program antee all CRP grasslands offers are treated equally, applicants who previously applied &53  Eligible farmers, ranchers, and private will be asked to reapply using the new landowners can sign up at their local Farm ranking criteria. Producers with pending 6HUYLFH$JHQF\ )6$ RI¿FHEHWZHHQ-XQH applications will receive a letter providing 4 and Aug. 17. FSA stopped accepting ap- the options. In return for enrolling land in CRP, plications last fall for the CRP continuous signup (excluding applications for the Con- USDA, through FSA on behalf of the Comservation Reserve Enhancement Program PRGLW\&UHGLW&RUSRUDWLRQ &&& SURYLGHV &5(3  DQG &53 JUDVVODQGV  7KLV SDXVH participants with annual rental payments and allowed USDA to review available acres cost-share assistance. Landowners enter into and avoid exceeding the 24 million-acre contracts that last between 10 and 15 years. CRP cap set by the 2014 Farm Bill. New CRP pays producers who remove sensitive limited practice availability and short sign lands from production and plant certain up period helps ensure that landowners with grasses, shrubs and trees that improve water the most sensitive acreage will enroll in the quality, prevent soil erosion and increase program and avoid unintended competition wildlife habitat. The new changes to CRP do not impact with new and beginning farmers seeking leases. CRP enrollment currently is about the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program, a related program offered by CCC 22.7 million acres. For this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s signup, limited priority and state partners. Producers wanting to apply for the CRP practices are available for continuous enrollment. They include grassed waterways, continuous signup or CRP grasslands should ¿OWHUVWULSVULSDULDQEXIIHUVZHWODQGUHVWRUD- contact their USDA service center. To locate tion and others. FSA will use updated soil \RXUORFDO)6$RI¿FHYLVLWZZZIDUPHUV rental rates to make annual rental payments, gov. More information on CRP can be found UHÃ&#x20AC;HFWLQJFXUUHQWYDOXHV,WZLOOQRWRIIHULQ- at www.fsa.usda.gov/crp. centive payments as part of the new signup.

SAVE! SAVE! SAVE!

$25.00!

College Students 3 Months $10.50 6 Months $21.00 9 Months $31.50

Online Subscription Only 1 year subscription $35 2 year subscription $69 3 year subscription $102

The Glasgow Courier Serving Proudly As The Voice Of Valley County Since 1913

341 Third Ave. South, Glasgow, MT 59230 â&#x20AC;¢ www.glasgowcourier.com/subscribe â&#x20AC;¢ 406-228-9301

_________________________ City, State, Zip ________________ Phone or Email _______________ Payment must accompany this form. Offer good from Aug. 1-31, 2018. Offer applies to new and renewal customers.

The Month in Weather: Below Normal Precipitation Continues Across Region H[SODLQVWKHORZFRQ¿GHQFH,W¶VDZDLWDQGVHH approach to see what Mother Nature will bring. Looking back at July, as of press date, eight days in the month saw at least a trace July is typically a month in which quite a of reported precipitation, and three days saw bit of rainfall occurs, as it is one of the stronger at least a tenth of an inch of accumulated months for severe weather. But, for most of the precipitation. As for winds, 10 days saw susregion, outside of a couple of rainfall events, tained winds greater than 25 mph, and 18 days much of the month was characterized by hot with winds greater than 20 mph. The highest and dry conditions. Many locations across the sustained wind was reported at 41 mph and region continue to be behind normal for the occurred on July 3, and the highest wind month, and even now behind normal for the gust was also recorded on July 3, at 51 mph. As of press date, per the National Weather year in terms of precipitation. /RRNLQJ IRUZDUG WRZDUGV$XJXVW FRQ¿- Service in Glasgow, the highest observed dence in the trends for both temperatures and temperature for the month was 100 degrees precipitation across northeast Montana again on both July 6 and 10, and the lowest was is low. The Climate Prediction Center forecast 48 on July 4. The total liquid precipitation OD\VRXW³(TXDO&KDQFHV´IRUERWKDERYHRU UHSRUWHG DW *ODVJRZ ZDV ´ ZKLFK ZDV below-temperatures and precipitation, which See WEATHER Page 7 MICHELLE BIGELBACH FARM AND RANCH

55

NEW & USED TRUCKS AND CARS

USDA FARM SERVICE AGENCY FOR FARM & RANCH

The U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate have decided to take their disparate versions of farm bills to conference. The effort will attempt to reconcile the differences between the two bills. Namely the conferees will need to bring together differences in the Sustenance Nutritional Assistance Program, differences in conservation programs and gaps in spending and funding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We see this Farm Bill as pivotal for building a sturdier ladder of opportunity in $PHULFD´+RXVH6SHDNHU3DXO5\DQVDLGLQ DSUHVVUHOHDVHSXWRXWE\KLVRI¿FH³:LWKDOO this momentum in our economy, there could not be a better time to help more people move from welfare to work. This is a chance to close the skills gap, better equip our workforce, and COURIER FILE PHOTO / FOR FARM & RANCH support much-needed development in rural Two young boys show off their fair entries at the Northeast Montana Fair. Fair season is upon us in northcentral and northeastern Montana. communities. I look forward to working with Chairman Conaway and all of these lawmakers RQWKHVHYLWDOUHIRUPV´ The primary difference between the two bills is the House versionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mandate that reFLSLHQWVRI61$3EHQH¿WVZRXOGEHUHTXLUHG to work at least 20 hours a week or take Mail or Bring in this coupon for vocational training in order to qualify for the a year subscription for only program. Democrats and some republicans, especially in the Senate, are opposed to such a mandate which they feel would cause many to be bucked from the program and suffer undue hardship. An amendment to add similar language to the Senate version of the farm bill did not Name _____________________ Out of County / In Montana Out of State - National make it out of committee and it is unclear In Valley County: if the measure would pass conference with 3 Months $12.50 3 Months $15 3 Months $11.25 the Senate. Republican lawmakers hope the _________________________ 6 Months $24 6 Months $29 6 Months $21.50 change would incentivize moving Americans 1 year subscription $46 1 year subscription $56 1 year subscription $41 from welfare to work as employers struggle 2 year subscription $91 2 year subscription $111 Address ____________________ 2 year subscription $81 WR¿QGQHZHPSOR\HHVDFFRUGLQJWRDUHOHDVH 3 year subscription $135 by House Republicans. 3 year subscription $165 3 year subscription $120

August 2018 August 2018

NEWTON MOTORS, INC.

Continuous Conservation Reserve Program Enrollment

A.J. ETHERINGTON FOR FARM & RANCH

YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING THE HI-LINE FARM & RANCH THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Hi-Line Hi-Line

All In One Convenient Location

440 Highway 2 West â&#x20AC;¢ Glasgow â&#x20AC;¢ Across from the Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 â&#x20AC;¢ 406-228-4381 â&#x20AC;¢ 1-800-255-1472 Family owned by the Newton Boys! Rent A Car Come in and see Doug, Terry, or Ted!

Glasgow Stockyards, Inc. Linda & Mark Nielsen, Owners Iva Murch, Manager 263-7529 Dean Barnes, Yard Manager 263-1175 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 783-7285

August, SERVING AREA 2 September LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS & October 2018 FOR 72 YEARS! 1946 - 2018 Schedule

August 2018 Thursday

September 2018 Thursday

2

NO AUCTION

9

All Class Cattle Auction

13

5IFUI#JH'BMM:FBSMJOH$MBTTJD & All Class Cattle Auction

16

NO AUCTION

20

23

Early Yearling & All Class Cattle Auction

5IF0OFBOE0OMZ4IFFQ"VDUJPOPG & All Class Cattle Auction

27

All Class Cattle Auction

30

NO AUCTION

228-9306

10#PYt(MBTHPX .5 HTJ!OFNPOUOFU XXXHMBTHPXTUPDLZBSETDPN

6

All Class Cattle Auction

October 2018 Thursday

4

All Class Cattle Auction

11

All Class Cattle Auction

3OHDVHFDOOLQFRQVLJQPHQWVVREX\HUVFDQEHQRWLÃ&#x20AC;HG

FOR SALE: 40-foot Dry Van Trailer. Good rubber, for storage. Could be delivered. $3,500. Northstar Portable Livestock Scale. Rolling doors on each end of scale, Gallagher smart scale reader, easy to operate. Can be set up and ready to go in 10 minutes. Weighed only 200 head. $3,000. 1995 Chevy 1-ton Dually. 454, auto transmission overdrive, 5th wheel ball. Runs great. $2,000. Call Roger at 406-263-2400


44

Hi-Line Hi-Line

August2018 2018 August

What do â&#x20AC;&#x153;low costâ&#x20AC;? ag suppliers

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

REALLY do for you?

When You Buy From Us, We Give You Added Value! Let's Work Together

We Can Only Continue To Provide Service In Our Communities If YOU Support Those Services! After The Initial Saleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; WHAT Is Your 'LVFRXQW6XSSOLHU2ÍżHULQJ<RX"

When you buy your chemical & fertilizer from us we can help you with . . . Â&#x2021;&URS6FRXWLQJ Â&#x2021;:HHG,GHQWLĂ&#x20AC;FDWLRQ6HUYLFHV  Â&#x2021;6RLO$QDO\VLV Â&#x2021;&URS6SUD\LQJ  Â&#x2021;$SSOLFDWLRQ5HFRPPHQGDWLRQV Â&#x2021;)HUWLOL]HU$SSOLFDWLRQ â&#x20AC;˘ And Much More

We Have . . . $)XOO$JURQRP\6WDÍż$YDLODEOH

7R$OO2I2XU3DWURQV$FURVV2XU7UDGH$UHD

The People, The Know How And The Products To Cover All Your Needs . . .

     

:H2ÍžHU0DQ\6HUYLFHVWR2XU&XVWRPHUV Â&#x2021;2Q)DUP7LUH6HUYLFH Â&#x2021;6KRS6HUYLFHV 0LQRU5HSDLUV Â&#x2021;2LO )LOWHUV Â&#x2021;)HHG &U\VWDO\[  Â&#x2021;/DZQ&DUH,WHPV Â&#x2021;)HQFLQJ(TXLSPHQW

Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021; Â&#x2021;

%XON)XHO'HOLYHU\ 7LUHV%DWWHULHV%UDNHV +RXU*DV )XHO 2[\JHQ$FHW\OHQH7DQNV )XOO/LQH+DUGZDUH6WRUH

:H$OVR2ÍżHU)XOO&RPPRGLW\0DUNHWLQJ

Value Added Services . . . Use them to your advantage and maximize your yields!

Are You Getting This Kind Of Value Where You Buy?

!

Plus, if you pay in advance, earn a 6% premium Or 6% discount for cash at time of purchase!

Scobey â&#x20AC;˘ Flaxville â&#x20AC;˘ Peerless â&#x20AC;˘ Richland â&#x20AC;˘ Opheim â&#x20AC;˘ Four Buttes 487-2741

474-2231

893-4398

724-3353

762-3231

783-5519

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

White House Announces $12 Billion in Trade War Aid to Farmers the $12 billion value by a full $1 billion. Should trade relations not improve, the damOn Tuesday, the Trump administration ages will continue to accrue; according to announced a $12 billion plan to assist researchers at the University of Illinois and American farmers and ranchers coping with Ohio State University, Chinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 25% tariff on American soybeans could cost a mid-size Ilan escalating global trade war. 7KHSODQZLOOSULPDULO\EHQHÂżWIDUPHUV linois farm 87% of its income and $500,000 who grow soy, corn, sorghum, wheat, cot- of the operationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s net worth. National Farmers Union President Roger ton, dairy, and pork, all of which have been heavily targeted by international tariffs, Johnson expressed appreciation for the decialthough producers of other commodities sion to provide farmers with much-needed may be eligible for assistance as well. The assistance, but called the plan a â&#x20AC;&#x153;short-term government will allocate assistance through Âż[ WR D ORQJWHUP SUREOHP´$ RQHWLPH three programs authorized by the Com- payment does not address the potentially PRGLW\ &UHGLW &RUSRUDWLRQ &&&  HLWKHU permanent loss of key export markets and through direct payments or by purchasing sustained low prices. He urged the adminand redistributing surpluses. The plan also istration to â&#x20AC;&#x153;develop a support mechanism includes a provision that would develop and WKDW ZLOO PLWLJDWH WKH VLJQLÂżFDQW GDPDJH WKDW LV EHLQJ LQĂ&#x20AC;LFWHGXSRQ RXU PRVW YLWDO expand export markets. Though farmers affected by retaliatory LQWHUQDWLRQDO PDUNHWV IRU \HDUV WR FRPH´ tariffs are in great need of assistance, this and recommend that they work with Conplan will only put a small dent in the overall gress to â&#x20AC;&#x153;ensure farm bill programs provide GDPDJH LQ -XQH DORQH WKH ÂżQDQFLDO ORVV enough assistance to farmers when markets to soy, corn, and wheat farmers exceeded FROODSVH´ FOR FARM & RANCH

Document the Drought: USDA U.S. Drought Monitor Offers Producers a Voice USDA FARM AGENCY FOR FARM & RANCH The U.S. Drought Monitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reporting feature offers producers an opportunity to submit drought impact and condition reports. The USDA, in partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, produced the U.S. Drought Monitor to include a reporting feature that allows producers to report local drought impacts and conditions. The report allows producers to: Provide a written description of drought impacts on livelihood, activities, etc.; Select categories to show losses and gains as a result of the drought;

Report on the duration of drought event; Select Affected Places â&#x20AC;&#x201C; geographic areas ranging from an entire state to a small area within a state; Submit images that document the drought and its impact; Provide contact information (includes DQRSWLRQWRNHHSLQIRUPDWLRQFRQÂżGHQWLDO  The reporting tool for producers to record the effects of the drought can be accessed at the following link: droughtreporter.unl.edu/ submitreport/. 0RUHLQIRUPDWLRQLQFOXGLQJVWDWHVSHFLÂżF drought impact maps can be found on the U. S. Drought Monitor page: droughtmonitor. unl.edu/CurrentMap/StateDroughtMonitor. aspx?MT.

www.glasgowcourier.com Sign up for your FREE Trial Subscription

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

August August2018 2018

WANTED ARTICLES, IDEAS, TOPICS OF INTEREST RELATED TO AGRICULTURE

Advertise in the Farm and Ranch reaching across the Hi-Line for just $15.00 a column inch! Sponsor the weekly Glasgow Courier's Agriculture & Livestock page for $8.00 a column inch! The Glasgow Courier would like to invite you to share articles, ideas, and topics of interest related to agriculture. We have recently added an agriculture and livestock page to the paper which we are excited to fill with content that interests our readers. We also have this monthly publication, the Farm and Ranch, and we would love to have your ideas on these pages!

We want to hear from you! Call us at 406-228-9301 Email us at courier@nemont.net Find us at 341 3rd Ave South, Glasgow, Mt.

99


10

Hi-Line

August 2018

FARM & RANCH

Hi-Line

www.havredailynews.com

www.havredailynews.com

FARM & RANCH

August 2018

3

Field to trailer: Cattle buyers can help keep the ag production process local ■ Continued from page 3

Photo on the right Buyer Mark Billmayer sorts cattle based on weight while Loy Waid, 16, waits behind him, helping Billmayer when needed. “Lon wanted to sell the heavier end of the cattle pulled in from the field and so I was pulling out cattle that weighted less since not all the cattle from the field were going onto the trucks that day,” said Billmayer in an interview a week after Waids' shipping date. A buyer fills an important role when dealing with cattle. Along with being the point of contact for those buying and selling cattle, they also are the ones who help visibly inspect the livestock to make sure each head of cattle is the agreed upon weight and that any signs of injury are noted. What is also worth mentioning is that it is the buyer who helps keep things local when moving cattle around. For example the cattle on the Waid Ranch came from ranches in Blaine, Hill and Liberty county. This keeps costs lower for transporting and helps stimulate local economy.

Photo above Jack Soloman, a neighbor who was helping move cattle, rounds up steers after they broke through a fence on the Waids' ranch. While most times rounding up cattle is relatively straight forward, it is when things go wrong that shows how much more work is involved in cattle handling and production. The Waids used seven riders, each on horseback, along with a couple experienced cattle dogs to drive the steers into the stockyard. Following the lead of Lon Waid, the cattle were moved mostly by the presence of the riders and dogs, however, the vocal cues and physical force were sometimes needed for

the more stubborn steers. This was often the case when pushing the herd through vegetation and water since the cows could easily spread. Another issue that arose while moving the second herd was that group mentality can easily lead the cattle to doing things against the handlers' direction. Such was the case that lead to a group of steers breaking the fence after cattle at the front of the herd became confused where to go, causing those behind to get further confused and so on, until some of the steers opted to take a route out through the fence.

■ See Field to trailer Page 10


2

Hi-Line

August 2018

FARM & RANCH

Hi-Line

www.havredailynews.com

A photo essay: Local yearling operation ships cattle

www.havredailynews.com

FARM & RANCH Cattle dogs also can help keep production costs down because their cost and upkeep is less than an employee.

Ryan Welch photos@havredailynews.com

Photo below Stacey Waid records the weight of the steers in groups of about 16 as she receives the data from the scale's display to her right. The weight data of the steers helps the buyer confirm the true weight of the cattle, which need to meet a weight range at the time of sale. Growth, weight and profit go hand and hand on the ranch. “Any day that the cattle is not growing is

This month's article is a photo essay of the Waid Ranch's yearling operation in the Bear Paw Mountains. Lon and Stacey Waid have been raising yearlings since 2003, the year that a drought caused them to switch their operation from cow-calf to yearlings. Photo on the right Stacey Waid rides her horse rounding up cattle from a pasture on the Waids' land the morning of July 9. Six more riders were also working to move the herd of nearly 600 steers that day to their stockyards for shipping. For their yearling operation, the Waids buy young cattle at roughly 500 pounds and sell them at around 900 pounds, averaging a gain of about two pounds each day. They grow the cattle in their background lots, where feed and water intake can be monitored and controlled, and in their pastures. This process is important, said Darrin Boss, superintendent of the Northern Agriculture Research Center, because it allows cattle to grow into a size that has ideal muscle mass before they are moved to a feed lot where the meat is marbled.

Photo above Lon Waid, using cattle dogs, drives cattle branded with the Waids' brand, after they were sorted by the buyer, toward a scale in the Waids' stockyard. Moving cattle in a stockyard can prove challenging for even the most veteran ranch-

er due to the tight space and random movements of the cattle when stressed. To help combat this the Waids use cattle dogs. “A good (cattle) dog can take the place of two or three ranchers,” said Lon Waid. “They can get to places that a rancher and a horse would have trouble getting to and they’re pretty fast.”

August 2018

11

a day that is hindering potential profits when it comes time to sell,” said Boss. Maintaining that constant growth, around two pounds a day according to Stacy Waid, is one of the main challenges when it comes to a yearling operation. Cattle, much like people, eat at different rates and different amounts which, over time, can lead to an imbalance in a herd if not managed carefully. "If the animal gets too big, it can start to force out the others in the group when it comes to feeding," Lon Waid said. This can lead to the larger animal growing faster and the smaller animal growing slower, both of which can mess with profits.

■ See Field to trailer Page 12


12

Hi-Line

August 2018

FARM & RANCH

Field to trailer: Eight trucks were used to haul cattle that day ■ Continued from page A1 Photo above Jeremy Couch, a truck driver hauling cattle that day, stands on railings in his trailer as cattle, walking under him, are herded aboard for transportation from the Waids' ranch to a feed lot in Colorado. Another important function of weighing the cattle is to let truckers know how many cattle they can fit on their trailers legally since states have hauling weight restrictions of around 100,000 pounds. “Most trucks weigh 32,000 pounds which gives us 60-or-so-thousand pounds to use,” said Billmayer. “Now this can differ between trucks, depending on the number of axles they have and on the state laws. But the general rule of thumb is that the more axles you have, the more cattle you can carry.” In order to ship all the cattle eight trucks were brought to the Waids' ranch

that day. Each truck, holding on average 60 head of cattle, took roughy 30 minutes to fill. The process of getting cattle on the trailers involves breaking down the total number of cattle to be loaded onto the trailer into groups that can fit the various compartments in those trailers. The inside of a livestock trailer contains trap doors and walls that slide and fall to give a trucker the ability to distribute the cattle evenly and safely into the available spaces of the two levels. Even with the trap doors it is not an easy task. Being confined in a space barely 10 feet across and less then 7 feet tall with an animal that weighs hundreds of pounds more than you can lead to some serious injury if the trucker is not careful.

www.havredailynews.com

Field to trailer

Hi-Line Farm & Ranch August 2018  
Hi-Line Farm & Ranch August 2018  
Advertisement