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The science of ag production: Northern Ag Research Center


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www.havredailynews.com Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com Darrin Boss, superintendent of Montana State University’s Northern Agricultural Research Center at Fort Assinniboine near Havre, so easily rattles off the academic credentials and work history of the facility’s managerial staff, lead scientists and associate researchers that one readily believes he could do the same for the temporary workers recently hired for the summer. He speaks of the accomplishments and the everyday work of Northern Ag’s people, of his predecessor, Gregg Carlson, who retired in May 2012, of the facility and of all the research center’s supporters with pride and generosity. One could be forgiven if, after a half-hour speaking with him, one is ready to quit one’s job and go to work at Northern Ag to be with these people, even if it’s just to mow lawns and clear sidewalks. In boots, jeans and a shirt sporting the Northern Ag logo, Boss details the scientific research in beef cattle and crop production using terminology that the layman can understand, so it’s easy to forget that he is also the beef cattle research specialist, a grant writer and a published scientist with a doctorate — until one thinks about the Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Darrin Boss, superintendent of Montana State University's Northern Agricultural Research Center, in May discusses ongoing beef cattle and crop production research being conducted by scientists and staff at the research facility south of Havre.

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Historically, Northern Ag has had up to four scientists rather than just the two currently there, said Jacobsen, and effort has been made to fill these positions — in cropping systems and animal nutrition — including advertising the positions and making offers, but the offers were not accepted. These searches are costly, in time as well as money, but Jacobsen thinks they might have a solution. “We have been chatting with Darrin Boss and others about what are call post-doc positions,” Jacobsen said. These positions are for people who’ve just graduated with their doctorates and are looking for immediate work. The positions aren’t considered to be permanent, by the applicant or the organization. They do give both parties a type of nocommitments opportunity to work together. “They’re not permanent, but at least it gets somebody with a fresh graduate degree, and it puts them in a position where they have some mentors and can start to build a career,” Jacobsen said. “And it’s thought that if we can do that — get people to Havre, even for a year or two — we can then ultimately permanently hire them.” Both Boss and Jacobsen said they felt that once a scientist got to Northern Ag, the likelihood was high that he or she would find working at the facility and with the people in place a positive thing and want to stay on permanently.

Collaborations The overriding theme of any discussion about research centers is the degree to which cooperation and collaboration is crucial to every aspect of the research efforts, informa-

FARM & RANCH tion dissemination and the internal workings. “We collaborate with just about anybody that has something to do with agriculture,” Boss said. As one of seven Montana research centers which are divisions of the experiment station in Bozeman, there are plenty of opportunities to collaborate efforts within the state, but Boss said that often the researchers at Northern Ag are working with other scientists and trials outside of the state as well. Lamb’s research with camelina and pulse rotations with cereal grain crops is part of a study with three other research centers in Montana and Wyoming and with Kansas State University. Lamb said her portion of the study, in which Sebelius is also taking part, focuses on production practices. Jacobsen attributes this move to broad collaboration to both funding and the staff. “If you look at, frankly, any state, do they have the resources to go it alone, and if the answer is yes, I want to know more about that institution because that would be a supreme surprise to me,” said Jacobsen, who added that the drive to better utilize resources can drive the collaborations as well as the trials and doing this helps keep programs from spreading too thin, so they can build “vertically” instead. “If a place like Montana State University, whether it be in Bozeman or up at the Northern Agricultural Research Center in Havre which has a Peggy Lamb that is outstanding with oilseed crops in one area, as well as small grain agronomy, then you hook her up and create a win-win. … You’re leveraging resources, and you’re learning new things and building programs.”

But it’s not just collaborations among crop and animal scientists that are seen at Northern Ag. The research center has been a National Weather Service recorder since the research center started, Boss said, and they’ve participated in acid rain studies because of the unique air quality of the area. Boss also is excited that, though the research center is not part of Montana State University-Northern, the two organizations work together on many levels from MSUNorthern referring students to Northern Ag for employment to working together on oilseed crops for use in research in MSUNothern’s biofuels program and Northern Ag’s feed studies. The most important collaboration at Northern Ag, and with any research center or experiment station, though is with the producers, both Boss and Jacobsen said. The research centers have an advisory committee comprised of local producers and people representing organizations that have a stake in the ag industry, and the experiment station has a committee that functions on the state level. “One thing that’s pretty unique at each one of the research centers is we have an advisory council which is made up of, in Northern Ag Research Center’s case, the five counties that surround us, Hill, Blaine, Phillips, Chouteau and Liberty counties,” Boss said. “We have producers from each one of those counties — two producers and one agri-business related person, (who) could be an ag banker, could be an insurance person, could be a chemical representative. What these people do is we meet three times a year, and they give us feedback. We present our research, we talk about our research … it’s a sounding board.” Jacobsen said the experiment station’s committee has resresentatives from organizations like the Montana Stockgrowers and Montana Grain Growers associations and even some federal representatives, who all offer similar guidance with an eye toward regional, national and global concerns. While researchers pursue their own questions about agricultural production, it is often the research center’s connection with members of the agricultural community that drives research into different, and specific, areas, said Jacobsen and Boss. Ag producers, said Jacobsen, whether part of an advisory committee or not, have always been a valuable resource bringing questions or issues, but also experience and

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Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Northern Agricultural Research Center's research associate Angela Sebelius in May points out the metal tube inserted into the soil that she uses when testing moisture content at varying depths up to 4-feet in a rotation crop test plot. suggestions, all of which is valuable. “I brag on it that the Montana farmers and ranchers feed the world,” said Boss. “Fewer and fewer of us are doing that job, and our job is to help them do that as efficiently as possible. If I were looking to boil down our whole mission statement, that’s what we do at Northern Ag is we try to keep these guys and gals on the farm and ranch and do it so their job is more sustainable and more efficient.”


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The science of ag production: Northern Ag Research Center ■ Continued from page 3

A number of large holding pens are fitted with GrowSafe feeding systems, part of the $250,000 upgrade to the cattle-handling facilities which help researchers track nutrition intake by individual cattle. Each calf is fitted with an electronic identification ear tag that is much like a social security number that sticks with that animal throughout its life. Sensors on the GrowSafe feeders read the ID cards and track the amount of food that animal consumed, by noting the beginning and ending weight of a feed bin as that animal is eating. This can help researchers in calculations for such data tracking as maternal growth rate and efficiency, said Boss, adding that they also are working on ways to accurately measure feed intake and efficiency on range feeds. Other beef cattle research at Northern Ag includes a study by research associate Julia Dafoe on the use of oil seed feeds to synchronize heat cycles in heifers This is related to studies on use of local area byproducts as feed. “Byproducts are unbelievably valuable to the livestock industry. We strip off the most valuable component; either drive it toward human or high-end markets,” Boss said, and then the livestock industry utilizes the byproduct as high-quality feed, making both the product and the byproduct usable. “That’s the win-win,” he added. The bulk of the acreage at the old fort is

used by the agronomics division for crop production studies. While a portion of the crops become feed for the cattle in on-site collaboration of research, this land’s main purpose is to produce a variety of grain and oilseed crops for research. Doing this requires anything from using their custom six-row seeder to plant a single, 22-foot long row of a seed variety grown for display, to making a series of sideby-side plots comparing cover-crop effectiveness under a variety of production processes, to seed propagation, plant fertility and crop rotation studies. In the fourth year of a rotation crop trial, Lamb and agronomy research associate Angela Sebelius, are looking at the effect of continuous crop rotation in fields on the production of grains. Three 22-foot long plots of cover crops, containing a mix of seed types, was planted and allowed to grown on the dry land farm ground. One plot was harvested, a second plot was grazed, and the third was chemical fallowed, and this year the plots were planted with wheat. Sebelius and Lamb are recording plant development, crop yield and soil moisture content at five depths to 48 inches to develop a conclusion about the cover crop methods. Like most projects at the research center, this study is labor intensive and, therefore, inefficient. But that, in a sense, is what the research center is here for, said Boss. “If something fails, I’d rather have it fail

at the station and say, OK, this is probably not a good rotation for you guys to do, because (the producers) can’t afford to lose the money. They can’t afford to take the risks we do.”

Funding In the end, the state, federal and grant money is what saves the producers and the public money as the research center scientist focus their time and resources — time and resources the producers can’t afford — pursuing ideas and needed solutions. Though selling some of the cattle in the beef market helps offset the much-higher cost of cattle research, the ag research center is not intended to make a profit like a private farm or ranch. Because conducting research into agricultural production efficiency requires a greater degree of inefficiency with lengthy trial and error processes, ag research centers rely on state and federal funding to continue their work which benefits the ag community and, thus, the consumers. The state Legislature and governor “treated the experiment station very well,” said Jeff Jacobsen, dean and director at Bozeman’s MSU College of Agriculture, which oversees the experiment station, research centers and extension offices. “Being in agriculture, it kind of transcends party lines,” said Boss, “It transcends

a lot of things. It’s because, being the number one industry in Montana, it kind of has a little bit of sway that way. “It was,” he added, “really good to see everybody working together. I mean it doesn’t matter who it was it was all trying to find something everybody could work with in the long run.” “We got the same base budget,” said Jacobsen “which sometimes they might reduce things because of the state budget or something. So we remain whole, and we got some additional monies in some program support areas – one of which helps the research centers.” The added funding is about $800,000 over the next two years. “That will allow us to expand our research efforts with pulse crops, some of which we do research on at Havre, and an animal science research and teaching position,” Jacobsen said, adding that they are still considering options about the animal science position. “It could be (in) Bozeman or some relationship with the Havre research center as well. We just haven’ come up with the best solution on that one at this juncture.” Both Jacobsen and Boss stressed that one of the main goals at Northern Ag is to increase the number of scientists, those personnel who, generally, have their doctorates, lead studies, write for the grants and guide the research associates.

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wealth of information he has served up in a short time — without one “um” or awkward pause while searching for a word — and considers the conversations he prompted from others as interview questions and answers lagged. But Boss, who said he went to work at Northern Ag for two months 19 years ago and just forgot to leave, isn’t the only person with enthusiasm, a stellar work background and academic cred. Delyn Jensen, who runs Northern Ag’s ranch in the Bear Paw Mountains, is a longtime cowhand from Canada — with a master’s degre in range science. Livestock Operations Manager Andy Matakis has a degree from MSU and honed his logistics and efficiency skills working several years for the second-largest cattle feeding operation in the world. Tom Allen, the farm operations manager, is a former extension agent and instructor with a master’s degree. And despite the fact that Peggy Lamb doesn’t currently have her doctorate, MSU administration moved her up to lead agronomist after Carlson retired because of her strong job and academic performance over the years. The enthusiasm for this historical research center is contagious and even partisan politicians of the Montana Legislature managed to work together this year to give the research centers an increase in funding that will help offset cuts from previous years.

Background Northern Ag Research Center encompasses 6,000 acres, that once was part of his-

toric Fort Assinniboine, and an additional 1,000 acres of leased land. Of that total acreage, 4,000 is a ranch in the Bear Paw Mountains and the remaining 3,000 is at the fort’s building site located east off U.S. Highway 87, just a few miles south of Havre. Northern Ag is part of the research division of MSU, which is a land grant institution responsible for agricultural education, research and information dissemination. These three functions are carried out respect i ve l y t h ro u g h t h e M S U C o l l e ge o f Agriculture; the experiment station in Bozeman and research centers around the state; and extension offices in each county. Land grant educational institutions were originally created by the Morrill Act of 1862 which granted federally controlled land to each state for development or sale to establish a college that would focus on teaching practical agriculture, science, military science and engineering. The original law has been modified over the years, including to ensure that participation is not limited by race and to allow for creation of “land grant” colleges through granted funding rather than land. The scope of land grant universities was expanded further by the Hatch Act of 1887 which created agricultural experiment stations and the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 which allowed for cooperative extension offices.

The facility MSU in Bozeman, then under the name Agricultural College of the State of Montana, was established as the state’s land grant col-

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Montana’s seven agricultural research centers • • • • • • •

Central Agriculture Research Center, Moccasin Northwestern Agriculture Research Center, Kalispell Eastern Agriculture Research Center, Sidney Southern Agriculture Research Center, Huntley Western Agriculture Research Center, Corvallis Western Triangle Agriculture Research Center, Conrad Northern Agriculture Research Center, Havre

Cooperating sites in Montana

• Fort Keogh USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Miles City • Sidney USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Sidney lege in 1893 and in 1915, after Fort Assinniboine south of Havre was decommissioned in 1911, 6,000 acres was granted to MSU — with the rest later split between Rocky Boy’s Indian Reservation and Beaver Creek Park. Originally utilizing the main building site of Fort Assinniboine, in recent years, Northern Ag Research Center but has been able to move out of the historical buildings and into the $1.2 million modern facilities — an office and laboratory building, a cattle handling system and a calving barn — funded through previous legislation. That legislative action promised $4 in match for every $1 raised by Northern Ag, said Boss. Out of the seven research centers across the state, which all focus on crop production relevant to predominant crops grown in those areas, Northern Ag is the only one that also has the cattle research component. This is, in part, due to the center’s unique

location, said Boss. Because the main facility is down on the prairie lands and the larger pasture is located in the Bear Paws, Northern Ag’s range land most closely, of all the state’s research centers, matches the variety of range seen across Montana’s landscape, Boss said. Of the 3,000 acres at the main facility at Fort Assinniboine, some is for the office, maintenance and cattle handling facilities, which includes the calving barn, holding pens and corrals, and some small pastures. Included in the beef cattle facilities is a cattle-handling chute system that was modeled, Boss said, after designs by Temple Grandin, a world-renown animal scientist whose autism has helped her develop more humane and calming cattle handling systems to avoid stress and trauma which can increase injury and loss and decrease profits.

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CCOWbOys OWbOysU UP!P!

Montana MontanaCowboy CowboyHall HallOfOfFame FameAnnounces AnnouncesClass ClassOfOf2013; 2013;Hi-Line Hi-LineWell-Represented Well-Represented

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EVITABLE, EVITABLE,BUT BUTITS ITSTOLL TOLLISISNOT NOT

he he Montana Cowboy Hall of of lished by by thethe MCHF & WHC Board of of • District 7 (Big Horn, Carbon, Montana Cowboy Hall lished MCHF & WHC Board • District 7 (Big Horn, Carbon, Fame & Western Heritage Directors for the Class of 2013 InducStillwater, Sweet Grass, & Fame & Western Heritage Directors for the Class of 2013 InducStillwater, Sweet Grass, Yellow& Yelloweem • Reduced activity andand in anusual ingness to initiate contact with theInductee community Center (MCHF &pleasure WHC) antions required thatthat onecontact Living Inductee stone Counties): Living Award – Peter esteem • Reduced activity in usual ingness to initiate with the community Center (MCHF &pleasure WHC) tions required one Living stone Counties): Living Award – Peter the activities: “Doing anything is just too much resource (“How do you feel about seeking help nounced the sixth class of inductions and at least two Legacy Inductees from Christian “Pete” Harms, Big Timber. se the nounced activities:the “Doing is just too much and resource do you feel about seeking sixth anything class of inductions at least(“How two Legacy Inductees from help Christian “Pete” Harms, Big Timber. you of into an effort.” from person/agency?”) Montana Cowboy Hall of of Fame. ofthis thethis 12person/agency?”) districts be be elected. 2013 Legacy Award – James Thurkel “Turk” ly youinto ofthe an effort.” from the Montana Cowboy Hall Fame. each each of the 12 districts elected. 2013 Legacy Award – James Thurkel “Turk” • People problems: “I don’t want anyone to 6. Where the person or family is unwilling The inductees were chosen from is the third year that the MCHF has Greenough, Red Lodge and Connolly ly. • People problems: “I don’t want anyone to 6. 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Legacy ngths,nominated • Guilt and low self esteem: “It’s all my Call the agency and ask to speak to the nominated by the public and Montana Cowboy Hall of Award – Tim Babcock, Helena. Legacy porfault,” “I should be of punished.” intake worker (if (if there is one). impor-appointed fault,” “Itrustees should be punished.” intake worker there is one). the Fame are: Award – Montana Department of of Liveappointed trustees of the Fame are: Award – Montana Department LiveSetSetMCHF Signs intent include: Identify yourself andand your with ng. Signs ofWHC. suicidal intent include: Identify yourself your relationship with &ofWHC. 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Award – Fae Taylor Park Counties): Living Award – Wendell MCHF & WHC. Living Award – Fae Taylor Park Counties): Living Award – Wendell eme on on alone, lack ofof friends andand supports. from suicidal acts, needs an appointment alone, lack ofof friends supports. from suicidal acts, needs an appointment “Our Hall Fame Phillips, Scobey. Legacy Lovely, Wilsall. Legacy Award – Augus“Our Hall Fame Phillips, Scobey. Legacy forfor Lovely, Wilsall. Legacy Award – Augusyray or orvoting • Helpless and hopeless: Sense of complete counseling, needs financial or legal advice). • Helpless and hopeless: Sense of complete counseling, needs financial or legal advice). process gives Award – Shirley Bridges, tustus Franklin “Frank” Crail, BigBig Sky andand voting process gives Award – Shirley Bridges, Franklin “Frank” Crail, Sky andandour powerlessness, a hopeless State what you think the person’s or famly powerlessness, a hopeless feeling. 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Wolf Point and Marvin Earl Presley, Gardiner. our volunteer trustees Wolf Point and Marvinor famEarl Presley, Gardiner. • Alcohol abuse: There is often a link be- ily’s needs areBrookman, (needs immediate protection •voice Alcohol abuse: There (needs immediate protection direct in who from Wolf Point. • District 10 10 (Flathead, Lake, Lincoln, direct voice in who from is often a link be- ily’s needs are Brookman, Wolf Point. • District (Flathead, Lake, Lincoln, s of oftheir tween alcoholism and suicide. from suicidal acts, needs an appointment for rces tween alcoholism and suicide. from suicidal acts, needs an appointment community will be be • District 2 (Dawson, & Sanders Counties): Living Award – – their community will • District 2 (Dawson, for & Sanders Counties): Living Award ies, inducted • Previous suicidal attempts: May have been needs financial or legal advice). obbies, • Previous suicidal attempts: May have been counseling, counseling, needs financial or Prairie, legal advice). into the Montana Garfield, McCone, Robert Henry “Bob” Schall, Jr.,Jr., Arlee. inducted into the Montana Garfield, McCone, Prairie, Robert Henry “Bob” Schall, Arlee. previous attempts of low to high lethality. 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Award – Ed Lambert, Stevensville sods of of be be better offoff without me.” willwill take: FORFOR HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH better without me.” take: HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH (two-way tie) Robert W. “Bob” Olson, class of Hall of Fame inductees.” • District 3 (Carter, Custer, Fallon, Powclass HOW of Hall of Fame inductees.” District 3 (Carter, Fallon, Pow- Fae Taylor Phillips, above, of Scobey is the winner (two-way tie) Robert W. “Bob” Olson, TO REFER A PERSON FORFOR HELP ••When will they actCuster, on on thethe referral? HOW TO A PERSON HELP • When will they act referral? Fae Taylor Phillips, above, of Scobey is the winner Greenough The MCHF & REFER WHC board hashas desigderder River, Rosebud, & Treasure Counties): and Trails’ End, Missoula. The MCHF & WHC board desigRiver, Rosebud, & Treasure Counties): of the Montana Cowboy HallHall of Fame District 1 1 Greenough and Trails’ End, Missoula. 1. Be aware of the agencies andand resources • Who willwill be be thethe person forfor youyou to contact of the Montana Cowboy of Fame District oach eachnated 1. Be aware of the agencies resources • Who person to contact 12 trustee districts across the state Living Award – Frank P. “Bob” Robin• District 1212 (Deer Lodge, Beavernated 12 districts across the state later Living Award – Frank P. “Bob” RobinDistrict (Deer Lodge, BeaverLiving Award for for Daniels, Phillips, Roosevelt, tion available in trustee your community - what services if necessary? Living Award Daniels, Phillips, Roosevelt, head,• Silver ciation available in your community - what services later if necessary? from which up to 20 trustees may be son, Broadus. Legacy Award – Daniel M. Bow, Granite, Madison, from which up to 20 trustees may be son, Broadus. Legacy Award – Daniel M. head, Silver Bow, Granite, Madison, Sheridan and Valley counties. Winners of the they offer and what their limitations are. • What will be the cost of the service (flat they offer what their are. “Dan” Gaskill, • What Volborg will be the cost ofHenry the service (flat Sheridan and Valley counties. Winners of the & Powell Counties): Living Award appointed byand thethe MCHF &limitations WHC board andand John by MCHF & WHC board “Dan” Gaskill, Volborg John Henry district Legacy Award areare Shirley Bridges (left) district Legacy Award Shirley Bridges (left) & Powell Counties): Living Award ding 2. 2. Listen for signs and symptoms thatthat fee/sliding scale)? rridingof appointed Listen for signs and symptoms fee/sliding scale)? directors. Nomination criteria estabHaughian, Miles City. – Charles Hahnkamp, Dillon. Legacy and Marvin Brookman (below) of Wolf Point. of directors. Nomination criteria estabHaughian, Miles City. – Charles Hahnkamp, Dillon. Legacy and Marvin Brookman (below) of Wolf Point. est, the person or family needs help which you • Do you need to do anything else to come best, the person or family needs help which you • Do you need to do anything else to comAward – Agnes “Annie” Morgan, PhilAward – Agnes “Annie” Morgan, Philents can’t provide, i.e., financial, legal or personal plete the referral? events can’t provide, i.e., financial, legal or personal plete the referral? • District 4 (Blaine, Choteau, Hill, & & lipsburg, and P & O Ranch (Philip H. H. • District 4 (Blaine, Choteau, Hill, lipsburg, and P & O Ranch (Philip ons counseling. 7. Make sure the person or family and referactions counseling. 7. Make sure the person or family and referLiberty Counties): Living Award – Rob&& William C. C. Orr), Dillon. Poindexter William Orr), Dillon. 3. Assess what agency or or community re-re- ral ral agency connect andand getget together. Make oneoneLiberty Counties): Living Award – Rob- Poindexter 3. Assess what agency community agency connect together. Make ert “Bob” Sivertsen, Havre. Legacy Since the initial round of ert “Bob” Sivertsen, Havre. Legacy Since the initial round of source would be be most appropriate to address follow-up contacts with thethe agency if if NT source would most appropriate to address or more or more follow-up contacts with agency Award – Jack Siebrasse, Havre inductions to to thethe Montana Award – Jack Siebrasse, Havre inductions Montana mpperson’s (or(or family’s) problems. called forfor by by thethe situation. symp- thethe person’s family’s) problems. called situation. and Elmer Weaver, Chinook. Cowboy Hall of Fame in in and Elmer Weaver, Chinook. Cowboy Hall of Fame ing, thethe referral with thethe person or or Roubie Younkin, an an MSU Extension ncing, 4. Discuss 4. Discuss referral with person Roubie Younkin, MSU Extension• District 5 (Cascade, 2008, including this year’s • District 5 (Cascade, 2008, including this year’s ion, (“It(“It sounds/looks likelike youyou areare feeling in in Valley County, compiled thisthis re-redition, family family sounds/looks feeling agent agent Valley County, compiled Glacier, Pondera, Teton, & inductions, 174 historical Glacier, Pondera, Teton, & inductions, 174 historical owI think _____ could help youyou deal with from Extension sources. SheShe cancan be be ollow- _____. _____. I think _____ could help deal with port port from Extension sources. Toole Counties): Living figures have been honToole Counties): Living figures have been honit isit is your situation.”) reached at at (406)228-6239 or or ryounkin@ nt, your situation.”) reached (406)228-6239 ryounkin@ Award – Raymond W. ored as inductees. Full Award – Raymond W. ored as inductees. Full fes5. Explore the individual’s or family’s willprofes5. Explore the individual’s or family’s will- valleycountymt.net. valleycountymt.net. “Rib” Gustafson, Conrad. biographies for past “Rib” Gustafson, Conrad. biographies for past for es for Legacy Award – 1904 inductees areare available Legacy Award – 1904 inductees available World Champion Fort onon thethe MCHF && WHC’s World Champion Fort MCHF WHC’s Shaw Indian School website. Shaw Indian School website. nts, ments, Peerless Peerless Girls Basketball Team, For more informaGirls Basketball Team, For more informa893-4398 893-4398 Fort Shaw and Thomas tion about the Montana Fort Shaw and Thomas ess, tion about the Montana peless, “Butch” O’Connell, Great Cowboy Hall of of Fame && “Butch” O’Connell, Great Cowboy Hall Fame Richland Richland Falls. Western Heritage Center, Falls. Western Heritage Center, ”I’m “I’m 724-3353 724-3353 • District 6 (Fergus, or or forfor more details onon • District 6 (Fergus, more details Golden Valley, Judith Basin, the Montana Cowboy Hall Golden Valley, Judith Basin, 1FFSMFTTt3JDIMBOEt0QIFJNt'PVS#VUUFT Opheim the Montana Cowboy Hall •Feed Richland Four Buttes Peerless • Richland •Buying Four Buttes 1FFSMFTTt3JDIMBOEt0QIFJNt'PVS#VUUFT Opheim Peerless Richland •Opheim ••Buying Four Buttes Peerless •Seed Richland •Opheim Opheim Four Buttes tPeerless Grain Feed t•t and t Grain Seed• •Opheim and Musselshell, Petroleum, & of Fame inductees, please Musselshell, Petroleum, & of Fame inductees, please 762-3231 762-3231 893-4398 724-3353 783-5519 893-4398 - 762-3231 - -783-5519 893-4398 - -724-3353 762-3231 893-4398 724-3353 762-3231 783-5519 893-4398 -724-3353 724-3353 -762-3231 762-3231 -783-5519 893-4398 -724-3353 762-3231 -783-5519 783-5519 Wheatland Counties): Livcontact Christy Stensland by by t Fertilizer Merchandising Grain Wheatland Counties): Livcontact Christy Stensland t Fertilizer Merchandising Grain inging Award – George W.W. GriemsFour calling (406) 653-3800, emailing Award – George GriemsFour calling (406) 653-3800, emailing tt Agronomist tt AgAg Chemicals Chemicals Agronomist man, Roundup. Legacy Award – Wallis Buttes man, Roundup. Legacy Award – Wallis cstensland@montanacowboyfame. cstensland@montanacowboyfame. Buttes Huidekoper, Two DotDot andand George Kelly, or or visiting www.montanacowtt Petroleum Services Huidekoper, Two George Kelly, com, 783-5519 com, visiting www.montanacowPetroleum Services 783-5519 Utica. boyfame.org. Utica. boyfame.org.

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GIVE THEsE GUys GIVE THEsE GUys AA LEATHER COAT LEATHER COAT Michael Chappell, aftermarket manager, Michael Chappell, aftermarket manager, Jason Green, parts specialist, andand John Jason Green, parts specialist, John Grimes andand Tyler Sanner, service technicians, Grimes Tyler Sanner, service technicians, at Farm Equipment Sales in Glasgow eacheach at Farm Equipment Sales in Glasgow recently achieved master certification recently achieved master certification after completing extensive training in the after completing extensive training in the John Deere University program. University John Deere University program. University credits areare earned in various categories to to credits earned in various categories ensure expertise in sales, service or parts ensure expertise in sales, service or parts departments at Deere dealerships. Shown departments at Deere dealerships. Shown from leftleft areare Chappell, Grimes, Green andand from Chappell, Grimes, Green Sanner. EachEach received a special plaque andand Sanner. received a special plaque a John Deere University leather coatcoat in in a John Deere University leather recognition to honor their accomplishment. recognition to honor their accomplishment.

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Hard HardDays DaysNight NightFor ForBeetles Beetles‘Fan’ ‘Fan’

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 7 CONTINUED FROM PAGE joined thethe Montana Wood-Boring Insect Surcambium layer between thethe bark andand thethe joined Montana Wood-Boring Insect Sur- thethe cambium layer between bark vey,vey, a joint effort of the Montana Agricultural thus preventing water andand nutrients a joint effort of the Montana Agricultural wood, wood, thus preventing water nutrients Experiment Station, Montana Department of of from reaching thethe leaves. Experiment Station, Montana Department from reaching leaves. Agriculture and USDA-APHIS. Now workThe goal of Hart’s work is to identify Agriculture and USDA-APHIS. Now workThe goal of Hart’s work is to identify inging on on hishis master’s degree in in entomology, longhorn beetles thatthat areare now present in in master’s degree entomology, thethe longhorn beetles now present Hart recently published twotwo papers about hishis Montana, making it easier to to spot invasive Hart recently published papers about Montana, making it easier spot invasive findings in the scientific journal “Coleopterists andand take early action, IvieIvie said. Hart findings in the scientific journal “Coleopterists species species take early action, said. Hart Bulletin.” has documented 151 species so far, including Bulletin.” has documented 151 species so far, including “It’s always exciting publishing forfor thethe firstfirst thethe firstfirst report of an invasive thatthat is newly ar- ar“It’s always exciting publishing report of an invasive is newly time,” Hart said. rived in the state. That’s 55 55 more than recorded time,” Hart said. rived in the state. That’s more than recorded Hart continues to search forfor longhorn beebutbut information from a statistical Hart continues to search longhorn bee- previously, previously, information from a statistical tlestles andand willwill soon be be assisted by by fivefive 4-H’ers of of thethe data indicates thatthat Montana soon assisted 4-H’ers analysis analysis data indicates Montana andand other interested Montanans who cancan refer stillstill have another 29 29 species thatthat haven’t other interested Montanans who refer could could have another species haven’t andand report to atonew website being developed documented. report a new website being developed been been documented. by by James Beck, a 2012 MSU graduate in in Longhorn beetles areare relatively wellJames Beck, a 2012 MSU graduate Longhorn beetles relatively wellcomputer science. TheThe 4-H’ers, all all working throughout North America, butbut gaps of of computer science. 4-H’ers, working known known throughout North America, gaps on on entomology projects in their clubs, livelive in in knowledge exist in areas thatthat have been poorly entomology projects in their clubs, knowledge exist in areas have been poorly Custer, Fergus, Lewis andand Clark, andand PetroIvieIvie said. HeHe added thatthat no no oneone elseelse Custer, Fergus, Lewis Clark, Petro- collected, collected, said. added leum counties. hashas conducted thethe comprehensive survey of of leum counties. conducted comprehensive survey “I “I started outout in in 4-H4-H entomology, so so it’sit’s Montana thatthat Hart is. is. started entomology, Montana Hart kind of come fullfull circle,” IvieIvie said. “It’s a matter of boots on on thethe ground,” IvieIvie kind of come circle,” said. “It’s a matter of boots ground,” Hart’s work hashas alsoalso spawned a similar Hart’s work spawned a similar said. said. project on on thethe metallic wood-boring beetles thatthat Montana is still a frontier project metallic wood-boring beetles Noting Noting Montana is still a frontier of Montana. Kayla Arend of Rochester, Minn. it comes to to documenting some of of its its of Montana. Kayla Arend of Rochester, Minn. when when it comes documenting some -- an MSU senior minoring in entomology -fauna, Hart said he has been interested in in -- an MSU senior minoring in entomology -- fauna, Hart said he has been interested saidsaid sheshe should be be ready later thisthis summer to to bugs since he he waswas a boy growing up up in Idaho should ready later summer bugs since a boy growing in Idaho submit herher findings forfor publication. Falls, Idaho. HeHe didn’t become serious about submit findings publication. Falls, Idaho. didn’t become serious about Longhorn beetles and metallic wood-boring them until he took an introductory course from Longhorn beetles and metallic wood-boring them until he took an introductory course from beetles areare twotwo types of wood-boring beetles entomologist Kevin O’Neill, however. beetles types of wood-boring beetles MSU MSU entomologist Kevin O’Neill, however. thatthat livelive in Montana, IvieIvie said. Wood-boring then decided to minor in entomology andand in Montana, said. Wood-boring HeHe then decided to minor in entomology beetles include both native Montanans who working forfor Ivie. HeHe eventually ob-obbeetles include both native Montanans who started started working Ivie. eventually grew up in rotten logs and outsiders who artained funding from MSU’s Undergraduate grew up in rotten logs and outsiders who ar- tained funding from MSU’s Undergraduate rived in wood pallets or firewood, andand they all all Scholars Program to conduct research under rived in wood pallets or firewood, they Scholars Program to conduct research under eateat wood. TheThe emerald ashash borer, forfor example, supervision. wood. emerald borer, example, Ivie’s Ivie’s supervision. is aismetallic wood-boring beetle thatthat eatseats ashash Hart’s project hashas taken himhim intointo thethe Mona metallic wood-boring beetle Hart’s project taken Montrees thatthat have been introduced from Asia to to tana Entomology Collection, which is housed trees have been introduced from Asia tana Entomology Collection, which is housed thethe U.S. Midwest. If an infestation occurs in in at MSU andand curated by by Ivie, andand thethe private U.S. Midwest. If an infestation occurs at MSU curated Ivie, private Montana, thethe borer could destroy thethe look andand collection of James Cope of Ennis, Hart said. Montana, borer could destroy look collection of James Cope of Ennis, Hart said. feelfeel of Montana towns where most of the shade alone gave himhim 8,631 Montana speciof Montana towns where most of the shade That That alone gave 8,631 Montana speciis provided by by native ash.ash. Bozeman’s “forest” TheThe project hashas alsoalso taken himhim on on back is provided native Bozeman’s “forest” mens. mens. project taken back is 60 to 80 percent ash.ash. roads, through forests andand intointo every county is 60 to 80 percent roads, through forests every county Wood-boring beetles killkill trees by by eating Wood-boring beetles trees eating of Montana. of Montana.

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www.havredailynews.com www.havredailynews.com www.havredailynews.com Lauckner (plaid BillBill Lauckner (plaid shirt) discusses shirt) discusses thethe wheat durum wheat andand durum varieties planted varieties planted in in Extension thethe MSUMSU Extension testtest plot on his farm north plot on his farm north of Nashua. With of Nashua. With himhim on the Valley County on the Valley County from plotplot tourtour are,are, from left, Kurt Breigenzer, left, Kurt Breigenzer, Steve Hansen Marc Steve Hansen andand Marc Breigenzer. Breigenzer.

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 6 Because of the interalthough is growing Because of the interalthough sheshe is growing national commitment crop seed. high national commitment to to thisthis crop forfor seed. It’sIt’s high carbon-neutral growth past protein and the cows love carbon-neutral growth past protein and the cows love 2020, biofuel is mandated it, she it, she said. 2020, biofuel is mandated said. now. Males comLunch served now. Males saidsaid thethe comLunch waswas served in in pany owns North Will Will Peggy Lauckner’s pany thethe owns thethe North andand Peggy Lauckner’s American rights is trying garden, oasis of shade American rights is trying to to garden, an an oasis of shade certification flowers getget jet jet fuelfuel certification for for andand flowers on on thethe out-outB. carinara in the United skirts skirts of Nashua. Will B. carinara in the United of Nashua. Will is is States, Canada and Europe. Bill and Myrna Lauckner’s States, Canada and Europe. Bill and Myrna Lauckner’s crop is managed TheThe crop is managed son.son. canola, subject to the Afterward, group likelike canola, subject to the Afterward, thethe group same diseases insects traveled traveled with Will Laucksame diseases andand insects with Will Lauckthat canola is, except it ner and his son, Willie, that canola is, except it ner and his son, Willie, to to doesn’t blackleg. take a look at their crops doesn’t getget blackleg. It isIt is take a look at their crops a very aggressive competi- south south of Nashua a very aggressive competiof Nashua on on thethe with weeds, is frost- Milk Milk River, millet tor tor with weeds, is frostRiver, millet andand tolerant pods alfalfa of the tolerant andand thethe pods areare alfalfa on on oneone sideside of the shatter resistant. highway silage corn shatter resistant. highway andand silage corn In Canada, studies other. In Canada, studies areare on on thethe other. TheThe rainrain thisthis to evaluate carinara’s year year provided water on on to evaluate carinara’s provided all all thethe water in stopping recrop- hishis crops needed. useuse in stopping thethe recropcrops needed. ping of durum, what Males TheThe millet made 2 1/2 ping of durum, what Males millet made 2 1/2 called the “durum/snow tons per acre last year, called the “durum/snow tons per acre last year, rotation.� Will Lauckner said. There rotation.� Will Lauckner said. There Shelley Mills, Valley is Willow is Willow Creek forage Shelley Mills, thethe Valley Creek forage County Extension crop winter wheat doing County Extension crop winter wheat doing finefine specialist, with added water. specialist, ledled thethe wayway to to with no no added water. fields of alfalfa planted NuTech herher fields of alfalfa andand for-for- HeHe planted NuTech barley Tampico andand some varieties ageage barley off off thethe Tampico some newnew varieties Road east of Glasgow, of Pioneer corn May Road east of Glasgow, of Pioneer corn on on May 7 7 which have recovered from andand probably able which have recovered from willwill probably be be able flood in 2011. That year,to harvest to harvest Sept. thethe flood in 2011. That year, on on Sept. 15.15. TheThe after 52 days underwater, cool nights have slowed after 52 days underwater, cool nights have slowed alfalfa drowned. corn down, said. thethe alfalfa drowned. TheThe thethe corn down, he he said. alfalfa flowering TheThe plants have KeyKey alfalfa waswas flowering plants have twotwo earsears ready second of corn of corn some andand ready for for thethe second andand some areare put-putcutting, just three weeks ting out a third ear. cutting, just three weeks ting out a third ear. after cutting. pickups turned after thethe firstfirst cutting. As As pickups turned “It’s amazing around in the field, Wil“It’s an an amazing al- alaround in the field, Wilfalfa,� Mills said. She said lie Lauckner yelled falfa,� Mills said. She said lie Lauckner yelled andand it has a lot of resistance. guarded guarded a little stand it has a lot of resistance. a little stand of of Bestford six-row baby baby cottonwood trees. TheThe Bestford six-row cottonwood trees. In In barley a nearby field bottomlands potholes barley in ainnearby field bottomlands andand potholes thick high, even all all over county, these waswas thick andand high, even over thethe county, these though it was fertil- areare legacy of the though it was notnot fertilthethe legacy of the ized, sprayed or watered record record flood more ized, sprayed or watered flood andand twotwo more this year. Mills expects 5 years of excellent moisthis year. Mills expects 5 years of excellent moistons acre as forage, in Valley County. tons perper acre as forage, tureture in Valley County.

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atat CourierPrinting Printing Courier Glasgow ininGlasgow Weoffer offera afull fullline lineofof We PrintingServices! Services! AgAgPrinting VIRGIL VaUPEL / HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH VIRGIL VaUPEL / HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH

There’s in every crowd. – and mom – are on one of the fence, little is fooling around on the other When he gets hungry, There’s oneone in every crowd. TheThe herdherd – and mom – are on one sideside of the fence, butbut oneone little guyguy is fooling around on the other side.side. When he gets hungry, he usually he finds his way back in through the same place he got out. he usually he finds his way back in through the same place he got out.

USDAAccepts Accepts1.7 1.7Million MillionAcres AcresUnder UnderCRP CRPSign-Up Sign-Up USDA

HI-LINE FARM & RANCH environmentally sensitive land enrollingtrients trients from washing waterways, reduce FORFOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH environmentally sensitive land by by enrolling from washing intointo waterways, reduce U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilin CRP." soil erosion that may otherwise contribute U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vil- in CRP." soil erosion that may otherwise contribute sack announced July U.S. Over Over four years, USDA to poor water quality, provide sack announced on on July 22 22 thatthat thethe U.S. thethe lastlast four years, USDA hashasto poor air air andand water quality, andand provide Department Agriculture (USDA) aside significant acreage under CRP'svaluable valuable habitat wildlife. Department of of Agriculture (USDA) willwillset set aside significant acreage under CRP's habitat forfor wildlife. accept million acres offered under Continuous Enrollment Programs to target In 2012, In 2012, CRP helped to reduce nitrogen accept 1.71.7 million acres offered under thetheContinuous Enrollment Programs to target CRP helped to reduce nitrogen 45th Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)habitat habitat conservation especially importantandand phosphorous losses from farm fields 45th Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) conservation on on especially important phosphorous losses from farm fields by by general sign-up. lands, USDA officials said. million pounds million pounds general sign-up. lands, USDA officials said. 605605 million pounds andand 121121 million pounds Department received nearly 28,000 ForFor example, March, 2012, Presidentrespectively. respectively. TheThe Department received nearly 28,000 example, on on March, 2012, President offers on more than 1.9 million acres of Obama dedicated 1 million acres of CRP to CRP restored more than million offers on more than 1.9 million acres of Obama dedicated 1 million acres of CRP to CRP hashas restored more than twotwo million land, demonstrating CRP's continuing Continuous Enrollment Programs con-acres acres wetlands associated buffers land, demonstrating CRP's continuing ap-ap-Continuous Enrollment Programs to to conof of wetlands andand associated buffers peal a voluntary programs soil, water,serve serve wetlands, grasslands wildlife. andand reduces erosion more than peal as aasvoluntary programs forfor soil, water, wetlands, grasslands andand wildlife. reduces soilsoil erosion by by more than 300300 and wildlife conservation. This year, farmers and ranchers have million tons per year. CRP also provides and wildlife conservation. This year, farmers and ranchers have million tons per year. CRP also provides USDA enrolled nearly millionalready already offered more than 370,000 acres$2 $2 billion annually landowners-dollars USDA hashas enrolled nearly 12 12 million offered more than 370,000 acres billion annually to to landowners-dollars acres new CRP contracts since 2009.under under Continuous CRP signup, a figure make their local economies, acres in in new CRP contracts since 2009. Continuous CRP signup, a figure thatthatthatthat make their wayway intointo local economies, Currently, there more than 26.9 millionUSDA USDA officials called impressive given supporting small businesses creating Currently, there areare more than 26.9 million officials called impressive given thatthatsupporting small businesses andand creating acres enrolled on 700,000 contracts. the lack of a Farm Bill extension last fall jobs. acres enrolled on 700,000 contracts. the lack of a Farm Bill extension last fall jobs. "For years, lands in CRP have helpedmeant meant CRP enrollment only reopened In addition, In addition, CRP sequesters more carbon "For 27 27 years, lands in CRP have helped thatthat CRP enrollment only reopened CRP sequesters more carbon conserve nation's resources spring in May. Lack a comprehen-dioxide dioxide than other conservation proto to conserve ourour nation's resources andandthisthis spring in May. Lack of of a comprehenthan anyany other conservation proplayed a part in mitigating climate change," sive Farm Bill this year has resulted in gram in the country, and also reduces both played a part in mitigating climate change," sive Farm Bill this year has resulted in gram in the country, and also reduces both Vilsack. "American farmers ranch-uncertainty uncertainty achieving further enrollmentfuelfuel fertilizer according to USDA. saidsaid Vilsack. "American farmers andand ranchforfor achieving further enrollment andand fertilizer use,use, according to USDA. continue to recognize importance objectives under continuous CRP. Yearly, CRP results in carbon sequestration ersers continue to recognize thethe importance of ofobjectives under continuous CRP. Yearly, CRP results in carbon sequestration protecting nation's most environmen- CRP CRP a voluntary program allowsequal equal to taking almost million protecting ourour nation's most environmenis aisvoluntary program thatthat allows to taking almost 10 10 million carscars offoff tally sensitive land enrolling in CRP. eligible eligible landowners to receive annual rentalthethe road. tally sensitive land by by enrolling in CRP. landowners to receive annual rental road. commodities produced payments cost-share assistance to estab- USDA USDA selected offers enrollment "As"As thethe commodities produced by by ourourpayments andand cost-share assistance to estabselected offers forfor enrollment farmers ranchers continue to performlishlish long-term, resource-conserving coversbased based Environmental Benefits Index farmers andand ranchers continue to perform long-term, resource-conserving covers on on an an Environmental Benefits Index strongly in the marketplace – supporting on eligible farmland throughout the duration (EBI) comprised of five environmental strongly in the marketplace – supporting on eligible farmland throughout the duration (EBI) comprised of five environmental every twelve jobs here of their to 15 year contracts. factors plus cost. environmental oneone outout of of every twelve jobs here in in thetheof their 10 10 to 15 year contracts. factors plus cost. TheThe fivefive environmental United States is no surprise Ameri- Under Under CRP, farmers ranchers plantfactors factors wildlife enhancement, United States – it–isitno surprise thatthat AmeriCRP, farmers andand ranchers plant are:are: (1)(1) wildlife enhancement, (2)(2) producers continue recognize grasses trees in fields along streamswater water quality, erosion, enduring cancan producers continue to to recognize thethegrasses andand trees in fields andand along streams quality, (3)(3) soilsoil erosion, (4)(4) enduring importance of protecting nation's mostor rivers. or rivers. plantings prevent benefits, quality. importance of protecting ourour nation's most TheThe plantings prevent soilsoil andand nu-nu-benefits, andand (5)(5) air air quality.

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LOWESTPRICES PRICESININ LOWEST VALLEYCOUNTY COUNTY VALLEY Stan Man CallCall Stan TheThe Man at at 406-228-9301 406-228-9301

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TheGlasgow GlasgowCourier Courier The Serving Proudly As The Of Valley County Serving Proudly As The VoiceVoice Of Valley County SinceSince 19131913


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CropTour TourFeatures FeaturesWheat WheatVarieties Varieties Crop

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PRAIRIE PRAIRIE sUNFLOWERs sUNFLOWERs

silage Corn, silage Corn, Forage barley Forage barley And Alfalfa And Alfalfa Fields Prosper Fields Prosper

BY SAMAR BY SAMAR FAY FAY HI-LINE FARM & RANCH HI-LINE FARM & RANCH Two days earlier, summer thunderTwo days earlier, summer thunderstorms had turned ugly, lashing ripening storms had turned ugly, lashing ripening fields crushed, fields withwith big big hail.hail. PeasPeas lay lay crushed, residue heavy justjust residue now,now, too too lowlow andand heavy to to combine. In the storm path, wheat combine. In the storm path, wheat waswas stripped flattened, a total stripped andand flattened, a total loss.loss. on crop Valley ButBut on crop tourtour day,day, JulyJuly 26, 26, Valley County was blessed with a cool, breezy County was blessed with a cool, breezy Those attending annual day.day. Those attending the the 33rd33rd annual MSU Extension MSU Extension cropcrop bumped tourtour bumped overover farm tracks to see farm tracks to see test test plots of 20 varieties of 20 varieties of of Dr. Joyce Eckhoff, research agronomist at MSU, the stem of a wheat varietyplotsspring A stray rye plant among the wheat varieties a close examination during the Valley Dr. Joyce Eckhoff, research agronomist at MSU, cuts cuts the stem of a wheat variety wheat A stray rye plant among the wheat varieties getsgets a close examination during the Valley spring wheat andand 14 14 is supposed be solid and shows to of one of those attended County plot tour. leftRussell are Russell Menge, agronomist Dr. Joyce Eckhoff, Valley thatthat is supposed to betosolid stemstem and shows it to itone those whowho attended the thekinds kinds of durum on Bill County plot tour. FromFrom left are Menge, MSUMSU agronomist Dr. Joyce Eckhoff, Valley of durum on Bill Valley County Twenty-four varieties of spring wheat and durum County Extension agent Shelley Tihista, Cenex Harvest States agronomist Valley County plot plot tour.tour. Twenty-four varieties of spring wheat and durum werewereandand Myrna Lauckner’s County Extension agent Shelley Mills,Mills, JoshJosh Tihista, Cenex Harvest States agronomist Myrna Lauckner’s planted in 520-foot by 20-foot test plots onLauckner’ Bill Lauckner’ s farm of Nashua. Gilbert Mogan andunidentified an unidentified planted in 5 by test plots on Bill s farm northnorth of Nashua. on the Glentana Gilbert Mogan and an man.man. farmfarm on the Glentana Road north of Nashua. Road north of Nashua. Solid stems, Solid stems, highhigh MALES yield, resistance, MALES yield, scabscab resistance, high protein, good high protein, good semolina color, cadmium – it’s semolina color, lowlow cadmium – it’s up to the farmer to match his soil up to the farmer to match his soil withwith hoped-for rainfall try luck his luck the the hoped-for rainfall andand try his with the old favorite and hopeful with the old favorite and hopeful newnew varieties of wheat on the market. MSU varieties of wheat on the market. MSU research agronomist Joyce Eckhoff research agronomist Dr. Dr. Joyce Eckhoff knows them a teacher knows knows them as aasteacher knows her her students, by name and by qualities. students, by name and by qualities. SheShe moved from to row, labeled, moved from rowrow to row, eacheach labeled, Choteau, Vida, Elgin, Kelby, MounChoteau, Vida, Elgin, Volt,Volt, Kelby, Mountrail, Alzada, Strongfield one taller, trail, Alzada, Strongfield - one taller, oneone thicker, bluer, greener. thicker, oneone bluer, oneone greener. TheThe littlelittle by 20-foot plots almost ready 5 by5 20-foot test test plots are are almost ready for the tiny combine to harvest the grain. for the tiny combine to harvest the grain. It will be sent to the MSU test station It will be sent to the MSU test station for for weighing, protein analysis evaluaweighing, protein analysis andand evaluafor performance on this particular tiontion for performance on this particular piece of northeast Montana. piece of northeast Montana. The tour began in the Valley County The tour began in the Valley County Courthouse an introduction Courthouse withwith an introduction to to Ethiopian mustard, Brassica carinara, Ethiopian mustard, Brassica carinara, a hot prospect for producing jet a hot prospect for producing jet fuelfuel biodiesel. Daryl Males, a consultandand biodiesel. Daryl Males, a consulting agronomist, described the trials ing agronomist, described the trials in in Canada of this hardy seed crop native Canada of this hardy seed crop native to semi-arid lands in the of Africa. to semi-arid lands in the hornhorn of Africa. is grown in Saskatchewan a winter It isItgrown in Saskatchewan as aaswinter crop. He said jet fuel from the carinara crop. He said jet fuel from the carinara oil seeds efficient in pure form, oil seeds are are efficient eveneven in pure form, mixed fossil fuels. Emissions not not mixed withwith fossil fuels. Emissions of of carbon and sulfates are very low; even SamaR FaY / HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH carbon and sulfates are very low; even SamaR FaY / HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH the jet contrails are eliminated. Shelley Mills, Valley County Extension agent, shows the Bestford six-row forage barley she is growing east of Glasgow. The stop was part of the annual Valley County Shelley Mills, Valley County Extension agent, shows the Bestford six-row forage barley she is growing east of Glasgow. The stop was part of the annual Valley County the jet contrails are eliminated. CONTINUED ON PAGE variety plot tour held July 26. CONTINUED ON PAGE 8 8 variety plot tour held July 26.

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Prairie sunflowers flourish Prairie sunflowers flourish in in disturbed ground on the edge disturbed ground on the edge of of dirt roads and in fields. The flowers dirt roads and in fields. The flowers attract bees and butterflies, attract bees and butterflies, and and the seeds are consumed by game the seeds are consumed by game and songbirds. birdsbirds and songbirds.

HardDays Days Hard NightFor For Night Beetles‘Fan’ ‘Fan’ Beetles

SERVICE MSUMSU NEWSNEWS SERVICE Searching for longhorn the longhorn Searching for the beetles of Montana transbeetles of Montana has has transformed Charles Hart into formed Charles Hart into a a night stalker pursues night stalker whowho pursues his his prey with nets, traps prey with nets, traps andand a a crowbar. crowbar. 33,000-mile quest TheThe 33,000-mile quest three summers overover three summers has has alsoalso turned the Montana turned the Montana StateState Uni-University graduate student versity graduate student intointo a published author dema published author and and demonstrated that undergraduate onstrated that undergraduate research foster success, research can can foster success, MSU entomologist saidsaid MSU entomologist Mi-Michael Ivie. chael Ivie. an MSU underHartHart waswas an MSU undergraduate in biology when graduate in biology when he he CONTINUED ON PAGE CONTINUED ON PAGE 9 9

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CropTour TourFeatures FeaturesWheat WheatVarieties Varieties Crop

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PRAIRIE PRAIRIE sUNFLOWERs sUNFLOWERs

silage Corn, silage Corn, Forage barley Forage barley And Alfalfa And Alfalfa Fields Prosper Fields Prosper

BY SAMAR BY SAMAR FAY FAY HI-LINE FARM & RANCH HI-LINE FARM & RANCH Two days earlier, summer thunderTwo days earlier, summer thunderstorms had turned ugly, lashing ripening storms had turned ugly, lashing ripening fields crushed, fields withwith big big hail.hail. PeasPeas lay lay crushed, residue heavy justjust residue now,now, too too lowlow andand heavy to to combine. In the storm path, wheat combine. In the storm path, wheat waswas stripped flattened, a total stripped andand flattened, a total loss.loss. on crop Valley ButBut on crop tourtour day,day, JulyJuly 26, 26, Valley County was blessed with a cool, breezy County was blessed with a cool, breezy Those attending annual day.day. Those attending the the 33rd33rd annual MSU Extension MSU Extension cropcrop bumped tourtour bumped overover farm tracks to see farm tracks to see test test plots of 20 varieties of 20 varieties of of Dr. Joyce Eckhoff, research agronomist at MSU, the stem of a wheat varietyplotsspring A stray rye plant among the wheat varieties a close examination during the Valley Dr. Joyce Eckhoff, research agronomist at MSU, cuts cuts the stem of a wheat variety wheat A stray rye plant among the wheat varieties getsgets a close examination during the Valley spring wheat andand 14 14 is supposed be solid and shows to of one of those attended County plot tour. leftRussell are Russell Menge, agronomist Dr. Joyce Eckhoff, Valley thatthat is supposed to betosolid stemstem and shows it to itone those whowho attended the thekinds kinds of durum on Bill County plot tour. FromFrom left are Menge, MSUMSU agronomist Dr. Joyce Eckhoff, Valley of durum on Bill Valley County Twenty-four varieties of spring wheat and durum County Extension agent Shelley Tihista, Cenex Harvest States agronomist Valley County plot plot tour.tour. Twenty-four varieties of spring wheat and durum werewereandand Myrna Lauckner’s County Extension agent Shelley Mills,Mills, JoshJosh Tihista, Cenex Harvest States agronomist Myrna Lauckner’s planted in 520-foot by 20-foot test plots onLauckner’ Bill Lauckner’ s farm of Nashua. Gilbert Mogan andunidentified an unidentified planted in 5 by test plots on Bill s farm northnorth of Nashua. on the Glentana Gilbert Mogan and an man.man. farmfarm on the Glentana Road north of Nashua. Road north of Nashua. Solid stems, Solid stems, highhigh MALES yield, resistance, MALES yield, scabscab resistance, high protein, good high protein, good semolina color, cadmium – it’s semolina color, lowlow cadmium – it’s up to the farmer to match his soil up to the farmer to match his soil withwith hoped-for rainfall try luck his luck the the hoped-for rainfall andand try his with the old favorite and hopeful with the old favorite and hopeful newnew varieties of wheat on the market. MSU varieties of wheat on the market. MSU research agronomist Joyce Eckhoff research agronomist Dr. Dr. Joyce Eckhoff knows them a teacher knows knows them as aasteacher knows her her students, by name and by qualities. students, by name and by qualities. SheShe moved from to row, labeled, moved from rowrow to row, eacheach labeled, Choteau, Vida, Elgin, Kelby, MounChoteau, Vida, Elgin, Volt,Volt, Kelby, Mountrail, Alzada, Strongfield one taller, trail, Alzada, Strongfield - one taller, oneone thicker, bluer, greener. thicker, oneone bluer, oneone greener. TheThe littlelittle by 20-foot plots almost ready 5 by5 20-foot test test plots are are almost ready for the tiny combine to harvest the grain. for the tiny combine to harvest the grain. It will be sent to the MSU test station It will be sent to the MSU test station for for weighing, protein analysis evaluaweighing, protein analysis andand evaluafor performance on this particular tiontion for performance on this particular piece of northeast Montana. piece of northeast Montana. The tour began in the Valley County The tour began in the Valley County Courthouse an introduction Courthouse withwith an introduction to to Ethiopian mustard, Brassica carinara, Ethiopian mustard, Brassica carinara, a hot prospect for producing jet a hot prospect for producing jet fuelfuel biodiesel. Daryl Males, a consultandand biodiesel. Daryl Males, a consulting agronomist, described the trials ing agronomist, described the trials in in Canada of this hardy seed crop native Canada of this hardy seed crop native to semi-arid lands in the of Africa. to semi-arid lands in the hornhorn of Africa. is grown in Saskatchewan a winter It isItgrown in Saskatchewan as aaswinter crop. He said jet fuel from the carinara crop. He said jet fuel from the carinara oil seeds efficient in pure form, oil seeds are are efficient eveneven in pure form, mixed fossil fuels. Emissions not not mixed withwith fossil fuels. Emissions of of carbon and sulfates are very low; even SamaR FaY / HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH carbon and sulfates are very low; even SamaR FaY / HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH the jet contrails are eliminated. Shelley Mills, Valley County Extension agent, shows the Bestford six-row forage barley she is growing east of Glasgow. The stop was part of the annual Valley County Shelley Mills, Valley County Extension agent, shows the Bestford six-row forage barley she is growing east of Glasgow. The stop was part of the annual Valley County the jet contrails are eliminated. CONTINUED ON PAGE variety plot tour held July 26. CONTINUED ON PAGE 8 8 variety plot tour held July 26.

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Prairie sunflowers flourish Prairie sunflowers flourish in in disturbed ground on the edge disturbed ground on the edge of of dirt roads and in fields. The flowers dirt roads and in fields. The flowers attract bees and butterflies, attract bees and butterflies, and and the seeds are consumed by game the seeds are consumed by game and songbirds. birdsbirds and songbirds.

HardDays Days Hard NightFor For Night Beetles‘Fan’ ‘Fan’ Beetles

SERVICE MSUMSU NEWSNEWS SERVICE Searching for longhorn the longhorn Searching for the beetles of Montana transbeetles of Montana has has transformed Charles Hart into formed Charles Hart into a a night stalker pursues night stalker whowho pursues his his prey with nets, traps prey with nets, traps andand a a crowbar. crowbar. 33,000-mile quest TheThe 33,000-mile quest three summers overover three summers has has alsoalso turned the Montana turned the Montana StateState Uni-University graduate student versity graduate student intointo a published author dema published author and and demonstrated that undergraduate onstrated that undergraduate research foster success, research can can foster success, MSU entomologist saidsaid MSU entomologist Mi-Michael Ivie. chael Ivie. an MSU underHartHart waswas an MSU undergraduate in biology when graduate in biology when he he CONTINUED ON PAGE CONTINUED ON PAGE 9 9

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www.havredailynews.com www.havredailynews.com www.havredailynews.com Lauckner (plaid BillBill Lauckner (plaid shirt) discusses shirt) discusses thethe wheat durum wheat andand durum varieties planted varieties planted in in Extension thethe MSUMSU Extension testtest plot on his farm north plot on his farm north of Nashua. With of Nashua. With himhim on the Valley County on the Valley County from plotplot tourtour are,are, from left, Kurt Breigenzer, left, Kurt Breigenzer, Steve Hansen Marc Steve Hansen andand Marc Breigenzer. Breigenzer.

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LOOKING FOR GREENER PAsTUREs? LOOKING FOR GREENER PAsTUREs?

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 6 Because of the interalthough is growing Because of the interalthough sheshe is growing national commitment crop seed. high national commitment to to thisthis crop forfor seed. It’sIt’s high carbon-neutral growth past protein and the cows love carbon-neutral growth past protein and the cows love 2020, biofuel is mandated it, she it, she said. 2020, biofuel is mandated said. now. Males comLunch served now. Males saidsaid thethe comLunch waswas served in in pany owns North Will Will Peggy Lauckner’s pany thethe owns thethe North andand Peggy Lauckner’s American rights is trying garden, oasis of shade American rights is trying to to garden, an an oasis of shade certification flowers getget jet jet fuelfuel certification for for andand flowers on on thethe out-outB. carinara in the United skirts skirts of Nashua. Will B. carinara in the United of Nashua. Will is is States, Canada and Europe. Bill and Myrna Lauckner’s States, Canada and Europe. Bill and Myrna Lauckner’s crop is managed TheThe crop is managed son.son. canola, subject to the Afterward, group likelike canola, subject to the Afterward, thethe group same diseases insects traveled traveled with Will Laucksame diseases andand insects with Will Lauckthat canola is, except it ner and his son, Willie, that canola is, except it ner and his son, Willie, to to doesn’t blackleg. take a look at their crops doesn’t getget blackleg. It isIt is take a look at their crops a very aggressive competi- south south of Nashua a very aggressive competiof Nashua on on thethe with weeds, is frost- Milk Milk River, millet tor tor with weeds, is frostRiver, millet andand tolerant pods alfalfa of the tolerant andand thethe pods areare alfalfa on on oneone sideside of the shatter resistant. highway silage corn shatter resistant. highway andand silage corn In Canada, studies other. In Canada, studies areare on on thethe other. TheThe rainrain thisthis to evaluate carinara’s year year provided water on on to evaluate carinara’s provided all all thethe water in stopping recrop- hishis crops needed. useuse in stopping thethe recropcrops needed. ping of durum, what Males TheThe millet made 2 1/2 ping of durum, what Males millet made 2 1/2 called the “durum/snow tons per acre last year, called the “durum/snow tons per acre last year, rotation.� Will Lauckner said. There rotation.� Will Lauckner said. There Shelley Mills, Valley is Willow is Willow Creek forage Shelley Mills, thethe Valley Creek forage County Extension crop winter wheat doing County Extension crop winter wheat doing finefine specialist, with added water. specialist, ledled thethe wayway to to with no no added water. fields of alfalfa planted NuTech herher fields of alfalfa andand for-for- HeHe planted NuTech barley Tampico andand some varieties ageage barley off off thethe Tampico some newnew varieties Road east of Glasgow, of Pioneer corn May Road east of Glasgow, of Pioneer corn on on May 7 7 which have recovered from andand probably able which have recovered from willwill probably be be able flood in 2011. That year,to harvest to harvest Sept. thethe flood in 2011. That year, on on Sept. 15.15. TheThe after 52 days underwater, cool nights have slowed after 52 days underwater, cool nights have slowed alfalfa drowned. corn down, said. thethe alfalfa drowned. TheThe thethe corn down, he he said. alfalfa flowering TheThe plants have KeyKey alfalfa waswas flowering plants have twotwo earsears ready second of corn of corn some andand ready for for thethe second andand some areare put-putcutting, just three weeks ting out a third ear. cutting, just three weeks ting out a third ear. after cutting. pickups turned after thethe firstfirst cutting. As As pickups turned “It’s amazing around in the field, Wil“It’s an an amazing al- alaround in the field, Wilfalfa,� Mills said. She said lie Lauckner yelled falfa,� Mills said. She said lie Lauckner yelled andand it has a lot of resistance. guarded guarded a little stand it has a lot of resistance. a little stand of of Bestford six-row baby baby cottonwood trees. TheThe Bestford six-row cottonwood trees. In In barley a nearby field bottomlands potholes barley in ainnearby field bottomlands andand potholes thick high, even all all over county, these waswas thick andand high, even over thethe county, these though it was fertil- areare legacy of the though it was notnot fertilthethe legacy of the ized, sprayed or watered record record flood more ized, sprayed or watered flood andand twotwo more this year. Mills expects 5 years of excellent moisthis year. Mills expects 5 years of excellent moistons acre as forage, in Valley County. tons perper acre as forage, tureture in Valley County.

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atat CourierPrinting Printing Courier Glasgow ininGlasgow Weoffer offera afull fullline lineofof We PrintingServices! Services! AgAgPrinting VIRGIL VaUPEL / HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH VIRGIL VaUPEL / HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH

There’s in every crowd. – and mom – are on one of the fence, little is fooling around on the other When he gets hungry, There’s oneone in every crowd. TheThe herdherd – and mom – are on one sideside of the fence, butbut oneone little guyguy is fooling around on the other side.side. When he gets hungry, he usually he finds his way back in through the same place he got out. he usually he finds his way back in through the same place he got out.

USDAAccepts Accepts1.7 1.7Million MillionAcres AcresUnder UnderCRP CRPSign-Up Sign-Up USDA

HI-LINE FARM & RANCH environmentally sensitive land enrollingtrients trients from washing waterways, reduce FORFOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH environmentally sensitive land by by enrolling from washing intointo waterways, reduce U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilin CRP." soil erosion that may otherwise contribute U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vil- in CRP." soil erosion that may otherwise contribute sack announced July U.S. Over Over four years, USDA to poor water quality, provide sack announced on on July 22 22 thatthat thethe U.S. thethe lastlast four years, USDA hashasto poor air air andand water quality, andand provide Department Agriculture (USDA) aside significant acreage under CRP'svaluable valuable habitat wildlife. Department of of Agriculture (USDA) willwillset set aside significant acreage under CRP's habitat forfor wildlife. accept million acres offered under Continuous Enrollment Programs to target In 2012, In 2012, CRP helped to reduce nitrogen accept 1.71.7 million acres offered under thetheContinuous Enrollment Programs to target CRP helped to reduce nitrogen 45th Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)habitat habitat conservation especially importantandand phosphorous losses from farm fields 45th Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) conservation on on especially important phosphorous losses from farm fields by by general sign-up. lands, USDA officials said. million pounds million pounds general sign-up. lands, USDA officials said. 605605 million pounds andand 121121 million pounds Department received nearly 28,000 ForFor example, March, 2012, Presidentrespectively. respectively. TheThe Department received nearly 28,000 example, on on March, 2012, President offers on more than 1.9 million acres of Obama dedicated 1 million acres of CRP to CRP restored more than million offers on more than 1.9 million acres of Obama dedicated 1 million acres of CRP to CRP hashas restored more than twotwo million land, demonstrating CRP's continuing Continuous Enrollment Programs con-acres acres wetlands associated buffers land, demonstrating CRP's continuing ap-ap-Continuous Enrollment Programs to to conof of wetlands andand associated buffers peal a voluntary programs soil, water,serve serve wetlands, grasslands wildlife. andand reduces erosion more than peal as aasvoluntary programs forfor soil, water, wetlands, grasslands andand wildlife. reduces soilsoil erosion by by more than 300300 and wildlife conservation. This year, farmers and ranchers have million tons per year. CRP also provides and wildlife conservation. This year, farmers and ranchers have million tons per year. CRP also provides USDA enrolled nearly millionalready already offered more than 370,000 acres$2 $2 billion annually landowners-dollars USDA hashas enrolled nearly 12 12 million offered more than 370,000 acres billion annually to to landowners-dollars acres new CRP contracts since 2009.under under Continuous CRP signup, a figure make their local economies, acres in in new CRP contracts since 2009. Continuous CRP signup, a figure thatthatthatthat make their wayway intointo local economies, Currently, there more than 26.9 millionUSDA USDA officials called impressive given supporting small businesses creating Currently, there areare more than 26.9 million officials called impressive given thatthatsupporting small businesses andand creating acres enrolled on 700,000 contracts. the lack of a Farm Bill extension last fall jobs. acres enrolled on 700,000 contracts. the lack of a Farm Bill extension last fall jobs. "For years, lands in CRP have helpedmeant meant CRP enrollment only reopened In addition, In addition, CRP sequesters more carbon "For 27 27 years, lands in CRP have helped thatthat CRP enrollment only reopened CRP sequesters more carbon conserve nation's resources spring in May. Lack a comprehen-dioxide dioxide than other conservation proto to conserve ourour nation's resources andandthisthis spring in May. Lack of of a comprehenthan anyany other conservation proplayed a part in mitigating climate change," sive Farm Bill this year has resulted in gram in the country, and also reduces both played a part in mitigating climate change," sive Farm Bill this year has resulted in gram in the country, and also reduces both Vilsack. "American farmers ranch-uncertainty uncertainty achieving further enrollmentfuelfuel fertilizer according to USDA. saidsaid Vilsack. "American farmers andand ranchforfor achieving further enrollment andand fertilizer use,use, according to USDA. continue to recognize importance objectives under continuous CRP. Yearly, CRP results in carbon sequestration ersers continue to recognize thethe importance of ofobjectives under continuous CRP. Yearly, CRP results in carbon sequestration protecting nation's most environmen- CRP CRP a voluntary program allowsequal equal to taking almost million protecting ourour nation's most environmenis aisvoluntary program thatthat allows to taking almost 10 10 million carscars offoff tally sensitive land enrolling in CRP. eligible eligible landowners to receive annual rentalthethe road. tally sensitive land by by enrolling in CRP. landowners to receive annual rental road. commodities produced payments cost-share assistance to estab- USDA USDA selected offers enrollment "As"As thethe commodities produced by by ourourpayments andand cost-share assistance to estabselected offers forfor enrollment farmers ranchers continue to performlishlish long-term, resource-conserving coversbased based Environmental Benefits Index farmers andand ranchers continue to perform long-term, resource-conserving covers on on an an Environmental Benefits Index strongly in the marketplace – supporting on eligible farmland throughout the duration (EBI) comprised of five environmental strongly in the marketplace – supporting on eligible farmland throughout the duration (EBI) comprised of five environmental every twelve jobs here of their to 15 year contracts. factors plus cost. environmental oneone outout of of every twelve jobs here in in thetheof their 10 10 to 15 year contracts. factors plus cost. TheThe fivefive environmental United States is no surprise Ameri- Under Under CRP, farmers ranchers plantfactors factors wildlife enhancement, United States – it–isitno surprise thatthat AmeriCRP, farmers andand ranchers plant are:are: (1)(1) wildlife enhancement, (2)(2) producers continue recognize grasses trees in fields along streamswater water quality, erosion, enduring cancan producers continue to to recognize thethegrasses andand trees in fields andand along streams quality, (3)(3) soilsoil erosion, (4)(4) enduring importance of protecting nation's mostor rivers. or rivers. plantings prevent benefits, quality. importance of protecting ourour nation's most TheThe plantings prevent soilsoil andand nu-nu-benefits, andand (5)(5) air air quality.

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TheGlasgow GlasgowCourier Courier The Serving Proudly As The Of Valley County Serving Proudly As The VoiceVoice Of Valley County SinceSince 19131913


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he he Montana Cowboy Hall of of lished by by thethe MCHF & WHC Board of of • District 7 (Big Horn, Carbon, Montana Cowboy Hall lished MCHF & WHC Board • District 7 (Big Horn, Carbon, Fame & Western Heritage Directors for the Class of 2013 InducStillwater, Sweet Grass, & Fame & Western Heritage Directors for the Class of 2013 InducStillwater, Sweet Grass, Yellow& Yelloweem • Reduced activity andand in anusual ingness to initiate contact with theInductee community Center (MCHF &pleasure WHC) antions required thatthat onecontact Living Inductee stone Counties): Living Award – Peter esteem • Reduced activity in usual ingness to initiate with the community Center (MCHF &pleasure WHC) tions required one Living stone Counties): Living Award – Peter the activities: “Doing anything is just too much resource (“How do you feel about seeking help nounced the sixth class of inductions and at least two Legacy Inductees from Christian “Pete” Harms, Big Timber. se the nounced activities:the “Doing is just too much and resource do you feel about seeking sixth anything class of inductions at least(“How two Legacy Inductees from help Christian “Pete” Harms, Big Timber. you of into an effort.” from person/agency?”) Montana Cowboy Hall of of Fame. ofthis thethis 12person/agency?”) districts be be elected. 2013 Legacy Award – James Thurkel “Turk” ly youinto ofthe an effort.” from the Montana Cowboy Hall Fame. each each of the 12 districts elected. 2013 Legacy Award – James Thurkel “Turk” • People problems: “I don’t want anyone to 6. Where the person or family is unwilling The inductees were chosen from is the third year that the MCHF has Greenough, Red Lodge and Connolly ly. • People problems: “I don’t want anyone to 6. Where the person or family is unwilling The inductees were chosen from is the third year that the MCHF has Greenough, Red Lodge and Connolly me,” feel so so lonely.” to take initiative or where theraddition is some asee field of “I candidates that have made included athe “Living” category in addition Saddlery, Billings. me,” “I feel lonely.” to take initiative or where ther is some asee field of candidates that have made included athe “Living” category in Saddlery, Billings. nag- a notable • Physical problems: Sleeping problems, danger if action is not taken, you should take contribution to the histo the Legacy Award honor. • District 8 (Broadwater, Jefferson, manag• Physical problems: Sleeping problems, danger if action is not taken, you should take a notable contribution to the histo the Legacy Award honor. • District 8 (Broadwater, Jefferson, decreased sexual interest, headaches. the initiative: tory and culture of Montana, The 2013 inductees into the & Lewis and Clark Counties): Living decreased sexual interest, headaches. the initiative: tory and culture of Montana, The 2013 inductees into the & Lewis and Clark Counties): Living ths, • Guilt and low self esteem: “It’s all my Call the agency and ask to speak to the by the public and Montana Cowboy Hall of Award – Tim Babcock, Helena. Legacy ngths,nominated • Guilt and low self esteem: “It’s all my Call the agency and ask to speak to the nominated by the public and Montana Cowboy Hall of Award – Tim Babcock, Helena. Legacy porfault,” “I should be of punished.” intake worker (if (if there is one). impor-appointed fault,” “Itrustees should be punished.” intake worker there is one). the Fame are: Award – Montana Department of of Liveappointed trustees of the Fame are: Award – Montana Department LiveSetSetMCHF Signs intent include: Identify yourself andand your with ng. Signs ofWHC. suicidal intent include: Identify yourself your relationship with &ofWHC. Winners • District 1 (Daniels, stock, Helena andand Montana thethe MagaMCHF &suicidal Winners • District 1 relationship (Daniels, stock, Helena Montana Magahan • Anxiety oronor depression: intense person orPhillips, family. e thanwere • Anxiety depression: Severe, intense thethe person orPhillips, family. selected regional Roosevelt, Sherizine of of Western History, Helena. were selected on regional Severe, Roosevelt, Sherizine Western History, Helena. ade feelings of anxiety or depression. State what you think thethe person’s or or fams madebasis feelings anxiety or depression. State what you think person’s famby by theof local trustees dan, & Valley Counties): • District 9 (Gallatin, Meagher, && basis the local trustees dan, & Valley Counties): • District 9 (Gallatin, Meagher, • Withdrawal or or isolation: Withdrawn, needs areLiving (needs immediate protection • Withdrawal isolation: Withdrawn, ily’s ily’s needs are (needs immediate protection of of MCHF & WHC. Award – Fae Taylor Park Counties): Living Award – Wendell MCHF & WHC. Living Award – Fae Taylor Park Counties): Living Award – Wendell eme on on alone, lack ofof friends andand supports. from suicidal acts, needs an appointment alone, lack ofof friends supports. from suicidal acts, needs an appointment “Our Hall Fame Phillips, Scobey. Legacy Lovely, Wilsall. Legacy Award – Augus“Our Hall Fame Phillips, Scobey. Legacy forfor Lovely, Wilsall. Legacy Award – Augusyray or orvoting • Helpless and hopeless: Sense of complete counseling, needs financial or legal advice). • Helpless and hopeless: Sense of complete counseling, needs financial or legal advice). process gives Award – Shirley Bridges, tustus Franklin “Frank” Crail, BigBig Sky andand voting process gives Award – Shirley Bridges, Franklin “Frank” Crail, Sky andandour powerlessness, a hopeless State what you think the person’s or famly powerlessness, a hopeless feeling. State what you think the person’s volunteer trustees a afeeling. Wolf Point and Marvin Earl Presley, Gardiner. our volunteer trustees Wolf Point and Marvinor famEarl Presley, Gardiner. • Alcohol abuse: There is often a link be- ily’s needs areBrookman, (needs immediate protection •voice Alcohol abuse: There (needs immediate protection direct in who from Wolf Point. • District 10 10 (Flathead, Lake, Lincoln, direct voice in who from is often a link be- ily’s needs are Brookman, Wolf Point. • District (Flathead, Lake, Lincoln, s of oftheir tween alcoholism and suicide. from suicidal acts, needs an appointment for rces tween alcoholism and suicide. from suicidal acts, needs an appointment community will be be • District 2 (Dawson, & Sanders Counties): Living Award – – their community will • District 2 (Dawson, for & Sanders Counties): Living Award ies, inducted • Previous suicidal attempts: May have been needs financial or legal advice). obbies, • Previous suicidal attempts: May have been counseling, counseling, needs financial or Prairie, legal advice). into the Montana Garfield, McCone, Robert Henry “Bob” Schall, Jr.,Jr., Arlee. inducted into the Montana Garfield, McCone, Prairie, Robert Henry “Bob” Schall, Arlee. previous attempts of low to high lethality. Provide the agency with background in-inprevious attempts of low to high lethality. Provide the agency with background Cowboy Hall of of Fame,” Richland, & Wibaux CounLegacy Award – Dorothy M.M. Johnson, Cowboy Hall Fame,” Richland, & Wibaux CounLegacy Award – Dorothy Johnson, ngs • Suicidal plan: Frequent or constant formation (name, address and phone; age and thingssaid • Christy Suicidal plan: Frequent or constant formationties): (name, address and–phone; age and Christy Stensland, Living Award Mary Whitefish andand EdEd Lane, Arlee. said Stensland, ties): Living Award – Mary Whitefish Lane, Arlee. ring thoughts with a specific in mind. gender; nature of(Kasten) current problem or crisis; anyany duringexecutive thoughts with a specific plan in mind. gender; nature of(Kasten) current problem or crisis; director of of theplan Rose Haughian, • District 11 11 (Mineral, Missoula, executive director the Rose Haughian, • District (Mineral, Missoula, and Cries for help: Making a will, giving posses past history you’re aware of; further informae, andMCHF Cries for help: Making a will, giving posses past history you’re aware of; further informa& WHC. “It is these Terry. Legacy Award – Harley & Ravalli Counties): Living Award – – MCHF & WHC. “It is these Terry. Legacy Award – Harley & Ravalli Counties): Living Award • sions away, making statements such as “I’m tiontion as Everett called for). • sions away, making statements such as “I’m as called for). local trustees who review the Abarr, Jordan and Obert Dwain Rennaker, Hamilton. Legacy localittrustees who review Abarr, Jordan andaction Obertthey Dwain Rennaker, Hamilton. Legacy nd- calling or “Maybe mythe family would theEverett agency what follow-up friendcallingquits,” it quits,” or “Maybe my family would Ask Ask the agency what follow-up action they nominations andand vote to elect each Kartevold, Glendive. Award – Ed Lambert, Stevensville andand nominations vote to elect each Kartevold, Glendive. Award – Ed Lambert, Stevensville sods of of be be better offoff without me.” willwill take: FORFOR HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH better without me.” take: HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH (two-way tie) Robert W. “Bob” Olson, class of Hall of Fame inductees.” • District 3 (Carter, Custer, Fallon, Powclass HOW of Hall of Fame inductees.” District 3 (Carter, Fallon, Pow- Fae Taylor Phillips, above, of Scobey is the winner (two-way tie) Robert W. “Bob” Olson, TO REFER A PERSON FORFOR HELP ••When will they actCuster, on on thethe referral? HOW TO A PERSON HELP • When will they act referral? Fae Taylor Phillips, above, of Scobey is the winner Greenough The MCHF & REFER WHC board hashas desigderder River, Rosebud, & Treasure Counties): and Trails’ End, Missoula. The MCHF & WHC board desigRiver, Rosebud, & Treasure Counties): of the Montana Cowboy HallHall of Fame District 1 1 Greenough and Trails’ End, Missoula. 1. Be aware of the agencies andand resources • Who willwill be be thethe person forfor youyou to contact of the Montana Cowboy of Fame District oach eachnated 1. Be aware of the agencies resources • Who person to contact 12 trustee districts across the state Living Award – Frank P. “Bob” Robin• District 1212 (Deer Lodge, Beavernated 12 districts across the state later Living Award – Frank P. “Bob” RobinDistrict (Deer Lodge, BeaverLiving Award for for Daniels, Phillips, Roosevelt, tion available in trustee your community - what services if necessary? Living Award Daniels, Phillips, Roosevelt, head,• Silver ciation available in your community - what services later if necessary? from which up to 20 trustees may be son, Broadus. Legacy Award – Daniel M. Bow, Granite, Madison, from which up to 20 trustees may be son, Broadus. Legacy Award – Daniel M. head, Silver Bow, Granite, Madison, Sheridan and Valley counties. Winners of the they offer and what their limitations are. • What will be the cost of the service (flat they offer what their are. “Dan” Gaskill, • What Volborg will be the cost ofHenry the service (flat Sheridan and Valley counties. Winners of the & Powell Counties): Living Award appointed byand thethe MCHF &limitations WHC board andand John by MCHF & WHC board “Dan” Gaskill, Volborg John Henry district Legacy Award areare Shirley Bridges (left) district Legacy Award Shirley Bridges (left) & Powell Counties): Living Award ding 2. 2. Listen for signs and symptoms thatthat fee/sliding scale)? rridingof appointed Listen for signs and symptoms fee/sliding scale)? directors. Nomination criteria estabHaughian, Miles City. – Charles Hahnkamp, Dillon. Legacy and Marvin Brookman (below) of Wolf Point. of directors. Nomination criteria estabHaughian, Miles City. – Charles Hahnkamp, Dillon. Legacy and Marvin Brookman (below) of Wolf Point. est, the person or family needs help which you • Do you need to do anything else to come best, the person or family needs help which you • Do you need to do anything else to comAward – Agnes “Annie” Morgan, PhilAward – Agnes “Annie” Morgan, Philents can’t provide, i.e., financial, legal or personal plete the referral? events can’t provide, i.e., financial, legal or personal plete the referral? • District 4 (Blaine, Choteau, Hill, & & lipsburg, and P & O Ranch (Philip H. H. • District 4 (Blaine, Choteau, Hill, lipsburg, and P & O Ranch (Philip ons counseling. 7. Make sure the person or family and referactions counseling. 7. Make sure the person or family and referLiberty Counties): Living Award – Rob&& William C. C. Orr), Dillon. Poindexter William Orr), Dillon. 3. Assess what agency or or community re-re- ral ral agency connect andand getget together. Make oneoneLiberty Counties): Living Award – Rob- Poindexter 3. Assess what agency community agency connect together. Make ert “Bob” Sivertsen, Havre. Legacy Since the initial round of ert “Bob” Sivertsen, Havre. Legacy Since the initial round of source would be be most appropriate to address follow-up contacts with thethe agency if if NT source would most appropriate to address or more or more follow-up contacts with agency Award – Jack Siebrasse, Havre inductions to to thethe Montana Award – Jack Siebrasse, Havre inductions Montana mpperson’s (or(or family’s) problems. called forfor by by thethe situation. symp- thethe person’s family’s) problems. called situation. and Elmer Weaver, Chinook. Cowboy Hall of Fame in in and Elmer Weaver, Chinook. Cowboy Hall of Fame ing, thethe referral with thethe person or or Roubie Younkin, an an MSU Extension ncing, 4. Discuss 4. Discuss referral with person Roubie Younkin, MSU Extension• District 5 (Cascade, 2008, including this year’s • District 5 (Cascade, 2008, including this year’s ion, (“It(“It sounds/looks likelike youyou areare feeling in in Valley County, compiled thisthis re-redition, family family sounds/looks feeling agent agent Valley County, compiled Glacier, Pondera, Teton, & inductions, 174 historical Glacier, Pondera, Teton, & inductions, 174 historical owI think _____ could help youyou deal with from Extension sources. SheShe cancan be be ollow- _____. _____. I think _____ could help deal with port port from Extension sources. Toole Counties): Living figures have been honToole Counties): Living figures have been honit isit is your situation.”) reached at at (406)228-6239 or or ryounkin@ nt, your situation.”) reached (406)228-6239 ryounkin@ Award – Raymond W. ored as inductees. Full Award – Raymond W. ored as inductees. Full fes5. Explore the individual’s or family’s willprofes5. Explore the individual’s or family’s will- valleycountymt.net. valleycountymt.net. “Rib” Gustafson, Conrad. biographies for past “Rib” Gustafson, Conrad. biographies for past for es for Legacy Award – 1904 inductees areare available Legacy Award – 1904 inductees available World Champion Fort onon thethe MCHF && WHC’s World Champion Fort MCHF WHC’s Shaw Indian School website. Shaw Indian School website. nts, ments, Peerless Peerless Girls Basketball Team, For more informaGirls Basketball Team, For more informa893-4398 893-4398 Fort Shaw and Thomas tion about the Montana Fort Shaw and Thomas ess, tion about the Montana peless, “Butch” O’Connell, Great Cowboy Hall of of Fame && “Butch” O’Connell, Great Cowboy Hall Fame Richland Richland Falls. Western Heritage Center, Falls. Western Heritage Center, ”I’m “I’m 724-3353 724-3353 • District 6 (Fergus, or or forfor more details onon • District 6 (Fergus, more details Golden Valley, Judith Basin, the Montana Cowboy Hall Golden Valley, Judith Basin, 1FFSMFTTt3JDIMBOEt0QIFJNt'PVS#VUUFT Opheim the Montana Cowboy Hall •Feed Richland Four Buttes Peerless • Richland •Buying Four Buttes 1FFSMFTTt3JDIMBOEt0QIFJNt'PVS#VUUFT Opheim Peerless Richland •Opheim ••Buying Four Buttes Peerless •Seed Richland •Opheim Opheim Four Buttes tPeerless Grain Feed t•t and t Grain Seed• •Opheim and Musselshell, Petroleum, & of Fame inductees, please Musselshell, Petroleum, & of Fame inductees, please 762-3231 762-3231 893-4398 724-3353 783-5519 893-4398 - 762-3231 - -783-5519 893-4398 - -724-3353 762-3231 893-4398 724-3353 762-3231 783-5519 893-4398 -724-3353 724-3353 -762-3231 762-3231 -783-5519 893-4398 -724-3353 762-3231 -783-5519 783-5519 Wheatland Counties): Livcontact Christy Stensland by by t Fertilizer Merchandising Grain Wheatland Counties): Livcontact Christy Stensland t Fertilizer Merchandising Grain inging Award – George W.W. GriemsFour calling (406) 653-3800, emailing Award – George GriemsFour calling (406) 653-3800, emailing tt Agronomist tt AgAg Chemicals Chemicals Agronomist man, Roundup. Legacy Award – Wallis Buttes man, Roundup. Legacy Award – Wallis cstensland@montanacowboyfame. cstensland@montanacowboyfame. Buttes Huidekoper, Two DotDot andand George Kelly, or or visiting www.montanacowtt Petroleum Services Huidekoper, Two George Kelly, com, 783-5519 com, visiting www.montanacowPetroleum Services 783-5519 Utica. boyfame.org. Utica. boyfame.org.

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GIVE THEsE GUys GIVE THEsE GUys AA LEATHER COAT LEATHER COAT Michael Chappell, aftermarket manager, Michael Chappell, aftermarket manager, Jason Green, parts specialist, andand John Jason Green, parts specialist, John Grimes andand Tyler Sanner, service technicians, Grimes Tyler Sanner, service technicians, at Farm Equipment Sales in Glasgow eacheach at Farm Equipment Sales in Glasgow recently achieved master certification recently achieved master certification after completing extensive training in the after completing extensive training in the John Deere University program. University John Deere University program. University credits areare earned in various categories to to credits earned in various categories ensure expertise in sales, service or parts ensure expertise in sales, service or parts departments at Deere dealerships. Shown departments at Deere dealerships. Shown from leftleft areare Chappell, Grimes, Green andand from Chappell, Grimes, Green Sanner. EachEach received a special plaque andand Sanner. received a special plaque a John Deere University leather coatcoat in in a John Deere University leather recognition to honor their accomplishment. recognition to honor their accomplishment.

FORFOR HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH HI-LINE FaRm & RaNcH

Hard HardDays DaysNight NightFor ForBeetles Beetles‘Fan’ ‘Fan’

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7 7 CONTINUED FROM PAGE joined thethe Montana Wood-Boring Insect Surcambium layer between thethe bark andand thethe joined Montana Wood-Boring Insect Sur- thethe cambium layer between bark vey,vey, a joint effort of the Montana Agricultural thus preventing water andand nutrients a joint effort of the Montana Agricultural wood, wood, thus preventing water nutrients Experiment Station, Montana Department of of from reaching thethe leaves. Experiment Station, Montana Department from reaching leaves. Agriculture and USDA-APHIS. Now workThe goal of Hart’s work is to identify Agriculture and USDA-APHIS. Now workThe goal of Hart’s work is to identify inging on on hishis master’s degree in in entomology, longhorn beetles thatthat areare now present in in master’s degree entomology, thethe longhorn beetles now present Hart recently published twotwo papers about hishis Montana, making it easier to to spot invasive Hart recently published papers about Montana, making it easier spot invasive findings in the scientific journal “Coleopterists andand take early action, IvieIvie said. Hart findings in the scientific journal “Coleopterists species species take early action, said. Hart Bulletin.” has documented 151 species so far, including Bulletin.” has documented 151 species so far, including “It’s always exciting publishing forfor thethe firstfirst thethe firstfirst report of an invasive thatthat is newly ar- ar“It’s always exciting publishing report of an invasive is newly time,” Hart said. rived in the state. That’s 55 55 more than recorded time,” Hart said. rived in the state. That’s more than recorded Hart continues to search forfor longhorn beebutbut information from a statistical Hart continues to search longhorn bee- previously, previously, information from a statistical tlestles andand willwill soon be be assisted by by fivefive 4-H’ers of of thethe data indicates thatthat Montana soon assisted 4-H’ers analysis analysis data indicates Montana andand other interested Montanans who cancan refer stillstill have another 29 29 species thatthat haven’t other interested Montanans who refer could could have another species haven’t andand report to atonew website being developed documented. report a new website being developed been been documented. by by James Beck, a 2012 MSU graduate in in Longhorn beetles areare relatively wellJames Beck, a 2012 MSU graduate Longhorn beetles relatively wellcomputer science. TheThe 4-H’ers, all all working throughout North America, butbut gaps of of computer science. 4-H’ers, working known known throughout North America, gaps on on entomology projects in their clubs, livelive in in knowledge exist in areas thatthat have been poorly entomology projects in their clubs, knowledge exist in areas have been poorly Custer, Fergus, Lewis andand Clark, andand PetroIvieIvie said. HeHe added thatthat no no oneone elseelse Custer, Fergus, Lewis Clark, Petro- collected, collected, said. added leum counties. hashas conducted thethe comprehensive survey of of leum counties. conducted comprehensive survey “I “I started outout in in 4-H4-H entomology, so so it’sit’s Montana thatthat Hart is. is. started entomology, Montana Hart kind of come fullfull circle,” IvieIvie said. “It’s a matter of boots on on thethe ground,” IvieIvie kind of come circle,” said. “It’s a matter of boots ground,” Hart’s work hashas alsoalso spawned a similar Hart’s work spawned a similar said. said. project on on thethe metallic wood-boring beetles thatthat Montana is still a frontier project metallic wood-boring beetles Noting Noting Montana is still a frontier of Montana. Kayla Arend of Rochester, Minn. it comes to to documenting some of of its its of Montana. Kayla Arend of Rochester, Minn. when when it comes documenting some -- an MSU senior minoring in entomology -fauna, Hart said he has been interested in in -- an MSU senior minoring in entomology -- fauna, Hart said he has been interested saidsaid sheshe should be be ready later thisthis summer to to bugs since he he waswas a boy growing up up in Idaho should ready later summer bugs since a boy growing in Idaho submit herher findings forfor publication. Falls, Idaho. HeHe didn’t become serious about submit findings publication. Falls, Idaho. didn’t become serious about Longhorn beetles and metallic wood-boring them until he took an introductory course from Longhorn beetles and metallic wood-boring them until he took an introductory course from beetles areare twotwo types of wood-boring beetles entomologist Kevin O’Neill, however. beetles types of wood-boring beetles MSU MSU entomologist Kevin O’Neill, however. thatthat livelive in Montana, IvieIvie said. Wood-boring then decided to minor in entomology andand in Montana, said. Wood-boring HeHe then decided to minor in entomology beetles include both native Montanans who working forfor Ivie. HeHe eventually ob-obbeetles include both native Montanans who started started working Ivie. eventually grew up in rotten logs and outsiders who artained funding from MSU’s Undergraduate grew up in rotten logs and outsiders who ar- tained funding from MSU’s Undergraduate rived in wood pallets or firewood, andand they all all Scholars Program to conduct research under rived in wood pallets or firewood, they Scholars Program to conduct research under eateat wood. TheThe emerald ashash borer, forfor example, supervision. wood. emerald borer, example, Ivie’s Ivie’s supervision. is aismetallic wood-boring beetle thatthat eatseats ashash Hart’s project hashas taken himhim intointo thethe Mona metallic wood-boring beetle Hart’s project taken Montrees thatthat have been introduced from Asia to to tana Entomology Collection, which is housed trees have been introduced from Asia tana Entomology Collection, which is housed thethe U.S. Midwest. If an infestation occurs in in at MSU andand curated by by Ivie, andand thethe private U.S. Midwest. If an infestation occurs at MSU curated Ivie, private Montana, thethe borer could destroy thethe look andand collection of James Cope of Ennis, Hart said. Montana, borer could destroy look collection of James Cope of Ennis, Hart said. feelfeel of Montana towns where most of the shade alone gave himhim 8,631 Montana speciof Montana towns where most of the shade That That alone gave 8,631 Montana speciis provided by by native ash.ash. Bozeman’s “forest” TheThe project hashas alsoalso taken himhim on on back is provided native Bozeman’s “forest” mens. mens. project taken back is 60 to 80 percent ash.ash. roads, through forests andand intointo every county is 60 to 80 percent roads, through forests every county Wood-boring beetles killkill trees by by eating Wood-boring beetles trees eating of Montana. of Montana.

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The science of ag production: Northern Ag Research Center ■ Continued from page 3

A number of large holding pens are fitted with GrowSafe feeding systems, part of the $250,000 upgrade to the cattle-handling facilities which help researchers track nutrition intake by individual cattle. Each calf is fitted with an electronic identification ear tag that is much like a social security number that sticks with that animal throughout its life. Sensors on the GrowSafe feeders read the ID cards and track the amount of food that animal consumed, by noting the beginning and ending weight of a feed bin as that animal is eating. This can help researchers in calculations for such data tracking as maternal growth rate and efficiency, said Boss, adding that they also are working on ways to accurately measure feed intake and efficiency on range feeds. Other beef cattle research at Northern Ag includes a study by research associate Julia Dafoe on the use of oil seed feeds to synchronize heat cycles in heifers This is related to studies on use of local area byproducts as feed. “Byproducts are unbelievably valuable to the livestock industry. We strip off the most valuable component; either drive it toward human or high-end markets,” Boss said, and then the livestock industry utilizes the byproduct as high-quality feed, making both the product and the byproduct usable. “That’s the win-win,” he added. The bulk of the acreage at the old fort is

used by the agronomics division for crop production studies. While a portion of the crops become feed for the cattle in on-site collaboration of research, this land’s main purpose is to produce a variety of grain and oilseed crops for research. Doing this requires anything from using their custom six-row seeder to plant a single, 22-foot long row of a seed variety grown for display, to making a series of sideby-side plots comparing cover-crop effectiveness under a variety of production processes, to seed propagation, plant fertility and crop rotation studies. In the fourth year of a rotation crop trial, Lamb and agronomy research associate Angela Sebelius, are looking at the effect of continuous crop rotation in fields on the production of grains. Three 22-foot long plots of cover crops, containing a mix of seed types, was planted and allowed to grown on the dry land farm ground. One plot was harvested, a second plot was grazed, and the third was chemical fallowed, and this year the plots were planted with wheat. Sebelius and Lamb are recording plant development, crop yield and soil moisture content at five depths to 48 inches to develop a conclusion about the cover crop methods. Like most projects at the research center, this study is labor intensive and, therefore, inefficient. But that, in a sense, is what the research center is here for, said Boss. “If something fails, I’d rather have it fail

at the station and say, OK, this is probably not a good rotation for you guys to do, because (the producers) can’t afford to lose the money. They can’t afford to take the risks we do.”

Funding In the end, the state, federal and grant money is what saves the producers and the public money as the research center scientist focus their time and resources — time and resources the producers can’t afford — pursuing ideas and needed solutions. Though selling some of the cattle in the beef market helps offset the much-higher cost of cattle research, the ag research center is not intended to make a profit like a private farm or ranch. Because conducting research into agricultural production efficiency requires a greater degree of inefficiency with lengthy trial and error processes, ag research centers rely on state and federal funding to continue their work which benefits the ag community and, thus, the consumers. The state Legislature and governor “treated the experiment station very well,” said Jeff Jacobsen, dean and director at Bozeman’s MSU College of Agriculture, which oversees the experiment station, research centers and extension offices. “Being in agriculture, it kind of transcends party lines,” said Boss, “It transcends

a lot of things. It’s because, being the number one industry in Montana, it kind of has a little bit of sway that way. “It was,” he added, “really good to see everybody working together. I mean it doesn’t matter who it was it was all trying to find something everybody could work with in the long run.” “We got the same base budget,” said Jacobsen “which sometimes they might reduce things because of the state budget or something. So we remain whole, and we got some additional monies in some program support areas – one of which helps the research centers.” The added funding is about $800,000 over the next two years. “That will allow us to expand our research efforts with pulse crops, some of which we do research on at Havre, and an animal science research and teaching position,” Jacobsen said, adding that they are still considering options about the animal science position. “It could be (in) Bozeman or some relationship with the Havre research center as well. We just haven’ come up with the best solution on that one at this juncture.” Both Jacobsen and Boss stressed that one of the main goals at Northern Ag is to increase the number of scientists, those personnel who, generally, have their doctorates, lead studies, write for the grants and guide the research associates.

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wealth of information he has served up in a short time — without one “um” or awkward pause while searching for a word — and considers the conversations he prompted from others as interview questions and answers lagged. But Boss, who said he went to work at Northern Ag for two months 19 years ago and just forgot to leave, isn’t the only person with enthusiasm, a stellar work background and academic cred. Delyn Jensen, who runs Northern Ag’s ranch in the Bear Paw Mountains, is a longtime cowhand from Canada — with a master’s degre in range science. Livestock Operations Manager Andy Matakis has a degree from MSU and honed his logistics and efficiency skills working several years for the second-largest cattle feeding operation in the world. Tom Allen, the farm operations manager, is a former extension agent and instructor with a master’s degree. And despite the fact that Peggy Lamb doesn’t currently have her doctorate, MSU administration moved her up to lead agronomist after Carlson retired because of her strong job and academic performance over the years. The enthusiasm for this historical research center is contagious and even partisan politicians of the Montana Legislature managed to work together this year to give the research centers an increase in funding that will help offset cuts from previous years.

Background Northern Ag Research Center encompasses 6,000 acres, that once was part of his-

toric Fort Assinniboine, and an additional 1,000 acres of leased land. Of that total acreage, 4,000 is a ranch in the Bear Paw Mountains and the remaining 3,000 is at the fort’s building site located east off U.S. Highway 87, just a few miles south of Havre. Northern Ag is part of the research division of MSU, which is a land grant institution responsible for agricultural education, research and information dissemination. These three functions are carried out respect i ve l y t h ro u g h t h e M S U C o l l e ge o f Agriculture; the experiment station in Bozeman and research centers around the state; and extension offices in each county. Land grant educational institutions were originally created by the Morrill Act of 1862 which granted federally controlled land to each state for development or sale to establish a college that would focus on teaching practical agriculture, science, military science and engineering. The original law has been modified over the years, including to ensure that participation is not limited by race and to allow for creation of “land grant” colleges through granted funding rather than land. The scope of land grant universities was expanded further by the Hatch Act of 1887 which created agricultural experiment stations and the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 which allowed for cooperative extension offices.

The facility MSU in Bozeman, then under the name Agricultural College of the State of Montana, was established as the state’s land grant col-

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Montana’s seven agricultural research centers • • • • • • •

Central Agriculture Research Center, Moccasin Northwestern Agriculture Research Center, Kalispell Eastern Agriculture Research Center, Sidney Southern Agriculture Research Center, Huntley Western Agriculture Research Center, Corvallis Western Triangle Agriculture Research Center, Conrad Northern Agriculture Research Center, Havre

Cooperating sites in Montana

• Fort Keogh USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Miles City • Sidney USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Sidney lege in 1893 and in 1915, after Fort Assinniboine south of Havre was decommissioned in 1911, 6,000 acres was granted to MSU — with the rest later split between Rocky Boy’s Indian Reservation and Beaver Creek Park. Originally utilizing the main building site of Fort Assinniboine, in recent years, Northern Ag Research Center but has been able to move out of the historical buildings and into the $1.2 million modern facilities — an office and laboratory building, a cattle handling system and a calving barn — funded through previous legislation. That legislative action promised $4 in match for every $1 raised by Northern Ag, said Boss. Out of the seven research centers across the state, which all focus on crop production relevant to predominant crops grown in those areas, Northern Ag is the only one that also has the cattle research component. This is, in part, due to the center’s unique

location, said Boss. Because the main facility is down on the prairie lands and the larger pasture is located in the Bear Paws, Northern Ag’s range land most closely, of all the state’s research centers, matches the variety of range seen across Montana’s landscape, Boss said. Of the 3,000 acres at the main facility at Fort Assinniboine, some is for the office, maintenance and cattle handling facilities, which includes the calving barn, holding pens and corrals, and some small pastures. Included in the beef cattle facilities is a cattle-handling chute system that was modeled, Boss said, after designs by Temple Grandin, a world-renown animal scientist whose autism has helped her develop more humane and calming cattle handling systems to avoid stress and trauma which can increase injury and loss and decrease profits.

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www.havredailynews.com Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com Darrin Boss, superintendent of Montana State University’s Northern Agricultural Research Center at Fort Assinniboine near Havre, so easily rattles off the academic credentials and work history of the facility’s managerial staff, lead scientists and associate researchers that one readily believes he could do the same for the temporary workers recently hired for the summer. He speaks of the accomplishments and the everyday work of Northern Ag’s people, of his predecessor, Gregg Carlson, who retired in May 2012, of the facility and of all the research center’s supporters with pride and generosity. One could be forgiven if, after a half-hour speaking with him, one is ready to quit one’s job and go to work at Northern Ag to be with these people, even if it’s just to mow lawns and clear sidewalks. In boots, jeans and a shirt sporting the Northern Ag logo, Boss details the scientific research in beef cattle and crop production using terminology that the layman can understand, so it’s easy to forget that he is also the beef cattle research specialist, a grant writer and a published scientist with a doctorate — until one thinks about the Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Darrin Boss, superintendent of Montana State University's Northern Agricultural Research Center, in May discusses ongoing beef cattle and crop production research being conducted by scientists and staff at the research facility south of Havre.

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Historically, Northern Ag has had up to four scientists rather than just the two currently there, said Jacobsen, and effort has been made to fill these positions — in cropping systems and animal nutrition — including advertising the positions and making offers, but the offers were not accepted. These searches are costly, in time as well as money, but Jacobsen thinks they might have a solution. “We have been chatting with Darrin Boss and others about what are call post-doc positions,” Jacobsen said. These positions are for people who’ve just graduated with their doctorates and are looking for immediate work. The positions aren’t considered to be permanent, by the applicant or the organization. They do give both parties a type of nocommitments opportunity to work together. “They’re not permanent, but at least it gets somebody with a fresh graduate degree, and it puts them in a position where they have some mentors and can start to build a career,” Jacobsen said. “And it’s thought that if we can do that — get people to Havre, even for a year or two — we can then ultimately permanently hire them.” Both Boss and Jacobsen said they felt that once a scientist got to Northern Ag, the likelihood was high that he or she would find working at the facility and with the people in place a positive thing and want to stay on permanently.

Collaborations The overriding theme of any discussion about research centers is the degree to which cooperation and collaboration is crucial to every aspect of the research efforts, informa-

FARM & RANCH tion dissemination and the internal workings. “We collaborate with just about anybody that has something to do with agriculture,” Boss said. As one of seven Montana research centers which are divisions of the experiment station in Bozeman, there are plenty of opportunities to collaborate efforts within the state, but Boss said that often the researchers at Northern Ag are working with other scientists and trials outside of the state as well. Lamb’s research with camelina and pulse rotations with cereal grain crops is part of a study with three other research centers in Montana and Wyoming and with Kansas State University. Lamb said her portion of the study, in which Sebelius is also taking part, focuses on production practices. Jacobsen attributes this move to broad collaboration to both funding and the staff. “If you look at, frankly, any state, do they have the resources to go it alone, and if the answer is yes, I want to know more about that institution because that would be a supreme surprise to me,” said Jacobsen, who added that the drive to better utilize resources can drive the collaborations as well as the trials and doing this helps keep programs from spreading too thin, so they can build “vertically” instead. “If a place like Montana State University, whether it be in Bozeman or up at the Northern Agricultural Research Center in Havre which has a Peggy Lamb that is outstanding with oilseed crops in one area, as well as small grain agronomy, then you hook her up and create a win-win. … You’re leveraging resources, and you’re learning new things and building programs.”

But it’s not just collaborations among crop and animal scientists that are seen at Northern Ag. The research center has been a National Weather Service recorder since the research center started, Boss said, and they’ve participated in acid rain studies because of the unique air quality of the area. Boss also is excited that, though the research center is not part of Montana State University-Northern, the two organizations work together on many levels from MSUNorthern referring students to Northern Ag for employment to working together on oilseed crops for use in research in MSUNothern’s biofuels program and Northern Ag’s feed studies. The most important collaboration at Northern Ag, and with any research center or experiment station, though is with the producers, both Boss and Jacobsen said. The research centers have an advisory committee comprised of local producers and people representing organizations that have a stake in the ag industry, and the experiment station has a committee that functions on the state level. “One thing that’s pretty unique at each one of the research centers is we have an advisory council which is made up of, in Northern Ag Research Center’s case, the five counties that surround us, Hill, Blaine, Phillips, Chouteau and Liberty counties,” Boss said. “We have producers from each one of those counties — two producers and one agri-business related person, (who) could be an ag banker, could be an insurance person, could be a chemical representative. What these people do is we meet three times a year, and they give us feedback. We present our research, we talk about our research … it’s a sounding board.” Jacobsen said the experiment station’s committee has resresentatives from organizations like the Montana Stockgrowers and Montana Grain Growers associations and even some federal representatives, who all offer similar guidance with an eye toward regional, national and global concerns. While researchers pursue their own questions about agricultural production, it is often the research center’s connection with members of the agricultural community that drives research into different, and specific, areas, said Jacobsen and Boss. Ag producers, said Jacobsen, whether part of an advisory committee or not, have always been a valuable resource bringing questions or issues, but also experience and

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Havre Daily News/Lindsay Brown Northern Agricultural Research Center's research associate Angela Sebelius in May points out the metal tube inserted into the soil that she uses when testing moisture content at varying depths up to 4-feet in a rotation crop test plot. suggestions, all of which is valuable. “I brag on it that the Montana farmers and ranchers feed the world,” said Boss. “Fewer and fewer of us are doing that job, and our job is to help them do that as efficiently as possible. If I were looking to boil down our whole mission statement, that’s what we do at Northern Ag is we try to keep these guys and gals on the farm and ranch and do it so their job is more sustainable and more efficient.”


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