__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

12

Hi-Line

April 2018

www.havredailynews.com FARM & RANCH NILE seeks interns for stock show and rodeo Havre Daily News staff The Northern International Livestock Exposition — NILE — says it is looking for college students who are “willing and able to work all day and into the night, eat and sleep minimally, handle high pressure situations, work in the extreme weather conditions of October in Montana, and enjoy every minute of it.” NILE staff is looking for those college students to work as interns Oct. 11-21 for its annual Stock Show and Rodeo in Billings. The purpose of the internships is to provide an opportunity to gain training and work experience in the livestock and equine

industries as well as events based business through The NILE Stock Show and Rodeo. All applications must be in the NILE Office by Aug. 31 and interns will be announced shortly thereafter. For more information or to obtain an application form, people can go to http:// www.thenile.org or call the NILE Office at 406-256-2495 or emailing shelby@thenile. org.

Bear Paw Livestock Commission Company & Order Buying Firm

Chinook, MT

BANGS FAMILY · INVERNESS, MT Read stories from our members at MontanaFarmersUnion.com

THE POWER OF MANY MEANS

THE POWER OF YOU Montana Farmers Union has spent the last century connecting Montana farmers and ranchers in our communities through cooperation, education, and legislation. Because successful farmers and ranchers are good for everyone in Montana.

406·452·6406 / 800·234·4071 MontanaFarmersUnion.com


2

Hi-Line

April 2018

FARM & RANCH

Hi-Line

www.havredailynews.com

www.havredailynews.com

FARM & RANCH

April 2018

11

Ag producers slammed by the weather all year MSU releases green pea variety 12 years in the making Tough year on cattle, making decisions on crops Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com Local agricultural producers have had a one-two — for some a one-two-three — punch from the weather and more weather punches look to be on the way. “It’s been very hard. It was just a bad year to start with, with the drought and the shortage of hay,” Blaine County Farm Service Agency Executive Director Tracy Harshman said. “People have been fighting the weather for several months.” One problem after another What started as a year that could have been decent for agriculture rapidly turned bad last spring as the moisture refused to Havre Daily News/Ryan Welch A calf and a cow stand in the snow in March at Northern Agriculture Research Center. Drought, fires, blizzards and bitter, frigid cold have taken their toll on livestock producers in the past year.

By Jenny Lavey MSU News Service BOZEMAN — More than a decade ago when Montana’s pulse crop industry was a sliver in northeastern Montana and there wasn’t much money to fund alternative crop trials, a Montana State University agricultural faculty member was planting the future. Chengci Chen, superintendent of the MSU Eastern Agricultural Research Center in Sidney has spent the last 12 years developing pulse crops specifically adapted to Montana’s growing conditions. One successful green pea variety with high yield and protein, currently named MT457, was released from the university last month. It will be commercially available in 2020. The new pea variety has a heavy seed weight and genetic resistance to Fusarium oxysporum Race 1, a widespread fungus that damages pulse crops. Chen said the variety also has nice height and produces multiple pods along the stem and is resistant to plant collapse, also called “lodging,” which can make harvesting harder and reduce yield. “What’s unique about this variety is that it’s bred specifically to perform well in Montana,” said Kevin McPhee, who holds a doctorate in plant sciences as MSU’s pulse crop breeder and professor in the Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology. “I’m not confident this variety would perform well outside of Montana, in fact.” Chen and McPhee have been working together for more than a decade breeding and testing pea varieties for Montana — before Montana produced the most pulse crops in the nation and before there were strong commodity markets for Big Sky peas. In Montana, pulse crops are chickpea, pea and lentil. In 2017, Montana farmers planted 525,000 acres of dry pea, according to the 2017 USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. Chen, who has a doctorate in agronomy, has been working on pulse crops since he started working at the MSU Central Agricultural Research Center in Moccasin as an assistant professor of

agronomy and cropping systems in 2002, before moving to Sidney to become superintendent of EARC in 2015. The Moccasin facility is one of seven statewide agricultural research centers in the College of Agriculture and the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station. At CARC, Chen requested pea populations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service’s Grain Legume Genetics and Physiology Research Unit in Pullman, Washington, where McPhee worked as the USDA unit’s research plant geneticist at the time. Following Chen’s request, McPhee sent pea populations to Moccasin for Chen to make genetic selections for potentially adapted high-yielding plants for Montana. It was a long process starting from a single plant. According to Chen, his pulse crop research program may have evaporated if it weren’t for having a full-time CARC research associate, formerly Karnes Neill, who provided research support and field assistance. “It was a long and hard 12 years, especially the first few years when Montana’s pulse crop industry was in its infancy,” Chen said. “There weren’t any check-off dollars from growers or funding support for pulse crop breeding or variety trials. We did this without any funding support. It was challenging.” McPhee would stop at Moccasin once or twice a year on the way to visit family in Lewistown to check on the field trials and suggest new genetic selections to Chen. “Ultimately, our goal was to breed a variety that worked well for U.S. northwest production and future markets by sharing advanced lines and populations,” McPhee said. “Stopping at Moccasin to visit Dr. Chen was convenient, and I was happy to see the consistent trials at the location which made new selections maybe a bit faster than other field trial locations.”  Despite researching a relatively new crop for Montana with little funding at the time, Chen said he was obligated to introduce new crops to the state.

MSU Photo by Adrian Sanchez-Gonzalez Chase Stoner with Stoner Family Farms harvests dry green peas July 23, 2016, at the family's farm fields north of Havre. The Montana State University pulse crop breeding program has released a new green pea variety bred specifically for Montana growing conditions. The variety, currently named MT457, will be commericallly available in 2020.

“My job description is to introduce specialty crops to Montana in wheatbased cropping systems,” Chen said. “So, whether I have funding or not, I have to test specialty crops that have potential to grow in Montana. I’m happy to see this released finally.” After multiple genetic selections and field trials, Chen and Neill selected MT457. Chen said the new variety wouldn’t have been possible without his colleagues at the seven research centers and on the main campus in Bozeman, for their support in testing this variety at multiple locations statewide during the last three years. Chen said EARC Research Scientist Yesuf Mohammed, who has a PhD in soil science, coordinated the statewide testing. Chen, who researches how pea crop yield and protein are affected by genetics that interact with diverse environments,

said the new variety has a big seed size and bright color, which may be ideal for the green pea market in soups, salads or fried snack peas. “This variety flowers and matures a few days earlier than other varieties, which presents   some advantages to growers in central and southern regions of Montana to be able to avoid heat stress in the summer,” he said. “From our statewide testing results in the past three years, this variety also performs very well under irrigated conditions.” Montana Foundation Seed Program manager Doug Holen said after McPhee increases enough breeder seed, the university will increase its foundation seed quantity of MT457 and the variety will likely be available commercially in 2020. The MFSP provides foundation seed, or genetically pure seed, to statewide producers and certified seed houses.


10

Hi-Line

April 2018

Hi-Line

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Winter: Heavy layer of snow also impacting crop planting decisions ■ Continued from page A1 amount of snow and could end up setting an all-time record by the end of June, depending on the next few months. The cold also is close to setting records, with National Weather Service reporting that Havre in mid-March had recorded its fourth-coldest winter on record. In several periods, the region saw several days with highs below zero and many lows far below zero. Now, the question is, what will the next few weeks bring. The long-range forecast calls for below-normal temperatures and above-normal precipitation, quite likely including some more snow. One thing it could bring, with snowpack still on much of the ground, is flooding. Much of the region had been seeing nights with temperatures dropping below freezing at night and no remarkably warm days, keeping the snowmelt relatively slow. Creeks in many areas were near their banks but as of the end of March, aside from some roads flooding in Chouteau County, no severe flooding had come as yet. Getting hit from all sides For cattle producers, the weather this year has caused one problem after another. The drought reduced how much grass was available for grazing and how much hay was harvested, with the fires also burning hay that was put up and reducing forage for the fall and winter for ranchers impacted by the blazes. Prices of hay have shot up — Hill C o u n t y FSA E xe c u t i ve D i re c to r Le s Rispens said he has heard of people having to pay as much as $180 a ton to have it delivered — while the cold, snowy winter has increased how much hay is needed to feed the cattle. Harshman said the warmer weather in some ways has increased the problems. The melting snow means cattle are getting wet, and with cold winds blowing, that can make it very difficult to keep them healthy as well. “It’s been a struggle to keep the animals well and fed,” she said. “It’s been a real challenge this year.” She said the melting snow is also causing difficulties finding warm, dry places for cattle to give birth.

Harshman said producers also have lost a d u l t c a t t l e a n d c a l ve s t h i s w i n t e r, although the agency doesn’t have numbers right now — it is focusing on finding the causes of the deaths. “Right now we are gathering information about the storms,” she said. She added that it is crucial that producers report their cattle losses to FSA as quickly as possible — they must report the losses within 30 days to be eligible for assistance. Rispens said the loss of calves is much higher than usual this year. “We’ve heard from more than we normally hear,” he said. Many of the losses seem to be related to the East Fork Fire, but the cause is not known yet, he said. “Something happened as a result of that fire,” Rispens said. He said people are speculating that cattle are eating pine needles due to the lack of other forage, which can cause spontaneous abortions. But that usually happens early in the term of pregnancy, he added, and this year many cows are coming to within a few weeks of the end of the pregnancy and then losing the calves. Nobody seems to know for sure what the cause is, he said. And that is compounding the problems f o r t h e r a n c h e r s, R i s p e n s a d d e d . Producers are losing calves, so losing income, and having to buy expensive hay to feed cattle that won’t raise a calf this year. “It’s a pretty expensive position, hitting them from both sides,” he said. “ … It’s going to be a tough year on our livestock guys.” It is leading to people culling their herds as well, he said, which can also lead to cattle prices going down — making it more difficult to recoup their losses. The prices have not dropped severely as yet, he said. “The prices are not bad but not awesome,” Rispens said. “ … If there is a silver lining, it is that the cows have some value when they go to sell them.” The colder nights and lower high temperatures also has a benefit, he said, with the snow melting off more slowly than it could. The snowmelt is likely to cause some major problems especially in the

burned areas of the mountains, he said, with runoff causing erosion and damaging roads and bridges. “It could be a real mess. Thawing a little bit then freezing at night is about the best outcome we could hope for,” he said. “If we have high warmup there could be some serious damage.” The long-term impact of the fire is something the federal fire emergency team members warned people about, he added. “The federal fire managers told us that when the fire goes out, this isn’t the end, and, boy, were they right,” Rispens said. Impact on spring crops And the heavy snow and slow meltoff could impact plans farmers had for spring planting. Rispens said may producers have deep concerns about the planting. Quite a few producers who often plant winter wheat didn’t plant that crop last year, probably partially due to the drought and partially due to prices. The producers who did plant winter wheat are saying the crop seems to have come through the winter well, however, he said. Many producers had planned to plant pulse crops due to the low prices of wheat, but crops like peas and lentils need to be planted earlier, Rispens said. “The snow cover is causing problems with that,” he said. “ … We’re not on that trajectory at all.”

The prices of pulse crops also are taking a hit, he said, so even planting those crops likely won’t bring the revenue producers hoped for. “They’re seeing their profit margin erode even before they get into the field,” he said. Harshman said much of the same is happening in Blaine County, although she said more people probably planned on planting spring wheat. She said that a trend is to plant more pulse crops, but the drought hurt the yield and quality of those crops and she is not sure how many were planting them this year. Many people who usually plant winter wheat decided not to because of the lack of moisture, Harshman said. She also said the people who did say the crop seems to have survived the winter. “People I have talked to that planted winter wheat are cautiously optimistic they will have a crop that’s viable once the snow melts,” she said. She also said how fast the snow melts could have a major impact on many decisions. “It all depends on how fast this melts,” she said. “It hasn’t been melting off very fast — we haven’t had many warm days, which is probably a good thing — but planting time could be cut down significantly.”

www.havredailynews.com fall. The land and crops started drying up, and that led to one of the worst fire years in Montana history with a number of major fires, including the July Fire in The Little Rocky Mountains that burned 11,699 acres and the East Fork Fire in the Bear Paw Mountains in August and September that burned 21,896 acres. By the end of July the area had dropped to less than half of its normal yearly precipitation, about 3.5 inches compared to a norm of 7.5 inches. By the end of August, with the East Fork Fire blazing in the Bear Paws, the moisture deficit increased, with Havre showing some 5 inches less than the about 8.5 inches it normally receives by that time. It continued to increase, with Havre showing a nearly 5.5-inch shortfall by the beginning of October. Then the region saw some precipitation — but not the way it would have liked. A record-setting snowstorm Oct. 2-3 dropped some 2 inches of precipitation in the form of wet, heavy snow that broke trees, d ow n e d p owe r p o l e s a n d l i n e s f ro m Chester to Malta and put some people out of power for more than a week. Relatively normal fall and early winter weather then set in until about Christmas. Then the cold and snow of a harsh winter set in with a vengeance, and stayed. Parts of north-central Montana still are buried under several feet of snow in a year that has seen close to triple the normal

■ See Winter Page 10

FARM & RANCH

April 2018

3

Havre Daily News/Ryan Welch The Boyces feed cattle in sub-zero temperatures in late December on their ranch in the Bear Paw Mountains. Drought and fires have made hay in short supply this year, with prices going up while more hay is needed to feed cattle in snowy, bitterly cold weather.


44

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

April2018 2018 April

The Month in Weather Michelle BigelBach For FarM and ranch

ANNUAL BULL SALE

APRIL 11, 2018 1:00 PM at the Ranch • Fair view, Mont ana

Selling:

100 Yearling Angus Bulls 35 Angus Heifers 20 F1 Baldy Heifers BULLS BRED FOR:

ADDITIONAL SIRES:

H Soundness & Longevity H Gentle Disposition H Calving Ease H Maternal Strength

H 249 Windy 449 JV H GDAR Leuopold 4493

H Merit Rage 4031B H PRA 141 249

KG RESOLUTION 4042 AAA#

17998319 Sire: KG Solution 0018

SAV RESOURCE 1441 AAA#

17016597

Sire:

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

the 2018 Spring production auctions have Begun at the glasgow Stockyards

Rito 707 of Ideal 3407 7075

14043 County Rd. 340 • Fairview, MT 59221 Dale Vitt 406-798-3398 • 406-480-5676 C Jim Vitt 406-798-3653 e-mail djvitt@midrivers.com

www.barjvangus.com

Even though it is technically now spring with March coming to a close, it has only shown brief glimpses of its existence across northeast Montana. The month has been characterized by continually near to well-below average temperatures and well above-normal precipitation, continuing the trend thus far in 2018. Twelve of the days of March, as of press date, saw at least a trace of reported precipitation, with two of those 12 days providing well over half of the total liquid precipitation for the month. One of those days also provided the vast majority of the snowfall for the month. With the very gradual change from winter to spring weather-wise, winds were generally stronger this month than last, with nine days reporting at least 25 mph winds, and 17 days with winds greater than 20 mph. The highest sustained wind and wind gust were both reported on Mar. 22, with 40 mph sustained winds and gusts to 48 mph. As of press date, per the National Weather Service in Glasgow, the highest observed temperature for the month was 48 degrees on

Mar. 27, and the lowest was 1 degree below zero on both Mar. 7 and 8. The total liquid precipitation reported at Glasgow was 1.21”, which was a substantial 0.86” above normal. For the month, 18.6” of snowfall was also reported, which is approximately half of the seasonal normal total snowfall for the area. Over a 24-hour period, the greatest precipitation total was 0.45”, which occurred on Mar. 4. The overall mean temperature for the month was approximately 24 degrees, which was approximately 6.5 degrees below normal. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor was released on Mar. 22. With continued above normal precipitation across the region, there have been continued improvements in the drought condition across the northeast, and the state as a whole. Only approximately 15 percent of the state is now classified as at least Abnormally Dry, and under 10 percent of the state is in Moderate Drought or worse conditions. Only the far northeast, Daniels, Sheridan and Roosevelt counties, are still listed in the Severe Drought category, while in Garfield, Phillips and Petroleum counties the drought conditions have been completely removed.

OCC UNMISTAKABLE AAA#

16294218 Sire: OCC Paxton 730P

YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

NEWTON MOTORS, INC. NEW & USED TRUCKS AND CARS All In One Convenient Location

440 Highway 2 West • Glasgow • Across from the Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 • 406-228-4381 • 1-800-255-1472 Family owned by the Newton Boys! Rent A Car Come in and see Doug, Terry, or Ted!

The Glasgow Stockyards have started bull production auctions and will continue for seven weeks. You can travel for miles but you will not find any better bulls than right here at the Stockyards. Wittkopp Angus – Wittkopp Angus Ranch of Circle, Mont. held their 30th annual angus bull production auction on Feb. 8, at the Glasgow Stockyards. This year, 85 registered yearling bulls were offered as well as a select group of yearling females. The Wittkopp family has been raising quality, registered black Angus cattle for over 30 years, with ranch hand Jaramie McLean being instrumental to their breeding program the past couple of years. Curt and Sue, along with their two daughters, Michelle and Allison, take care of the daily farming and ranching operations at their ranch southeast of Circle. MARKET REPORT It was a cold, windy and snowy day across the whole Northeast corner of Montana with less than favorable road conditions, but a good crowd gathered to bid on these bulls. They sold 83 bulls for an average of $3,738. Their high-selling bull going out the door was a son of Hilltop True Grit 9202. He sold for $6750 to a long-time customer, Wade Massar of Circle. The bull had a 83 lb. birthweight; 205 Ratio 118; EPDs: BW +0.6; WW +69; YW +115; Milk +25. Lot 74 was a son of KCF Bennett Fortress, out of a Vermilion X Factor Dam sold to Na-

Hi-Line Hi-Line

Production Auctions continued FroM page 8 Resource, Rampage, Payweight 1682, Visionary and HA Cowboy Up; Red Angus, HXC Conquest, Redemption and Andras New Direction; Simmental, Catalyst, Upgrade, Prime Beef and Beef King; Red Stabilizer, cadillac, 15 Karat and Big Gene; and Black Stabilizer, trinity and prophet. This herd has produced the top rate-of-grain steer eight of the last 10 years at the Northeast Montana Fair. According to Floyd Nelson, Jr., ranching is a family business, currently located northeast of Tampico, with his father starting it all. Presently Floyd and his brother, Don run the ranch. In the early 50s, the ranch started off with only Line 1 bulls, and in 1969 decided to start breeding simmentals. Now the Nelson

Koenig Ranch – Koeing Ranch will be holding their 9th annual Koenig Red Angus Bull and Female Production Auction on Thursday, May 10. The Koenig Ranch, based out of Winnitt, Mont., was established in 1987 and prides themselves in having the same program for the past 21 years. The bulls selected for their sales are selected for length, thickness, disposition and performance. The range is developed for fertility, health, longevity, fitness and adaptability.

Glasgow Stockyards, Inc. Linda & Mark Nielsen, Owners Iva Murch, Manager 263-7529 Dean Barnes, Yard Manager 263-1175 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 783-7285

April, May & June 2018 Schedule

April 2018

Serving AreA ✯ LiveStock ProducerS For 72 YeArS! 1946 - 2018

May 2018 (cont.) Thursday

Thursday

5

Bowles J5 Red Angus Bull & Female Production Auction, Feeder Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

12

Eayrs Angus Bull Production Auction, Bred Heifer, Pair & All Class Cattle Auction

19

McRae’s Big Dry Angus Production Auction, Replacement Heifer and Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction Humbert-Fossum “North Country” Angus Production Auction & Anderson Bar Triangle Charolais Production Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

May 2018

See production auctionS page 6

Ranch crossbreeds Simmentals with red Angus and black cattle.

Thursday

3

Nelson Simmental & Simmental/ Angus Composite Bull Production Auction, and “Going to Grass” All Class Cattle Auction

10

Koenig Red Angus Bull and Female Production Auction, Cow Calf Pair Special & All Class Cattle Auction

17

All Class Cattle Auction

24

All Class Cattle Auction See production auctionS page 9

31

All Class Cattle Auction

June 2018 Thursday

7

Cow/Calf Pair Special & All Class Cattle Auction

14

All Class Cattle Auction

21

All Class Cattle Auction

28

Big Pre 4th Dry Cow Auction All Class Cattle Auction

228-9306

P.O. Box 129 • Glasgow, MT 59230 gsi@nemont.net • www.glasgowstockyards.com

Please call in consignments so buyers can be notified

April April 2018 2018

99

how Weeds develop herbicide resistance Meryl rygg McKenna / For FarM and ranch

26

gel’s, Inc. of Circle for $6500. His birthweight was 86 lbs., 205 Ratio 125, EPDS: BW +2.3; WW +76; YW +127; Milk +14. Lot 48 was sired by Barstow Bankroll B73 and sold to Kent Kleeman of Peerless for $6,250. His birthweight was 88 lbs., 205 Ratio 104, EPDS: Birth +0.7; WW +51; YW +98; Milk +17. Lot 7, a Connealy Comrade 1385 son, sold to John Fahlgren of Glasgow for $6250. Lot 7 was a Heifer Bull with a birthweight of 68 lbs., and a 205 Ratio of 107; EPDS: BW –2.5; WW +56; YW +112; Milk +28. The 83 Bulls averaged $3,738. Volume

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Herbicides have allowed producers to control weeds and increase yields for decades, yet some weeds are no longer killed by certain herbicides due to the development of herbicide resistance. Herbicide resistance is defined as the innate ability of a weed “biotype” to survive and reproduce after treatment with a dose of herbicide that would normally be lethal. A biotype is a group of plants, animals, or microbes having the same basic constitution in terms of genetic or hereditary factors. At least seven weed species in Montana have been confirmed for resistance to one or more groups of herbicides: kochia, wild oat, Persian darnel, downy brome, Russian thistle, horseweed and green foxtail. A certified Crop Advisor (CCA) in Cut Bank, Chuck Gatzemeier, described the process of plants developing herbicide resistance in this way: when any particular herbicide is applied to a weed population in a field, suppose 99 plants die and one survives. That plant survives because it has something a little different from the others — some basic genetic variation that makes it more resistant to that herbicide. Imagine one in 100 plants, or fewer, because herbicide resistance is rare. Plants' variability arises from mutations in their genetic makeup. Genetic mutations happen naturally over time, affecting the plant’s chances of survival and also altering the biotype. The plant that survived the herbicide grows and goes to seed. The seeds blow across the field, sprout the following year and survive another application of the herbicide. The second-year seeds are scattered and thus the number of resistant plants grows each year, immune to the same herbicide. The higher the potential for the weed to reproduce, the more likely it is that the rare resistance gene is passed on, added Prashant Jha, associate professor of Weed Science based at Montana State University’s Southern Agricultural Research Center in Huntley. If you apply the same chemical or mode of action to plants that have already survived it, you are creating selection pressure; you are supporting an increased chance of resistant plants. Chemical modes of action and group numbers Each herbicide has at least one mode of action — the way it kills a plant. Some affect protein synthesis, acting at certain stages of growth or target sites. A target site is the gene or enzyme where the herbicide binds and affects a plant’s growth. Other herbicides are growth regulators, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, which bring about excessive cell expansion, creating odd tissue formation, twisting and curling, and causing the plant to die. “People may associate a product’s name with its mode of action, but they are not the same thing,” Gatzemeier cautioned. “Farmers need to know an herbicide’s mode of action to avoid falling for advertisements that say, “Use this

product, it’s different,” when it actually uses the same mode of action or active ingredient; it just has a different name.” Modes of action have group numbers. When manufacturers know how a product actually kills a plant, that tells them what group to put it in. Newer containers of herbicides show the group numbers right on the label. If the label is marked with just one group number, “Group 2” for example, the product uses one mode of action. If you see more numbers separated by commas, such as “Group 4, 7,” more than one mode of action is involved. Charts of the groups are available, showing how they work. Most importantly, remember to use more than one group number, make sure that all the chosen groups are labeled as effective on the target weed, and carefully follow all instructions on the labels. Manufacturers and distributors have used group numbers for modes of action for quite a while, Gatzemeier said, but understanding them is so much more critical now that plants have developed resistance. Farmers and ranchers can learn more about modes of action and their group numbers by going to university extension meetings and workshops, reading articles and connecting with other producers. It is in the best interests of the customer and agriculture as a whole to understand the labeling system for mode of action groups. Make use of multiple sources of information regarding chemicals. Gatzemeier’s advice is to visit with other producers and try to help everyone be aware of the growing problem of resistance. Resistance in a Nutshell Three basic factors control development of resistant weeds: 1. Selection pressure. If you’re using the same product (or its mode of action) over and over, you are selecting for that resistant biotype to take over. One plant didn’t die, so its offspring can be resistant. In year two, maybe you have 20 resistant plants, and in year three maybe several hundred. 2. Weed biology. This brings us back to genetic variability in the biotype. Cross-pollination can happen between biotypes in the field, leading to changes in the biotype. The plants are doing this naturally; the process has nothing to do with the herbicide itself. 3. The genetics of resistance. Differences among the various herbicide target sites can dictate whether resistance is more or less likely to develop. Some target sites can develop resistance sooner than others — some take two or three years; some take 20 years or longer. Over time, a target site can develop resistance through continuous exposure to the same product. Where certain modes of action target particular places on plants, the plants can evolve to counter the herbicide’s effectiveness. In some cases, plants can reduce how much herbicide they absorb, reduce the distance the herbicide can move inside a plant, or break down the herbicide to reduce its effects. For more information on certified crop advisers, or to find one near you, go to www. certifiedcropadviser.org.


88

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

April2018 2018 April

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

PRSRT”STD U.S. POSTAGE

EAYRS EAYRS ANGUS ANGUS

24th 24th Annual Annual

2012 Spring Production Auctions 2012 Spring Production Auctions WIP 10th 10th Annual Annual

PAID GLASGOW, MT 59230 PERMIT NO. 5

2012 PRODUCTION EAYRS ANGUS EAYRS ANGUS WSpring ITTKOPP AUCTION ITTKOPP WIP 10th Annual WIP 10th Annual Angus Sale PRODUCTION ANgUS ANgUS BULL BULL PRODUCTION Thursday, April Thursday, April 12 12 PRODUCTION PRODUCTION PRODUCTION W ITTKOPP AUCTION AUCTION Production AUCTION W ITTKOPP AUCTION AUCTION Angus Sale PRODUCTION ANgUS BULL Thursday, Feb. 9 Thursday, Thursday,BULL Feb. 9 Angus Sale PRODUCTION Thursday, April April 5 5 PRODUCTION ANgUS AUCTION Thursday, April 12 Auctions AUCTION Production Auctions PRODUCTION AUCTION 24th Annual

AAA# 17586776

AAA# 17455841

BDAR Fat Cat Z077

Connealy Cool 39L

CED: +5 BW: +1.2 WW: +55 YW: +107 M: +22

CED: +7 BW: +1.2 WW: +70 YW: +117 M: +27

24th Annual

Woodland Woodland Farms Farms

P.O. Box 129

We Can Only Continue To Provide Service In Our Communities ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED If YOU Support Those Services!

RED ANgUS

AAA# 16752262

AAA# 17302304

Connealy Courage 25L

CED: +10 BW: -.2 WW: +63 YW: +107 M: +14

CED: +16 BW: -.6 WW: +57 YW: +94 M: +18

Free Delivery in Montana • All Bulls Genomically and Parentage Verified

Offering range-ready yearling Angus bulls. H

H H

2

ESTOCK TION

H H

Dorothy Eayrs ElizabEth ShipStEad / For Farm and ranch Dorothy Eayrs Thursday, March 29 Curt Hinsdale, MT 59241 26. A special feature at this year’s sale are 20 Curt & & Sue Sue Wittkopp Wittkopp Hinsdale, MT 59241 Jim Bowles a common sight when calving season starts in March. ella Shipstead (l) and erin Shipstead (r) work to warm 406-367-5327 Jim Bowles 406-367-5327 replacement heifers. (406) 406-648-5477 Home up and save a calf. (406) 485-3552 485-3552 12995 Paradise Valley Rd Thursday, March 29 Raising Angus since 1962 406-648-5477 Home C. K. Allen 12995 Paradise Valley Rd Lee Humbert and Jim Fossum joined (406) continued FroM pageThursday, 7 Monte Eayrs Chinook, MT 406-648-7130 Cell Feb. 10 (406) 974-3552 974-3552 forces 30406-648-7130 years to sell cattle dueHwy to their com362 537 • PO Box 186Chinook, Thursday, April 5 Monte Eayrs MT Cell Dorothy Eayrs wipangus@midrivers.com 406-357-3125 •• cell 406-539-3100 E mon interest in raising bulls. Over the years, Curt & Sue Wittkopp 406-486-5684 Raising Angus since 1962E C. K. Allen ckallen@nemont.net wipangus@midrivers.com 406-357-3125 cell 406-539-3100 Hinsdale, MT 59241 406-486-5684 ckallen@nemont.net Jim Bowles 406-367-5327 third generation of raisingFeb. Angus in 9 Fallon, Humbert and Fossum have established a really Thursday, (406) 485-3552 362relationship. Hwy 537Humbert • PO Box 186 406-648-5477 Home 5 Valley Rd Dorothy Eayrs 12995 Paradise Mont., the Eayrs’ specialize in calfing ease and good himself has raised Thursday, April (406) 974-3552 Curtthat&can Sue Wittkopp Monte Eayrs Chinook, MT gentle cattle survive eastern Montana Hinsdale, MTfor59241 registered Angus cattle almost406-648-7130 45 years and Cell Jim Bowles 406-367-5327 E wipangus@midrivers.com 406-357-3125 • cell 406-539-3100 weather extremes. 406-486-5684 he is proud of the fact that his cattle are backed (406) 485-3552 ckallen@nemont.net 406-648-5477 Home 12995 Paradise Valley Rd by 40+ years of selection. From all his years (406) 974-3552 Winnett, MT 406-429-6151 Monte Eayrs Chinook, MT Cell working406-648-7130 on his ranch 23 miles northwest fromFloyd Nelson Don Nelson the next how406-429-6151 many hoursE until someone finally elizaBeth ShipStead Winnett, MT Floyd Nelson Don Nelson wipangus@midrivers.com 406-539-3100 Scobey, he has proven his cattle work in the 406-357-3125 • cell For 406-486-5684 ckallen@nemont.net 3rd drags Annual you to the doctor and the doctor put you FarM and ranch 3rd Annual 228-2024 367-5251 367-5251 area. As a result of working in the field for so 228-2024

AUCTION

Let's Recognize Local Farmers and Ranchers

on bed rest. Koenig Red many years, he has developed many relationKoenig Red Angus How aboutAngus the Financial Finesse award? It could be simply that I’m in the thick of it, Floyd Nelson Don Nelson “PERFORMANCE ships with the people TO whoPROFIT” have purchased “PERFORMANCE TO PROFIT” Where you manage to still feed your family, but I think farmers and ranchers need to have Bull and Female Red BlackSimmental 228-2024 367-5251 keepand the bulls. BLACK Red and and BlackSimmental BLACK ANGUS ANGUS yourFemale farm afloat, diversify and contheir own awards show! Forget the GoldenBull 24th Jim Fossum and his Sale wife,of tinue to beat406-429-6151 the odds even in this dire dairy Globes and the Country Music Awards. Let’s MT 24th Annual Annual Sale ofDarlene took aTO & Simmental/ Winnett, “PERFORMANCE &PROFIT” Simmental/ couple of years off, but are now back withFloyd Nelson Don Nelson economy. have the Golden Tractor Awards! BETTER BEEF BULLS Red and BlackSimmental BLACK ANGUS Angus BETTER BULLS Humbert Angus,BEEF selling their Black Angus OrAnnual maybe the Expert Hauler Award! Where You know where the presenters and nomi- 3rd 228-2024 367-5251 24th Annual Sale ofAngus Thursday, April 26 bulls and heifers. Fossum has been in the busi& Simmental/ Thursday, April 26 you haul a record number of hopefully legal nees show up dressed in their best, complete 24th Annual McRae’s Composite 24th Annual McRae’s Koenig Angus Humbert Angus -- Lee 406-783-5341 BETTER BEEF BULLS ness since 1982 at his ranch 70 miles north and Composite weightRed semi loads of commodities to the elevaHumbert Angus Lee 406-783-5341 with clean cowboy hats or ball caps, striking Angus “PERFORMANCE TO PROFIT” border. AApril 26 wild rags, freshly Big Dry Angus Ranch – The Big Dry An- east of Glasgow along the Canadian Thursday, tor in one day. pressed button up shirts, blue Bull and Female Red and BlackSimmental BLACK ANGUS Annual McRae’s 13th Annual one man, one woman operation, the goal- has gus Ranch has been raising registered24th Angus 13th Annual BULL How about the Most Creative Fix On a HumbertBULL Angus Lee 406-783-5341 jeans, boots,Composite with maybe a bit of manure on 9th Annual 24th Annual Sale of always been to produce low birth weight cattle Charolais 9th Annual for more than 50 years. Owners Brent and Piece of Equipment Award?! You know that fix them, and the next generation by their side?! PRODUCTION Charolais & Simmental/ PRODUCTION with performance. 13th Annual BULL BAR Hillari McRae and Jack McRae will hold their ANDERSON baling twine and whatever other Maybe a cow dog or two would sneak in off that includesMay BETTER BEEF BULLS BULL PRODUCTION ANDERSON BAR TRIANgLE TRIANgLE Thursday, 10 BULL PRODUCTION AUCTION 9th Annual Thursday, May 10 Charolais Angus 30th annual production sale at the Glasgow random item is useful and available?! The one AUCTION the bale-bed pickups so as not to miss out on CHAROLAIS PRODUCTION CHAROLAIS Bar April 26 Thursday, Anderson ANDERSON BAR TRIANgLE AUCTION Stockyards on April 19. The ranch, located in that gets you through to the end of harvest. the action. BULL PRODUCTION 24th Annual McRae’s AUCTION AUCTION Composite Thursday, April - Lee Thursday, 406-783-5341 Triangle Angus Charolais CHAROLAIS Jordan, boasts a 300-acre pasture and 19 the cattle Humbert And don’t forget the Best Field Meal... There could be the Tracking Award! You Thursday, April 19 Thursday, AUCTION Fahlgren – Anderson Bar Triare run with the same traditions that have been cooked in aAngus crockpot, wired into a combine, know where a couple persistent cows are Fahlgren Angus April 26 Thursday, April 19will 13th Annual BULL April 26 Thursday, angle Charolais in place for generations. with homemade rolls and all the fixings! The ending up in the neighbor's front yard?! You Thursday, May 3 Brent Thursday, May 3 9th Annual beCharolais holding their 20th Brent •• 406-557-2777 406-557-2777 April 26 meal that brings the MT harvest crew to their follow their tracks back through the snow to Tom & Loretta PRODUCTION Glasgow, Thursday, May 3 annual charolais bull Tom & Loretta Glasgow, MT 406-228-8922 Jack knees! find a place where they’re leaving the pasture ANDERSON BAR TRIANgLE Glasgow, MT 406-228-8922 Jack •• 406-557-6266 406-557-6266 Brent • 406-557-2777 PRODUCTION Anderson Thursday, May 10 406-228-8922 Tom & Loretta production auction at AUCTION Anderson BULL I can think of so many reasons to recognize with graceful, deer-like fence clearing ease. CHAROLAIS Jack • 406-557-6266 406-654-1989 Anderson the Glasgow Stock406-230-0574 406-654-1989 Or the Tough As Nails Award! Where you our farmers and ranchers. Their ingenuity, AUCTION 406-654-1989 yards on Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, April 19 get injured on the job, but the job is not done drive, persistence and passion are admirable. April 26. Fahlgren So here’s toAngus you my friends, thank you for yet, so you keep going and continue while your April 26 all you do! leg creates a hematoma?! You keep going for Thursday, May 3 Brent • 406-557-2777 Nelson Ranch – Nelson Ranch will be “PERFORMANCE TO PROFIT” Tom & Loretta holding their 15th annual red and black SimGlasgow, MT 406-228-8922 Jack BLACK • 406-557-6266 ANGUS Anderson mental and Sim/Angus bull production auction on Thursday, May 3, starting at 1 p.m. 406-654-1989 A.I. sires represented include Black Angus, Humbert-Fossum “North Country” – North Country will be holding their 30th annual production auction on Thursday, April See production auctionS page 9

Koenig Red Angus

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION PRODUCTION AUCTION AUCTION AUCTION

PRODUCTION AUCTION

After The Initial Sale— WHAT Is Your "Discount" Supplier Offering You?

When you buy your chemical & fertilizer from us we can help you with . . . • Crop Scouting • Weed Identification Services • Soil Analysis • Crop Spraying • Application Recommendations • Fertilizer Application • And Much More

We Have . . . A Full Agronomy Staff Available

To All Of Our Patrons Across Our Trade Area

The People, The Know How And The Products To Cover All Your

Fall - Winter Schedule Needs . . . 2011

We Offer Many Services to Our Customers . . .

On Farm Tire Service • Bulk Fuel Delivery Fall - •Winter Schedule 2011

PRODUCTION • Shop Services & Minor Repairs • Tires - Batteries - Brakes • Oil & Filters • 24 Hour Gas & Fuel PRODUCTION AUCTIONS • Feed (Crystalyx) Oxygen/Acetylene Coming Up ••At The Tanks Gla Schedule 2011 AUCTIONS Fall - Winter • Lawn Care Items Full-Line Hardware Store

PRODUCTION Thursday, May 10 Fahlgren AUCTIONS Angus Fahlgren Angus

G Auction Service G Service s FarmAuction • Ranch • Equipment

“The Auction Brand of “The Auction Sound Service” Brand of Sound Service”

55

P.O. Box 129 Glasgow, MT 59230 Glasgow, MT 59230

RED RED ANgUS ANgUS BULL BULL & & FEMALE FEMALE

Woodland Farms Thursday, 29 Thursday, March March 29 RED ANgUS BULL & FEMALE gEorgiE kulczyk thE couriEr Woodland Farms a pair of bulls awaits sale day at the glasgow Stockyards. the bulls, ownedC. by Fahlgren angus, were sold along BULL & FEMALE Raising Raising Angus Angus since since 1962 1962 C. K. K. Allen Allen with several other yearlings at the production sale held March 29. Thursday, April 12 362 Hwy 537 • PO Box 186 362 Hwy 537 • PO Box 186

Connealy Capitalist 028

April April2018 2018

What do “low cost” G lasGow lasGow ag suppliers s tockyards tockyards REALLY do for you? I nc nc. P.O. Box 129 P.O. Box 129lasGow G G lasGow When You Buy From Us, Glasgow, Glasgow, MT MT 59230 59230 s We tockyards s tockyards Give You Added Value! I nc . I CORRECTION nc. Let's Work Together ADDRESS REQUESTED ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED

2012 Spring Production Auctions

For more than 50 years, Big Dry Angus Ranch has developed Angus cattle that perform on native grassland range of Eastern Montana and excel under practical management and environmental conditions.

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Hi-Line Hi-Line

YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

Coming Up At The Gla

• Fencing Equipment

Thursday, Octobe Value Added Services . . . 20, 2011 Thursday, Oct. Coming Up 5th Annual At The Gla Plus, if you pay in advance, earn 5th Annual Thursday, a 6%Bred premium Octob Dunbar Bros. Annual Bred Or 6% discount Dunbar Bros. of Whitewater, Dunbar Bros. 5th AnnualHeifer of Montana of Whitewater, Whitewater, Heifer Auctio Montana Montana AUCTiOn 75Bred Black Bred Heif (All Readable Shields) Dunbar Bros.  A.I. bred to In Focus and Heifer Image Maker of Whitewater, 107 Black Bred Heifers We Also Offer Full Commodity Marketing

Use them to your advantage and

maximize your yields!

Are You Getting This Kind Of Value Where You Buy?

for cash at time of purchase!

!

Scobey • Flaxville • Peerless • Richland • Opheim • Four Buttes

487-2741

474-2231

893-4398

724-3353

762-3231

783-5519


6 6

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

April2018 2018 April

Production Auctions continued FroM page 4 buyers were Brandon Reddig of Frazer, Walt Daley of Nashua, the Albus Bros. of Hinsdale and the Linn Family of Saco.

Infinity Angus Ranch – Infinity Angus Ranch held their third bull and female production auction at the Glasgow Stockyards March 1, with special guest consignor Pankratz An-

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Fahlgren’s cattle boast the bloodlines of Emulation 5522, EXT, New Design 036 and 878, Lead On, Boyd New Day, Final Answer, In Focus, Special Focus and Rito 6EM3. For 2016, they chose to use Musgrave Aviator, which they describe as a highly-proven sire. Some of their youngest cattle have five generations of industry-recognized sire bloodlines. According to J. Fahlgren, their focus has been to provide a moderate-sized production cow with sound udders. “We really focus on the maternal side,” he explained.

Call for more information Dorothy – 230-1201 (cell) or Monte – 406-486-5684, 406-957-5684 (cell)

Red & Black Simmental & Sim/Angus

Bull Sale May 3 • Glasgow Stockyards

Lunch at noon • Sale starts at 1 p.m. 40 Head Solid Head Solid Red 50 Black Head• 40 Black

15 Head Solid Red Composite yeARlINg BullS Thick – Meaty – Moderate Framed – Easy Calving A. I. Sires Represented

Black Angus – Resource, Rampage, Payweight 1682,Visionary, HA Cowboy Up Red Angus – HXC Conquest, Redemption, Andras New Direction Simmental – Catalyst, Upgrade, Prime Beef, Beef King Red Stabilizer – Cadillac, 18 Karat, Big Gene Black Stabilizer – Trinity, Prophet This herd has produced the top rate-of-gain steer 8 of the last 10 years at the NE Montana Fair.

“Breeding Simmentals since 1969”

Don Nelson

Nelson Ranch

(406) 367-5261 • cell 263-5261 173F Nelson Rd. • Glasgow, MT 59230

Floyd Nelson, Jr.

(406) 228-2024 • cell 263-5251 PO Box 254 • Glasgow, MT 59230

NPerformance to Profit

Quality & Integrity

in the herd for the long haul, which brings the bulls to a point of maturity that allows them to reach their true genetic potential. The Bowles stress the importance of providing cattle that have good dispositions and are easy for people to run.

Angus APRIL 5, 2012 AT 1:00 P.M.Humbert Lee (406) 783-5341

at Glasgow Stockyards, Glasgow Montana

Gibbs Red Angus – Gibbs Red Angus held their first production sale at the Glasgow Stockyards on March 29, featuring 20 yearling registered Red Angus bulls. The Gibbs are long-time cattle producers in Garfield county, established east of Jordan in the mid-90s. They started their registered herd four years ago. When asked what he would want people to know about his ranch and its operation, Pat Gibbs stated simply, “We want to raise good commercial bulls for our customers.”

77

H COU N T R T R O Y

ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE E

Fossum Angus Jim (406) 724-3327 (406) 724-7119

(406) 783-7771

70 Yearling Angus Bulls 50 Yearling Red Angus Bulls EAYRS ANGUS Peformance Tested Fertility Tested 100 Yearling Red Angus Heifers

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Selling g rlin 50 Yea ulls B Angus

April April2018 2018

continued FroM page 6

EAYRS ANGUS BULL SALE • Performance & Fertility Tested • Gentle Dispositions

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Production Auctions

gus. The sale featured 48 yearling bulls and 14 yearling heifers. Infinity strives to improve the quality of their herd as they increase the productivity of the calves produced. All of their cows are born and raised on their ranch, which is located 15 miles south of Peerless, and Hilltop Alliance 9205 is their oldest herd sire. He was the topselling bull in the 2010 Hilltop Angus sale, and “has a stellar maternal pedigree.” This season, Infinity used two new AI sires: SAV Resource 1441 and Connealy Arsenal 2174, and the new herd bull, OPP Upward 507, was the high-selling bull at the 2016 OPP Angus sale in Dickinson, N.D. Infinity Angus Ranch has been raising registered cattle since 1995, and this year produced nine pathfinder cows and one herd sire. According to Edwin Miner of Infinity Angus, they decided to switch from selling their

Lunch at noon • Sale starts at 1 p.m. • Glasgow Stockyards

Hi-Line Hi-Line

gEorgiE kulczyk - thE couriEr

Woodland Farm’s herd Sire was on display at the glasgow Stockyards prior to the production sale held March 29. bulls by private treaty to holding production sales in an effort to reach more people, and are happy with the results. “The Glasgow Stockyards treats us well,” he explained. MARKET REPORT On March 1, Infinity Angus Ranch of Peerless, Mont., held their third bull and female production auction at the Glasgow Stockyards. Also selling that day was a guest consignor, Pankratz Angus of Richland. Thirty-five bulls averaged $3,714 at this sale. The top selling bull brought $8,000 and the top 10 averaged $5,150. Also selling, were five registered heifers that averaged $1,550 and nine commercial heifers averaged $1,200. Volume bull buyers were the Floyd Ranch of Opheim, Ryan Thieven of Richland, Seven Blackfoot Ranch of Billings, Tony Gundermann of Larslan, Larry Roberton of Opheim and Monte Billing of Jordan. The East Fork Ranch of Glasgow purchased five heifers and Hanz Haynie of Circle bought nine heifers. The high selling bull was Lot 13 sired by SAV Resource 1441. Resource is in a league of his own for siring body dimension, fleshing ease, muscle thickness and breed character. He sires high quality, functional phenotype and unprecedented productivity. A FAHLGREN ANGUS genuine herd bull with EPDS: +1.58 BW; + John and Mary Fahlgren 65 WW; +28 Milk; +115 YW; 205 Wt. 787; 625 4th Avenue North Glasgow, Montana 59230 Ratio 112. There are nine pathfinders in this Ph: (406) 228-8922 Cell: (406) 230-0574 bull’s pedigree. He sold to the Seven BlackE-Mail: fahlgren.john@gmail.com foot Ranch of Billings for $8,000. Seven Blackfoot Ranch also purchased Lot 3 for $7,750 Infinitys Granite 5217 sired by Hilltop Granite 4218: BW +2.2; WW +56; Milk +21; YW +75. 205 Wt. 804; Ratio 115. Lot 31 sold to Scott Neubauer of Wolf Point for $5000. Another Resource Son out

of a high producing cow family. EPDS: BW +3.1; WW +63; Milk +24; YW +110. 205 Wt. 726; Ratio 104. Lot 9, an Opp Upward 507 son sold to Tande Ranch of Scobey for $4750. Lot 14 a SAV Resource 1441 son sold to Tony Gundermann of Larslan for $4750.

Bowles J5 Reds – Jim and Brady Bowles will be holding their 13th annual Red Angus bull and female production auction at the Glasgow Stockyards Thursday, April 5. The Bowles J5 Red Angus Ranch was established in January of 2004. It is located on the Milk River between Chinook and Harlem, which provides grass as their herd’s main food source. The Bowles feel that keeping them used to this type of diet ensures that they stay

Eayrs Angus – Eayrs Angus will be holding their 16th annual production auction at the Glasgow Stockyards on Thursday, April 12, at 1 p.m. A total of 50 Angus bulls will be available, with reference sires including grandsons of Cole Creek Black Cedar 46P, Cole Creek Cedar Ridge IV and BHA General Sinclair Emulation 0F4. The bulls available for auction are excellent calving ease bulls with gentle dispositions and have been weighed and fertility tested. The Eayrs’ have been raising registered angus since 1962 with the goal always being to raise hearty, healthy cattle that can calve out in the hills. Currently in its

First Montana Angus Sale March 29, 2012 Glasgow Stockyards 1 p.m. Selling:

See production auctionS page 8

EPDs

Length

Delivered

Growth

Glasgow Stockyards Sires Represented Connealy Capitalist 1922 Har Program 2938 Humbert Identity 4914 JCH BHa Top Seed 4042 Connealy Generation 1878

Reg. #17585540 Reg. #17386433 Reg. #17970079 Reg. #17787876 Reg. #18229218

S Unanimous 5562

FEATURING SONS & DAUGHTERS OF

17 Bulls, 5 young cows • Buf Crk Lancer-f L297

Most with calves at side Woodland Farms – The 7th Annual 5 Frozen Embryos• HRR Titan 727 (Barney 3474 X Rambo 502) 11 bulls recommended for heifers Woodland Farms Angus Sale was held at the . Connealy Capitalist 1922 Glasgow March 29. Woodland CalvingStockyards Ease EPDs on from 6 to 15, average 9.8 • 5L Mats Signal 87V (OSF Son of 5L Signature) Farms RanchEPDs is located north of Hinsdale, Birth weight from –2.4 to 2.0, average 0.3 • Red Six Mile Sakic and while owner C.K. has been in the Average WW EPDAllen 57, YW EPD 100 Hinsdale are for years, he has been in the • CBR Ram 8306 (Red Crowfoot Rambler 1024L) Average $Wnine 39.33 & Average $B 67.75 C. K. Allen That’s for just athe heifertime.” bulls ranching business “long 362 Hwy 537, P O Box 186 • Buf Crk Easy Going U032 (Buf Crk Medallion N328 x Beckton Julian GG B571) Hinsdale, MT 59241 Angus Average 406-648-5477 Home, 406-648-7130 CED Angus BW WW –YW $W $BAngus held • J5cellCopper Mine 913 (Dakota Copper 29K x GMRA Minotauro 3104) Fahlgren Fahlgren ckallen@nemont.net 5 1.8 47 85 26.69 55.27 their 7th annual production sale at For a catalog or more information call us at the Glasgow Stockyards on March 29. 406-357-3125 or Jim 406-539-3100 John and Mary or Brady 406-539-2102 • e-mail: bbowlesj5@yahoo.com Fahlgren started their purebred An12995 Paradise Valley Rd, Chinook, MT 59523 gus herd in 1994 and began their AI program in 1995. They have had success building their gEorgiE kulczyk - thE couriEr herd with sires that provide for very little this handsome bull was one of 20 red angus yearlings sold for gibbs red angus at the glasgow Stockyards on hands-on calving assistance. March 29. it was the first production sale for gibbs at the stockyards in glasgow. See production auctionS page 7

Woodland Farms

Humbert Identity 5771 S Unanimous 5562 S Courage 5727 BT Final Product 1533

Reg. #18285150 Reg. #18160130 Reg. #18163235 Reg. #17662629

“Two Breeders – With One Idea”

Breed cattle that work for us and our customers

YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA


6 6

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

April2018 2018 April

Production Auctions continued FroM page 4 buyers were Brandon Reddig of Frazer, Walt Daley of Nashua, the Albus Bros. of Hinsdale and the Linn Family of Saco.

Infinity Angus Ranch – Infinity Angus Ranch held their third bull and female production auction at the Glasgow Stockyards March 1, with special guest consignor Pankratz An-

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Fahlgren’s cattle boast the bloodlines of Emulation 5522, EXT, New Design 036 and 878, Lead On, Boyd New Day, Final Answer, In Focus, Special Focus and Rito 6EM3. For 2016, they chose to use Musgrave Aviator, which they describe as a highly-proven sire. Some of their youngest cattle have five generations of industry-recognized sire bloodlines. According to J. Fahlgren, their focus has been to provide a moderate-sized production cow with sound udders. “We really focus on the maternal side,” he explained.

Call for more information Dorothy – 230-1201 (cell) or Monte – 406-486-5684, 406-957-5684 (cell)

Red & Black Simmental & Sim/Angus

Bull Sale May 3 • Glasgow Stockyards

Lunch at noon • Sale starts at 1 p.m. 40 Head Solid Head Solid Red 50 Black Head• 40 Black

15 Head Solid Red Composite yeARlINg BullS Thick – Meaty – Moderate Framed – Easy Calving A. I. Sires Represented

Black Angus – Resource, Rampage, Payweight 1682,Visionary, HA Cowboy Up Red Angus – HXC Conquest, Redemption, Andras New Direction Simmental – Catalyst, Upgrade, Prime Beef, Beef King Red Stabilizer – Cadillac, 18 Karat, Big Gene Black Stabilizer – Trinity, Prophet This herd has produced the top rate-of-gain steer 8 of the last 10 years at the NE Montana Fair.

“Breeding Simmentals since 1969”

Don Nelson

Nelson Ranch

(406) 367-5261 • cell 263-5261 173F Nelson Rd. • Glasgow, MT 59230

Floyd Nelson, Jr.

(406) 228-2024 • cell 263-5251 PO Box 254 • Glasgow, MT 59230

NPerformance to Profit

Quality & Integrity

in the herd for the long haul, which brings the bulls to a point of maturity that allows them to reach their true genetic potential. The Bowles stress the importance of providing cattle that have good dispositions and are easy for people to run.

Angus APRIL 5, 2012 AT 1:00 P.M.Humbert Lee (406) 783-5341

at Glasgow Stockyards, Glasgow Montana

Gibbs Red Angus – Gibbs Red Angus held their first production sale at the Glasgow Stockyards on March 29, featuring 20 yearling registered Red Angus bulls. The Gibbs are long-time cattle producers in Garfield county, established east of Jordan in the mid-90s. They started their registered herd four years ago. When asked what he would want people to know about his ranch and its operation, Pat Gibbs stated simply, “We want to raise good commercial bulls for our customers.”

77

H COU N T R T R O Y

ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE E

Fossum Angus Jim (406) 724-3327 (406) 724-7119

(406) 783-7771

70 Yearling Angus Bulls 50 Yearling Red Angus Bulls EAYRS ANGUS Peformance Tested Fertility Tested 100 Yearling Red Angus Heifers

Thursday, April 12, 2018

Selling g rlin 50 Yea ulls B Angus

April April2018 2018

continued FroM page 6

EAYRS ANGUS BULL SALE • Performance & Fertility Tested • Gentle Dispositions

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Production Auctions

gus. The sale featured 48 yearling bulls and 14 yearling heifers. Infinity strives to improve the quality of their herd as they increase the productivity of the calves produced. All of their cows are born and raised on their ranch, which is located 15 miles south of Peerless, and Hilltop Alliance 9205 is their oldest herd sire. He was the topselling bull in the 2010 Hilltop Angus sale, and “has a stellar maternal pedigree.” This season, Infinity used two new AI sires: SAV Resource 1441 and Connealy Arsenal 2174, and the new herd bull, OPP Upward 507, was the high-selling bull at the 2016 OPP Angus sale in Dickinson, N.D. Infinity Angus Ranch has been raising registered cattle since 1995, and this year produced nine pathfinder cows and one herd sire. According to Edwin Miner of Infinity Angus, they decided to switch from selling their

Lunch at noon • Sale starts at 1 p.m. • Glasgow Stockyards

Hi-Line Hi-Line

gEorgiE kulczyk - thE couriEr

Woodland Farm’s herd Sire was on display at the glasgow Stockyards prior to the production sale held March 29. bulls by private treaty to holding production sales in an effort to reach more people, and are happy with the results. “The Glasgow Stockyards treats us well,” he explained. MARKET REPORT On March 1, Infinity Angus Ranch of Peerless, Mont., held their third bull and female production auction at the Glasgow Stockyards. Also selling that day was a guest consignor, Pankratz Angus of Richland. Thirty-five bulls averaged $3,714 at this sale. The top selling bull brought $8,000 and the top 10 averaged $5,150. Also selling, were five registered heifers that averaged $1,550 and nine commercial heifers averaged $1,200. Volume bull buyers were the Floyd Ranch of Opheim, Ryan Thieven of Richland, Seven Blackfoot Ranch of Billings, Tony Gundermann of Larslan, Larry Roberton of Opheim and Monte Billing of Jordan. The East Fork Ranch of Glasgow purchased five heifers and Hanz Haynie of Circle bought nine heifers. The high selling bull was Lot 13 sired by SAV Resource 1441. Resource is in a league of his own for siring body dimension, fleshing ease, muscle thickness and breed character. He sires high quality, functional phenotype and unprecedented productivity. A FAHLGREN ANGUS genuine herd bull with EPDS: +1.58 BW; + John and Mary Fahlgren 65 WW; +28 Milk; +115 YW; 205 Wt. 787; 625 4th Avenue North Glasgow, Montana 59230 Ratio 112. There are nine pathfinders in this Ph: (406) 228-8922 Cell: (406) 230-0574 bull’s pedigree. He sold to the Seven BlackE-Mail: fahlgren.john@gmail.com foot Ranch of Billings for $8,000. Seven Blackfoot Ranch also purchased Lot 3 for $7,750 Infinitys Granite 5217 sired by Hilltop Granite 4218: BW +2.2; WW +56; Milk +21; YW +75. 205 Wt. 804; Ratio 115. Lot 31 sold to Scott Neubauer of Wolf Point for $5000. Another Resource Son out

of a high producing cow family. EPDS: BW +3.1; WW +63; Milk +24; YW +110. 205 Wt. 726; Ratio 104. Lot 9, an Opp Upward 507 son sold to Tande Ranch of Scobey for $4750. Lot 14 a SAV Resource 1441 son sold to Tony Gundermann of Larslan for $4750.

Bowles J5 Reds – Jim and Brady Bowles will be holding their 13th annual Red Angus bull and female production auction at the Glasgow Stockyards Thursday, April 5. The Bowles J5 Red Angus Ranch was established in January of 2004. It is located on the Milk River between Chinook and Harlem, which provides grass as their herd’s main food source. The Bowles feel that keeping them used to this type of diet ensures that they stay

Eayrs Angus – Eayrs Angus will be holding their 16th annual production auction at the Glasgow Stockyards on Thursday, April 12, at 1 p.m. A total of 50 Angus bulls will be available, with reference sires including grandsons of Cole Creek Black Cedar 46P, Cole Creek Cedar Ridge IV and BHA General Sinclair Emulation 0F4. The bulls available for auction are excellent calving ease bulls with gentle dispositions and have been weighed and fertility tested. The Eayrs’ have been raising registered angus since 1962 with the goal always being to raise hearty, healthy cattle that can calve out in the hills. Currently in its

First Montana Angus Sale March 29, 2012 Glasgow Stockyards 1 p.m. Selling:

See production auctionS page 8

EPDs

Length

Delivered

Growth

Glasgow Stockyards Sires Represented Connealy Capitalist 1922 Har Program 2938 Humbert Identity 4914 JCH BHa Top Seed 4042 Connealy Generation 1878

Reg. #17585540 Reg. #17386433 Reg. #17970079 Reg. #17787876 Reg. #18229218

S Unanimous 5562

FEATURING SONS & DAUGHTERS OF

17 Bulls, 5 young cows • Buf Crk Lancer-f L297

Most with calves at side Woodland Farms – The 7th Annual 5 Frozen Embryos• HRR Titan 727 (Barney 3474 X Rambo 502) 11 bulls recommended for heifers Woodland Farms Angus Sale was held at the . Connealy Capitalist 1922 Glasgow March 29. Woodland CalvingStockyards Ease EPDs on from 6 to 15, average 9.8 • 5L Mats Signal 87V (OSF Son of 5L Signature) Farms RanchEPDs is located north of Hinsdale, Birth weight from –2.4 to 2.0, average 0.3 • Red Six Mile Sakic and while owner C.K. has been in the Average WW EPDAllen 57, YW EPD 100 Hinsdale are for years, he has been in the • CBR Ram 8306 (Red Crowfoot Rambler 1024L) Average $Wnine 39.33 & Average $B 67.75 C. K. Allen That’s for just athe heifertime.” bulls ranching business “long 362 Hwy 537, P O Box 186 • Buf Crk Easy Going U032 (Buf Crk Medallion N328 x Beckton Julian GG B571) Hinsdale, MT 59241 Angus Average 406-648-5477 Home, 406-648-7130 CED Angus BW WW –YW $W $BAngus held • J5cellCopper Mine 913 (Dakota Copper 29K x GMRA Minotauro 3104) Fahlgren Fahlgren ckallen@nemont.net 5 1.8 47 85 26.69 55.27 their 7th annual production sale at For a catalog or more information call us at the Glasgow Stockyards on March 29. 406-357-3125 or Jim 406-539-3100 John and Mary or Brady 406-539-2102 • e-mail: bbowlesj5@yahoo.com Fahlgren started their purebred An12995 Paradise Valley Rd, Chinook, MT 59523 gus herd in 1994 and began their AI program in 1995. They have had success building their gEorgiE kulczyk - thE couriEr herd with sires that provide for very little this handsome bull was one of 20 red angus yearlings sold for gibbs red angus at the glasgow Stockyards on hands-on calving assistance. March 29. it was the first production sale for gibbs at the stockyards in glasgow. See production auctionS page 7

Woodland Farms

Humbert Identity 5771 S Unanimous 5562 S Courage 5727 BT Final Product 1533

Reg. #18285150 Reg. #18160130 Reg. #18163235 Reg. #17662629

“Two Breeders – With One Idea”

Breed cattle that work for us and our customers

YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA


88

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

April2018 2018 April

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

PRSRT”STD U.S. POSTAGE

EAYRS EAYRS ANGUS ANGUS

24th 24th Annual Annual

2012 Spring Production Auctions 2012 Spring Production Auctions WIP 10th 10th Annual Annual

PAID GLASGOW, MT 59230 PERMIT NO. 5

2012 PRODUCTION EAYRS ANGUS EAYRS ANGUS WSpring ITTKOPP AUCTION ITTKOPP WIP 10th Annual WIP 10th Annual Angus Sale PRODUCTION ANgUS ANgUS BULL BULL PRODUCTION Thursday, April Thursday, April 12 12 PRODUCTION PRODUCTION PRODUCTION W ITTKOPP AUCTION AUCTION Production AUCTION W ITTKOPP AUCTION AUCTION Angus Sale PRODUCTION ANgUS BULL Thursday, Feb. 9 Thursday, Thursday,BULL Feb. 9 Angus Sale PRODUCTION Thursday, April April 5 5 PRODUCTION ANgUS AUCTION Thursday, April 12 Auctions AUCTION Production Auctions PRODUCTION AUCTION 24th Annual

AAA# 17586776

AAA# 17455841

BDAR Fat Cat Z077

Connealy Cool 39L

CED: +5 BW: +1.2 WW: +55 YW: +107 M: +22

CED: +7 BW: +1.2 WW: +70 YW: +117 M: +27

24th Annual

Woodland Woodland Farms Farms

P.O. Box 129

We Can Only Continue To Provide Service In Our Communities ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED If YOU Support Those Services!

RED ANgUS

AAA# 16752262

AAA# 17302304

Connealy Courage 25L

CED: +10 BW: -.2 WW: +63 YW: +107 M: +14

CED: +16 BW: -.6 WW: +57 YW: +94 M: +18

Free Delivery in Montana • All Bulls Genomically and Parentage Verified

Offering range-ready yearling Angus bulls. H

H H

2

ESTOCK TION

H H

Dorothy Eayrs ElizabEth ShipStEad / For Farm and ranch Dorothy Eayrs Thursday, March 29 Curt Hinsdale, MT 59241 26. A special feature at this year’s sale are 20 Curt & & Sue Sue Wittkopp Wittkopp Hinsdale, MT 59241 Jim Bowles a common sight when calving season starts in March. ella Shipstead (l) and erin Shipstead (r) work to warm 406-367-5327 Jim Bowles 406-367-5327 replacement heifers. (406) 406-648-5477 Home up and save a calf. (406) 485-3552 485-3552 12995 Paradise Valley Rd Thursday, March 29 Raising Angus since 1962 406-648-5477 Home C. K. Allen 12995 Paradise Valley Rd Lee Humbert and Jim Fossum joined (406) continued FroM pageThursday, 7 Monte Eayrs Chinook, MT 406-648-7130 Cell Feb. 10 (406) 974-3552 974-3552 forces 30406-648-7130 years to sell cattle dueHwy to their com362 537 • PO Box 186Chinook, Thursday, April 5 Monte Eayrs MT Cell Dorothy Eayrs wipangus@midrivers.com 406-357-3125 •• cell 406-539-3100 E mon interest in raising bulls. Over the years, Curt & Sue Wittkopp 406-486-5684 Raising Angus since 1962E C. K. Allen ckallen@nemont.net wipangus@midrivers.com 406-357-3125 cell 406-539-3100 Hinsdale, MT 59241 406-486-5684 ckallen@nemont.net Jim Bowles 406-367-5327 third generation of raisingFeb. Angus in 9 Fallon, Humbert and Fossum have established a really Thursday, (406) 485-3552 362relationship. Hwy 537Humbert • PO Box 186 406-648-5477 Home 5 Valley Rd Dorothy Eayrs 12995 Paradise Mont., the Eayrs’ specialize in calfing ease and good himself has raised Thursday, April (406) 974-3552 Curtthat&can Sue Wittkopp Monte Eayrs Chinook, MT gentle cattle survive eastern Montana Hinsdale, MTfor59241 registered Angus cattle almost406-648-7130 45 years and Cell Jim Bowles 406-367-5327 E wipangus@midrivers.com 406-357-3125 • cell 406-539-3100 weather extremes. 406-486-5684 he is proud of the fact that his cattle are backed (406) 485-3552 ckallen@nemont.net 406-648-5477 Home 12995 Paradise Valley Rd by 40+ years of selection. From all his years (406) 974-3552 Winnett, MT 406-429-6151 Monte Eayrs Chinook, MT Cell working406-648-7130 on his ranch 23 miles northwest fromFloyd Nelson Don Nelson the next how406-429-6151 many hoursE until someone finally elizaBeth ShipStead Winnett, MT Floyd Nelson Don Nelson wipangus@midrivers.com 406-539-3100 Scobey, he has proven his cattle work in the 406-357-3125 • cell For 406-486-5684 ckallen@nemont.net 3rd drags Annual you to the doctor and the doctor put you FarM and ranch 3rd Annual 228-2024 367-5251 367-5251 area. As a result of working in the field for so 228-2024

AUCTION

Let's Recognize Local Farmers and Ranchers

on bed rest. Koenig Red many years, he has developed many relationKoenig Red Angus How aboutAngus the Financial Finesse award? It could be simply that I’m in the thick of it, Floyd Nelson Don Nelson “PERFORMANCE ships with the people TO whoPROFIT” have purchased “PERFORMANCE TO PROFIT” Where you manage to still feed your family, but I think farmers and ranchers need to have Bull and Female Red BlackSimmental 228-2024 367-5251 keepand the bulls. BLACK Red and and BlackSimmental BLACK ANGUS ANGUS yourFemale farm afloat, diversify and contheir own awards show! Forget the GoldenBull 24th Jim Fossum and his Sale wife,of tinue to beat406-429-6151 the odds even in this dire dairy Globes and the Country Music Awards. Let’s MT 24th Annual Annual Sale ofDarlene took aTO & Simmental/ Winnett, “PERFORMANCE &PROFIT” Simmental/ couple of years off, but are now back withFloyd Nelson Don Nelson economy. have the Golden Tractor Awards! BETTER BEEF BULLS Red and BlackSimmental BLACK ANGUS Angus BETTER BULLS Humbert Angus,BEEF selling their Black Angus OrAnnual maybe the Expert Hauler Award! Where You know where the presenters and nomi- 3rd 228-2024 367-5251 24th Annual Sale ofAngus Thursday, April 26 bulls and heifers. Fossum has been in the busi& Simmental/ Thursday, April 26 you haul a record number of hopefully legal nees show up dressed in their best, complete 24th Annual McRae’s Composite 24th Annual McRae’s Koenig Angus Humbert Angus -- Lee 406-783-5341 BETTER BEEF BULLS ness since 1982 at his ranch 70 miles north and Composite weightRed semi loads of commodities to the elevaHumbert Angus Lee 406-783-5341 with clean cowboy hats or ball caps, striking Angus “PERFORMANCE TO PROFIT” border. AApril 26 wild rags, freshly Big Dry Angus Ranch – The Big Dry An- east of Glasgow along the Canadian Thursday, tor in one day. pressed button up shirts, blue Bull and Female Red and BlackSimmental BLACK ANGUS Annual McRae’s 13th Annual one man, one woman operation, the goal- has gus Ranch has been raising registered24th Angus 13th Annual BULL How about the Most Creative Fix On a HumbertBULL Angus Lee 406-783-5341 jeans, boots,Composite with maybe a bit of manure on 9th Annual 24th Annual Sale of always been to produce low birth weight cattle Charolais 9th Annual for more than 50 years. Owners Brent and Piece of Equipment Award?! You know that fix them, and the next generation by their side?! PRODUCTION Charolais & Simmental/ PRODUCTION with performance. 13th Annual BULL BAR Hillari McRae and Jack McRae will hold their ANDERSON baling twine and whatever other Maybe a cow dog or two would sneak in off that includesMay BETTER BEEF BULLS BULL PRODUCTION ANDERSON BAR TRIANgLE TRIANgLE Thursday, 10 BULL PRODUCTION AUCTION 9th Annual Thursday, May 10 Charolais Angus 30th annual production sale at the Glasgow random item is useful and available?! The one AUCTION the bale-bed pickups so as not to miss out on CHAROLAIS PRODUCTION CHAROLAIS Bar April 26 Thursday, Anderson ANDERSON BAR TRIANgLE AUCTION Stockyards on April 19. The ranch, located in that gets you through to the end of harvest. the action. BULL PRODUCTION 24th Annual McRae’s AUCTION AUCTION Composite Thursday, April - Lee Thursday, 406-783-5341 Triangle Angus Charolais CHAROLAIS Jordan, boasts a 300-acre pasture and 19 the cattle Humbert And don’t forget the Best Field Meal... There could be the Tracking Award! You Thursday, April 19 Thursday, AUCTION Fahlgren – Anderson Bar Triare run with the same traditions that have been cooked in aAngus crockpot, wired into a combine, know where a couple persistent cows are Fahlgren Angus April 26 Thursday, April 19will 13th Annual BULL April 26 Thursday, angle Charolais in place for generations. with homemade rolls and all the fixings! The ending up in the neighbor's front yard?! You Thursday, May 3 Brent Thursday, May 3 9th Annual beCharolais holding their 20th Brent •• 406-557-2777 406-557-2777 April 26 meal that brings the MT harvest crew to their follow their tracks back through the snow to Tom & Loretta PRODUCTION Glasgow, Thursday, May 3 annual charolais bull Tom & Loretta Glasgow, MT 406-228-8922 Jack knees! find a place where they’re leaving the pasture ANDERSON BAR TRIANgLE Glasgow, MT 406-228-8922 Jack •• 406-557-6266 406-557-6266 Brent • 406-557-2777 PRODUCTION Anderson Thursday, May 10 406-228-8922 Tom & Loretta production auction at AUCTION Anderson BULL I can think of so many reasons to recognize with graceful, deer-like fence clearing ease. CHAROLAIS Jack • 406-557-6266 406-654-1989 Anderson the Glasgow Stock406-230-0574 406-654-1989 Or the Tough As Nails Award! Where you our farmers and ranchers. Their ingenuity, AUCTION 406-654-1989 yards on Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, April 19 get injured on the job, but the job is not done drive, persistence and passion are admirable. April 26. Fahlgren So here’s toAngus you my friends, thank you for yet, so you keep going and continue while your April 26 all you do! leg creates a hematoma?! You keep going for Thursday, May 3 Brent • 406-557-2777 Nelson Ranch – Nelson Ranch will be “PERFORMANCE TO PROFIT” Tom & Loretta holding their 15th annual red and black SimGlasgow, MT 406-228-8922 Jack BLACK • 406-557-6266 ANGUS Anderson mental and Sim/Angus bull production auction on Thursday, May 3, starting at 1 p.m. 406-654-1989 A.I. sires represented include Black Angus, Humbert-Fossum “North Country” – North Country will be holding their 30th annual production auction on Thursday, April See production auctionS page 9

Koenig Red Angus

PRODUCTION PRODUCTION PRODUCTION AUCTION AUCTION AUCTION

PRODUCTION AUCTION

After The Initial Sale— WHAT Is Your "Discount" Supplier Offering You?

When you buy your chemical & fertilizer from us we can help you with . . . • Crop Scouting • Weed Identification Services • Soil Analysis • Crop Spraying • Application Recommendations • Fertilizer Application • And Much More

We Have . . . A Full Agronomy Staff Available

To All Of Our Patrons Across Our Trade Area

The People, The Know How And The Products To Cover All Your

Fall - Winter Schedule Needs . . . 2011

We Offer Many Services to Our Customers . . .

On Farm Tire Service • Bulk Fuel Delivery Fall - •Winter Schedule 2011

PRODUCTION • Shop Services & Minor Repairs • Tires - Batteries - Brakes • Oil & Filters • 24 Hour Gas & Fuel PRODUCTION AUCTIONS • Feed (Crystalyx) Oxygen/Acetylene Coming Up ••At The Tanks Gla Schedule 2011 AUCTIONS Fall - Winter • Lawn Care Items Full-Line Hardware Store

PRODUCTION Thursday, May 10 Fahlgren AUCTIONS Angus Fahlgren Angus

G Auction Service G Service s FarmAuction • Ranch • Equipment

“The Auction Brand of “The Auction Sound Service” Brand of Sound Service”

55

P.O. Box 129 Glasgow, MT 59230 Glasgow, MT 59230

RED RED ANgUS ANgUS BULL BULL & & FEMALE FEMALE

Woodland Farms Thursday, 29 Thursday, March March 29 RED ANgUS BULL & FEMALE gEorgiE kulczyk thE couriEr Woodland Farms a pair of bulls awaits sale day at the glasgow Stockyards. the bulls, ownedC. by Fahlgren angus, were sold along BULL & FEMALE Raising Raising Angus Angus since since 1962 1962 C. K. K. Allen Allen with several other yearlings at the production sale held March 29. Thursday, April 12 362 Hwy 537 • PO Box 186 362 Hwy 537 • PO Box 186

Connealy Capitalist 028

April April2018 2018

What do “low cost” G lasGow lasGow ag suppliers s tockyards tockyards REALLY do for you? I nc nc. P.O. Box 129 P.O. Box 129lasGow G G lasGow When You Buy From Us, Glasgow, Glasgow, MT MT 59230 59230 s We tockyards s tockyards Give You Added Value! I nc . I CORRECTION nc. Let's Work Together ADDRESS REQUESTED ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED

2012 Spring Production Auctions

For more than 50 years, Big Dry Angus Ranch has developed Angus cattle that perform on native grassland range of Eastern Montana and excel under practical management and environmental conditions.

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Hi-Line Hi-Line

YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

Coming Up At The Gla

• Fencing Equipment

Thursday, Octobe Value Added Services . . . 20, 2011 Thursday, Oct. Coming Up 5th Annual At The Gla Plus, if you pay in advance, earn 5th Annual Thursday, a 6%Bred premium Octob Dunbar Bros. Annual Bred Or 6% discount Dunbar Bros. of Whitewater, Dunbar Bros. 5th AnnualHeifer of Montana of Whitewater, Whitewater, Heifer Auctio Montana Montana AUCTiOn 75Bred Black Bred Heif (All Readable Shields) Dunbar Bros.  A.I. bred to In Focus and Heifer Image Maker of Whitewater, 107 Black Bred Heifers We Also Offer Full Commodity Marketing

Use them to your advantage and

maximize your yields!

Are You Getting This Kind Of Value Where You Buy?

for cash at time of purchase!

!

Scobey • Flaxville • Peerless • Richland • Opheim • Four Buttes

487-2741

474-2231

893-4398

724-3353

762-3231

783-5519


44

Hi-Line Hi-Line

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

April2018 2018 April

The Month in Weather Michelle BigelBach For FarM and ranch

ANNUAL BULL SALE

APRIL 11, 2018 1:00 PM at the Ranch • Fair view, Mont ana

Selling:

100 Yearling Angus Bulls 35 Angus Heifers 20 F1 Baldy Heifers BULLS BRED FOR:

ADDITIONAL SIRES:

H Soundness & Longevity H Gentle Disposition H Calving Ease H Maternal Strength

H 249 Windy 449 JV H GDAR Leuopold 4493

H Merit Rage 4031B H PRA 141 249

KG RESOLUTION 4042 AAA#

17998319 Sire: KG Solution 0018

SAV RESOURCE 1441 AAA#

17016597

Sire:

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

the 2018 Spring production auctions have Begun at the glasgow Stockyards

Rito 707 of Ideal 3407 7075

14043 County Rd. 340 • Fairview, MT 59221 Dale Vitt 406-798-3398 • 406-480-5676 C Jim Vitt 406-798-3653 e-mail djvitt@midrivers.com

www.barjvangus.com

Even though it is technically now spring with March coming to a close, it has only shown brief glimpses of its existence across northeast Montana. The month has been characterized by continually near to well-below average temperatures and well above-normal precipitation, continuing the trend thus far in 2018. Twelve of the days of March, as of press date, saw at least a trace of reported precipitation, with two of those 12 days providing well over half of the total liquid precipitation for the month. One of those days also provided the vast majority of the snowfall for the month. With the very gradual change from winter to spring weather-wise, winds were generally stronger this month than last, with nine days reporting at least 25 mph winds, and 17 days with winds greater than 20 mph. The highest sustained wind and wind gust were both reported on Mar. 22, with 40 mph sustained winds and gusts to 48 mph. As of press date, per the National Weather Service in Glasgow, the highest observed temperature for the month was 48 degrees on

Mar. 27, and the lowest was 1 degree below zero on both Mar. 7 and 8. The total liquid precipitation reported at Glasgow was 1.21”, which was a substantial 0.86” above normal. For the month, 18.6” of snowfall was also reported, which is approximately half of the seasonal normal total snowfall for the area. Over a 24-hour period, the greatest precipitation total was 0.45”, which occurred on Mar. 4. The overall mean temperature for the month was approximately 24 degrees, which was approximately 6.5 degrees below normal. The latest U.S. Drought Monitor was released on Mar. 22. With continued above normal precipitation across the region, there have been continued improvements in the drought condition across the northeast, and the state as a whole. Only approximately 15 percent of the state is now classified as at least Abnormally Dry, and under 10 percent of the state is in Moderate Drought or worse conditions. Only the far northeast, Daniels, Sheridan and Roosevelt counties, are still listed in the Severe Drought category, while in Garfield, Phillips and Petroleum counties the drought conditions have been completely removed.

OCC UNMISTAKABLE AAA#

16294218 Sire: OCC Paxton 730P

YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH THE AG MONTHLY FOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA

NEWTON MOTORS, INC. NEW & USED TRUCKS AND CARS All In One Convenient Location

440 Highway 2 West • Glasgow • Across from the Fairgrounds 406-228-9325 • 406-228-4381 • 1-800-255-1472 Family owned by the Newton Boys! Rent A Car Come in and see Doug, Terry, or Ted!

The Glasgow Stockyards have started bull production auctions and will continue for seven weeks. You can travel for miles but you will not find any better bulls than right here at the Stockyards. Wittkopp Angus – Wittkopp Angus Ranch of Circle, Mont. held their 30th annual angus bull production auction on Feb. 8, at the Glasgow Stockyards. This year, 85 registered yearling bulls were offered as well as a select group of yearling females. The Wittkopp family has been raising quality, registered black Angus cattle for over 30 years, with ranch hand Jaramie McLean being instrumental to their breeding program the past couple of years. Curt and Sue, along with their two daughters, Michelle and Allison, take care of the daily farming and ranching operations at their ranch southeast of Circle. MARKET REPORT It was a cold, windy and snowy day across the whole Northeast corner of Montana with less than favorable road conditions, but a good crowd gathered to bid on these bulls. They sold 83 bulls for an average of $3,738. Their high-selling bull going out the door was a son of Hilltop True Grit 9202. He sold for $6750 to a long-time customer, Wade Massar of Circle. The bull had a 83 lb. birthweight; 205 Ratio 118; EPDs: BW +0.6; WW +69; YW +115; Milk +25. Lot 74 was a son of KCF Bennett Fortress, out of a Vermilion X Factor Dam sold to Na-

Hi-Line Hi-Line

Production Auctions continued FroM page 8 Resource, Rampage, Payweight 1682, Visionary and HA Cowboy Up; Red Angus, HXC Conquest, Redemption and Andras New Direction; Simmental, Catalyst, Upgrade, Prime Beef and Beef King; Red Stabilizer, cadillac, 15 Karat and Big Gene; and Black Stabilizer, trinity and prophet. This herd has produced the top rate-of-grain steer eight of the last 10 years at the Northeast Montana Fair. According to Floyd Nelson, Jr., ranching is a family business, currently located northeast of Tampico, with his father starting it all. Presently Floyd and his brother, Don run the ranch. In the early 50s, the ranch started off with only Line 1 bulls, and in 1969 decided to start breeding simmentals. Now the Nelson

Koenig Ranch – Koeing Ranch will be holding their 9th annual Koenig Red Angus Bull and Female Production Auction on Thursday, May 10. The Koenig Ranch, based out of Winnitt, Mont., was established in 1987 and prides themselves in having the same program for the past 21 years. The bulls selected for their sales are selected for length, thickness, disposition and performance. The range is developed for fertility, health, longevity, fitness and adaptability.

Glasgow Stockyards, Inc. Linda & Mark Nielsen, Owners Iva Murch, Manager 263-7529 Dean Barnes, Yard Manager 263-1175 Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 783-7285

April, May & June 2018 Schedule

April 2018

Serving AreA ✯ LiveStock ProducerS For 72 YeArS! 1946 - 2018

May 2018 (cont.) Thursday

Thursday

5

Bowles J5 Red Angus Bull & Female Production Auction, Feeder Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

12

Eayrs Angus Bull Production Auction, Bred Heifer, Pair & All Class Cattle Auction

19

McRae’s Big Dry Angus Production Auction, Replacement Heifer and Feeder Special & All Class Cattle Auction Humbert-Fossum “North Country” Angus Production Auction & Anderson Bar Triangle Charolais Production Auction & All Class Cattle Auction

May 2018

See production auctionS page 6

Ranch crossbreeds Simmentals with red Angus and black cattle.

Thursday

3

Nelson Simmental & Simmental/ Angus Composite Bull Production Auction, and “Going to Grass” All Class Cattle Auction

10

Koenig Red Angus Bull and Female Production Auction, Cow Calf Pair Special & All Class Cattle Auction

17

All Class Cattle Auction

24

All Class Cattle Auction See production auctionS page 9

31

All Class Cattle Auction

June 2018 Thursday

7

Cow/Calf Pair Special & All Class Cattle Auction

14

All Class Cattle Auction

21

All Class Cattle Auction

28

Big Pre 4th Dry Cow Auction All Class Cattle Auction

228-9306

P.O. Box 129 • Glasgow, MT 59230 gsi@nemont.net • www.glasgowstockyards.com

Please call in consignments so buyers can be notified

April April 2018 2018

99

how Weeds develop herbicide resistance Meryl rygg McKenna / For FarM and ranch

26

gel’s, Inc. of Circle for $6500. His birthweight was 86 lbs., 205 Ratio 125, EPDS: BW +2.3; WW +76; YW +127; Milk +14. Lot 48 was sired by Barstow Bankroll B73 and sold to Kent Kleeman of Peerless for $6,250. His birthweight was 88 lbs., 205 Ratio 104, EPDS: Birth +0.7; WW +51; YW +98; Milk +17. Lot 7, a Connealy Comrade 1385 son, sold to John Fahlgren of Glasgow for $6250. Lot 7 was a Heifer Bull with a birthweight of 68 lbs., and a 205 Ratio of 107; EPDS: BW –2.5; WW +56; YW +112; Milk +28. The 83 Bulls averaged $3,738. Volume

FARM & FARM & RANCH RANCH

www.glasgowcourier.com www.glasgowcourier.com

Herbicides have allowed producers to control weeds and increase yields for decades, yet some weeds are no longer killed by certain herbicides due to the development of herbicide resistance. Herbicide resistance is defined as the innate ability of a weed “biotype” to survive and reproduce after treatment with a dose of herbicide that would normally be lethal. A biotype is a group of plants, animals, or microbes having the same basic constitution in terms of genetic or hereditary factors. At least seven weed species in Montana have been confirmed for resistance to one or more groups of herbicides: kochia, wild oat, Persian darnel, downy brome, Russian thistle, horseweed and green foxtail. A certified Crop Advisor (CCA) in Cut Bank, Chuck Gatzemeier, described the process of plants developing herbicide resistance in this way: when any particular herbicide is applied to a weed population in a field, suppose 99 plants die and one survives. That plant survives because it has something a little different from the others — some basic genetic variation that makes it more resistant to that herbicide. Imagine one in 100 plants, or fewer, because herbicide resistance is rare. Plants' variability arises from mutations in their genetic makeup. Genetic mutations happen naturally over time, affecting the plant’s chances of survival and also altering the biotype. The plant that survived the herbicide grows and goes to seed. The seeds blow across the field, sprout the following year and survive another application of the herbicide. The second-year seeds are scattered and thus the number of resistant plants grows each year, immune to the same herbicide. The higher the potential for the weed to reproduce, the more likely it is that the rare resistance gene is passed on, added Prashant Jha, associate professor of Weed Science based at Montana State University’s Southern Agricultural Research Center in Huntley. If you apply the same chemical or mode of action to plants that have already survived it, you are creating selection pressure; you are supporting an increased chance of resistant plants. Chemical modes of action and group numbers Each herbicide has at least one mode of action — the way it kills a plant. Some affect protein synthesis, acting at certain stages of growth or target sites. A target site is the gene or enzyme where the herbicide binds and affects a plant’s growth. Other herbicides are growth regulators, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, which bring about excessive cell expansion, creating odd tissue formation, twisting and curling, and causing the plant to die. “People may associate a product’s name with its mode of action, but they are not the same thing,” Gatzemeier cautioned. “Farmers need to know an herbicide’s mode of action to avoid falling for advertisements that say, “Use this

product, it’s different,” when it actually uses the same mode of action or active ingredient; it just has a different name.” Modes of action have group numbers. When manufacturers know how a product actually kills a plant, that tells them what group to put it in. Newer containers of herbicides show the group numbers right on the label. If the label is marked with just one group number, “Group 2” for example, the product uses one mode of action. If you see more numbers separated by commas, such as “Group 4, 7,” more than one mode of action is involved. Charts of the groups are available, showing how they work. Most importantly, remember to use more than one group number, make sure that all the chosen groups are labeled as effective on the target weed, and carefully follow all instructions on the labels. Manufacturers and distributors have used group numbers for modes of action for quite a while, Gatzemeier said, but understanding them is so much more critical now that plants have developed resistance. Farmers and ranchers can learn more about modes of action and their group numbers by going to university extension meetings and workshops, reading articles and connecting with other producers. It is in the best interests of the customer and agriculture as a whole to understand the labeling system for mode of action groups. Make use of multiple sources of information regarding chemicals. Gatzemeier’s advice is to visit with other producers and try to help everyone be aware of the growing problem of resistance. Resistance in a Nutshell Three basic factors control development of resistant weeds: 1. Selection pressure. If you’re using the same product (or its mode of action) over and over, you are selecting for that resistant biotype to take over. One plant didn’t die, so its offspring can be resistant. In year two, maybe you have 20 resistant plants, and in year three maybe several hundred. 2. Weed biology. This brings us back to genetic variability in the biotype. Cross-pollination can happen between biotypes in the field, leading to changes in the biotype. The plants are doing this naturally; the process has nothing to do with the herbicide itself. 3. The genetics of resistance. Differences among the various herbicide target sites can dictate whether resistance is more or less likely to develop. Some target sites can develop resistance sooner than others — some take two or three years; some take 20 years or longer. Over time, a target site can develop resistance through continuous exposure to the same product. Where certain modes of action target particular places on plants, the plants can evolve to counter the herbicide’s effectiveness. In some cases, plants can reduce how much herbicide they absorb, reduce the distance the herbicide can move inside a plant, or break down the herbicide to reduce its effects. For more information on certified crop advisers, or to find one near you, go to www. certifiedcropadviser.org.


10

Hi-Line

April 2018

Hi-Line

FARM & RANCH

www.havredailynews.com

Winter: Heavy layer of snow also impacting crop planting decisions ■ Continued from page A1 amount of snow and could end up setting an all-time record by the end of June, depending on the next few months. The cold also is close to setting records, with National Weather Service reporting that Havre in mid-March had recorded its fourth-coldest winter on record. In several periods, the region saw several days with highs below zero and many lows far below zero. Now, the question is, what will the next few weeks bring. The long-range forecast calls for below-normal temperatures and above-normal precipitation, quite likely including some more snow. One thing it could bring, with snowpack still on much of the ground, is flooding. Much of the region had been seeing nights with temperatures dropping below freezing at night and no remarkably warm days, keeping the snowmelt relatively slow. Creeks in many areas were near their banks but as of the end of March, aside from some roads flooding in Chouteau County, no severe flooding had come as yet. Getting hit from all sides For cattle producers, the weather this year has caused one problem after another. The drought reduced how much grass was available for grazing and how much hay was harvested, with the fires also burning hay that was put up and reducing forage for the fall and winter for ranchers impacted by the blazes. Prices of hay have shot up — Hill C o u n t y FSA E xe c u t i ve D i re c to r Le s Rispens said he has heard of people having to pay as much as $180 a ton to have it delivered — while the cold, snowy winter has increased how much hay is needed to feed the cattle. Harshman said the warmer weather in some ways has increased the problems. The melting snow means cattle are getting wet, and with cold winds blowing, that can make it very difficult to keep them healthy as well. “It’s been a struggle to keep the animals well and fed,” she said. “It’s been a real challenge this year.” She said the melting snow is also causing difficulties finding warm, dry places for cattle to give birth.

Harshman said producers also have lost a d u l t c a t t l e a n d c a l ve s t h i s w i n t e r, although the agency doesn’t have numbers right now — it is focusing on finding the causes of the deaths. “Right now we are gathering information about the storms,” she said. She added that it is crucial that producers report their cattle losses to FSA as quickly as possible — they must report the losses within 30 days to be eligible for assistance. Rispens said the loss of calves is much higher than usual this year. “We’ve heard from more than we normally hear,” he said. Many of the losses seem to be related to the East Fork Fire, but the cause is not known yet, he said. “Something happened as a result of that fire,” Rispens said. He said people are speculating that cattle are eating pine needles due to the lack of other forage, which can cause spontaneous abortions. But that usually happens early in the term of pregnancy, he added, and this year many cows are coming to within a few weeks of the end of the pregnancy and then losing the calves. Nobody seems to know for sure what the cause is, he said. And that is compounding the problems f o r t h e r a n c h e r s, R i s p e n s a d d e d . Producers are losing calves, so losing income, and having to buy expensive hay to feed cattle that won’t raise a calf this year. “It’s a pretty expensive position, hitting them from both sides,” he said. “ … It’s going to be a tough year on our livestock guys.” It is leading to people culling their herds as well, he said, which can also lead to cattle prices going down — making it more difficult to recoup their losses. The prices have not dropped severely as yet, he said. “The prices are not bad but not awesome,” Rispens said. “ … If there is a silver lining, it is that the cows have some value when they go to sell them.” The colder nights and lower high temperatures also has a benefit, he said, with the snow melting off more slowly than it could. The snowmelt is likely to cause some major problems especially in the

burned areas of the mountains, he said, with runoff causing erosion and damaging roads and bridges. “It could be a real mess. Thawing a little bit then freezing at night is about the best outcome we could hope for,” he said. “If we have high warmup there could be some serious damage.” The long-term impact of the fire is something the federal fire emergency team members warned people about, he added. “The federal fire managers told us that when the fire goes out, this isn’t the end, and, boy, were they right,” Rispens said. Impact on spring crops And the heavy snow and slow meltoff could impact plans farmers had for spring planting. Rispens said may producers have deep concerns about the planting. Quite a few producers who often plant winter wheat didn’t plant that crop last year, probably partially due to the drought and partially due to prices. The producers who did plant winter wheat are saying the crop seems to have come through the winter well, however, he said. Many producers had planned to plant pulse crops due to the low prices of wheat, but crops like peas and lentils need to be planted earlier, Rispens said. “The snow cover is causing problems with that,” he said. “ … We’re not on that trajectory at all.”

The prices of pulse crops also are taking a hit, he said, so even planting those crops likely won’t bring the revenue producers hoped for. “They’re seeing their profit margin erode even before they get into the field,” he said. Harshman said much of the same is happening in Blaine County, although she said more people probably planned on planting spring wheat. She said that a trend is to plant more pulse crops, but the drought hurt the yield and quality of those crops and she is not sure how many were planting them this year. Many people who usually plant winter wheat decided not to because of the lack of moisture, Harshman said. She also said the people who did say the crop seems to have survived the winter. “People I have talked to that planted winter wheat are cautiously optimistic they will have a crop that’s viable once the snow melts,” she said. She also said how fast the snow melts could have a major impact on many decisions. “It all depends on how fast this melts,” she said. “It hasn’t been melting off very fast — we haven’t had many warm days, which is probably a good thing — but planting time could be cut down significantly.”

www.havredailynews.com fall. The land and crops started drying up, and that led to one of the worst fire years in Montana history with a number of major fires, including the July Fire in The Little Rocky Mountains that burned 11,699 acres and the East Fork Fire in the Bear Paw Mountains in August and September that burned 21,896 acres. By the end of July the area had dropped to less than half of its normal yearly precipitation, about 3.5 inches compared to a norm of 7.5 inches. By the end of August, with the East Fork Fire blazing in the Bear Paws, the moisture deficit increased, with Havre showing some 5 inches less than the about 8.5 inches it normally receives by that time. It continued to increase, with Havre showing a nearly 5.5-inch shortfall by the beginning of October. Then the region saw some precipitation — but not the way it would have liked. A record-setting snowstorm Oct. 2-3 dropped some 2 inches of precipitation in the form of wet, heavy snow that broke trees, d ow n e d p owe r p o l e s a n d l i n e s f ro m Chester to Malta and put some people out of power for more than a week. Relatively normal fall and early winter weather then set in until about Christmas. Then the cold and snow of a harsh winter set in with a vengeance, and stayed. Parts of north-central Montana still are buried under several feet of snow in a year that has seen close to triple the normal

■ See Winter Page 10

FARM & RANCH

April 2018

3

Havre Daily News/Ryan Welch The Boyces feed cattle in sub-zero temperatures in late December on their ranch in the Bear Paw Mountains. Drought and fires have made hay in short supply this year, with prices going up while more hay is needed to feed cattle in snowy, bitterly cold weather.


2

Hi-Line

April 2018

FARM & RANCH

Hi-Line

www.havredailynews.com

www.havredailynews.com

FARM & RANCH

April 2018

11

Ag producers slammed by the weather all year MSU releases green pea variety 12 years in the making Tough year on cattle, making decisions on crops Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com Local agricultural producers have had a one-two — for some a one-two-three — punch from the weather and more weather punches look to be on the way. “It’s been very hard. It was just a bad year to start with, with the drought and the shortage of hay,” Blaine County Farm Service Agency Executive Director Tracy Harshman said. “People have been fighting the weather for several months.” One problem after another What started as a year that could have been decent for agriculture rapidly turned bad last spring as the moisture refused to Havre Daily News/Ryan Welch A calf and a cow stand in the snow in March at Northern Agriculture Research Center. Drought, fires, blizzards and bitter, frigid cold have taken their toll on livestock producers in the past year.

By Jenny Lavey MSU News Service BOZEMAN — More than a decade ago when Montana’s pulse crop industry was a sliver in northeastern Montana and there wasn’t much money to fund alternative crop trials, a Montana State University agricultural faculty member was planting the future. Chengci Chen, superintendent of the MSU Eastern Agricultural Research Center in Sidney has spent the last 12 years developing pulse crops specifically adapted to Montana’s growing conditions. One successful green pea variety with high yield and protein, currently named MT457, was released from the university last month. It will be commercially available in 2020. The new pea variety has a heavy seed weight and genetic resistance to Fusarium oxysporum Race 1, a widespread fungus that damages pulse crops. Chen said the variety also has nice height and produces multiple pods along the stem and is resistant to plant collapse, also called “lodging,” which can make harvesting harder and reduce yield. “What’s unique about this variety is that it’s bred specifically to perform well in Montana,” said Kevin McPhee, who holds a doctorate in plant sciences as MSU’s pulse crop breeder and professor in the Department of Plant Sciences and Plant Pathology. “I’m not confident this variety would perform well outside of Montana, in fact.” Chen and McPhee have been working together for more than a decade breeding and testing pea varieties for Montana — before Montana produced the most pulse crops in the nation and before there were strong commodity markets for Big Sky peas. In Montana, pulse crops are chickpea, pea and lentil. In 2017, Montana farmers planted 525,000 acres of dry pea, according to the 2017 USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service. Chen, who has a doctorate in agronomy, has been working on pulse crops since he started working at the MSU Central Agricultural Research Center in Moccasin as an assistant professor of

agronomy and cropping systems in 2002, before moving to Sidney to become superintendent of EARC in 2015. The Moccasin facility is one of seven statewide agricultural research centers in the College of Agriculture and the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station. At CARC, Chen requested pea populations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service’s Grain Legume Genetics and Physiology Research Unit in Pullman, Washington, where McPhee worked as the USDA unit’s research plant geneticist at the time. Following Chen’s request, McPhee sent pea populations to Moccasin for Chen to make genetic selections for potentially adapted high-yielding plants for Montana. It was a long process starting from a single plant. According to Chen, his pulse crop research program may have evaporated if it weren’t for having a full-time CARC research associate, formerly Karnes Neill, who provided research support and field assistance. “It was a long and hard 12 years, especially the first few years when Montana’s pulse crop industry was in its infancy,” Chen said. “There weren’t any check-off dollars from growers or funding support for pulse crop breeding or variety trials. We did this without any funding support. It was challenging.” McPhee would stop at Moccasin once or twice a year on the way to visit family in Lewistown to check on the field trials and suggest new genetic selections to Chen. “Ultimately, our goal was to breed a variety that worked well for U.S. northwest production and future markets by sharing advanced lines and populations,” McPhee said. “Stopping at Moccasin to visit Dr. Chen was convenient, and I was happy to see the consistent trials at the location which made new selections maybe a bit faster than other field trial locations.”  Despite researching a relatively new crop for Montana with little funding at the time, Chen said he was obligated to introduce new crops to the state.

MSU Photo by Adrian Sanchez-Gonzalez Chase Stoner with Stoner Family Farms harvests dry green peas July 23, 2016, at the family's farm fields north of Havre. The Montana State University pulse crop breeding program has released a new green pea variety bred specifically for Montana growing conditions. The variety, currently named MT457, will be commericallly available in 2020.

“My job description is to introduce specialty crops to Montana in wheatbased cropping systems,” Chen said. “So, whether I have funding or not, I have to test specialty crops that have potential to grow in Montana. I’m happy to see this released finally.” After multiple genetic selections and field trials, Chen and Neill selected MT457. Chen said the new variety wouldn’t have been possible without his colleagues at the seven research centers and on the main campus in Bozeman, for their support in testing this variety at multiple locations statewide during the last three years. Chen said EARC Research Scientist Yesuf Mohammed, who has a PhD in soil science, coordinated the statewide testing. Chen, who researches how pea crop yield and protein are affected by genetics that interact with diverse environments,

said the new variety has a big seed size and bright color, which may be ideal for the green pea market in soups, salads or fried snack peas. “This variety flowers and matures a few days earlier than other varieties, which presents   some advantages to growers in central and southern regions of Montana to be able to avoid heat stress in the summer,” he said. “From our statewide testing results in the past three years, this variety also performs very well under irrigated conditions.” Montana Foundation Seed Program manager Doug Holen said after McPhee increases enough breeder seed, the university will increase its foundation seed quantity of MT457 and the variety will likely be available commercially in 2020. The MFSP provides foundation seed, or genetically pure seed, to statewide producers and certified seed houses.


12

Hi-Line

April 2018

www.havredailynews.com FARM & RANCH NILE seeks interns for stock show and rodeo Havre Daily News staff The Northern International Livestock Exposition — NILE — says it is looking for college students who are “willing and able to work all day and into the night, eat and sleep minimally, handle high pressure situations, work in the extreme weather conditions of October in Montana, and enjoy every minute of it.” NILE staff is looking for those college students to work as interns Oct. 11-21 for its annual Stock Show and Rodeo in Billings. The purpose of the internships is to provide an opportunity to gain training and work experience in the livestock and equine

industries as well as events based business through The NILE Stock Show and Rodeo. All applications must be in the NILE Office by Aug. 31 and interns will be announced shortly thereafter. For more information or to obtain an application form, people can go to http:// www.thenile.org or call the NILE Office at 406-256-2495 or emailing shelby@thenile. org.

Bear Paw Livestock Commission Company & Order Buying Firm

Chinook, MT

BANGS FAMILY · INVERNESS, MT Read stories from our members at MontanaFarmersUnion.com

THE POWER OF MANY MEANS

THE POWER OF YOU Montana Farmers Union has spent the last century connecting Montana farmers and ranchers in our communities through cooperation, education, and legislation. Because successful farmers and ranchers are good for everyone in Montana.

406·452·6406 / 800·234·4071 MontanaFarmersUnion.com

Profile for Havre Daily News

Hi-Line Farm & Ranch April 2018  

Hi-Line Farm & Ranch April 2018  

Profile for havrenews
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded