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FARM & RANCH

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The families that farm together

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FARM & RANCH Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com Nearly 100 years past the last days of homesteading in the state and into an era when corporate agriculture-based buying power is as strong as it ever has been in the U.S., small family-run farms are still alive and well in north-central Montana. No one model defines how these family farms operate successfully. Just as each family is unique so is the business structure of the farms that sustain them.

Three generations working together

Courtesy photo Father-and-son farmers Lowell Miller, left, and Dale Miller survey the harvest progress in August 2012. Dale Miller runs the family farm with his son Justin Miller, but he still can count on his dad Lowell Miller to come out of retirement to help where needed during harvest.

Dale and Paula Miller and their family farm about 14,000 acres north of Gildford and run 125 head of registered Simmental cows on more than 9,000 acres of owned and leased pasture. Four of Dale’s great-grandparents homesteaded in Hill County around Gildford and north of Havre. The main Miller homestead is now the Gildford Colony, Dale said, and the cropland of another of the homesteads is farmed by a family member, while Dale uses the pasture land. Dale grew up helping his grandfather, his father, Lowell, and Lowell’s brother, Don, farm and, after returning from college, formally went to work for the two brothers who were then running the farm as a partnership. Because Don’s son would soon be

www.havredailynews.com returning from college to work the farm, the brothers decided to divide the farm up in 1979. This allowed each man to start developing their own farms with their respective families. Lowell, Dale and Dale’s sons Justin and Jared, who teaches full-time, then started expanding their farm to its current size — now under three corporations. Lowell has retired from day-to-day operation of the farm but, Dale said, he helps out during the busy times. Although Don and his family pool together manpower and equipment with Dale and his family to make shorter work of harvest, it’s Dale, Justin and Jared who each own a varying amounts of shares of the three corporations that comprise the farm. Justin, his wife, Becki, and their two young children live in a house they recently built on the family property, and Justin works alongside Dale, whose other son, Jared, works as a teacher in Arlee during the school months and comes back in the summers to help with haying and harvest. When the farm was divided in 1979, Dale was the only one interested in the cattle operation of registered Simmental, and to this day he and Paula are the sole owners of that portion of the family agriculture operation, though Justin helps out, Dale said. “This life is all I’ve ever known with grandpa and then dad and his brother, and it’s always been a family thing,” Dale said. Despite the fact that it was a family operation, he knew early on he had to bring something to the table to take make a place for himself as more than hired hand.

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“I want (my kids) to be interested, and my son does have an interest, but he’s going to school as an engineer, and he’s getting great grades, and he’s going to do so much better as an engineer than what a farm-head could make," he said, adding "I’ll encourage him, but on the other hand, he might have something else going that’s so much better for him. I wouldn’t blame him if he said no, dad." Mariha, the truck driver at harvest, hasn't declared a major yet, but she's doing well at school and all her plans thus far have been to work in the medical or athletic training fields, rather than farming, he said. “But if she wants to be out here, that would be fine with me, too,” he added. “I think when the time comes, I’m really not going to let let the door hit me in the butt. I’ll say ‘hey, take the reins.’” With his son and daughter possibly forging lives that don't include working the family farm, and nieces and nephews who have only shown fleeting interest in farming, Gary has refrained from expanding the farm from a one-man operation. “I can’t compete with those big guys,” he said about farms run as multi-family, multigeneration businesses. While Gary said he looks forward to the off-season when he has time to pursue is love of woodworking, he loves the farm work. As he looks ahead to the future his plan is to continue farming for and with the family, but if none of the younger generation wants to take over the farm he said he won't let the land go from family ownership. “I guess, really, I think I’ll try to leave

FARM & RANCH what I have with my kids and if they farm it great or, if they want to, lease it to the neighbor," Gary said. “That’s how I would see it. Maybe that way it would stay in the family.”

Becoming a firstgeneration farmer “It’s hard to get into (farming) if you’re not born into it. It’s tough ... it’s expensive,” Dale Miller said, adding that “there’s some pretty good programs for beginning farmers.” Miller said he feels that changes to the conservation reserve program, which lowered payment amounts, and that the rise in crop prices, which make agriculture production more lucrative, could benefit people who want to get started in farming but don't have a family connection. “Many of the farmers who got into the CRP program were ones who wanted to retire and did it this way because they didn’t have anyone to pass it along to," he said. "There’s opportunity to get into land purchase." Some programs and resources to help with the first-time farm-buyer are: • http://www.fsa.usda.gov/ • http://www.nal.usda.gov/ric/ricpubs/ small_farm_funding.htm • http://www.farmaid.org/ • http://www.start2farm.gov/ • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/Home.html • https://attra.ncat.org/calendar/ funding.php • http://www.sare.org/Grants.

File photo Grain is loaded into a truck during harvest at the Miller farm north of Gildford in 2010.

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The families that farm together Continued from page 3

The one-man family farm Gary Gullickson works his family’s 2,400-acre farm west of Big Sandy and lives in his grandmother’s house he remodeled — that still contains a portion of his great-grandfather’s original homesteader shack. G a r y d i d n ’ t g row u p o n t h e fa r m because for nearly 30 years, from about 1952 to 1979, it was leased to two other families. When one of the leases came open around 1979, Gary’s parents, Cliff and Doris Gullickson, decided to start farming the land themselves, he said. They began farming the other tract of cropland in 1981. In 1984, Gary’s grandmother passed away, leaving half of the farm to her daughter Doris. The other half of the farm his grandmother had already divided equally among the children — Gary, his two sisters and his brother — Gary said, though he is the only one of the four who farms their land. In a rather unique division of farm shares, by family agreement each of the siblings gets their individual crop yield taken to the elevator separately rather than farming the entire farm and each taking a portion of the proceeds. Gary gets a portion of the profits from each for doing

the farming. “It’s very complicated, I gotta tell you,” he said, with a laugh. While this means Gary needs to do some fancy farming to ensure that crop yields aren’t mixed, the system has worked for the family for decades. Gary started out in farming by helping another area farmer when he was 15, then helped his parents when needed each year after they took over the family farm but, he said, it wasn’t until 1987 that he moved out there to farm with his father full-time. Unexpectedly, at the beginning of harvest in 1999, Gary’s dad, Cliff, was killed in a vehicle rollover. Nearly 100 neighbors brought 25 combines and 25 grain trucks to the farm and completed the harvest in four hours that year. Gary has had sole management of the family farm since that time. Traditionally, each year Gary's siblings come out to the farm to help at harvest and his own twins, Matt and Mariha, who are in college now, have helped since they were old enough, filling in where they could until each found a specialty. Son Matt is a good hand with mechanics, Gary said. “It surprised me to see really how good he was — really without a helluva a lot of teaching. He’s been the best help," he said, "I’ve truly been blessed by both of them.

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“When I decided to farm with (my dad and uncle) I went out and got some land to rent, so that kind of threw into the mix, and then I went and also purchased a tractor under my name and kind of added that to the mix, too,” he said. Even with his contribution of land and equipment, for the partnership with is father — and now with his son — to work, eventually there needed to be release of control by the older generation to the younger. He sees this as one of the problems in family farm operations that end up not working well. “They want to include the family and have them part of it, but yet they don’t want to give up control, and I guess I’ve been more than willing to give up control,” he said. Another key to the Miller family’s success is their division of labor. Dale said duties need to be divided according to interests and abilities of the individuals. “Justin does all the marketing, he does all the chemical buying and that kind of stuff. I still do most of the bookwork,” he said, adding that “you just make it work.” Dale has two young grandchildren, by Justin and Becki, and he’s looking to their future with an open mind on whether or not they’ll choose the family farm as a career. “You can always hope,” he said, “but you never know. You kind of got to let kids find their own interest and their own deal. You know with Justin we kind of knew from the

FARM & RANCH day he started kindergarten. He always announced ‘Well, I’ll be a farmer some day,’ and there was never any doubt all the way through college. He went and did a five-year program in four years and was back home farming.”

A symbiotic duo Bruce Boyum and his son Matthew B oy u m fa r m n o r t h a n d s o u t h e a s t o f Havre on a total of about 10,000 acres. B r u c e h a s wo r ke d ove r t h e ye a rs to expand the farm, and Matthew, who grew up helping with the family's agriculture operations, has been contributing to the expansion effort since he came home from college about three years ago. Bruce had always worked on his family’s farm, but was just “a hired hand,” he said, until 1998 when he got to start making more decisions. Bruce said his grandfather had moved to the area from Minnesota to farm here, adding that his dad took over the farm in 1974, and then Bruce took it over in 1998 when he was 40, after gaining increased responsibility over the years. His transition to being the boss of the family operation made him feel good, he said, but he wasn’t free of all misgivings. “It was a little scary. I had to start writing bigger checks,” Bruce said. Bruce and Matthew, who has been a vested part of the business since rejoining his father after graduation, divide up decision-making duties by taking respon-

sibility for certain tracts of land which each has incorporated for himself, but they come together sharing the equipment and other duties in the farming operation as a whole. It’s a good way for them to work together, Bruce said, and it’s good for Matthew, too. “He probably leans on me quite a bit on some things, but if he wants to try something new, he’s free to do it,” Bruce said. “And he’s not my hired man. He’s a partner in a sense, but he’s not my hired hand.” This is a little different from the arrangement Bruce had with his own father because it allows Matthew to become a decisionmaking part of the family farm earlier. “It’s kind of the same, but I think I’m turning more over to Matt sooner,” Bruce said. “And he’s picked up some of his own ground.” Matthew, who had considered other careers while in college, said he appreciates being given responsibilities. Bruce said he thinks they’ve come up a good working solution for their family farm. “We’re enjoying it. It’s worked well. He’s gifted in many ways that complement me. He’s way better at mechanical things, mechanics and he’s a pretty good organizer,” Bruce said. “I guess I could do it without him," he added, “but he’s worth way more than one guy, and he has a vested interest, too.” Matthew agreed about their symbiotic relationship. “I get more say, I like that, kind of more freedom to do stuff, but more responsibility,”

www.havredailynews.com he said, adding that splitting problems and work load is helpful, as is the fact that his dad is a good marketer. One other thing that Bruce thinks helps makes the family farm work is the other businesses in the community helping the farmers. “There’s a lot of people that make it work. There’s businesses in town that work with you and you with them, they need you and you need them, like banking and all that.” It helps to have family members who have already forged those working relationships. “For me, when I bought my dad’s corporation, the operating part, well then I already had credit all over town at different businesses in town,” Bruce said, “and they know you and now they know Matt, so it’s helping him get started, too. You’re not coming into an area just plum new. That’s a little hard.” For years, Bruce focused more on cattle than farming with 150 pairs of registered Angus, but switched entirely to farming two years ago, he said, because they were getting spread too thin. He and Matthew had to purchase more equipment, and they planted hay ground to crops and leased out the pasture. “I’m just thankful that I had the opportunity to grow up (farming) and then to pass it on to my son,” he said. “I never did go to college, it’s kind of what I knew I was going to do.”

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OCTOBER SALE PRICES OCTOBER SALE PRICES FARM & RANCH FARM & RANCH FOR RANCHERS FOR RANCHERS FARM & RANCH

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this.this. Then w FOR FOR HI-LINE FARMFARM & RANCH The HI-LINE & RANCH Roe TheThe Montana Grains Foundation (MGF) an- an-paign,â€? paign,â€? Montana Grains Foundation (MGF) fr nounced Sept.Sept. 9 the9beginning of a of new initiative resource nounced the beginning a new initiativeresources and and eve to promote scientiďŹ c research in the control of ofers, ers, to promote scientiďŹ c research in the control wheat-stem sawy, Montana’s costliest grain Whe wheat-stem sawy, Montana’s costliest grain Wheat-st destroying production pest.pest. destroyii production BY SAMAR FAY FAY wrote in her opinion thatthat the the plaintiffs producers, feeders, processors andand retailBY SAMAR wrote in her opinion plaintiffs producers, feeders, processors retailprodu TheThe non-proďŹ t organization willwill seekseek to bring grain pr non-proďŹ t organization to bringgrain HI-LINE FARM & RANCH hadhad not not shown thatthat theythey were likely to to ers,Ranchers, which would be passed on to Ranchers, HI-LINE FARM & RANCH shown were likely ers, which would be passed onconsumto consum- all of the wheat and barley industry together in an grain compa grain co all of the wheat and barley industry together in an North American meat industry groups theirtheir case, nor nor hadhad theythey shown theythey ers. 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His organization Check our salesale prices oncontends SMARTLIC the g effort to reduce the detrimental impact this this small Check out our prices oncontends SMARTLIC hauling effort to reduce the detrimental impact smallhauling are are ranged on both sides of the USDA’s suffer irreparable injury if the casecase the the newnew rulerule doesdoes not not bring the the U.S.U.S. intointo ranged on both sides of the USDA’s would would suffer irreparable injury if the bring the grain ste insect has has had had on the state’s largest industry. the grain insect on the state’s largest industry. supplement tubs and ULTRA MIN 12-12 supplement tubs and ULTRA MIN 12-12 newnew country of origin label rule,rule, published compliance withwith the the WTO obligations, but but country of origin label publishedproceeded. proceeded. compliance WTO obligations, peting for nu “We“We planplan to put the project together in aninefpeting fo to put the project together an efin May andand set to effect in Novemtheythey were disappointed in the only risks increased discrimination against cattle mineral through October. Se-against in May setgo to into go into effect in Novem- Stating Stating were disappointed in the loose only risks increased discrimination loose cattle mineral through October. Se- ďŹ cient Sch manner,â€? saidsaid MGF board member WillWill DaleDale ďŹ cient manner,â€? MGF board member ber.ber. ruling, the the plaintiffs appealed the the judge’s imported products and retaliatory ruling, plaintiffs appealed judge’s lected imported products and retaliatory trade SMARTLIC protein tubs aretrade $40 serves lected SMARTLIC protein tubs are $40 Roehm, “beginning withwith a thorough assessment ser Roehm, “beginning a thorough assessmentarea,area, Brazilian Sisal or Plastic To bring the the United States intointo comdecision theBridon next day. sanctions. Brazilian Sisal or Bridon Plastic To bring United States comdecision the next day. sanctions. were genero of research progress to date, the affected geowere gen of research progress to date, the affected geoper ton off in ton lots and ULTRA MIN per ton off in ton lots and ULTRA MIN pliance withwith its obligations under World TheThe lawsuit to prevent the the implementaopposing group of producers, the the pliance its obligations under World lawsuit to prevent implementa- TheThe opposing group of producers, graphical areas beyond Montana’s borders, and andFoundation, Foundat graphical areas beyond Montana’s borders, is $1off per bagcase, or per ton.ton. which scientists and universities are pursuing us touscontinu Trade Organization agreements, the the USDA of COOL waswas brought by the National intervenors the case, are$40 the$40 United 12-12 is in $1off per bag or per Trade Organization agreements, USDAtiontion of COOL brought by the National12-12 intervenors in the are the United to con which scientists and universities are pursuing saidsaid labels on meats must statestate the the ani-ani- Cattlemen’s BeefBeef Association, the AmeriCattlemen’s Association, the Nalabels on meats must Cattlemen’s Association, the Ameri- States States Cattlemen’s Association, the NaNowNow is also timetime to get youryour cowcow cake is also to get cake mal’s country of birth, the the country where it itcan can Meat Institute, Canadian Cattlemen’s Farmers Union, the American Sheep mal’s country of birth, country where Meat Institute, Canadian Cattlemen’s tional tional Farmers Union, the American putput in toinAssociation beat the the winter and withwithSheep to Association beat winter and waswas raised andand where it was slaughtered. the the Canadian PorkPork Council, andrush therush Consumer raised where it was slaughtered. Association, Association, Canadian Council, Industry Industry and the Consumer time just around the the corner, getget Several meat industry groups filedfiled a a the the North American Meat Association, the theweaning Federation of America. weaning time around corner, Several meat industry groups North American Meat Association, Federation of just America. lawsuit on July 8 to8prevent thisthis rulerule from Association of Meat Processors, “We strongly believe that the American lawsuit on July to prevent from American American Association of Meat Processors,your “We strongly believe that the HEADSTART pellets ordered toAmerican your HEADSTART pellets ordered to going intointo effect. They alsoalso asked for the National Pork Producers Council, the consumer has a right to know where theirtheir going effect. They asked for an the National Pork Producers Council, the consumer has a right to know where to an keep your herd in top condition! to keep your herd in top condition! have them here in time. This is the best have them here in time. This is the best injunction against the the rulerule while the the law-law- Southwest Meat Association andand Mexico’s is from andand U.S.U.S. livestock producers injunction against while Southwest Meat Association Mexico’smeat meat is from livestock producers start youright can givedifferentiate youryour calves during suitsuit is proceeding. National Confederation of Livestock Orgahave the start right to differentiate their product jump you can give calves during is proceeding. National Confederation of Livestock Orga-jump have the to their product Other industry groups became interin the marketplace as to its origin,â€? wrote Other industry groups became inter- nizations. nizations. in the marketplace as to its origin,â€? wrote this high stress time. this high stress time. venors on the government’s sideside in the In an piece written afterafter the the USCA president Jon Jon Wooster. venors on the government’s in the Inop-ed an op-ed piece written USCA president Wooster. lawsuit on Aug. 19, 19, permitting them to to COOL announcement in May, Scott “It’s“It’s nicenice to see thatFarmers theFarmers judge sawsaw thatthat lawsuit on Aug. permitting them COOL announcement in May, Scott to see that the judge SALE PRICES FORFOR RANCHERS participate in the litigation. They agree George, the the NCBA president, saidsaid the the thisthis waswas an attempt forElevator the plaintiffs toCo. OCTOBER SALE PRICES RANCHERS participate inOCTOBER the litigation. They agree George, NCBA president, an attempt forElevator the plaintiffs to Co. withwith the the newnew rule.rule. federal government should not not mandate a a simply limitlimit theirtheir competition,â€? said Gilles federal government should mandate simply competition,â€? said 1st Ave. North 1st Ave. North Gilles On On Sept. 11, 11, the the U.S.U.S. District Court for for marketing program, andand thatthat the the majority a Grass Range producer and59230 Sept. District Court marketing program, majority Stockton, Stockton, a Grass Range producer and Glasgow, MT 59230 Glasgow, MT the the District of Columbia denied the the request were not not eveneven aware labelof the Northern Plains Resource District of Columbia denied requestof consumers of consumers were aware label- member member of the Northern Plains Resource Elevator • in 228-4422 / Fertilizer •the 228-2571 Elevator •ain 228-4422 / Fertilizer •injunction 228-2571 for the injunction. ing ing information waswas currently in place. statement afterPlant thePlant injunction for the injunction. information currently in place. Council Council a statement after U.S.U.S. District Judge Ketanji Jackson He said there would be added costs to was denied. District Judge Ketanji Jackson He said there would be added costs to was denied.

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Marvin Brookman was was inducted to represent Daniels, Phillips, Roosevelt, Sheridan and and Valley Counties in the hall.hall. Marvin Brookman inducted to represent Daniels, Phillips, Roosevelt, Sheridan Valley Counties in cowboy the cowboy

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In 1935, he married Doris Mann andand theythey horse herdherd of his at times numbering FOR FOR HI-LINE FARMFARM & RANCH In 1935, he married Doris Mann horse of own, his own, at times numbering HI-LINE & RANCH 500500 head. HereHere Brookman learned to to hadhad twotwo daughters, Reita andand Cleita. ecades of excellence in produc�������������������� �������������������� head. Brookman learned daughters, Reita Cleita. ecades of excellence in produc- overover �������������������� �������������������� ���� ������������ ���� ������������ ���� ������������ ���� ������������ waswas fascinated withwith bucking ing ing bucking horses dominate wrangle andand manage, skills thatthat would laterlater Brookman Brookman fascinated bucking bucking horses dominate wrangle manage, skills would ��������������� ��������������� ��������������� ��������������� be put to good use.use. He was justjust a teenager andand at the of 23 putting to- tothe name Marvin Brookman, be put to good He was a teenager horses horses at age the age ofbegan 23 began putting the name Marvin Brookman, ��������������� �������� ���������������� ���� �� ��������������� �������� ���������������� ���� �� his own string of horses chosen fromfrom whowho waswas a good-hearted andand humble man. he was hired on with the CBC (Chapgether his own string of horses chosen a good-hearted humble man. when when he was hired on with the CBC (Chap- gether ���� ����� ���� ����� herd. He selected 150150 headhead thatthat Brookman waswas inducted intointo the Montana Corporation) working in the Brookman inducted the Montana pel Brothers pel Brothers Corporation) working in the his father’s his father’s herd. He selected �������������������� of the andand Winnett country the backbone of his to Buckâ€? Cowboy HallHall of Fame as aas 2013 Legacy In- In- breaks Cowboy of Fame a 2013 Legacy breaks of Jordan the Jordan Winnett country became became the backbone of “Born his “Born to Buckâ€? breeding program. In 1936, he joined the the ductee fromfrom District 1, for Phillips, the Bear PawPaw Mountains of north breeding program. In 1936, he joined ductee District 1, Daniels, for Daniels, Phillips, andand the Bear Mountains of north Montana. He and a crew of cowboys Turtle Association, forerunner to to Roosevelt, Sheridan andand Valley counties. Cowboy Turtle Association, forerunner Roosevelt, Sheridan Valley counties. central central Montana. He and a crew of cowboysCowboy Brookman waswas bornborn on Sept. 10, 10, 1913, responsible for thousands of unclaimed Rodeo Cowboys Associaresponsible for thousands of unclaimedthe Professional the Professional Rodeo Cowboys AssociaBrookman on Sept. 1913, werewere on aon ranch close to the River nearnear horses abandoned by early homesteaders. obtaining his stock contracting cardcard the the a ranch close to Redwater the Redwater River horses abandoned by early homesteaders. tion,tion, obtaining his stock contracting year.year. Poplar, to Clyde andand Wavie Brookman. CBC cowboys werewere charged withwith the duties Poplar, to Clyde Wavie Brookman. CBC cowboys charged the duties same same on on Payback Mineral Supplements Payback Mineral Supplements mares andand colts, branding, andand Brookman’s philosophy waswas to select the the As aAs young manman he dreamed of living the the of sorting a young he dreamed of living of sorting mares colts, branding, Brookman’s philosophy to select descent andand the Thoroughbred cowboy lifestyle. cutting young stallions. Many daysdays werewere Percheron cutting young stallions. Many Percheron descent the Thoroughbred cowboy lifestyle. $ $ 4040 offoff perper tonton away fromfrom home starting in the thatthat he believed gavegave the horse As Brookman waswas growing up, up, his father As Brookman growing his fatherspent spent away home starting in spring the springbloodlines bloodlines he believed the horse in September andand October broke horses for the He ran a large ending in the more sizesize andand greater stamina. He had a a in September October more greater stamina. He had broke horses for cavalry. the cavalry. He ran a large andand ending in fall. the fall. strong sense of matching the mares andand strong sense of matching the mares Beat thethe rising cost of of Beat rising cost studs to get natural bucking horse. studs to aget a natural bucking horse. In the 1930s, Brookman worked as as your winter feed needs. In late the late 1930s, Brookman worked your winter feed needs. a pickup man in local rodeos. As time went a pickup man in local rodeos. As time went Order now and take Order now and take on, on, committees werewere in need of stock con-concommittees in need of stock early delivery. early delivery. tractors andand he took note.note. Making a dream tractors he took Making a dream come true,true, he started his own company in in come he started his own company Smart-lic Supplement Tubs Smart-lic Supplement Tubs the day when stock waswas trailed or shipped the day when stock trailed or shipped to keep youryour herdherd in top condition! by train to area rodeos. to keep in top condition! by train to area rodeos. In 1941 he began contracting for the In 1941 he began contracting for the Wolf Point WildWild Horse Stampede. He travWolf Point Horse Stampede. He traveledeled around to different towns producing around to different towns producing theirtheir rodeos andand continued to betoactive withwith rodeos continued be active the business untiluntil the time of his 440440 Highway 2 West • Glasgow • Across from thethe Fairgrounds the business the time of passing. his passing. Highway 2 West • Glasgow • Across from Fairgrounds For For his hometown WildWild Horse Stampede, his hometown Horse Stampede, 1st Ave. North 406-228-9325 • 406-228-4381 • 1-800-255-1472 1st Ave. North 406-228-9325 • 406-228-4381 • 1-800-255-1472 Marvin and a crew of eight to 10 cowMarvin and a crew of eight to 10 cowGlasgow, MT 59230 Glasgow, MT 59230 Family owned by the Newton Boys! Family owned by the Newton Boys! boysboys would trailtrail the bucking stock to the would the bucking stock to the RentRent A CarA Car SeeSee Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny or Ted! Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny or Ted! Elevator • 228-4422 / Fertilizer PlantPlant • 228-2571 Elevator • 228-4422 / Fertilizer • 228-2571 CONTINUED ON PAGE 9 9 CONTINUED ON PAGE ��� ������������ ��� ������������ ������������������� �������������������

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Bucking BuckingHorse HorseLegend Legend

a great stock contractor in the of of CONTINUED FROM PAGEPAGE 4 4 a great stock contractor in sport the sport CONTINUED FROM “Stampede Grounds� eacheach year.year. For For the the rodeo. TheThe respect reached all levels of of “Stampede Grounds� rodeo. respect reached all levels 75th75th Wolf Point WildWild Horse Stampede, a a professional rodeo andand beyond fromfrom the the Wolf Point Horse Stampede, professional rodeo beyond celebration committee organized a wagon to his TheThe Assiniboine celebration committee organized a wagon contestants contestants to peers. his peers. Assiniboine traintrain andand outriders thatthat trailed the BrookIndian Tribe made himhim an honorary outriders trailed the Brook- Sioux Sioux Indian Tribe made an honorary manman bucking horses fromfrom the Brookman in 1987 andand accorded himhim the the bucking horses the Brookman member member in 1987 accorded ranch to Wolf Point. He was named the the name “Rider of the ranch to Wolf Point. He was named name “Rider of Horse.� the Horse.� Grand Marshall for the celebration. Brookman received numerous stock Grand Marshall for big the big celebration. Brookman received numerous stock In 1992, the “Stampede Grounds� awards in the Rodeo CowIn 1992, the “Stampede Grounds� awards in Professional the Professional Rodeo Cowin Wolf Point waswas renamed the Marvin Association, the Dodge National in Wolf Point renamed the Marvin boysboys Association, the Dodge National Brookman Stadium. Circuit Finals Rodeo andand the Montana Brookman Stadium. Circuit Finals Rodeo the Montana Brookman Rodeo has has hadhad bucking Pro Pro Rodeo Circuit Finals. He produced Brookman Rodeo bucking Rodeo Circuit Finals. He produced stock selected for almost every National all over the country, but but his heart stock selected for almost every National rodeos rodeos all over the country, his heart Finals Rodeo since it began in 1959. waswas in producing rodeos in the statestate Finals Rodeo since it began in 1959. in producing rodeos in great the great Brookman waswas inducted intointo the Pro of Montana. He produced rodeos at Red Brookman inducted the Pro of Montana. He produced rodeos at Red Rodeo HallHall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Wolf Point, Glendive, Miles City,City, Rodeo of Fame in Colorado Springs, Lodge, Lodge, Wolf Point, Glendive, Miles Colo., in July 2005. He was trulytruly dediLivingston, Chinook, Belt,Belt, Colo., in July 2005. He was dedi- Glasgow, Glasgow, Livingston, Chinook, cated to the of Pro Rodeo. Stanford andand Culbertson. cated to world the world of Pro Rodeo. Stanford Culbertson. Many legendary broncs, suchsuch as as Brookman Rodeo continues as his Many legendary broncs, Brookman Rodeo continues as his Powder Face, Black Diamond, Oil Oil CityCity granddaughter, Cathy, andand her her husband, Powder Face, Black Diamond, granddaughter, Cathy, husband, Red,Red, Brookman’s Velvet andand the great Dave Wieferich, carry on the tradiBrookman’s Velvet the great Dave Wieferich, carry on family the family tradisiresire Alimony are examples of some of the of producing great bucking horses Alimony are examples of some of the tiontion of producing great bucking horses superstars thatthat Brookman developed on on andand rodeos. superstars Brookman developed rodeos. his ranch at Buzzard’s Glory. Powder FaceFace Brookman often said,said, “I would rather his ranch at Buzzard’s Glory. Powder Brookman often “I would rather waswas sentsent to ato special performance rodeo a horse, thatthat I raised, buckbuck more thanthan a special performance rodeo see see a horse, I raised, more thatthat waswas attended by President Ronald in the Raising bucking attended by President Ronald anything anything in world!� the world!� Raising bucking Reagan, while Alimony siredsired the 1980 waswas trulytruly his passion andand he cared Reagan, while Alimony the 1980 horses horses his passion he cared PRCA Saddle Bronc of the Brooklikelike family fromfrom the time PRCA Saddle Bronc of Year, the Year, Brook- for his for livestock his livestock family the time man’s Velvet. theythey werewere born. man’s Velvet. born. Brookman hadhad his own special breedMarvin Brookman passed away in in Brookman his own special breedMarvin Brookman passed away ing ing program andand waswas remembered as as January of 2006. program remembered January of 2006.

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tt BullBull Sale Catalogs Sale Catalogs tt Auction Posters Auction Posters tt Letterhead & Envelopes Letterhead & Envelopes tt Livestock Record Sheets Livestock Record Sheets Grasshopper Boom: Grasshopper Boom:M tt Business Cards Business Cards to g BY KEVIN WANNER exposed BY KEVIN WANNER tt Spreadsheets YouYou CanCan exposed Spreadsheets alsoalso reduces MSUMSU EXTENSION SPECIALIST redu EXTENSION SPECIALIST cu Grasshopper populations increased dramatithe whea Grasshopper populations increased dramati-the wheat Actually Write On Actually Write On disease callycally in Montana fromfrom 20072007 to 2010, fromfrom one one viralviral dis in Montana to 2010, tacres Even Labels For Your Vigilant million with more thanthan 15 grasshoppers t Even Labels For Your Vigils million acres with more 15 grasshoppers per square yardyard in 2007, to 17tomillion acres grasshop per square in 2007, 17 million acres grasshopper Pickle Jars! Really! Jars! Really! localized de withwith more thanPickle 15 grasshoppers per square localized more than 15 grasshoppers per square

an yardyard in 2010. However, cropcrop and and rangeland migrator in 2010. However, rangeland migratory sp damage has has beenbeen somewhat moderated by the prevalen damage somewhat moderated by the prevalent Brawl CL Plus, * High Yielding 2 Gene thre Brawl CL Plus, * High Yielding 2 Gene coolcool and and wet wet spring weather of 2010 and and 2011. Damage spring weather of 2010 2011. Damage Wheat*, A Solution to Weed Problems Wheat*, A Solution to Weed Problems per sp TheThe warm dry dry in late summer and and earlyearly fall fall are 3-7 are 3-7 warm in late summer Limited Supply Available for for thisthis FallFall weather has favored grasshopper development Limited Supply Available per sq 11-20 pe weather has favored grasshopper development 11-20 Typically gr and based on the August 2011 adult grasshopTypicall and based on the August 2011 adult grasshop*WINTER RYE* *WINTER RYE* per rangeland survey conducted by the surround per rangeland survey conducted by U.S. the U.S. surrounding Tall,Tall, High Yielding Forage High Yielding Forage attract Department of Agriculture Animal and and Plant attrg Department of Agriculture Animal Plant maymay Treatment st Inspection Service (USDA APHIS, Treatme Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS, WEWE DODO CUSTOM CRP BLENDS CUSTOM CRP BLENDS Health crop edges f Helena), grasshopper populations remain high crop edg Helena), grasshopper populations remain high NATIVE & INTRODUCED GRASS SEED NATIVE & INTRODUCED GRASS SEED Border tr across the state. Continuing warm weather will Bord across the state. Continuing warm weather will Western • Slender • Green Needle • Needle & Thread Western • Slender • Green Needle • Needle & Thread or see egg-laying behavior by female grasshopStreambank • Bluebunch • Thickspike • Sideoats Grama sprays o favor egg-laying behavior by female grasshop- sprays Streambank • Bluebunch • Thickspike • Sideoats Grama favor Switchgrass • Junegrass • Sandberg • Big •Blue • Wildryes Switchgrass • Junegrass • Sandberg Big Blue • Wildryes perspers and the rangeland hazard willwill remain highhigh mendation mendatif SE"WF4t(MBTHPX .5 and the rangeland hazard remain SE"WF4t(MBTHPX .5 Blue Blue Flax •Flax Woods' RoseRose • Yarrow • Small Burnet • Winter Fat Fat in 2012. Winter wheat will be at risk of attack • Woods' • Yarrow • Small Burnet • Winter Typic wheat. T in 2012. Winter wheat will be at risk of attack wheat. AlfalfaAlfalfa • Sweet CloverClover • Bozoisky • Russian & Dahurian Wildrye • Sweet • Bozoisky • Russian & Dahurian Wildrye beyond the ct this fall season. beyond this fall season. We put a We put a Smooth & Meadow Bromegrass • Pubescent Smooth & Meadow Bromegrass • Pubescent If grassho Planting winter wheat later in the season If gra Planting winter wheat later in the season Intermediate • Tall •• Tall Crested & Newhy Wheatgrass Intermediate • Crested & Newhy Wheatgrass little magic inbyin they are difďŹ little magic strategy to mitigate damage caused they are is one strategy to mitigate damage caused by What youyou needneed • When youyou want it it is one What • When want everything we do!do!scouting everything we is r grasshoppers. Adult grasshoppers willwill remain scouting grasshoppers. Adult grasshoppers remain 179179 Beaverton Road • Saco, MTMT active Beaverton Road • Saco, during the fall season as long as daytime the prote active during the fall season as long as daytime the protected borders up t remain warm. Later 888-757-2892 • 406-527-3334 borders temperatures remain warm. planting 888-757-2892 • 406-527-3334 temperatures We’re More Than A Later Newspaper! We’re More Than Aplanting Newspaper! peated appli dates reduce the window of time that the crop is peated a dates reduce the window of time that the crop is *CLEARFIELD WINTER *CLEARFIELD WINTER WHEAT SEED* WHEAT SEED*

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MONA DOEBLER / FOR HI-LINE FARMFARM & RANCH MONA DOEBLER / FOR HI-LINE & RANCH

Sage SageGrouse GrouseDraft DraftPlan, Plan,Public Public Comment CommentPeriod PeriodInInThe TheWorks Works

FORFOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH servation go together well. There have HI-LINE FARM & RANCH servation go together well. There have When Gov. Steve Bullock appointed studies thatthat show managed grazing When Gov. Steve Bullock appointed been been studies show managed grazing people to the Greater Sage-Grouse Habiprime sage-grouse habitat.� people to the Greater Sage-Grouse Habi- conserves conserves prime sage-grouse habitat.� tat tat Conservation Advisory Council, MonBLM’s Draft Resource ManageConservation Advisory Council, Mon- TheThe BLM’s Draft Resource Managetanatana Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) Plan for for the the Hi-Line, issued in in Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) ment ment Plan Hi-Line, issued wanted to be TheThe purpose of of March, is aisregulatory mechanism thatthat wanted to involved. be involved. purpose March, a regulatory mechanism the the council waswas to gather information, be used to ensure conservation of the council to gather information, cancan be used to ensure conservation of the furnish advice andand provide to the govamong other special status furnish advice provide to the gov- sage-grouse, sage-grouse, among other special status ernor recommendations on policies andand species. ernor recommendations on policies species. actions for for a statewide strategy to avoid Areas in south Phillips andand Valley actions a statewide strategy to avoid Areas in south Phillips Valley listing the the greater sage-grouse under the the counties encompassing about 930,000 listing greater sage-grouse under counties encompassing about 930,000 Endangered Species Act.Act. acres andand twotwo areas in north Phillips andand Endangered Species acres areas in north Phillips TheThe process is expected to reach a new of about 299,000 acres are are identiprocess is expected to reach a newValley Valley of about 299,000 acres identistage thisthis month with the the beginning of aof a fiedfied as important sage andand grassland stage month with beginning as important sage grassland public comment period. habitat for for the the sage-grouse. public comment period. habitat sage-grouse. TheThe advisory council – which includes explained thatthat Wyoming’s advisory council – which includes Cremer Cremer explained Wyoming’s representatives from farming andand ranchSage Grouse Habitat representatives from farming ranch- comprehensive comprehensive Sage Grouse Habitat ing,ing, conservation andand sportsmen, energy, Plan waswas being carefully conservation sportsmen, energy, Management Management Plan being carefully mining andand power transmission, tribal andand discussed by the advisory mining power transmission, tribal reviewed reviewed discussed by the advisory government, local government andand the the council. government, local government council. legislature – plans to have a draft man“They’re notnot going to use it verbatim, legislature – plans to have a draft man“They’re going to use it verbatim, agement planplan released in early October, planplan to take some pieces of itoftoit use agement released in early October, butbut to take some pieces to use when public comment willwill be solicited. Cremer said. “Wyoming when public comment be solicited. as aastemplate,� a template,� Cremer said. “Wyoming TheThe final recommendations are are duedue in in hashas developed some good practices of of final recommendations developed some good practices early January. which Farm Bureau supports.� early January. which Farm Bureau supports.� MFBF Central Regional Manager Council members noted twotwo concerns MFBF Central Regional Manager Council members noted concerns Chelcie Cremer attended the the meetings the the lossloss of sage-grouse habitat; Chelcie Cremer attended meetings regarding regarding of sage-grouse habitat; thisthis summer in Helena, andand explained the the conversion of rangeland to farmland summer in Helena, explained conversion of rangeland to farmland thatthat certain areas of the state have espethe the removal of sage brush from the the certain areas of the state have espe- andand removal of sage brush from cially large areas for for sage-grouse habitat. Conversion of rangeland to cropcially large areas sage-grouse habitat. range. range. Conversion of rangeland to crop“The areas they’re mostly concentratis not occurring at the raterate it once “The areas they’re mostly concentrat- landland is not occurring at the it once inging on for habitat conservation is the BigBig did,did, andand the the council seemed to recognize on for habitat conservation is the council seemed to recognize Hole in southwestern Montana, as well as asthat. They want to explore more op-opHole in southwestern Montana, as well that. They want to explore more some landland in central andand eastern Monfor for private landland owners to to some in central eastern Mon- portunities portunities private owners tana,� noted Cremer. “At“At the the meeting enroll in incentive programs promoting tana,� noted Cremer. meeting enroll in incentive programs promoting in Helena, the the council talked about howhow the the conservation of sage grouse habitat, in Helena, council talked about conservation of sage grouse habitat, grazing management strategies andand connoted. grazing management strategies con- Cremer Cremer noted.

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CatCh Of Of the Day atat NelsON ReseRvOiR CatCh the Day NelsON ReseRvOiR BY JIM ORR JIM ORR HI-LINE FARM &BY RANCH HI-LINE FARM & RANCH Hinsdale nature photographer Mona Doebler shares Hinsdale nature photographer Doebler these images of loons at Nelson Reservoir withMona Hi-Line Farmshares these images of loons at Nelson Reservoir with Hi-Line Farm & Ranch. Here's the story, in Mona's words, from behind her & Ranch. Here's the story, in Mona's words, from behind her camera lens: camera lens: "There have been literally dozens and dozens of loons on have been literally dozens dozens of loons on Nelson Reservoir"There this spring. I've been over thereand a number Nelson Reservoir this spring. I've been over there of times. I have to shoot from shore, but they have come in a number of times. I have to shoot from shore, but they have come in pretty close a few times. They're just wonderful, and it's thrillpretty close a few times. They're just wonderful, and it's thrilling to see them and hear that eerie call they make " ing to see them and hear that eerie call they make " Upper left photo: "The loons are wonderful, and Upper left photo: "The loons are wonderful, and I've been thrilled to see them within driving distance. I've been thrilled to see them within driving distance. This one was swimming close to shore when I snapped This one was swimming close to shore when I snapped this photo this at Nelson May 5,on 2013, photo Reservoir at Nelson on Reservoir Mayabout 5, 2013, about 4:45 in the4:45 afternoon." in the afternoon." Upper right: "I caught red eye, a time Upper right: the "I caught theand redateye, and at a time when he was sending out that eerie call they make." when he was sending out that eerie call they make." Mona callsMona this photo "Common Loon Calling." calls this photo "Common Loon Calling." Lower left: "The loons love crayfish, I managed a Lower left: "The loons lovesocrayfish, so I managed a few shots of this one fishing. He'd flip it into the air and few shots of this one fishing. He'd flip it into the air and then gobble it down gulp." then gobbleinitone down in one gulp." Lower right: "Here he flipping Crayfish Lower right:is"Here he isthe flipping the Crayfish around. Great fun to watch them diving and coming around. Great fun to watch them diving andupcoming up with a crayfish about every time." with a crayfish about every time." For a photographer, Mona says,Mona "These birds are birds are For a photographer, says, "These extremely extremely hard to photograph in order toincatch red that red hard to photograph orderthat to catch eye. If theeye. lightIfisthe justlight right, and right, they turn headtheir head is just and their they turn just so, I can catch it.toBut I have to be quick." justmanage so, I cantomanage catch it. But I have to be quick."

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Dan Reddig stands Reddig stands at hisDan Montana at his Montana Bison Ranch north Bison Ranch north of Lustre. He and of Lustre. He and his wife, Julie, have his wife, Julie, have about 200 bison about 200 bison and 1,000 andhead 1,000ofhead of beef cattle, beefand cattle, and they winter they their winter their bulls with thewith bison. bulls the bison. Below isBelow one ofistheir one of their fenced-in buffalo.buffalo. fenced-in VIRGIL VAUPEL / VIRGIL VAUPEL / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

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wire, 6-foot tall barbed wire perimeter cattle had same thing?” As another bisonbison rancher put it, BY VIRGILBYVAUPEL wire, 6-foot tall barbed wire perimeter cattledone had the done the same thing?” As another rancher put it, VIRGIL VAUPEL fence. fence. They Reddigs also run a “The“The cow cow doesn’t wantwant anything to to HI-LINE FARM & RANCH They Reddigs alsoabout run about a doesn’t anything HI-LINE FARM & RANCH ome ofome us have said, it said, Dean Reddig and hisand wife, head of beefofcattle, and they do with humans at birthing time.time. We We of usheard haveitheard Dean Reddig hisJulie, wife, Julie,thousand thousand head beef cattle, and they do with humans at birthing “If someone tries totries put to put went into theinto buffalo business 15 15 winterwinter their bulls bison. just leave themthem alonealone and they get the “If someone went the buffalo business their with bullsthe with the bison. just leave and they get the BuffaloBuffalo next tonext my place, with cows heifers myth that job done.” to my I’ll place,years I’ll ago years ago49with 49and cows and heifers Another Another mythhas thatkept hassome kept some job done.” shoot every of them bug- bugalong with ranchers from turning to buffalo is is To beTosure, therethere havehave beenbeen shootone every one ofwooly them wooly alongthree withbulls. three bulls. ranchers from turning to buffalo be sure, gers as gers they as step outstep of the just barely everyevery other other instances where bisonbison havehave escaped they outtrailer.” of the trailer.” “We were “Westruggling, were struggling, just barelythat they thatonly theyhave only calves have calves instances where escaped One of One the biggest fears that even each Carter,Carter, executive director confinement and done damage to to of the biggest fears that breaking breaking evenyear eachback yearthen, back then, year. Dave year. Dave executive director confinement and done damage ranchersranchers have about buffalo is that is that so we decided to make bold of the of National BisonBison Association, crops. Mostly, that wasn’t due to havethe about the buffalo so we decided to the make themove bold move the National Association, crops. Mostly, that wasn’t due to they carry and thatand every into raising bison along beef said this case. any inherent desire on the of the theybrucellosis carry brucellosis that every into raising bison with alongour with our beef saidisn’t thisthe isn’t the case. any inherent desire onpart the part of the buffalobuffalo has thehas disease. However, bi- bicattle, wheat and hay,” “They“They will calve everyevery year and buffalo to escape confinement, Carter the disease. However, cattle, wheat andDean hay,” said. Dean said. will calve year and buffalo to escape confinement, Carter son on private ranchesranches are a different ranchers in twice twice as many said.said. It was factors, he said, son on private are a different There were Thereseveral were several ranchers in most will mosthave willcalves have calves as many It due was to due to factors, he said, story. Bison point out thatout thatMontana who bought buffalobuffalo duringduringyears as beefascows will,”will,” CarterCarter said. said. suchsuch as water, feed feed and company. story.ranchers Bison ranchers point Montana who bought years beef cows as water, and company. bison confined to the private ranches, the boom the 1990s, but but “If the“If conditions are right, enough BisonBison producing for human bison confined to the private ranches, the times boom of times of the 1990s, the conditions are right, enough producing for human the responsibility of the individual themofsold when the in the feed and and a and socially attrac-attracconsumption is onisthe sincesince the responsibility of the individual most ofmost themout sold out in when feedwater and water a socially consumption onincrease the increase are disease-free. early 2000s the bottom tivetobull cowbuffalo ratio buffalo will have and today are 60,000 rancher,rancher, are disease-free. early 2000s the bottom fell outfell of out the of the tive bull cowtoratio will have 2004,2004, and today therethere are 60,000 bi- biMontana need the free- market.market. The Reddigs toughed calf every son slaughtered yearly compared Montana doesn’tdoesn’t need the freeThe Reddigs toughed it out it outa calf aevery year.”year.” son slaughtered yearly compared withwith a majority of people and say today sayare they are thankful escapees from his 120,000 Butsupthe suproamingroaming buffalo,buffalo, a majority of people and today they thankful they they AskedAsked about about escapees from his 120,000 beef beef cattlecattle daily.daily. But the in this say. region say.the Even the bison had thehad the foresight to see the potentialranch,ranch, Reddig said, “Ifhave they have is falling behind the demand in this region Even bison foresight to see the potential Reddig said, “If they ply isply falling behind the demand and and producers that. The free- in raising in raising these animals. of water, good water, enough natural the need for more ranches producing producers will saywill that.say The freethese animals. plentyplenty of good enough natural the need for more ranches producing ones that Deanthis took this reporter on a tourforageforage a socially balanced this non-typical is more apparent roamersroamers are the are onesthethat will dowill the do the Dean took reporter on a tour and a and socially balanced herd, herd, this non-typical cropcrop is more apparent most damage and spread of his recently. ranch recently. theto need to escape isn’t there.” ranchers most damage and spread disease,disease, of his ranch the need escape isn’t there.” everyevery day, day, bisonbison ranchers say. say. the 14,656 of buffalo of the first things he showed WhenWhen how these beasties forages. the early 1900s, forages. as aresort last resort they will In theInearly but the but 14,656 head ofhead buffalo in the in the One ofOne the first things he showed askedasked how these beasties 1900s, therethere werewere an an ThenThen as a last they will of Montana todaybeen have been was a cross was afence cross gate fencethat gate that had beenwinter,winter, heof kind of looked me witheat theeathay. estimated buffalo in the the hay. state ofstate Montana today have had been he kind looked at meat with estimated 1,0001,000 buffalo alivealive in the brucellosis-free the exception of turned into aofplate of spaghetti eyessaid that“Duh!” said “Duh!” United States. Today “We don’t to build brucellosis-free with thewith exception of turned into a plate spaghetti by a by a eyes that United States. Today therethere are are “We don’t have have to build windwind entireentire the “Yellowstone” distraught momma, cow and “They“They love winter,” he said. half million reported in North for them (bison),” the “Yellowstone” herd. herd. distraught momma, when awhen cow aand love winter,” he said. a halfa million reported in North breaksbreaks for them (bison),” DeanDean said. said. aboutabout As foron those on ranches, at present calf ended up on different sides the ranch (usually America, mostly on bison producing “We don’t have to pamper them in As for those ranches, at present calf ended up on different sides of the of the WhenWhen the ranch handshands (usually his his America, mostly on bison producing “We don’t have to pamper them in there are around 40ranchers bison ranchers fence. Another fence. Another sightthe was the destrucsons Brandon Bill,are who are part- any way. and ranches. A small minority any We way.don’t We don’t We don’t farmsfarms there are around 40 bison sight was destrucsons Brandon or Bill,orwho partand ranches. A small minority brand.brand. We don’t in theThe state. The largest is Montanation oftion of of a few of hisround own round ners the ranch) feed thethat hay that castrate, the total is ranging. free ranging. castrate, anddon’t we don’t pull calves of theoftotal in the state. largest is Montana a few his own bales balesners on theon ranch) feed the hay is free and we pull calves Bison north Ranchofnorth of Lustre in in an adjoining in an adjoining pasture. the ranch the buffalo The Montana Bison Association 40 below (For identi- The Montana Bison Ranch Lustre in pasture. the ranch growsgrows for thefor buffalo and and whenwhen Bison Association it’s 40it’s below zero.”zero.” (For identiNortheastern Montana with of a herd of His thought His thought was, this any cattle the cattle the bison turn upnoses their noses fication, awarded $10,000 toward health fication, theyhowever, do, however, Northeastern Montana with a herd was, “Is this“Is any bison turn up their $10,000 toward bisonbison health they do, put input earin ear awarded 200buffalo or so buffalo kept behind because it? if What at if it until at itthey untilhave they fed have on natural tags.)tags.) research this year. 200 or so kept behind a six- a six-worse worse because buffalobuffalo did it?did What onfed natural research this year.

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CatCh Of Of the Day atat NelsON ReseRvOiR CatCh the Day NelsON ReseRvOiR BY JIM ORR JIM ORR HI-LINE FARM &BY RANCH HI-LINE FARM & RANCH Hinsdale nature photographer Mona Doebler shares Hinsdale nature photographer Doebler these images of loons at Nelson Reservoir withMona Hi-Line Farmshares these images of loons at Nelson Reservoir with Hi-Line Farm & Ranch. Here's the story, in Mona's words, from behind her & Ranch. Here's the story, in Mona's words, from behind her camera lens: camera lens: "There have been literally dozens and dozens of loons on have been literally dozens dozens of loons on Nelson Reservoir"There this spring. I've been over thereand a number Nelson Reservoir this spring. I've been over there of times. I have to shoot from shore, but they have come in a number of times. I have to shoot from shore, but they have come in pretty close a few times. They're just wonderful, and it's thrillpretty close a few times. They're just wonderful, and it's thrilling to see them and hear that eerie call they make " ing to see them and hear that eerie call they make " Upper left photo: "The loons are wonderful, and Upper left photo: "The loons are wonderful, and I've been thrilled to see them within driving distance. I've been thrilled to see them within driving distance. This one was swimming close to shore when I snapped This one was swimming close to shore when I snapped this photo this at Nelson May 5,on 2013, photo Reservoir at Nelson on Reservoir Mayabout 5, 2013, about 4:45 in the4:45 afternoon." in the afternoon." Upper right: "I caught red eye, a time Upper right: the "I caught theand redateye, and at a time when he was sending out that eerie call they make." when he was sending out that eerie call they make." Mona callsMona this photo "Common Loon Calling." calls this photo "Common Loon Calling." Lower left: "The loons love crayfish, I managed a Lower left: "The loons lovesocrayfish, so I managed a few shots of this one fishing. He'd flip it into the air and few shots of this one fishing. He'd flip it into the air and then gobble it down gulp." then gobbleinitone down in one gulp." Lower right: "Here he flipping Crayfish Lower right:is"Here he isthe flipping the Crayfish around. Great fun to watch them diving and coming around. Great fun to watch them diving andupcoming up with a crayfish about every time." with a crayfish about every time." For a photographer, Mona says,Mona "These birds are birds are For a photographer, says, "These extremely extremely hard to photograph in order toincatch red that red hard to photograph orderthat to catch eye. If theeye. lightIfisthe justlight right, and right, they turn headtheir head is just and their they turn just so, I can catch it.toBut I have to be quick." justmanage so, I cantomanage catch it. But I have to be quick."

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Dan Reddig stands Reddig stands at hisDan Montana at his Montana Bison Ranch north Bison Ranch north of Lustre. He and of Lustre. He and his wife, Julie, have his wife, Julie, have about 200 bison about 200 bison and 1,000 andhead 1,000ofhead of beef cattle, beefand cattle, and they winter they their winter their bulls with thewith bison. bulls the bison. Below isBelow one ofistheir one of their fenced-in buffalo.buffalo. fenced-in VIRGIL VAUPEL / VIRGIL VAUPEL / HI-LINE FARM & RANCH HI-LINE FARM & RANCH

OO nnTT He IsOn AnCH HeBB IsOnrr AnCH

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wire, 6-foot tall barbed wire perimeter cattle had same thing?” As another bisonbison rancher put it, BY VIRGILBYVAUPEL wire, 6-foot tall barbed wire perimeter cattledone had the done the same thing?” As another rancher put it, VIRGIL VAUPEL fence. fence. They Reddigs also run a “The“The cow cow doesn’t wantwant anything to to HI-LINE FARM & RANCH They Reddigs alsoabout run about a doesn’t anything HI-LINE FARM & RANCH ome ofome us have said, it said, Dean Reddig and hisand wife, head of beefofcattle, and they do with humans at birthing time.time. We We of usheard haveitheard Dean Reddig hisJulie, wife, Julie,thousand thousand head beef cattle, and they do with humans at birthing “If someone tries totries put to put went into theinto buffalo business 15 15 winterwinter their bulls bison. just leave themthem alonealone and they get the “If someone went the buffalo business their with bullsthe with the bison. just leave and they get the BuffaloBuffalo next tonext my place, with cows heifers myth that job done.” to my I’ll place,years I’ll ago years ago49with 49and cows and heifers Another Another mythhas thatkept hassome kept some job done.” shoot every of them bug- bugalong with ranchers from turning to buffalo is is To beTosure, therethere havehave beenbeen shootone every one ofwooly them wooly alongthree withbulls. three bulls. ranchers from turning to buffalo be sure, gers as gers they as step outstep of the just barely everyevery other other instances where bisonbison havehave escaped they outtrailer.” of the trailer.” “We were “Westruggling, were struggling, just barelythat they thatonly theyhave only calves have calves instances where escaped One of One the biggest fears that even each Carter,Carter, executive director confinement and done damage to to of the biggest fears that breaking breaking evenyear eachback yearthen, back then, year. Dave year. Dave executive director confinement and done damage ranchersranchers have about buffalo is that is that so we decided to make bold of the of National BisonBison Association, crops. Mostly, that wasn’t due to havethe about the buffalo so we decided to the make themove bold move the National Association, crops. Mostly, that wasn’t due to they carry and thatand every into raising bison along beef said this case. any inherent desire on the of the theybrucellosis carry brucellosis that every into raising bison with alongour with our beef saidisn’t thisthe isn’t the case. any inherent desire onpart the part of the buffalobuffalo has thehas disease. However, bi- bicattle, wheat and hay,” “They“They will calve everyevery year and buffalo to escape confinement, Carter the disease. However, cattle, wheat andDean hay,” said. Dean said. will calve year and buffalo to escape confinement, Carter son on private ranchesranches are a different ranchers in twice twice as many said.said. It was factors, he said, son on private are a different There were Thereseveral were several ranchers in most will mosthave willcalves have calves as many It due was to due to factors, he said, story. Bison point out thatout thatMontana who bought buffalobuffalo duringduringyears as beefascows will,”will,” CarterCarter said. said. suchsuch as water, feed feed and company. story.ranchers Bison ranchers point Montana who bought years beef cows as water, and company. bison confined to the private ranches, the boom the 1990s, but but “If the“If conditions are right, enough BisonBison producing for human bison confined to the private ranches, the times boom of times of the 1990s, the conditions are right, enough producing for human the responsibility of the individual themofsold when the in the feed and and a and socially attrac-attracconsumption is onisthe sincesince the responsibility of the individual most ofmost themout sold out in when feedwater and water a socially consumption onincrease the increase are disease-free. early 2000s the bottom tivetobull cowbuffalo ratio buffalo will have and today are 60,000 rancher,rancher, are disease-free. early 2000s the bottom fell outfell of out the of the tive bull cowtoratio will have 2004,2004, and today therethere are 60,000 bi- biMontana need the free- market.market. The Reddigs toughed calf every son slaughtered yearly compared Montana doesn’tdoesn’t need the freeThe Reddigs toughed it out it outa calf aevery year.”year.” son slaughtered yearly compared withwith a majority of people and say today sayare they are thankful escapees from his 120,000 Butsupthe suproamingroaming buffalo,buffalo, a majority of people and today they thankful they they AskedAsked about about escapees from his 120,000 beef beef cattlecattle daily.daily. But the in this say. region say.the Even the bison had thehad the foresight to see the potentialranch,ranch, Reddig said, “Ifhave they have is falling behind the demand in this region Even bison foresight to see the potential Reddig said, “If they ply isply falling behind the demand and and producers that. The free- in raising in raising these animals. of water, good water, enough natural the need for more ranches producing producers will saywill that.say The freethese animals. plentyplenty of good enough natural the need for more ranches producing ones that Deanthis took this reporter on a tourforageforage a socially balanced this non-typical is more apparent roamersroamers are the are onesthethat will dowill the do the Dean took reporter on a tour and a and socially balanced herd, herd, this non-typical cropcrop is more apparent most damage and spread of his recently. ranch recently. theto need to escape isn’t there.” ranchers most damage and spread disease,disease, of his ranch the need escape isn’t there.” everyevery day, day, bisonbison ranchers say. say. the 14,656 of buffalo of the first things he showed WhenWhen how these beasties forages. the early 1900s, forages. as aresort last resort they will In theInearly but the but 14,656 head ofhead buffalo in the in the One ofOne the first things he showed askedasked how these beasties 1900s, therethere werewere an an ThenThen as a last they will of Montana todaybeen have been was a cross was afence cross gate fencethat gate that had beenwinter,winter, heof kind of looked me witheat theeathay. estimated buffalo in the the hay. state ofstate Montana today have had been he kind looked at meat with estimated 1,0001,000 buffalo alivealive in the brucellosis-free the exception of turned into aofplate of spaghetti eyessaid that“Duh!” said “Duh!” United States. Today “We don’t to build brucellosis-free with thewith exception of turned into a plate spaghetti by a by a eyes that United States. Today therethere are are “We don’t have have to build windwind entireentire the “Yellowstone” distraught momma, cow and “They“They love winter,” he said. half million reported in North for them (bison),” the “Yellowstone” herd. herd. distraught momma, when awhen cow aand love winter,” he said. a halfa million reported in North breaksbreaks for them (bison),” DeanDean said. said. aboutabout As foron those on ranches, at present calf ended up on different sides the ranch (usually America, mostly on bison producing “We don’t have to pamper them in As for those ranches, at present calf ended up on different sides of the of the WhenWhen the ranch handshands (usually his his America, mostly on bison producing “We don’t have to pamper them in there are around 40ranchers bison ranchers fence. Another fence. Another sightthe was the destrucsons Brandon Bill,are who are part- any way. and ranches. A small minority any We way.don’t We don’t We don’t farmsfarms there are around 40 bison sight was destrucsons Brandon or Bill,orwho partand ranches. A small minority brand.brand. We don’t in theThe state. The largest is Montanation oftion of of a few of hisround own round ners the ranch) feed thethat hay that castrate, the total is ranging. free ranging. castrate, anddon’t we don’t pull calves of theoftotal in the state. largest is Montana a few his own bales balesners on theon ranch) feed the hay is free and we pull calves Bison north Ranchofnorth of Lustre in in an adjoining in an adjoining pasture. the ranch the buffalo The Montana Bison Association 40 below (For identi- The Montana Bison Ranch Lustre in pasture. the ranch growsgrows for thefor buffalo and and whenwhen Bison Association it’s 40it’s below zero.”zero.” (For identiNortheastern Montana with of a herd of His thought His thought was, this any cattle the cattle the bison turn upnoses their noses fication, awarded $10,000 toward health fication, theyhowever, do, however, Northeastern Montana with a herd was, “Is this“Is any bison turn up their $10,000 toward bisonbison health they do, put input earin ear awarded 200buffalo or so buffalo kept behind because it? if What at if it until at itthey untilhave they fed have on natural tags.)tags.) research this year. 200 or so kept behind a six- a six-worse worse because buffalobuffalo did it?did What onfed natural research this year.

SS

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Sage SageGrouse GrouseDraft DraftPlan, Plan,Public Public Comment CommentPeriod PeriodInInThe TheWorks Works

FORFOR HI-LINE FARM & RANCH servation go together well. There have HI-LINE FARM & RANCH servation go together well. There have When Gov. Steve Bullock appointed studies thatthat show managed grazing When Gov. Steve Bullock appointed been been studies show managed grazing people to the Greater Sage-Grouse Habiprime sage-grouse habitat.� people to the Greater Sage-Grouse Habi- conserves conserves prime sage-grouse habitat.� tat tat Conservation Advisory Council, MonBLM’s Draft Resource ManageConservation Advisory Council, Mon- TheThe BLM’s Draft Resource Managetanatana Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) Plan for for the the Hi-Line, issued in in Farm Bureau Federation (MFBF) ment ment Plan Hi-Line, issued wanted to be TheThe purpose of of March, is aisregulatory mechanism thatthat wanted to involved. be involved. purpose March, a regulatory mechanism the the council waswas to gather information, be used to ensure conservation of the council to gather information, cancan be used to ensure conservation of the furnish advice andand provide to the govamong other special status furnish advice provide to the gov- sage-grouse, sage-grouse, among other special status ernor recommendations on policies andand species. ernor recommendations on policies species. actions for for a statewide strategy to avoid Areas in south Phillips andand Valley actions a statewide strategy to avoid Areas in south Phillips Valley listing the the greater sage-grouse under the the counties encompassing about 930,000 listing greater sage-grouse under counties encompassing about 930,000 Endangered Species Act.Act. acres andand twotwo areas in north Phillips andand Endangered Species acres areas in north Phillips TheThe process is expected to reach a new of about 299,000 acres are are identiprocess is expected to reach a newValley Valley of about 299,000 acres identistage thisthis month with the the beginning of aof a fiedfied as important sage andand grassland stage month with beginning as important sage grassland public comment period. habitat for for the the sage-grouse. public comment period. habitat sage-grouse. TheThe advisory council – which includes explained thatthat Wyoming’s advisory council – which includes Cremer Cremer explained Wyoming’s representatives from farming andand ranchSage Grouse Habitat representatives from farming ranch- comprehensive comprehensive Sage Grouse Habitat ing,ing, conservation andand sportsmen, energy, Plan waswas being carefully conservation sportsmen, energy, Management Management Plan being carefully mining andand power transmission, tribal andand discussed by the advisory mining power transmission, tribal reviewed reviewed discussed by the advisory government, local government andand the the council. government, local government council. legislature – plans to have a draft man“They’re notnot going to use it verbatim, legislature – plans to have a draft man“They’re going to use it verbatim, agement planplan released in early October, planplan to take some pieces of itoftoit use agement released in early October, butbut to take some pieces to use when public comment willwill be solicited. Cremer said. “Wyoming when public comment be solicited. as aastemplate,� a template,� Cremer said. “Wyoming TheThe final recommendations are are duedue in in hashas developed some good practices of of final recommendations developed some good practices early January. which Farm Bureau supports.� early January. which Farm Bureau supports.� MFBF Central Regional Manager Council members noted twotwo concerns MFBF Central Regional Manager Council members noted concerns Chelcie Cremer attended the the meetings the the lossloss of sage-grouse habitat; Chelcie Cremer attended meetings regarding regarding of sage-grouse habitat; thisthis summer in Helena, andand explained the the conversion of rangeland to farmland summer in Helena, explained conversion of rangeland to farmland thatthat certain areas of the state have espethe the removal of sage brush from the the certain areas of the state have espe- andand removal of sage brush from cially large areas for for sage-grouse habitat. Conversion of rangeland to cropcially large areas sage-grouse habitat. range. range. Conversion of rangeland to crop“The areas they’re mostly concentratis not occurring at the raterate it once “The areas they’re mostly concentrat- landland is not occurring at the it once inging on for habitat conservation is the BigBig did,did, andand the the council seemed to recognize on for habitat conservation is the council seemed to recognize Hole in southwestern Montana, as well as asthat. They want to explore more op-opHole in southwestern Montana, as well that. They want to explore more some landland in central andand eastern Monfor for private landland owners to to some in central eastern Mon- portunities portunities private owners tana,� noted Cremer. “At“At the the meeting enroll in incentive programs promoting tana,� noted Cremer. meeting enroll in incentive programs promoting in Helena, the the council talked about howhow the the conservation of sage grouse habitat, in Helena, council talked about conservation of sage grouse habitat, grazing management strategies andand connoted. grazing management strategies con- Cremer Cremer noted.

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this.this. Then w FOR FOR HI-LINE FARMFARM & RANCH The HI-LINE & RANCH Roe TheThe Montana Grains Foundation (MGF) an- an-paign,â€? paign,â€? Montana Grains Foundation (MGF) fr nounced Sept.Sept. 9 the9beginning of a of new initiative resource nounced the beginning a new initiativeresources and and eve to promote scientiďŹ c research in the control of ofers, ers, to promote scientiďŹ c research in the control wheat-stem sawy, Montana’s costliest grain Whe wheat-stem sawy, Montana’s costliest grain Wheat-st destroying production pest.pest. destroyii production BY SAMAR FAY FAY wrote in her opinion thatthat the the plaintiffs producers, feeders, processors andand retailBY SAMAR wrote in her opinion plaintiffs producers, feeders, processors retailprodu TheThe non-proďŹ t organization willwill seekseek to bring grain pr non-proďŹ t organization to bringgrain HI-LINE FARM & RANCH hadhad not not shown thatthat theythey were likely to to ers,Ranchers, which would be passed on to Ranchers, HI-LINE FARM & RANCH shown were likely ers, which would be passed onconsumto consum- all of the wheat and barley industry together in an grain compa grain co all of the wheat and barley industry together in an North American meat industry groups theirtheir case, nor nor hadhad theythey shown theythey ers. Hisout organization alsoalso thatthat North American meat industry groups winwin case, shown ers. His organization Check our salesale prices oncontends SMARTLIC the g effort to reduce the detrimental impact this this small Check out our prices oncontends SMARTLIC hauling effort to reduce the detrimental impact smallhauling are are ranged on both sides of the USDA’s suffer irreparable injury if the casecase the the newnew rulerule doesdoes not not bring the the U.S.U.S. intointo ranged on both sides of the USDA’s would would suffer irreparable injury if the bring the grain ste insect has has had had on the state’s largest industry. the grain insect on the state’s largest industry. supplement tubs and ULTRA MIN 12-12 supplement tubs and ULTRA MIN 12-12 newnew country of origin label rule,rule, published compliance withwith the the WTO obligations, but but country of origin label publishedproceeded. proceeded. compliance WTO obligations, peting for nu “We“We planplan to put the project together in aninefpeting fo to put the project together an efin May andand set to effect in Novemtheythey were disappointed in the only risks increased discrimination against cattle mineral through October. Se-against in May setgo to into go into effect in Novem- Stating Stating were disappointed in the loose only risks increased discrimination loose cattle mineral through October. Se- ďŹ cient Sch manner,â€? saidsaid MGF board member WillWill DaleDale ďŹ cient manner,â€? MGF board member ber.ber. ruling, the the plaintiffs appealed the the judge’s imported products and retaliatory ruling, plaintiffs appealed judge’s lected imported products and retaliatory trade SMARTLIC protein tubs aretrade $40 serves lected SMARTLIC protein tubs are $40 Roehm, “beginning withwith a thorough assessment ser Roehm, “beginning a thorough assessmentarea,area, Brazilian Sisal or Plastic To bring the the United States intointo comdecision theBridon next day. sanctions. Brazilian Sisal or Bridon Plastic To bring United States comdecision the next day. sanctions. were genero of research progress to date, the affected geowere gen of research progress to date, the affected geoper ton off in ton lots and ULTRA MIN per ton off in ton lots and ULTRA MIN pliance withwith its obligations under World TheThe lawsuit to prevent the the implementaopposing group of producers, the the pliance its obligations under World lawsuit to prevent implementa- TheThe opposing group of producers, graphical areas beyond Montana’s borders, and andFoundation, Foundat graphical areas beyond Montana’s borders, is $1off per bagcase, or per ton.ton. which scientists and universities are pursuing us touscontinu Trade Organization agreements, the the USDA of COOL waswas brought by the National intervenors the case, are$40 the$40 United 12-12 is in $1off per bag or per Trade Organization agreements, USDAtiontion of COOL brought by the National12-12 intervenors in the are the United to con which scientists and universities are pursuing saidsaid labels on meats must statestate the the ani-ani- Cattlemen’s BeefBeef Association, the AmeriCattlemen’s Association, the Nalabels on meats must Cattlemen’s Association, the Ameri- States States Cattlemen’s Association, the NaNowNow is also timetime to get youryour cowcow cake is also to get cake mal’s country of birth, the the country where it itcan can Meat Institute, Canadian Cattlemen’s Farmers Union, the American Sheep mal’s country of birth, country where Meat Institute, Canadian Cattlemen’s tional tional Farmers Union, the American putput in toinAssociation beat the the winter and withwithSheep to Association beat winter and waswas raised andand where it was slaughtered. the the Canadian PorkPork Council, andrush therush Consumer raised where it was slaughtered. Association, Association, Canadian Council, Industry Industry and the Consumer time just around the the corner, getget Several meat industry groups filedfiled a a the the North American Meat Association, the theweaning Federation of America. weaning time around corner, Several meat industry groups North American Meat Association, Federation of just America. lawsuit on July 8 to8prevent thisthis rulerule from Association of Meat Processors, “We strongly believe that the American lawsuit on July to prevent from American American Association of Meat Processors,your “We strongly believe that the HEADSTART pellets ordered toAmerican your HEADSTART pellets ordered to going intointo effect. They alsoalso asked for the National Pork Producers Council, the consumer has a right to know where theirtheir going effect. They asked for an the National Pork Producers Council, the consumer has a right to know where to an keep your herd in top condition! to keep your herd in top condition! have them here in time. This is the best have them here in time. This is the best injunction against the the rulerule while the the law-law- Southwest Meat Association andand Mexico’s is from andand U.S.U.S. livestock producers injunction against while Southwest Meat Association Mexico’smeat meat is from livestock producers start youright can givedifferentiate youryour calves during suitsuit is proceeding. National Confederation of Livestock Orgahave the start right to differentiate their product jump you can give calves during is proceeding. National Confederation of Livestock Orga-jump have the to their product Other industry groups became interin the marketplace as to its origin,â€? wrote Other industry groups became inter- nizations. nizations. in the marketplace as to its origin,â€? wrote this high stress time. this high stress time. venors on the government’s sideside in the In an piece written afterafter the the USCA president Jon Jon Wooster. venors on the government’s in the Inop-ed an op-ed piece written USCA president Wooster. lawsuit on Aug. 19, 19, permitting them to to COOL announcement in May, Scott “It’s“It’s nicenice to see thatFarmers theFarmers judge sawsaw thatthat lawsuit on Aug. permitting them COOL announcement in May, Scott to see that the judge SALE PRICES FORFOR RANCHERS participate in the litigation. They agree George, the the NCBA president, saidsaid the the thisthis waswas an attempt forElevator the plaintiffs toCo. OCTOBER SALE PRICES RANCHERS participate inOCTOBER the litigation. They agree George, NCBA president, an attempt forElevator the plaintiffs to Co. withwith the the newnew rule.rule. federal government should not not mandate a a simply limitlimit theirtheir competition,â€? said Gilles federal government should mandate simply competition,â€? said 1st Ave. North 1st Ave. North Gilles On On Sept. 11, 11, the the U.S.U.S. District Court for for marketing program, andand thatthat the the majority a Grass Range producer and59230 Sept. District Court marketing program, majority Stockton, Stockton, a Grass Range producer and Glasgow, MT 59230 Glasgow, MT the the District of Columbia denied the the request were not not eveneven aware labelof the Northern Plains Resource District of Columbia denied requestof consumers of consumers were aware label- member member of the Northern Plains Resource Elevator • in 228-4422 / Fertilizer •the 228-2571 Elevator •ain 228-4422 / Fertilizer •injunction 228-2571 for the injunction. ing ing information waswas currently in place. statement afterPlant thePlant injunction for the injunction. information currently in place. Council Council a statement after U.S.U.S. District Judge Ketanji Jackson He said there would be added costs to was denied. District Judge Ketanji Jackson He said there would be added costs to was denied.

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Marvin Brookman was was inducted to represent Daniels, Phillips, Roosevelt, Sheridan and and Valley Counties in the hall.hall. Marvin Brookman inducted to represent Daniels, Phillips, Roosevelt, Sheridan Valley Counties in cowboy the cowboy

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Marvin Brookman Inducted Into Montana Cowboy Hall OfOf Fame Marvin Brookman Inducted Into Montana Cowboy Hall Fame

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In 1935, he married Doris Mann andand theythey horse herdherd of his at times numbering FOR FOR HI-LINE FARMFARM & RANCH In 1935, he married Doris Mann horse of own, his own, at times numbering HI-LINE & RANCH 500500 head. HereHere Brookman learned to to hadhad twotwo daughters, Reita andand Cleita. ecades of excellence in produc�������������������� �������������������� head. Brookman learned daughters, Reita Cleita. ecades of excellence in produc- overover �������������������� �������������������� ���� ������������ ���� �������ż˝ďż˝ďż˝ďż˝ďż˝ďż˝ďż˝ ���� ������������ ���� ������������ waswas fascinated withwith bucking ing ing bucking horses dominate wrangle andand manage, skills thatthat would laterlater Brookman Brookman fascinated bucking bucking horses dominate wrangle manage, skills would ��������������� ��������������� ��������������� ��������������� be put to good use.use. He was justjust a teenager andand at the of 23 putting to- tothe name Marvin Brookman, be put to good He was a teenager horses horses at age the age ofbegan 23 began putting the name Marvin Brookman, ��������������� �������� ���������������� ���� �� ��������������� �������� ���������������� ���� �� his own string of horses chosen fromfrom whowho waswas a good-hearted andand humble man. he was hired on with the CBC (Chapgether his own string of horses chosen a good-hearted humble man. when when he was hired on with the CBC (Chap- gether ���� ����� ���� ����� herd. He selected 150150 headhead thatthat Brookman waswas inducted intointo the Montana Corporation) working in the Brookman inducted the Montana pel Brothers pel Brothers Corporation) working in the his father’s his father’s herd. He selected �������������������� of the andand Winnett country the backbone of his to Buckâ€? Cowboy HallHall of Fame as aas 2013 Legacy In- In- breaks Cowboy of Fame a 2013 Legacy breaks of Jordan the Jordan Winnett country became became the backbone of “Born his “Born to Buckâ€? breeding program. In 1936, he joined the the ductee fromfrom District 1, for Phillips, the Bear PawPaw Mountains of north breeding program. In 1936, he joined ductee District 1, Daniels, for Daniels, Phillips, andand the Bear Mountains of north Montana. He and a crew of cowboys Turtle Association, forerunner to to Roosevelt, Sheridan andand Valley counties. Cowboy Turtle Association, forerunner Roosevelt, Sheridan Valley counties. central central Montana. He and a crew of cowboysCowboy Brookman waswas bornborn on Sept. 10, 10, 1913, responsible for thousands of unclaimed Rodeo Cowboys Associaresponsible for thousands of unclaimedthe Professional the Professional Rodeo Cowboys AssociaBrookman on Sept. 1913, werewere on aon ranch close to the River nearnear horses abandoned by early homesteaders. obtaining his stock contracting cardcard the the a ranch close to Redwater the Redwater River horses abandoned by early homesteaders. tion,tion, obtaining his stock contracting year.year. Poplar, to Clyde andand Wavie Brookman. CBC cowboys werewere charged withwith the duties Poplar, to Clyde Wavie Brookman. CBC cowboys charged the duties same same on on Payback Mineral Supplements Payback Mineral Supplements mares andand colts, branding, andand Brookman’s philosophy waswas to select the the As aAs young manman he dreamed of living the the of sorting a young he dreamed of living of sorting mares colts, branding, Brookman’s philosophy to select descent andand the Thoroughbred cowboy lifestyle. cutting young stallions. Many daysdays werewere Percheron cutting young stallions. Many Percheron descent the Thoroughbred cowboy lifestyle. $ $ 4040 offoff perper tonton away fromfrom home starting in the thatthat he believed gavegave the horse As Brookman waswas growing up, up, his father As Brookman growing his fatherspent spent away home starting in spring the springbloodlines bloodlines he believed the horse in September andand October broke horses for the He ran a large ending in the more sizesize andand greater stamina. He had a a in September October more greater stamina. He had broke horses for cavalry. the cavalry. He ran a large andand ending in fall. the fall. strong sense of matching the mares andand strong sense of matching the mares Beat thethe rising cost of of Beat rising cost studs to get natural bucking horse. studs to aget a natural bucking horse. In the 1930s, Brookman worked as as your winter feed needs. In late the late 1930s, Brookman worked your winter feed needs. a pickup man in local rodeos. As time went a pickup man in local rodeos. As time went Order now and take Order now and take on, on, committees werewere in need of stock con-concommittees in need of stock early delivery. early delivery. tractors andand he took note.note. Making a dream tractors he took Making a dream come true,true, he started his own company in in come he started his own company Smart-lic Supplement Tubs Smart-lic Supplement Tubs the day when stock waswas trailed or shipped the day when stock trailed or shipped to keep youryour herdherd in top condition! by train to area rodeos. to keep in top condition! by train to area rodeos. In 1941 he began contracting for the In 1941 he began contracting for the Wolf Point WildWild Horse Stampede. He travWolf Point Horse Stampede. He traveledeled around to different towns producing around to different towns producing theirtheir rodeos andand continued to betoactive withwith rodeos continued be active the business untiluntil the time of his 440440 Highway 2 West • Glasgow • Across from thethe Fairgrounds the business the time of passing. his passing. Highway 2 West • Glasgow • Across from Fairgrounds For For his hometown WildWild Horse Stampede, his hometown Horse Stampede, 1st Ave. North 406-228-9325 • 406-228-4381 • 1-800-255-1472 1st Ave. North 406-228-9325 • 406-228-4381 • 1-800-255-1472 Marvin and a crew of eight to 10 cowMarvin and a crew of eight to 10 cowGlasgow, MT 59230 Glasgow, MT 59230 Family owned by the Newton Boys! Family owned by the Newton Boys! boysboys would trailtrail the bucking stock to the would the bucking stock to the RentRent A CarA Car SeeSee Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny or Ted! Doug, Andy, Terry, Kenny or Ted! Elevator • 228-4422 / Fertilizer PlantPlant • 228-2571 Elevator • 228-4422 / Fertilizer • 228-2571 CONTINUED ON PAGE 9 9 CONTINUED ON PAGE ��� ������������ ��� ������������ ������������������� �������������������

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Bucking BuckingHorse HorseLegend Legend

a great stock contractor in the of of CONTINUED FROM PAGEPAGE 4 4 a great stock contractor in sport the sport CONTINUED FROM “Stampede Grounds� eacheach year.year. For For the the rodeo. TheThe respect reached all levels of of “Stampede Grounds� rodeo. respect reached all levels 75th75th Wolf Point WildWild Horse Stampede, a a professional rodeo andand beyond fromfrom the the Wolf Point Horse Stampede, professional rodeo beyond celebration committee organized a wagon to his TheThe Assiniboine celebration committee organized a wagon contestants contestants to peers. his peers. Assiniboine traintrain andand outriders thatthat trailed the BrookIndian Tribe made himhim an honorary outriders trailed the Brook- Sioux Sioux Indian Tribe made an honorary manman bucking horses fromfrom the Brookman in 1987 andand accorded himhim the the bucking horses the Brookman member member in 1987 accorded ranch to Wolf Point. He was named the the name “Rider of the ranch to Wolf Point. He was named name “Rider of Horse.� the Horse.� Grand Marshall for the celebration. Brookman received numerous stock Grand Marshall for big the big celebration. Brookman received numerous stock In 1992, the “Stampede Grounds� awards in the Rodeo CowIn 1992, the “Stampede Grounds� awards in Professional the Professional Rodeo Cowin Wolf Point waswas renamed the Marvin Association, the Dodge National in Wolf Point renamed the Marvin boysboys Association, the Dodge National Brookman Stadium. Circuit Finals Rodeo andand the Montana Brookman Stadium. Circuit Finals Rodeo the Montana Brookman Rodeo has has hadhad bucking Pro Pro Rodeo Circuit Finals. He produced Brookman Rodeo bucking Rodeo Circuit Finals. He produced stock selected for almost every National all over the country, but but his heart stock selected for almost every National rodeos rodeos all over the country, his heart Finals Rodeo since it began in 1959. waswas in producing rodeos in the statestate Finals Rodeo since it began in 1959. in producing rodeos in great the great Brookman waswas inducted intointo the Pro of Montana. He produced rodeos at Red Brookman inducted the Pro of Montana. He produced rodeos at Red Rodeo HallHall of Fame in Colorado Springs, Wolf Point, Glendive, Miles City,City, Rodeo of Fame in Colorado Springs, Lodge, Lodge, Wolf Point, Glendive, Miles Colo., in July 2005. He was trulytruly dediLivingston, Chinook, Belt,Belt, Colo., in July 2005. He was dedi- Glasgow, Glasgow, Livingston, Chinook, cated to the of Pro Rodeo. Stanford andand Culbertson. cated to world the world of Pro Rodeo. Stanford Culbertson. Many legendary broncs, suchsuch as as Brookman Rodeo continues as his Many legendary broncs, Brookman Rodeo continues as his Powder Face, Black Diamond, Oil Oil CityCity granddaughter, Cathy, andand her her husband, Powder Face, Black Diamond, granddaughter, Cathy, husband, Red,Red, Brookman’s Velvet andand the great Dave Wieferich, carry on the tradiBrookman’s Velvet the great Dave Wieferich, carry on family the family tradisiresire Alimony are examples of some of the of producing great bucking horses Alimony are examples of some of the tiontion of producing great bucking horses superstars thatthat Brookman developed on on andand rodeos. superstars Brookman developed rodeos. his ranch at Buzzard’s Glory. Powder FaceFace Brookman often said,said, “I would rather his ranch at Buzzard’s Glory. Powder Brookman often “I would rather waswas sentsent to ato special performance rodeo a horse, thatthat I raised, buckbuck more thanthan a special performance rodeo see see a horse, I raised, more thatthat waswas attended by President Ronald in the Raising bucking attended by President Ronald anything anything in world!� the world!� Raising bucking Reagan, while Alimony siredsired the 1980 waswas trulytruly his passion andand he cared Reagan, while Alimony the 1980 horses horses his passion he cared PRCA Saddle Bronc of the Brooklikelike family fromfrom the time PRCA Saddle Bronc of Year, the Year, Brook- for his for livestock his livestock family the time man’s Velvet. theythey werewere born. man’s Velvet. born. Brookman hadhad his own special breedMarvin Brookman passed away in in Brookman his own special breedMarvin Brookman passed away ing ing program andand waswas remembered as as January of 2006. program remembered January of 2006.

FIRST FIRST CREEK CREEK SEEDS SEEDS

tt BullBull Sale Catalogs Sale Catalogs tt Auction Posters Auction Posters tt Letterhead & Envelopes Letterhead & Envelopes tt Livestock Record Sheets Livestock Record Sheets Grasshopper Boom: Grasshopper Boom:M tt Business Cards Business Cards to g BY KEVIN WANNER exposed BY KEVIN WANNER tt Spreadsheets YouYou CanCan exposed Spreadsheets alsoalso reduces MSUMSU EXTENSION SPECIALIST redu EXTENSION SPECIALIST cu Grasshopper populations increased dramatithe whea Grasshopper populations increased dramati-the wheat Actually Write On Actually Write On disease callycally in Montana fromfrom 20072007 to 2010, fromfrom one one viralviral dis in Montana to 2010, tacres Even Labels For Your Vigilant million with more thanthan 15 grasshoppers t Even Labels For Your Vigils million acres with more 15 grasshoppers per square yardyard in 2007, to 17tomillion acres grasshop per square in 2007, 17 million acres grasshopper Pickle Jars! Really! Jars! Really! localized de withwith more thanPickle 15 grasshoppers per square localized more than 15 grasshoppers per square

an yardyard in 2010. However, cropcrop and and rangeland migrator in 2010. However, rangeland migratory sp damage has has beenbeen somewhat moderated by the prevalen damage somewhat moderated by the prevalent Brawl CL Plus, * High Yielding 2 Gene thre Brawl CL Plus, * High Yielding 2 Gene coolcool and and wet wet spring weather of 2010 and and 2011. Damage spring weather of 2010 2011. Damage Wheat*, A Solution to Weed Problems Wheat*, A Solution to Weed Problems per sp TheThe warm dry dry in late summer and and earlyearly fall fall are 3-7 are 3-7 warm in late summer Limited Supply Available for for thisthis FallFall weather has favored grasshopper development Limited Supply Available per sq 11-20 pe weather has favored grasshopper development 11-20 Typically gr and based on the August 2011 adult grasshopTypicall and based on the August 2011 adult grasshop*WINTER RYE* *WINTER RYE* per rangeland survey conducted by the surround per rangeland survey conducted by U.S. the U.S. surrounding Tall,Tall, High Yielding Forage High Yielding Forage attract Department of Agriculture Animal and and Plant attrg Department of Agriculture Animal Plant maymay Treatment st Inspection Service (USDA APHIS, Treatme Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS, WEWE DODO CUSTOM CRP BLENDS CUSTOM CRP BLENDS Health crop edges f Helena), grasshopper populations remain high crop edg Helena), grasshopper populations remain high NATIVE & INTRODUCED GRASS SEED NATIVE & INTRODUCED GRASS SEED Border tr across the state. Continuing warm weather will Bord across the state. Continuing warm weather will Western • Slender • Green Needle • Needle & Thread Western • Slender • Green Needle • Needle & Thread or see egg-laying behavior by female grasshopStreambank • Bluebunch • Thickspike • Sideoats Grama sprays o favor egg-laying behavior by female grasshop- sprays Streambank • Bluebunch • Thickspike • Sideoats Grama favor Switchgrass • Junegrass • Sandberg • Big •Blue • Wildryes Switchgrass • Junegrass • Sandberg Big Blue • Wildryes perspers and the rangeland hazard willwill remain highhigh mendation mendatif SE"WF4t(MBTHPX .5 and the rangeland hazard remain SE"WF4t(MBTHPX .5 Blue Blue Flax •Flax Woods' RoseRose • Yarrow • Small Burnet • Winter Fat Fat in 2012. Winter wheat will be at risk of attack • Woods' • Yarrow • Small Burnet • Winter Typic wheat. T in 2012. Winter wheat will be at risk of attack wheat. AlfalfaAlfalfa • Sweet CloverClover • Bozoisky • Russian & Dahurian Wildrye • Sweet • Bozoisky • Russian & Dahurian Wildrye beyond the ct this fall season. beyond this fall season. We put a We put a Smooth & Meadow Bromegrass • Pubescent Smooth & Meadow Bromegrass • Pubescent If grassho Planting winter wheat later in the season If gra Planting winter wheat later in the season Intermediate • Tall •• Tall Crested & Newhy Wheatgrass Intermediate • Crested & Newhy Wheatgrass little magic inbyin they are difďŹ little magic strategy to mitigate damage caused they are is one strategy to mitigate damage caused by What youyou needneed • When youyou want it it is one What • When want everything we do!do!scouting everything we is r grasshoppers. Adult grasshoppers willwill remain scouting grasshoppers. Adult grasshoppers remain 179179 Beaverton Road • Saco, MTMT active Beaverton Road • Saco, during the fall season as long as daytime the prote active during the fall season as long as daytime the protected borders up t remain warm. Later 888-757-2892 • 406-527-3334 borders temperatures remain warm. planting 888-757-2892 • 406-527-3334 temperatures We’re More Than A Later Newspaper! We’re More Than Aplanting Newspaper! peated appli dates reduce the window of time that the crop is peated a dates reduce the window of time that the crop is *CLEARFIELD WINTER *CLEARFIELD WINTER WHEAT SEED* WHEAT SEED*

YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH – THE AG AG MONTHLY FORFOR NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA. YOU’RE READING HI-LINE FARM & RANCH – THE MONTHLY NORTHEAST & NORTH CENTRAL MONTANA.

LOWEST LOWESTPRICES PRICESININ VALLEY VALLEYCOUNTY COUNTY CallCall Stan TheThe Man at at Stan Man 406-228-9301 406-228-9301

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The families that farm together Continued from page 3

The one-man family farm Gary Gullickson works his family’s 2,400-acre farm west of Big Sandy and lives in his grandmother’s house he remodeled — that still contains a portion of his great-grandfather’s original homesteader shack. G a r y d i d n ’ t g row u p o n t h e fa r m because for nearly 30 years, from about 1952 to 1979, it was leased to two other families. When one of the leases came open around 1979, Gary’s parents, Cliff and Doris Gullickson, decided to start farming the land themselves, he said. They began farming the other tract of cropland in 1981. In 1984, Gary’s grandmother passed away, leaving half of the farm to her daughter Doris. The other half of the farm his grandmother had already divided equally among the children — Gary, his two sisters and his brother — Gary said, though he is the only one of the four who farms their land. In a rather unique division of farm shares, by family agreement each of the siblings gets their individual crop yield taken to the elevator separately rather than farming the entire farm and each taking a portion of the proceeds. Gary gets a portion of the profits from each for doing

the farming. “It’s very complicated, I gotta tell you,” he said, with a laugh. While this means Gary needs to do some fancy farming to ensure that crop yields aren’t mixed, the system has worked for the family for decades. Gary started out in farming by helping another area farmer when he was 15, then helped his parents when needed each year after they took over the family farm but, he said, it wasn’t until 1987 that he moved out there to farm with his father full-time. Unexpectedly, at the beginning of harvest in 1999, Gary’s dad, Cliff, was killed in a vehicle rollover. Nearly 100 neighbors brought 25 combines and 25 grain trucks to the farm and completed the harvest in four hours that year. Gary has had sole management of the family farm since that time. Traditionally, each year Gary's siblings come out to the farm to help at harvest and his own twins, Matt and Mariha, who are in college now, have helped since they were old enough, filling in where they could until each found a specialty. Son Matt is a good hand with mechanics, Gary said. “It surprised me to see really how good he was — really without a helluva a lot of teaching. He’s been the best help," he said, "I’ve truly been blessed by both of them.

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“When I decided to farm with (my dad and uncle) I went out and got some land to rent, so that kind of threw into the mix, and then I went and also purchased a tractor under my name and kind of added that to the mix, too,” he said. Even with his contribution of land and equipment, for the partnership with is father — and now with his son — to work, eventually there needed to be release of control by the older generation to the younger. He sees this as one of the problems in family farm operations that end up not working well. “They want to include the family and have them part of it, but yet they don’t want to give up control, and I guess I’ve been more than willing to give up control,” he said. Another key to the Miller family’s success is their division of labor. Dale said duties need to be divided according to interests and abilities of the individuals. “Justin does all the marketing, he does all the chemical buying and that kind of stuff. I still do most of the bookwork,” he said, adding that “you just make it work.” Dale has two young grandchildren, by Justin and Becki, and he’s looking to their future with an open mind on whether or not they’ll choose the family farm as a career. “You can always hope,” he said, “but you never know. You kind of got to let kids find their own interest and their own deal. You know with Justin we kind of knew from the

FARM & RANCH day he started kindergarten. He always announced ‘Well, I’ll be a farmer some day,’ and there was never any doubt all the way through college. He went and did a five-year program in four years and was back home farming.”

A symbiotic duo Bruce Boyum and his son Matthew B oy u m fa r m n o r t h a n d s o u t h e a s t o f Havre on a total of about 10,000 acres. B r u c e h a s wo r ke d ove r t h e ye a rs to expand the farm, and Matthew, who grew up helping with the family's agriculture operations, has been contributing to the expansion effort since he came home from college about three years ago. Bruce had always worked on his family’s farm, but was just “a hired hand,” he said, until 1998 when he got to start making more decisions. Bruce said his grandfather had moved to the area from Minnesota to farm here, adding that his dad took over the farm in 1974, and then Bruce took it over in 1998 when he was 40, after gaining increased responsibility over the years. His transition to being the boss of the family operation made him feel good, he said, but he wasn’t free of all misgivings. “It was a little scary. I had to start writing bigger checks,” Bruce said. Bruce and Matthew, who has been a vested part of the business since rejoining his father after graduation, divide up decision-making duties by taking respon-

sibility for certain tracts of land which each has incorporated for himself, but they come together sharing the equipment and other duties in the farming operation as a whole. It’s a good way for them to work together, Bruce said, and it’s good for Matthew, too. “He probably leans on me quite a bit on some things, but if he wants to try something new, he’s free to do it,” Bruce said. “And he’s not my hired man. He’s a partner in a sense, but he’s not my hired hand.” This is a little different from the arrangement Bruce had with his own father because it allows Matthew to become a decisionmaking part of the family farm earlier. “It’s kind of the same, but I think I’m turning more over to Matt sooner,” Bruce said. “And he’s picked up some of his own ground.” Matthew, who had considered other careers while in college, said he appreciates being given responsibilities. Bruce said he thinks they’ve come up a good working solution for their family farm. “We’re enjoying it. It’s worked well. He’s gifted in many ways that complement me. He’s way better at mechanical things, mechanics and he’s a pretty good organizer,” Bruce said. “I guess I could do it without him," he added, “but he’s worth way more than one guy, and he has a vested interest, too.” Matthew agreed about their symbiotic relationship. “I get more say, I like that, kind of more freedom to do stuff, but more responsibility,”

www.havredailynews.com he said, adding that splitting problems and work load is helpful, as is the fact that his dad is a good marketer. One other thing that Bruce thinks helps makes the family farm work is the other businesses in the community helping the farmers. “There’s a lot of people that make it work. There’s businesses in town that work with you and you with them, they need you and you need them, like banking and all that.” It helps to have family members who have already forged those working relationships. “For me, when I bought my dad’s corporation, the operating part, well then I already had credit all over town at different businesses in town,” Bruce said, “and they know you and now they know Matt, so it’s helping him get started, too. You’re not coming into an area just plum new. That’s a little hard.” For years, Bruce focused more on cattle than farming with 150 pairs of registered Angus, but switched entirely to farming two years ago, he said, because they were getting spread too thin. He and Matthew had to purchase more equipment, and they planted hay ground to crops and leased out the pasture. “I’m just thankful that I had the opportunity to grow up (farming) and then to pass it on to my son,” he said. “I never did go to college, it’s kind of what I knew I was going to do.”

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FARM & RANCH Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com Nearly 100 years past the last days of homesteading in the state and into an era when corporate agriculture-based buying power is as strong as it ever has been in the U.S., small family-run farms are still alive and well in north-central Montana. No one model defines how these family farms operate successfully. Just as each family is unique so is the business structure of the farms that sustain them.

Three generations working together

File photo Father-and-son farmers Lowell Miller, left, and Dale Miller survey the harvest progress in August 2012. Dale Miller runs the family farm with his son Justin Miller, but he still can count on his dad Lowell Miller to come out of retirement to help where needed during harvest.

Dale and Paula Miller and their family farm about 14,000 acres north of Gildford and run 125 head of registered Simmental cows on more than 9,000 acres of owned and leased pasture. Four of Dale’s great-grandparents homesteaded in Hill County around Gildford and north of Havre. The main Miller homestead is now the Gildford Colony, Dale said, and the cropland of another of the homesteads is farmed by a family member, while Dale uses the pasture land. Dale grew up helping his grandfather, his father, Lowell, and Lowell’s brother, Don, farm and, after returning from college, formally went to work for the two brothers who were then running the farm as a partnership. Because Don’s son would soon be

www.havredailynews.com returning from college to work the farm, the brothers decided to divide the farm up in 1979. This allowed each man to start developing their own farms with their respective families. Lowell, Dale and Dale’s sons Justin and Jared, who teaches full-time, then started expanding their farm to its current size — now under three corporations. Lowell has retired from day-to-day operation of the farm but, Dale said, he helps out during the busy times. Although Don and his family pool together manpower and equipment with Dale and his family to make shorter work of harvest, it’s Dale, Justin and Jared who each own a varying amounts of shares of the three corporations that comprise the farm. Justin, his wife, Becki, and their two young children live in a house they recently built on the family property, and Justin works alongside Dale, whose other son, Jared, works as a teacher in Arlee during the school months and comes back in the summers to help with haying and harvest. When the farm was divided in 1979, Dale was the only one interested in the cattle operation of registered Simmental, and to this day he and Paula are the sole owners of that portion of the family agriculture operation, though Justin helps out, Dale said. “This life is all I’ve ever known with grandpa and then dad and his brother, and it’s always been a family thing,” Dale said. Despite the fact that it was a family operation, he knew early on he had to bring something to the table to take make a place for himself as more than hired hand.

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“I want (my kids) to be interested, and my son does have an interest, but he’s going to school as an engineer, and he’s getting great grades, and he’s going to do so much better as an engineer than what a farm-head could make," he said, adding "I’ll encourage him, but on the other hand, he might have something else going that’s so much better for him. I wouldn’t blame him if he said no, dad." Mariha, the truck driver at harvest, hasn't declared a major yet, but she's doing well at school and all her plans thus far have been to work in the medical or athletic training fields, rather than farming, he said. “But if she wants to be out here, that would be fine with me, too,” he added. “I think when the time comes, I’m really not going to let let the door hit me in the butt. I’ll say ‘hey, take the reins.’” With his son and daughter possibly forging lives that don't include working the family farm, and nieces and nephews who have only shown fleeting interest in farming, Gary has refrained from expanding the farm from a one-man operation. “I can’t compete with those big guys,” he said about farms run as multi-family, multigeneration businesses. While Gary said he looks forward to the off-season when he has time to pursue is love of woodworking, he loves the farm work. As he looks ahead to the future his plan is to continue farming for and with the family, but if none of the younger generation wants to take over the farm he said he won't let the land go from family ownership. “I guess, really, I think I’ll try to leave

FARM & RANCH what I have with my kids and if they farm it great or, if they want to, lease it to the neighbor," Gary said. “That’s how I would see it. Maybe that way it would stay in the family.”

Becoming a firstgeneration farmer “It’s hard to get into (farming) if you’re not born into it. It’s tough ... it’s expensive,” Dale Miller said, adding that “there’s some pretty good programs for beginning farmers.” Miller said he feels that changes to the conservation reserve program, which lowered payment amounts, and that the rise in crop prices, which make agriculture production more lucrative, could benefit people who want to get started in farming but don't have a family connection. “Many of the farmers who got into the CRP program were ones who wanted to retire and did it this way because they didn’t have anyone to pass it along to," he said. "There’s opportunity to get into land purchase." Some programs and resources to help with the first-time farm-buyer are: • http://www.fsa.usda.gov/ • http://www.nal.usda.gov/ric/ricpubs/ small_farm_funding.htm • http://www.farmaid.org/ • http://www.start2farm.gov/ • http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/Home.html • https://attra.ncat.org/calendar/ funding.php • http://www.sare.org/Grants.

File photo Grain is loaded into a truck during harvest at the Miller farm north of Gildford in 2010.

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The families that farm together


Hi-Line Farm & Ranch October 2013