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12 July 2014 12 July 2014 12 July

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Branding Day A Day In In The The A Good Good Day Great Outdoors // Page Page 11 11 Great Montana Montana Outdoors

InInGlasgow Glasgowsee see Derrick, Sheena, Derrick, Sheena,Mike, Mike,ororScott Scott 54275 54275Hwy Hwy2 2East East Glasgow, Glasgow,MT MT59230 59230 406-228-2496 406-228-2496

InInCulbertson Culbertsonsee see See SeeTodd ToddororKyle Kyle 2121West West2nd 2ndSt. St. Culbertson, MT 59218 Culbertson, MT 59218 406-787-6201 406-787-6201

InInPlentywood Plentywoodsee see Bob, Darvin, Bob, Darvin,ororDennis Dennis 804 804East East1st 1stAve. Ave. Plentywood, MT 59254 Plentywood, MT 59254 406-765-1531 406-765-1531

In InCircle Circlesee see See Justin, See Justin,Dustin, Dustin,or or Kyle Kyle Hwy Hwy200 200East East Circle, Circle,MT MT59215 59215 406-485-2145 406-485-2145

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July 2014 July 2014 July 2014

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CowboysUp! Up!Cloud, Cloud,lee, lee,Taylor Taylorin inhall hall AGAGPARTNERS PARTNERSLLC LLC Cowboys

waswas involved in the community. HeHe helped brother looking forfor a place to call home. HeHe waswas Neil By By Bonnie DaviDson Neil involved in the community. helped brother looking a place to call home. Bonnie DaviDson organize the Big Muddy Hereford Association andand born Sept. 7, 1897. When they found their way to TheThe GlasGow Courier organize the Big Muddy Hereford Association born Sept. 7, 1897. When they found their way to GlasGow Courier Scobey Saddle Club andand waswas a member of of it was 1914 andand they eventually claimed Contributing to the culture andand communities of of Montana Scobey Saddle Club a member Montana it was 1914 they eventually claimed thethe Contributing to the culture communities the Montana Stock Growers Association and the land near the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. They Montana over the years can be shown in a variety Montana over the years can be shown in a variety land near the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. They the Montana Stock Growers Association and the farm bureau. HeHe alsoalso served 12 12 years in in sold dairy cows, butbut thethe bigbig of ways. ButBut each year a few areare noticed farm bureau. served years sold dairy cows, of ways. each year a few noticed thethe Montana Legislature,and waswas called business waswas horses. in each of the 12 12 districts of the Montana Montana Legislature,and called business horses. in each of the districts of the Montana thethe “Iron Dukeâ€? forfor standing on on hishis They attempted to expand Cowboy Hall OfOf Fame & Western Heri“Iron Dukeâ€? standing They attempted to expand Cowboy Hall Fame & Western Hericonvictions. intointo Saskatchewan, butbut thethe tage Center. convictions. Saskatchewan, tage Center. Neil passed away on on May 2, 2, 1964, land wasn’t able to produce. Cowboys areare recognized forfor their Neil passed away May 1964, land wasn’t able to produce. Cowboys recognized their after suffering a severe heart attack while Neil was known for his work work, their personalities and their after suffering a severe heart attack while Neil was known for his work work, their personalities and their helping thethe neighbors with their cattle. with horses. HeHe would round Stop over thethe years. This year helping neighbors with their cattle. with horses. would round Stopbybyand andvisit visitwith withusus achievements achievements over years. This year While he he didn’t livelive to atoripe oldold age, he he up up thousands of horses. forfor District 1, 1, which includes Daniels, While didn’t a ripe age, thousands of horses. District which includes Daniels, about aboutyour yourSpring SpringNeeds Needs Phillips, did leave a footprint behind. Fae explained that her Roosevelt, Sheridan and Valley did leave a footprint behind. Fae explained that her Phillips, Roosevelt, Sheridan and Valley Don LeeLee daddad waswas extremely outgoing counties, three individuals were selected * Fertilizers Don extremely outgoing counties, three individuals were selected * Fertilizers Another lover of of horses recognized as well. HeHe would telltell stories forfor recognition. TheThe Living Award went Taylor Another lover horses recognized as well. would stories recognition. Living Award went lee Taylor * Soil lee * SoilSampling Sampling this year for the Legacy Award waswas Don and talk to just about anyone to to John Russell Cloud of Wolf Point/ this year for the Legacy Award Don and talk to just about anyone John Russell Cloud of Wolf Point/ Lee. HeHe wasn’t intointo rounding them up;up; he he who would listen. HeHe married *Chemicals Great Falls, andand Legacy awards went to to Lee. wasn’t rounding them who would listen. married *Chemicals Great Falls, Legacy awards went intointo speed andand probably adrenaline. ForFor Lee, Kenedy on on June 26,26, 1923, in Saskatoon, Don LeeLee of of Dodson andand Edmund “Neilâ€? Taylor speed probably adrenaline. Lee, Florence Kenedy June 1923, in Saskatoon, waswas Don Dodson Edmund “Neilâ€? Taylor Florence *Seed *Seed& &Seed SeedTreatments Treatments of Scobey. it was all about the races and the rodeos. Sask. Their honeymoon took them to Scobey, by Sask. Their honeymoon took them to Scobey, by it was all about the races and the rodeos. of Scobey. waswas born in 1912 on on a family homestead. train. They found a place in the Line Coulee comEdmund “Neilâ€? Taylor We born in 1912 a family homestead. train. They found a place in the Line Coulee com- LeeLee Edmund “Neilâ€? Taylor Weare areyour yourdealer dealerfor for HeHe worked on on thethe homestead thatthat waswas a combimunity in 1925, when their firstfirst daughter Margaret Like daughter, likelike father. Neil Taylor passed worked homestead a combimunity in 1925, when their daughter Margaret Like daughter, father. Neil Taylor passed seed corn &&alfalfa seed corn alfalfa waswas born. FaeFae followed in 1927. away 50 50 years ago, butbut hishis work with horses is still ConTinueD onon PaGe 3 3 born. followed in 1927. away years ago, work with horses is still ConTinueD PaGe June BOM BW Ad Ecommerce not for use in CT or RI Š ŠAd - Ecommerce - not for use in CT or RI June BOM BW – Round-Up Ready Varieties – – remembered. Last year hishis daughter, FaeFae (Taylor) – Round-Up Ready Varieties remembered. Last year daughter, (Taylor) Phillips, waswas given thethe Living Award andand inducted Phillips, given Living Award inducted intointo thethe hallhall of fame. While herher memory isn’t fully of fame. While memory isn’t fully intact, sheshe remembers herher beloved horse named intact, remembers beloved horse named Linda & Mark Nielsen, Linda & Mark Nielsen, Kit,Kit, who waswas given to to herher by by herher dad. SheShe alsoalso SERVING AREA âœŻâœŻ who given dad. SERVING AREA Owners Glasgow – 228-2571 Owners remembers her dad building a cart to hook onto Glasgow – 228-2571 remembers her dad building a cart to hook onto IVESTOCK P RODUCERS L LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS Iva Iva Murch, Manager Murch, Manager an an oldold mare named Daisy to get them fivefive miles Sales: – 263-2571 mare named Daisy to get them miles Sales: Gilbert Gilbert – 263-2571 263-7529 6868 YEARS ! ! FORFOR 263-7529 YEARS down the road for school. down the road for school. Dean Barnes, YardYard Manager Josh – 785-7006 Dean Barnes, Manager Josh – 785-7006 FaeFae took after herher dad. SheShe worked outdoors 1946 - 2014 took after dad. worked outdoors 263-1175 1946 - 2014 263-1175 Your Customer Owned Co-op with thethe horses and livestock. Neil came up to Choose from Your Customer Owned Co-op with horses and livestock. Neil came up to Ed Hinton, Auctioneer Choose from Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 10W-30, 5W-30 Montana the age5W-30 of 16 16 with hishis dad and older 10W-30, June - not for use inwith ordad RI Montana at10W-40 the age of and older 783-7285 JuneBOM BOMBW BWAdAd- Ecommerce - Ecommerce -atand not for use inCT CT or RI 783-7285

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BBranding randingdday ay ItItTakes TakesAA‘Degree’ ‘Degree’Of OfHelp Help

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owow many college he he waswas considerably quiet andand many college considerably quiet degrees does it take somewhat pleasant to to degrees does it take even even somewhat pleasant to brand 120120 calves? around. Except when oneone to brand calves? be be around. Except when There were folks with dude putput a brand on on crooked. There were folks with dude a brand crooked. degrees in farm/ranch manButBut thatthat passed over likelike a fast degrees in farm/ranch manpassed over a fast agement, financial managemoving prairie T-storm. agement, financial managemoving prairie T-storm. ment, teaching andand range One roper found great de-dement, teaching range One roper found great management, andand oneone feller light in dragging calves to the management, feller light in dragging calves to the even owned up up to having four wrasslers andand stopping even owned to having four women women wrasslers stopping degrees, all all involvjustjust exactly where degrees, involvexactly where virGil inging criminal justice the girls would be be virGil criminal justice the girls would andand probation stuff. in “cow flop� when vauPel probation stuff. in “cow flop� when vauPel It was quite a heady they satsat to hold thethe It was quite a heady they to hold bunch of smartness calfcalf down. Quite bunch of smartness down. Quite I found myself sur-suramusing to some. I found myself amusing to some. rounded by,by, indeed. NotNot quite to others. rounded indeed. quite to others. They had all Then the lastlast calfcalf They had all Then the gathered up up on on thethe waswas caught, branded gathered caught, branded south bench to help andand turned loose. south bench to help turned loose. Chris andand Carol TheThe calves in the penpen Chris Carol calves in the Christensen of Hinwere turned outout to to Christensen of Hinwere turned sdale brand a bunch their mommies sdale brand a bunch their mommies THANKS FORFOR findfind THANKS of calves. andand have lunch. of calves. have lunch. LISTENING LISTENING OfOf thethe 45 45 or so TheThe cowboys or so cowboys folks in attendance, and cowgirls hadhad folks in attendance, and cowgirls about halfhalf were teenage andand thethe same thought in mind andand about were teenage same thought in mind under, notnot quite oldold enough lined up up to get their only paypay under, quite enough lined to get their only forfor degrees. Hard workers forfor thethe day. A scrumpdelicious degrees. Hard workers day. A scrumpdelicious nonetheless. homemade meal of biscuits andand nonetheless. homemade meal of biscuits There were ropers, branders, andand pie.pie. There were ropers, branders, beans beans wrasslers, inoculators, cutters, Oh,Oh, andand to answer thethe queswrasslers, inoculators, cutters, to answer questaggers, counters andand sorters. How many degrees does it it taggers, counters sorters. tion: tion: How many degrees does Everyone had a specific job to take to brand 120 calves? Everyone had a specific job to take to brand 120 calves? do do to keep thethe operation runI conjured up up about 24.24. to keep operation runI conjured about ning smoothly. Including thethe four thatthat oneone guyguy ning smoothly. Including four One guy had a degree in told me he had. One guy had a degree in told me he had. roping ‘cause he he could rope Everyone loaded up up their roping ‘cause could rope Everyone loaded their from either sideside of his horse. in their trailers andand from either of his horse. horses horses in their trailers Learned it from a bunch of of headed offoff to the next branding Learned it from a bunch headed to the next branding Australians, I heard. Instead thatthat very afternoon, thus ending Australians, I heard. Instead very afternoon, thus ending of dropping hishis twine from hishis another good dayday in the great of dropping twine from another good in the great right sideside andand under thethe calf, Montana Cowboy Outdoors. right under calf, Montana Cowboy Outdoors. he he kinda houlihanded it right That’s it for now folks. kinda houlihanded it right That’s it for now folks. handed andand snagged thethe calfcalf Thanks forfor listening. handed snagged Thanks listening. on on thethe left.left. Sorta. It happened Cover photo: Brittany Sorta. It happened Cover photo: Brittany so so fastfast mymy eyes could barely Bealer, left,left, who hashas a teaching eyes could barely Bealer, who a teaching keep up. degree, and Kim Suta, who's keep up. degree, and Kim Suta, who's Someone must have working on on a livestock manSomeone must have working a livestock mandropped a valium in the boss’ degree, help brand dropped a valium in the boss’ agement agement degree, help brand coffee thatthat morning because calves in Hinsdale. coffee morning because calves in Hinsdale.

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MSU seeks nominations for outstanding ag leaders

54062 US Highway 2 W Ste 2 BOARD OF SUPERVISORS The public is always invited to the Conservation Glasgow, MT 59230-2846 Jeff Pattison ......................Supervisor – Chair Valley County District’s monthly board meetings which are held the Dick Rohde .......................Supervisor Phone: 406-228-4321 Ext. 101 second Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. in the ConConservation Jody Mason ......................Supervisor ference Room of the USDA Building. vccdmt20@gmail.com District Ron Garwood ...................Supervisor MSU News Service to those who have exhibited outimpact many; an industry leader, or an ag.montana.edu/development/outstanding. Call 228-4321 Ext 101 to verify time and date.awards All VACANTshould ............................Area 5 Supervisor BOZEMAN — Montana State University’s standing leadership in Montana public serupcoming, active and innovative producer; htm. Forms be received at 202 VCCD and NRCS programs are offered on a nondiscrimiCheck us out on Facebook Nancy Heins ......................Urban Supervisor Local Common Sense Conservation College ofnatory Agriculture seeking vice, as an agricultural producer, industry or have a lifetime of achievement in agriLinfield Hall, MSU, Bozeman, MT 59717 by basis withoutisregard to race,nominacolor, national oriwww.facebook.com/valleycd Vice-Chair/Treas. tions for outstanding agricultural leaders to leader, or as a friend culture. Aug. 29. gin, religion, sex, age, marital status or handicap. advocate,foragri-business links to soil webinars and current happenings VACANT ............................Urban Supervisor honor during its 2014 Celebrate Agriculture of agriculture. C u r r e n t M S U , s t a t e, o r f e d e r a l The Celebrate Agriculture event includes Allen tours, Bunk ........................Associate, EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER event Nov. 7-8. The deadline for nominations is Aug. employees, will not be considered except a breakfast, model classes,DPRW current Glenn Duff, interim college dean and director of the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station, said, “The weekend is about sharing ideas and developing relationships.” The College of Agriculture annually presents Outstanding Agricultural Leaders

29. Nominees not selected will be reconsidered the following year. Applications should be updated with current information. Successful award applicants will be: well respected in their agricultural community; actively involved in the agriculture industry with accomplishments that

in the friend of agriculture category. Past MSU, state or federal employees need to have been retired for a minimum of two years, and shown service above and beyond their job requirements to be considered. Download nomination forms at http://

Marvinrelated Tarum ...................Associate, DPRW agricultural research and a visit Sierra Stoneberg-Holt .......Associate with the dean. The Department of Penny Shipp .....................Administrator Ext 101 Agricultural Economics and Economics will NRCS PERSONNEL be hosting an Outlook Conference, where Tracy Cumber ........................................... Ext 126 keynote speakers discuss the state of agriDistrict Conservationist culture in Mike Montana. All events are free Lackner ........................................... Ext.and 123 open to the public. Soil Conservationist

News From The Valley County Conservation District

Over 80 Area Students Attend Annual Outdoor Classroom

The Valley County Conser- made with meal worms. The vation District hosted the 21st students then traveled to KiAnnual Outdoor Classroom for wanis Park where they traveled 5th graders on May 1. Over 80 through and participated in students from 3 local schools eight different stations: range and 17 volunteers from NRCS, plant scavenger hunt and ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — State pigs last year MT as part a $1Extenmillion grazing pilot discussion by Randy DNRC, FWP,ofMSU and federal wildlife managers in New project. sion Most Service, of the work done across Dirkson and Marc Kloker from CMRwas Refuge, Mexico are making progress in their fight New Mexico's eastern and plains. Weed District BLM came DNRC; noxious weed ID by against feral pigs. Mosttogether of the pigs Stone Tihista from the Weed for a removed fun day ofwere natu- female, They say they have eliminated the major- which should put a dent thebegan population's District; interactive river modral education. Theinday ity of invasive porkers from 10 counties, and ability to atmultiply. Eastside School for an ed- eling trailer by Ann Kulczyk progress is being made in another seven The results have been good despite and Nate Ward from DNRC; baible insect presentation by some counties where the pigs have taken up resiuncooperative hindering sic surveying with Jody Mason Roubie private Younkinlandowners and Shelley dency. the effort, heof said. will continue and Dean Jensen from BLM; Mills MSU"We Extension Service to work Alan Live May,fish state director of thebyU.S. with those few folks to Krispie explain the imporcultural presentation and soil followed by Rice treats education presented Tyler HadDepartment of Agriculture's Wildlife tance ofwith whatants we're to do so weeducation can by Tracy Cumber andtrying banana bread dix and Dave Fuller was one ofService eight stations Division at in the Albuquerque, federal hunthopefully achieve statewide eradication 21st Annualsaid Outdoor Classroom.

and Kevin Farr from NRCS; owl pellet examination and education by Ron Selden and Lisa Flowers from MT FWP; horse education and safety by Glenn Guenther and Shaylene Piedalue of CMR Refuge; and live fish education by Tyler Haddix and Dave Fuller from MT FWP. A special thank you to the volunteers for making the day possible, to Ezzie’s for their donation of water and ice for the students and volunteers, and to Eastside School for the lunches they provided for the volunteers.

Kevin Farr ................................................ Ext. 130 Soil Conservationist Technician Levi Doll .................................................. Ext. 118 Civil Engineeer Douglas Jones ......................................... Ext. 122 Civil Engineer Technician John Fahlgren .......................................... Ext. 132 Range Conservationist

New Mexico makes progress against feral pigs And The Winners Are . . . County winners of the VCCD “Dig Deeper-Mysteries in the Soil” were presented with a $5 prize and certificate, and their posters were sent on to the MACD State competition.

ers tracked down and eliminated about 700

someday," May said. Feral pigs have made themselves at home across more than three quarters of the U.S. and are responsible for an estimated $1.5 billion in damages each year. In one year alone, federal managers trapped The Valley County Conservation District announces a new ground and killed water sampling program. Rural water users have expressed concernmore than 32,000 pigs from 28 andoilcollected thousands of samples about the potential effects on water quality andstates supply from to check for the nearly three dozen diseasdevelopment. Water users voiced concerns about chemical storage, esmanagement feral pigs are capable of carrying and production water disposal, frac water injection, waste passing accidents at well-heads or injection pits, accidents and/or spillson dur-to humans, livestock and other Jody Mason and Andrew Linder, Irle School ing chemical and product transportation and largewildlife. withdrawals of Introduced by Spanish explorers cenground water. Pictured are the made the Outdoor Classroom such a success. Back row(L-R): Kevin Farr ago, pigs began to volunteers expand who their The Montana Department of Natural Resourcesturies and ConservaNRCS, Tracy Cumber NRCS, Randy Dirkson DNRC, Nate Ward DNRC, Marc Kloker DNRC, Dave Fuller MT range. Hunters complicated matters by Glenn Guenther CMR Refuge, Tyler Haddix MT FWP & Ron Selden MT FWP. Front Row: Jody Mason tion (DNRC) and Montana Salinity Control Association (MSCA) are FWP, importing Eurasian boars to Weed the U.S. for BLM, Stone Tihista District, Ann Kulczyk DNRC, Shaylene Piedalue CMR Refuge & Lisa Flowers MT assisting the conservation district with this program.sport. The purpose of Generations inpictured the wild, theJensen pigs BLM, Roubie Younkin & Shelley Mills MSU Extension Service. FWP. Not are Dean this program is to establish a baseline of current conditions where have evolved into survivors, willing to eat water quality is potable or usable and/or identifyjust wells about that mayanything and capable of trahave oil and gas development impacts. versing some of the most rugged territoValley County will prioritize and select domesticry. and stockwater Pursuant to 76-15-702, as may assist conservation ing bison/buffalo to our wells to evaluate based on the proximity to a potential Conserva Rasource n c h eofrs Valley a n d faCounty r m e rs h ave c o m - of soil and water resources County. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert contamination such as active or abandoned oil/gasplained wells, injection for years feral and tion about Districtthe hasdamage the authorprevent Darwin or controlhelps ero- JohnThe District is working on trapper, not pictured, set a trail Michael Schmidt, a wildlife wells, waste management or chemical management areas. Landpigs can cause. the loss regulations of crops and sion ityBut to formulate in this district. a bison/buffalo ordinance camera to record the presence of feral hogs near a trap they just set in New owner interest and cooperation and well accessibility will be a part of governing the spread noxious weeds pigs Orleans the usebyofthe lands With this June authority, which provides terminol17. ValAn estimated 5 million swine, descendants of both escaped Jody Mason with Brielle Partridge, of the selection process. Selected wells must be registered with the towithin are proving be more challenging and wild ogy Eurasian boars its boundaries in the in leydomestic County pigs Conservation to protect our imported property by hunters, do Irleabout School $800 milGround Water Information Center (GWIC). In most cases, a well was times of drought. lion in damage year to nationwide. Damage outside farms and populainterest of conserving soil District, in an effort toa proandfarms residents under Monassigned a GWIC number when the well driller filed the Eradication well drill log and efforts in the northeastern control bring and the annual totalMCA to $1.5 billion. A preservative used to cure water resources and tecttion private property tana Statues 81-4-201 and/or through the DNRC water rights process. corner of the state will continue, but the new public baconprotection is being tested poison running for feralathogs. preventing and controlling rights asAnimals large; Scientists with U.S. Department of focus willforinclude twoIncounties New granted Each well selected in this program will be evaluated on-site Agriculture sodium nitrite may be the best erosion. pertinent in part, by thesay Montana 81-4-202 Penalties; 81-4-chance for controlling the big, proMexico's Bootheel region, officials said. field parameters and water availability. Well samples will be analific animals. Valley County Conservation Constitution, is formulating 215 Liability of owners of

Will Your Water Well Be Safe From Oil And Gas Development?

Bison Ordinance In The Works:

lyzed for drinking water quality and for indicators of contamination specific to energy development activities. Well sampling and lab fees total approximately $1,200 per well, but a DNRC grant covers most of the expense so Valley County residents can participate in this program for $40.00. A signed participation agreement from the well owner is also required. If you are interested in participating in this ground water sampling program, please contact Penny Shipp, Administrator for the Valley County Conservation District at 406-228-4321 x 101 or email vccdmt20@gmail.com to begin the sign-up process.

District is authorized to adopt regulations that include any means, measures, operations, and programs

a process to protect property owners from damages and/or danger from outside groups relocating or hous-

stock for trespass; 81-4-208 Killing of animal running at large – notice – posting and service.

Watch for the Valley County Conservation District booth at the Northeast Montana Fair August 2 – 5, 2014. We will have many giveaway and informational items as well as landowner plat books and other items for sale. Stop in and say hello to your local conservation district staff and express your local conservation concerns.

Dick Rohde with Natasha Chamberlain, Nashua High School

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ConTinueDFroM PaGe 2 nation farm and ranch. The raised cattle and horses, and grew hay, sugar beets and grains. Lee took a liking to horses, and as he grew he got involved in horsemanship. He rode the broncs, jockeyed and took part in local rodeos. He began announcing rodeo events in 1932, when the announcer wasn’t going to make it to the rodeo and he stepped up to take his place. This is where he became well known to many along the Hi-Line, as well as in the rodeo circuits. He left to serve during WWII and was in action in the South Pacific and Germany. He later went back to rodeo, retiring in 1953 due to health issues, and moved to Arizona. He died in 1996. John Russell Cloud Overcoming some difficult odds growing up, the Living inductee award for the first District 1 went to John Russell Cloud this year. He was born in November 1927. His family moved to Wolf Point shortly after the bottom dropped out of the economy and banks went dry in 1930. He went through high school working at a hog ranch. He eventually bought a share of N Bar N Ranch. His world shifted at 17 when his father died and he sold his share in ClouD the ranch. After high school he joined the Navy. He was on the USS Presley, discharged in 1946, and returned home. He received a horse, named Kid, and struggled with it because it enjoyed bucking. Kid was left behind when he went off to college in 1951 to obtain a degree in business administration. Kid was given away after no one could ride him. The horse became famous bucking at the rodeo finals in Madison Square Garden. Eventually he heard of a job working for First National Bank in Whitefish. He married a teacher there and they had three children. In 1958, he came to work for Glasgow First National Bank – and he continued working with horses. He stayed in Glasgow a short time and returned to Whitefish in 1962. He was instrumental in creating the Flathead Bank of Big Fork. John divorced in 1977, but remarried with Elaine “Pete” Cuff in 1979. They began ranching 160 acres west of Harlem and did so until retiring from ranching in the 1990s. Pete died from lung cancer in 1997. John later married a high school sweetheart. They live in Great Falls.

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Conserving conservation Conservation program changes include helping new farmers get a start Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com Changes in the finally enacted Farm Bill may shift some conservation efforts, including a push to help new farmers and military veterans get a solid start in the industry. The Farm Bill crafted in 2007 expired two years ago, and gridlock in Washington delayed its successor until t h i s ye a r. T h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f Agriculture — and nutrition programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program that took the place of food stamps and school lunch proHavre Daily News/File photo Unfarmed grasslands are seen south of Havre in this 2012 photo. The new Farm Bill passed earlier this year has expanded a program to help new farmers take over land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program, putting it back into production.

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Guide available on Japanese beetles in Montana MSU News Services BOZEMAN — A guide to help Montanans detect, monitor and control Japanese beetles is now available from Montana State University Extension. Prior to 2013, the Japanese beetle was established in a small area of Billings, but had not spread. In 2013, it was introduced into seven municipalities through shipments of infested nursery stock, said  insect diagnostician Laurie Kerzicnik. The larvae are pests of turf grass. Lawns with yellow patches might indicate an infestation. The adults feed on more than 300 plants, but they prefer roses, apple, grape, cherry, raspberry and linden.  They also eat field crops, vegetables and ornamental bushes. Japanese beetle larvae, also known as grubs, are about one inch long when they

Photo by David Cappaert, Michigan State University Above left: A Japanese beetle larva. Photo by Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood Below left: Japanese beetle adults feed on a rose.

mature. They are off-white, have a C-shaped body and three pairs of legs. Japanese beetle adults can be half an inch long. They have a metallic green, oval body with bronzed outer wings. They have five small tufts of white hair along the sides of their abdomen and two more patches protruding from the last segment of their abdomen. A variety of approaches are available to control Japanese beetles, Kerzicnik said. Montanans can use insecticides or plant resistant species, such as lilacs, spruce and the common chokecherry. They can use biological controls, which include parasites, nematodes, fungi or other organisms. For more information about the Japanese beetle, including its life cycle, behavior, susceptible plants, and control methods, Montanans can request an MSU Extension MontGuide by visiting the online store at http://store.msuextension.org/Products/ Japanese-Beetle__MT201404AG.aspx or emailing orderpubs@montana.edu. The MontGuide was written by Kerzicnik and MSU Extension Horticulture Associate Specialist Toby Day. It is a June 14 publication numbered MT201404AG.

Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org Leaf damage caused by adult Japanese Beetles.


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Conserving conservation: New program to help new farmers get started ■ Continued from page 5 The local figures: • Blaine County dropped from 150,186 acres to 81,217 acres • Chouteau County from 265,015 acres to 172,617 acres • Liberty County from 142,693 acres to 91,872 acres.

An option with new farmers The new Farm Bill also continues and strengthens an option to help move land out of CRP — transitioning it to new farmers. The Transition Incentives Program, known as TIP, allows farmers to receive two additional years of rental payments from the government while they sell or lease the land to eligible farmers — beginning farmers, essentially people who have farmed less than 10 years, and any military veterans or people who meet the definition of minority or socially disadvantaged farmers. In a June release announcing the increase of funds for TIP, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said that while CRP helps prevent erosion, increases conservation and improves wildlife habitat, TIP also helps continue the American farming tradition. "The average age of farmers and ranchers in the United States is 58 years, and twice as many are 65 or older compared to those 45 or younger,” he said in the release. “The cost of buying land is one of the biggest barriers to many interested in getting started in agriculture. The Transition Incentives Program is very useful as we work to help new farmers and ranchers get started." TIP funding was increased by more than 30 percent in the 2014 Farm Bill, providing up to $33 million through 2018. As part of the 2014 Farm Bill, participants meeting specific qualifications also may have the opportunity to terminate their CRP contract during fiscal year 2015 if the contract has been in effect for a minimum of five years and if other conditions are also met. Rispens said the program has attracted attention — in Chouteau County farmers are in the process of using TIP to transfer land in some 30 contracts. In Hill County, Rispens said, some farmers are looking into the program, although contracts have not yet been signed. “Some are kicking the idea around,” he said.

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grams — was running on extensions of previous funding until the new bill was passed this year. The bill passed early this year continues some traditional programs, ends others, including the guaranteed direct payment program that many farmers count on to shore up their income, and scales back others. That includes reducing the cap on the total number of acres enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program over five years from 32 million to 24 million, although farmers seem to be headed that way on their own and the new bill emphasizes some alternatives, including programs that could make up some of the income lost in direct payments.

A decline in CRP enrollment

Havre Daily News/File photo Antelope forage in a stubble field south of Havre in 2012. USDA conservation programs are intended, in part, to help preserve wildlife habitat. One issue is that the program can’t be used to transfer land to a blood relative, but it does help get the land in the hand of new farmers, Rispens said. “It puts a little extra money in to help the new guys get rolling … ,” he said. “It’s a good program.” He added that, although the program has been expanded, it does not have unlimited funds. “When this money runs out, we’re done,” Rispens said. “If people are thinking about this … there’s still money available but it is limited.”

Conservation stewardship And a separate program, this one administered by the USDA’s Natural Resources and Conservation Service, to help farmers and ranchers practice conservation also is expanded in the new Farm Bill.

The Conservation Stewardship Program CSP offers two kinds of payments for farmers and ranchers willing to implement, or continue, conservation practices on their land. The intent of the program is to improve resource conditions including soil quality, water quality, water quantity, air quality and habitat quality. The payments are made in five-year contracts: annual payments for installing new conservation activities and maintaining existing practices; and supplemental payments for adopting a resource-conserving crop rotation. Contracts can be renewed if producers can show they have successfully fulfilled the initial contract and agree to work on additional conservation objectives. Montana Grain Growers Association Past President Ryan McCormick of Kremlin has said in presentations in Havre that CSP could help ag producers make up the income lost by the cancellation of the direct payment program. McCormick said the loss of direct payments is likely to be felt in downtown busi-

nesses in rural America, with a significant loss of income due to the cut. In 2012 Hill County alone saw $6.3 million in direct payments, he said. Along with keeping farms viable in general, if a farmer had a good year the direct payments became disposable income, turning into purchase for remodeling the kitchen, buying an entertainment center, updating vehicles and so on, McCormick said. He said the Farm Bill’s increase in CSP, with the goal of enrolling 10 million new acres a year, could help make up some of the lost direct payment funds. Rispens echoed that, saying CSP could help both make up for money farmers had received from CRP, when they take the land out of that program, as well as the loss in direct payments. Dawn Wickum, NRCS district conservationist for the Chester, Havre and Rocky Boy field offices, said the program has raised interest in this area. “In general, along the Hi-Line it’s very popular,” she said.

A combination of increased grain prices and a reduction of payments in CRP, along with more stringent requirements in the program, already have cut back the number of acres in the program. CRP, administered by the USDA’s Farm Service Agency, has long been bemoaned by some as taking land out of active production and crippling agricultural economies. Others say it provides a consistent income for farmers while providing conservation and wildlife habitat, along with economic benefits from providing habitat, both for wildlife viewers and hunters. In the program, a producer is paid rent in return for taking land out of active production and returning it to native plant life and providing wildlife habitat. Les Rispens, Hill County FSA executive director, said the acres enrolled in this county have dropped by nearly half in the last decade. The peak was in 2007, when 305,000 acres were enrolled in the program in Hill County. Last October, the start of the 2014 fiscal year for the program, that had dropped to 160,143 acres, and 300 contracts are expiring this fall. The delay in the bill’s passing, and in setting up the implementation, has complicated things even more. The continuous signup period, which allows land meeting certain criteria for being environmentally sensitive, began June 9, but Rispens said new contracts in a general signup will not be issued this year, although producers can obtain a one-year extension on eligible land. In Hill County, only about 120 of the 300 expiring contracts are eligible for the extension. Because of that, Hill County “will lose quite a good chunk this year,” Rispens said. But some farmers were not planning to re-enroll their land anyway. Rispens said farmers were planning on taking land, in at least a good two dozen contracts, out regardless. And that trend is common in north-central Montana, with FSA reporting that the counties surrounding Hill also have dropped in the number of CRP enrollments from 2009 to 2013.

■ Continued on page 8

Havre Daily News/File photo Grasslands are seen south of Havre in this 2012 photo. Land actively farmed has increased in north-central Montana in recent years, as farmers put land previously enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program back into production. In Hill County, CRP acreage dropped from 305,000 in 2007 to just more than 160,000 last fall.


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The public is always invited to the Conservation District’s monthly board meetings which are held the second Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. in the Conference Room of the USDA Building. Call 228-4321 Ext 101 to verify time and date. All VCCD and NRCS programs are offered on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status or handicap.

54062 US Highway 2 W Ste 2 Glasgow, MT 59230-2846 Phone: 406-228-4321 Ext. 101 vccdmt20@gmail.com Check us out on Facebook www.facebook.com/valleycd for links to soil webinars and current happenings

www.havredailynews. www.havredailynews.com

Valley County Conservation District Local Common Sense Conservation

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

News From The Valley County Conservation District

Over 80 Area Students Attend Annual Outdoor Classroom

Live fish education presented by Tyler Haddix and Dave Fuller was one of eight stations at the 21st Annual Outdoor Classroom.

The Valley County Conservation District hosted the 21st Annual Outdoor Classroom for 5th graders on May 1. Over 80 students from 3 local schools and 17 volunteers from NRCS, DNRC, MT FWP, MSU Extension Service, CMR Refuge, Weed District and BLM came together for a fun day of natural education. The day began at Eastside School for an edible insect presentation by Roubie Younkin and Shelley Mills of MSU Extension Service followed by Rice Krispie treats with ants and banana bread

made with meal worms. The students then traveled to Kiwanis Park where they traveled through and participated in eight different stations: range plant scavenger hunt and grazing discussion by Randy Dirkson and Marc Kloker from DNRC; noxious weed ID by Stone Tihista from the Weed District; interactive river modeling trailer by Ann Kulczyk and Nate Ward from DNRC; basic surveying with Jody Mason and Dean Jensen from BLM; cultural presentation and soil education by Tracy Cumber

and Kevin Farr from NRCS; owl pellet examination and education by Ron Selden and Lisa Flowers from MT FWP; horse education and safety by Glenn Guenther and Shaylene Piedalue of CMR Refuge; and live fish education by Tyler Haddix and Dave Fuller from MT FWP. A special thank you to the volunteers for making the day possible, to Ezzie’s for their donation of water and ice for the students and volunteers, and to Eastside School for the lunches they provided for the volunteers.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS Jeff Pattison ......................Supervisor – Chair Dick Rohde .......................Supervisor Jody Mason ......................Supervisor Ron Garwood ...................Supervisor VACANT ............................Area 5 Supervisor Nancy Heins ......................Urban Supervisor Vice-Chair/Treas. VACANT ............................Urban Supervisor Allen Bunk ........................Associate, DPRW Marvin Tarum ...................Associate, DPRW Sierra Stoneberg-Holt .......Associate Penny Shipp .....................Administrator Ext 101 NRCS PERSONNEL Tracy Cumber ........................................... Ext 126 District Conservationist Mike Lackner ........................................... Ext. 123 Soil Conservationist Kevin Farr ................................................ Ext. 130 Soil Conservationist Technician Levi Doll .................................................. Ext. 118 Civil Engineeer Douglas Jones ......................................... Ext. 122 Civil Engineer Technician John Fahlgren .......................................... Ext. 132 Range Conservationist

And The Winners Are . . . County winners of the VCCD “Dig Deeper-Mysteries in the Soil” were presented with a $5 prize and certificate, and their posters were sent on to the MACD State competition.

Will Your Water Well Be Safe From Oil And Gas Development? The Valley County Conservation District announces a new ground water sampling program. Rural water users have expressed concern about the potential effects on water quality and supply from oil development. Water users voiced concerns about chemical storage, production water disposal, frac water injection, waste management accidents at well-heads or injection pits, accidents and/or spills during chemical and product transportation and large withdrawals of ground water. The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) and Montana Salinity Control Association (MSCA) are assisting the conservation district with this program. The purpose of this program is to establish a baseline of current conditions where water quality is potable or usable and/or identify wells that may have oil and gas development impacts. Valley County will prioritize and select domestic and stockwater wells to evaluate based on the proximity to a potential source of contamination such as active or abandoned oil/gas wells, injection wells, waste management or chemical management areas. Landowner interest and cooperation and well accessibility will be a part of the selection process. Selected wells must be registered with the Ground Water Information Center (GWIC). In most cases, a well was assigned a GWIC number when the well driller filed the well drill log and/or through the DNRC water rights process. Each well selected in this program will be evaluated on-site for field parameters and water availability. Well samples will be analyzed for drinking water quality and for indicators of contamination specific to energy development activities. Well sampling and lab fees total approximately $1,200 per well, but a DNRC grant covers most of the expense so Valley County residents can participate in this program for $40.00. A signed participation agreement from the well owner is also required. If you are interested in participating in this ground water sampling program, please contact Penny Shipp, Administrator for the Valley County Conservation District at 406-228-4321 x 101 or email vccdmt20@gmail.com to begin the sign-up process.

Jody Mason and Andrew Linder, Irle School Pictured are the volunteers who made the Outdoor Classroom such a success. Back row(L-R): Kevin Farr NRCS, Tracy Cumber NRCS, Randy Dirkson DNRC, Nate Ward DNRC, Marc Kloker DNRC, Dave Fuller MT FWP, Glenn Guenther CMR Refuge, Tyler Haddix MT FWP & Ron Selden MT FWP. Front Row: Jody Mason BLM, Stone Tihista Weed District, Ann Kulczyk DNRC, Shaylene Piedalue CMR Refuge & Lisa Flowers MT FWP. Not pictured are Dean Jensen BLM, Roubie Younkin & Shelley Mills MSU Extension Service.

Bison Ordinance In The Works:

Pursuant to 76-15-702, Valley County Conservation District has the authority to formulate regulations governing the use of lands within its boundaries in the interest of conserving soil and water resources and preventing and controlling erosion. In pertinent part, Valley County Conservation District is authorized to adopt regulations that include any means, measures, operations, and programs

as may assist conservation of soil and water resources and prevent or control erosion in this district. With this authority, Valley County Conservation District, in an effort to protect private property and public protection rights granted by the Montana Constitution, is formulating a process to protect property owners from damages and/or danger from outside groups relocating or hous-

ing bison/buffalo to our County. The District is working on a bison/buffalo ordinance which provides terminology to protect our property and residents under Montana Statues MCA 81-4-201 Animals running at large; 81-4-202 Penalties; 81-4215 Liability of owners of stock for trespass; 81-4-208 Killing of animal running at large – notice – posting and service.

Watch for the Valley County Conservation District booth at the Northeast Montana Fair August 2 – 5, 2014. We will have many giveaway and informational items as well as landowner plat books and other items for sale. Stop in and say hello to your local conservation district staff and express your local conservation concerns.

Jody Mason with Brielle Partridge, Irle School

Dick Rohde with Natasha Chamberlain, Nashua High School

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ConTinueDFroM PaGe 2 nation farm and ranch. The raised cattle and horses, and grew hay, sugar beets and grains. Lee took a liking to horses, and as he grew he got involved in horsemanship. He rode the broncs, jockeyed and took part in local rodeos. He began announcing rodeo events in 1932, when the announcer wasn’t going to make it to the rodeo and he stepped up to take his place. This is where he became well known to many along the Hi-Line, as well as in the rodeo circuits. He left to serve during WWII and was in action in the South Pacific and Germany. He later went back to rodeo, retiring in 1953 due to health issues, and moved to Arizona. He died in 1996. John Russell Cloud Overcoming some difficult odds growing up, the Living inductee award for the first District 1 went to John Russell Cloud this year. He was born in November 1927. His family moved to Wolf Point shortly after the bottom dropped out of the economy and banks went dry in 1930. He went through high school working at a hog ranch. He eventually bought a share of N Bar N Ranch. His world shifted at 17 when his father died and he sold his share in ClouD the ranch. After high school he joined the Navy. He was on the USS Presley, discharged in 1946, and returned home. He received a horse, named Kid, and struggled with it because it enjoyed bucking. Kid was left behind when he went off to college in 1951 to obtain a degree in business administration. Kid was given away after no one could ride him. The horse became famous bucking at the rodeo finals in Madison Square Garden. Eventually he heard of a job working for First National Bank in Whitefish. He married a teacher there and they had three children. In 1958, he came to work for Glasgow First National Bank – and he continued working with horses. He stayed in Glasgow a short time and returned to Whitefish in 1962. He was instrumental in creating the Flathead Bank of Big Fork. John divorced in 1977, but remarried with Elaine “Pete” Cuff in 1979. They began ranching 160 acres west of Harlem and did so until retiring from ranching in the 1990s. Pete died from lung cancer in 1997. John later married a high school sweetheart. They live in Great Falls.

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The public is always invited to the Conservation District’s monthly board meetings which are held the second Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. in the Conference Room of the USDA Building. Call 228-4321 Ext 101 to verify time and date. All VCCD and NRCS programs are offered on a nondiscriminatory basis without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, marital status or handicap.

54062 US Highway 2 W Ste 2 Glasgow, MT 59230-2846 Phone: 406-228-4321 Ext. 101 vccdmt20@gmail.com Check us out on Facebook www.facebook.com/valleycd for links to soil webinars and current happenings

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Valley County Conservation District Local Common Sense Conservation

EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

News From The Valley County Conservation District

Over 80 Area Students Attend Annual Outdoor Classroom

Live fish education presented by Tyler Haddix and Dave Fuller was one of eight stations at the 21st Annual Outdoor Classroom.

The Valley County Conservation District hosted the 21st Annual Outdoor Classroom for 5th graders on May 1. Over 80 students from 3 local schools and 17 volunteers from NRCS, DNRC, MT FWP, MSU Extension Service, CMR Refuge, Weed District and BLM came together for a fun day of natural education. The day began at Eastside School for an edible insect presentation by Roubie Younkin and Shelley Mills of MSU Extension Service followed by Rice Krispie treats with ants and banana bread

made with meal worms. The students then traveled to Kiwanis Park where they traveled through and participated in eight different stations: range plant scavenger hunt and grazing discussion by Randy Dirkson and Marc Kloker from DNRC; noxious weed ID by Stone Tihista from the Weed District; interactive river modeling trailer by Ann Kulczyk and Nate Ward from DNRC; basic surveying with Jody Mason and Dean Jensen from BLM; cultural presentation and soil education by Tracy Cumber

and Kevin Farr from NRCS; owl pellet examination and education by Ron Selden and Lisa Flowers from MT FWP; horse education and safety by Glenn Guenther and Shaylene Piedalue of CMR Refuge; and live fish education by Tyler Haddix and Dave Fuller from MT FWP. A special thank you to the volunteers for making the day possible, to Ezzie’s for their donation of water and ice for the students and volunteers, and to Eastside School for the lunches they provided for the volunteers.

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS Jeff Pattison ......................Supervisor – Chair Dick Rohde .......................Supervisor Jody Mason ......................Supervisor Ron Garwood ...................Supervisor VACANT ............................Area 5 Supervisor Nancy Heins ......................Urban Supervisor Vice-Chair/Treas. VACANT ............................Urban Supervisor Allen Bunk ........................Associate, DPRW Marvin Tarum ...................Associate, DPRW Sierra Stoneberg-Holt .......Associate Penny Shipp .....................Administrator Ext 101 NRCS PERSONNEL Tracy Cumber ........................................... Ext 126 District Conservationist Mike Lackner ........................................... Ext. 123 Soil Conservationist Kevin Farr ................................................ Ext. 130 Soil Conservationist Technician Levi Doll .................................................. Ext. 118 Civil Engineeer Douglas Jones ......................................... Ext. 122 Civil Engineer Technician John Fahlgren .......................................... Ext. 132 Range Conservationist

And The Winners Are . . . County winners of the VCCD “Dig Deeper-Mysteries in the Soil” were presented with a $5 prize and certificate, and their posters were sent on to the MACD State competition.

Will Your Water Well Be Safe From Oil And Gas Development? The Valley County Conservation District announces a new ground water sampling program. Rural water users have expressed concern about the potential effects on water quality and supply from oil development. Water users voiced concerns about chemical storage, production water disposal, frac water injection, waste management accidents at well-heads or injection pits, accidents and/or spills during chemical and product transportation and large withdrawals of ground water. The Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation (DNRC) and Montana Salinity Control Association (MSCA) are assisting the conservation district with this program. The purpose of this program is to establish a baseline of current conditions where water quality is potable or usable and/or identify wells that may have oil and gas development impacts. Valley County will prioritize and select domestic and stockwater wells to evaluate based on the proximity to a potential source of contamination such as active or abandoned oil/gas wells, injection wells, waste management or chemical management areas. Landowner interest and cooperation and well accessibility will be a part of the selection process. Selected wells must be registered with the Ground Water Information Center (GWIC). In most cases, a well was assigned a GWIC number when the well driller filed the well drill log and/or through the DNRC water rights process. Each well selected in this program will be evaluated on-site for field parameters and water availability. Well samples will be analyzed for drinking water quality and for indicators of contamination specific to energy development activities. Well sampling and lab fees total approximately $1,200 per well, but a DNRC grant covers most of the expense so Valley County residents can participate in this program for $40.00. A signed participation agreement from the well owner is also required. If you are interested in participating in this ground water sampling program, please contact Penny Shipp, Administrator for the Valley County Conservation District at 406-228-4321 x 101 or email vccdmt20@gmail.com to begin the sign-up process.

Jody Mason and Andrew Linder, Irle School Pictured are the volunteers who made the Outdoor Classroom such a success. Back row(L-R): Kevin Farr NRCS, Tracy Cumber NRCS, Randy Dirkson DNRC, Nate Ward DNRC, Marc Kloker DNRC, Dave Fuller MT FWP, Glenn Guenther CMR Refuge, Tyler Haddix MT FWP & Ron Selden MT FWP. Front Row: Jody Mason BLM, Stone Tihista Weed District, Ann Kulczyk DNRC, Shaylene Piedalue CMR Refuge & Lisa Flowers MT FWP. Not pictured are Dean Jensen BLM, Roubie Younkin & Shelley Mills MSU Extension Service.

Bison Ordinance In The Works:

Pursuant to 76-15-702, Valley County Conservation District has the authority to formulate regulations governing the use of lands within its boundaries in the interest of conserving soil and water resources and preventing and controlling erosion. In pertinent part, Valley County Conservation District is authorized to adopt regulations that include any means, measures, operations, and programs

as may assist conservation of soil and water resources and prevent or control erosion in this district. With this authority, Valley County Conservation District, in an effort to protect private property and public protection rights granted by the Montana Constitution, is formulating a process to protect property owners from damages and/or danger from outside groups relocating or hous-

ing bison/buffalo to our County. The District is working on a bison/buffalo ordinance which provides terminology to protect our property and residents under Montana Statues MCA 81-4-201 Animals running at large; 81-4-202 Penalties; 81-4215 Liability of owners of stock for trespass; 81-4-208 Killing of animal running at large – notice – posting and service.

Watch for the Valley County Conservation District booth at the Northeast Montana Fair August 2 – 5, 2014. We will have many giveaway and informational items as well as landowner plat books and other items for sale. Stop in and say hello to your local conservation district staff and express your local conservation concerns.

Jody Mason with Brielle Partridge, Irle School

Dick Rohde with Natasha Chamberlain, Nashua High School

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ConTinueDFroM PaGe 2 nation farm and ranch. The raised cattle and horses, and grew hay, sugar beets and grains. Lee took a liking to horses, and as he grew he got involved in horsemanship. He rode the broncs, jockeyed and took part in local rodeos. He began announcing rodeo events in 1932, when the announcer wasn’t going to make it to the rodeo and he stepped up to take his place. This is where he became well known to many along the Hi-Line, as well as in the rodeo circuits. He left to serve during WWII and was in action in the South Pacific and Germany. He later went back to rodeo, retiring in 1953 due to health issues, and moved to Arizona. He died in 1996. John Russell Cloud Overcoming some difficult odds growing up, the Living inductee award for the first District 1 went to John Russell Cloud this year. He was born in November 1927. His family moved to Wolf Point shortly after the bottom dropped out of the economy and banks went dry in 1930. He went through high school working at a hog ranch. He eventually bought a share of N Bar N Ranch. His world shifted at 17 when his father died and he sold his share in ClouD the ranch. After high school he joined the Navy. He was on the USS Presley, discharged in 1946, and returned home. He received a horse, named Kid, and struggled with it because it enjoyed bucking. Kid was left behind when he went off to college in 1951 to obtain a degree in business administration. Kid was given away after no one could ride him. The horse became famous bucking at the rodeo finals in Madison Square Garden. Eventually he heard of a job working for First National Bank in Whitefish. He married a teacher there and they had three children. In 1958, he came to work for Glasgow First National Bank – and he continued working with horses. He stayed in Glasgow a short time and returned to Whitefish in 1962. He was instrumental in creating the Flathead Bank of Big Fork. John divorced in 1977, but remarried with Elaine “Pete” Cuff in 1979. They began ranching 160 acres west of Harlem and did so until retiring from ranching in the 1990s. Pete died from lung cancer in 1997. John later married a high school sweetheart. They live in Great Falls.

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Conserving conservation: New program to help new farmers get started ■ Continued from page 5 The local figures: • Blaine County dropped from 150,186 acres to 81,217 acres • Chouteau County from 265,015 acres to 172,617 acres • Liberty County from 142,693 acres to 91,872 acres.

An option with new farmers The new Farm Bill also continues and strengthens an option to help move land out of CRP — transitioning it to new farmers. The Transition Incentives Program, known as TIP, allows farmers to receive two additional years of rental payments from the government while they sell or lease the land to eligible farmers — beginning farmers, essentially people who have farmed less than 10 years, and any military veterans or people who meet the definition of minority or socially disadvantaged farmers. In a June release announcing the increase of funds for TIP, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack said that while CRP helps prevent erosion, increases conservation and improves wildlife habitat, TIP also helps continue the American farming tradition. "The average age of farmers and ranchers in the United States is 58 years, and twice as many are 65 or older compared to those 45 or younger,” he said in the release. “The cost of buying land is one of the biggest barriers to many interested in getting started in agriculture. The Transition Incentives Program is very useful as we work to help new farmers and ranchers get started." TIP funding was increased by more than 30 percent in the 2014 Farm Bill, providing up to $33 million through 2018. As part of the 2014 Farm Bill, participants meeting specific qualifications also may have the opportunity to terminate their CRP contract during fiscal year 2015 if the contract has been in effect for a minimum of five years and if other conditions are also met. Rispens said the program has attracted attention — in Chouteau County farmers are in the process of using TIP to transfer land in some 30 contracts. In Hill County, Rispens said, some farmers are looking into the program, although contracts have not yet been signed. “Some are kicking the idea around,” he said.

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grams — was running on extensions of previous funding until the new bill was passed this year. The bill passed early this year continues some traditional programs, ends others, including the guaranteed direct payment program that many farmers count on to shore up their income, and scales back others. That includes reducing the cap on the total number of acres enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program over five years from 32 million to 24 million, although farmers seem to be headed that way on their own and the new bill emphasizes some alternatives, including programs that could make up some of the income lost in direct payments.

A decline in CRP enrollment

Havre Daily News/File photo Antelope forage in a stubble field south of Havre in 2012. USDA conservation programs are intended, in part, to help preserve wildlife habitat. One issue is that the program can’t be used to transfer land to a blood relative, but it does help get the land in the hand of new farmers, Rispens said. “It puts a little extra money in to help the new guys get rolling … ,” he said. “It’s a good program.” He added that, although the program has been expanded, it does not have unlimited funds. “When this money runs out, we’re done,” Rispens said. “If people are thinking about this … there’s still money available but it is limited.”

Conservation stewardship And a separate program, this one administered by the USDA’s Natural Resources and Conservation Service, to help farmers and ranchers practice conservation also is expanded in the new Farm Bill.

The Conservation Stewardship Program CSP offers two kinds of payments for farmers and ranchers willing to implement, or continue, conservation practices on their land. The intent of the program is to improve resource conditions including soil quality, water quality, water quantity, air quality and habitat quality. The payments are made in five-year contracts: annual payments for installing new conservation activities and maintaining existing practices; and supplemental payments for adopting a resource-conserving crop rotation. Contracts can be renewed if producers can show they have successfully fulfilled the initial contract and agree to work on additional conservation objectives. Montana Grain Growers Association Past President Ryan McCormick of Kremlin has said in presentations in Havre that CSP could help ag producers make up the income lost by the cancellation of the direct payment program. McCormick said the loss of direct payments is likely to be felt in downtown busi-

nesses in rural America, with a significant loss of income due to the cut. In 2012 Hill County alone saw $6.3 million in direct payments, he said. Along with keeping farms viable in general, if a farmer had a good year the direct payments became disposable income, turning into purchase for remodeling the kitchen, buying an entertainment center, updating vehicles and so on, McCormick said. He said the Farm Bill’s increase in CSP, with the goal of enrolling 10 million new acres a year, could help make up some of the lost direct payment funds. Rispens echoed that, saying CSP could help both make up for money farmers had received from CRP, when they take the land out of that program, as well as the loss in direct payments. Dawn Wickum, NRCS district conservationist for the Chester, Havre and Rocky Boy field offices, said the program has raised interest in this area. “In general, along the Hi-Line it’s very popular,” she said.

A combination of increased grain prices and a reduction of payments in CRP, along with more stringent requirements in the program, already have cut back the number of acres in the program. CRP, administered by the USDA’s Farm Service Agency, has long been bemoaned by some as taking land out of active production and crippling agricultural economies. Others say it provides a consistent income for farmers while providing conservation and wildlife habitat, along with economic benefits from providing habitat, both for wildlife viewers and hunters. In the program, a producer is paid rent in return for taking land out of active production and returning it to native plant life and providing wildlife habitat. Les Rispens, Hill County FSA executive director, said the acres enrolled in this county have dropped by nearly half in the last decade. The peak was in 2007, when 305,000 acres were enrolled in the program in Hill County. Last October, the start of the 2014 fiscal year for the program, that had dropped to 160,143 acres, and 300 contracts are expiring this fall. The delay in the bill’s passing, and in setting up the implementation, has complicated things even more. The continuous signup period, which allows land meeting certain criteria for being environmentally sensitive, began June 9, but Rispens said new contracts in a general signup will not be issued this year, although producers can obtain a one-year extension on eligible land. In Hill County, only about 120 of the 300 expiring contracts are eligible for the extension. Because of that, Hill County “will lose quite a good chunk this year,” Rispens said. But some farmers were not planning to re-enroll their land anyway. Rispens said farmers were planning on taking land, in at least a good two dozen contracts, out regardless. And that trend is common in north-central Montana, with FSA reporting that the counties surrounding Hill also have dropped in the number of CRP enrollments from 2009 to 2013.

■ Continued on page 8

Havre Daily News/File photo Grasslands are seen south of Havre in this 2012 photo. Land actively farmed has increased in north-central Montana in recent years, as farmers put land previously enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program back into production. In Hill County, CRP acreage dropped from 305,000 in 2007 to just more than 160,000 last fall.


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Conserving conservation Conservation program changes include helping new farmers get a start Tim Leeds tleeds@havredailynews.com Changes in the finally enacted Farm Bill may shift some conservation efforts, including a push to help new farmers and military veterans get a solid start in the industry. The Farm Bill crafted in 2007 expired two years ago, and gridlock in Washington delayed its successor until t h i s ye a r. T h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f Agriculture — and nutrition programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program that took the place of food stamps and school lunch proHavre Daily News/File photo Unfarmed grasslands are seen south of Havre in this 2012 photo. The new Farm Bill passed earlier this year has expanded a program to help new farmers take over land enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program, putting it back into production.

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Guide available on Japanese beetles in Montana MSU News Services BOZEMAN — A guide to help Montanans detect, monitor and control Japanese beetles is now available from Montana State University Extension. Prior to 2013, the Japanese beetle was established in a small area of Billings, but had not spread. In 2013, it was introduced into seven municipalities through shipments of infested nursery stock, said  insect diagnostician Laurie Kerzicnik. The larvae are pests of turf grass. Lawns with yellow patches might indicate an infestation. The adults feed on more than 300 plants, but they prefer roses, apple, grape, cherry, raspberry and linden.  They also eat field crops, vegetables and ornamental bushes. Japanese beetle larvae, also known as grubs, are about one inch long when they

Photo by David Cappaert, Michigan State University Above left: A Japanese beetle larva. Photo by Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood Below left: Japanese beetle adults feed on a rose.

mature. They are off-white, have a C-shaped body and three pairs of legs. Japanese beetle adults can be half an inch long. They have a metallic green, oval body with bronzed outer wings. They have five small tufts of white hair along the sides of their abdomen and two more patches protruding from the last segment of their abdomen. A variety of approaches are available to control Japanese beetles, Kerzicnik said. Montanans can use insecticides or plant resistant species, such as lilacs, spruce and the common chokecherry. They can use biological controls, which include parasites, nematodes, fungi or other organisms. For more information about the Japanese beetle, including its life cycle, behavior, susceptible plants, and control methods, Montanans can request an MSU Extension MontGuide by visiting the online store at http://store.msuextension.org/Products/ Japanese-Beetle__MT201404AG.aspx or emailing orderpubs@montana.edu. The MontGuide was written by Kerzicnik and MSU Extension Horticulture Associate Specialist Toby Day. It is a June 14 publication numbered MT201404AG.

Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org Leaf damage caused by adult Japanese Beetles.


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MSU seeks nominations for outstanding ag leaders

54062 US Highway 2 W Ste 2 BOARD OF SUPERVISORS The public is always invited to the Conservation Glasgow, MT 59230-2846 Jeff Pattison ......................Supervisor – Chair Valley County District’s monthly board meetings which are held the Dick Rohde .......................Supervisor Phone: 406-228-4321 Ext. 101 second Tuesday of each month at 1:00 p.m. in the ConConservation Jody Mason ......................Supervisor ference Room of the USDA Building. vccdmt20@gmail.com District Ron Garwood ...................Supervisor MSU News Service to those who have exhibited outimpact many; an industry leader, or an ag.montana.edu/development/outstanding. Call 228-4321 Ext 101 to verify time and date.awards All VACANTshould ............................Area 5 Supervisor BOZEMAN — Montana State University’s standing leadership in Montana public serupcoming, active and innovative producer; htm. Forms be received at 202 VCCD and NRCS programs are offered on a nondiscrimiCheck us out on Facebook Nancy Heins ......................Urban Supervisor Local Common Sense Conservation College ofnatory Agriculture seeking vice, as an agricultural producer, industry or have a lifetime of achievement in agriLinfield Hall, MSU, Bozeman, MT 59717 by basis withoutisregard to race,nominacolor, national oriwww.facebook.com/valleycd Vice-Chair/Treas. tions for outstanding agricultural leaders to leader, or as a friend culture. Aug. 29. gin, religion, sex, age, marital status or handicap. advocate,foragri-business links to soil webinars and current happenings VACANT ............................Urban Supervisor honor during its 2014 Celebrate Agriculture of agriculture. C u r r e n t M S U , s t a t e, o r f e d e r a l The Celebrate Agriculture event includes Allen tours, Bunk ........................Associate, EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER event Nov. 7-8. The deadline for nominations is Aug. employees, will not be considered except a breakfast, model classes,DPRW current Glenn Duff, interim college dean and director of the Montana Agricultural Experiment Station, said, “The weekend is about sharing ideas and developing relationships.” The College of Agriculture annually presents Outstanding Agricultural Leaders

29. Nominees not selected will be reconsidered the following year. Applications should be updated with current information. Successful award applicants will be: well respected in their agricultural community; actively involved in the agriculture industry with accomplishments that

in the friend of agriculture category. Past MSU, state or federal employees need to have been retired for a minimum of two years, and shown service above and beyond their job requirements to be considered. Download nomination forms at http://

Marvinrelated Tarum ...................Associate, DPRW agricultural research and a visit Sierra Stoneberg-Holt .......Associate with the dean. The Department of Penny Shipp .....................Administrator Ext 101 Agricultural Economics and Economics will NRCS PERSONNEL be hosting an Outlook Conference, where Tracy Cumber ........................................... Ext 126 keynote speakers discuss the state of agriDistrict Conservationist culture in Mike Montana. All events are free Lackner ........................................... Ext.and 123 open to the public. Soil Conservationist

News From The Valley County Conservation District

Over 80 Area Students Attend Annual Outdoor Classroom

The Valley County Conser- made with meal worms. The vation District hosted the 21st students then traveled to KiAnnual Outdoor Classroom for wanis Park where they traveled 5th graders on May 1. Over 80 through and participated in students from 3 local schools eight different stations: range and 17 volunteers from NRCS, plant scavenger hunt and ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — State pigs last year MT as part a $1Extenmillion grazing pilot discussion by Randy DNRC, FWP,ofMSU and federal wildlife managers in New project. sion Most Service, of the work done across Dirkson and Marc Kloker from CMRwas Refuge, Mexico are making progress in their fight New Mexico's eastern and plains. Weed District BLM came DNRC; noxious weed ID by against feral pigs. Mosttogether of the pigs Stone Tihista from the Weed for a removed fun day ofwere natu- female, They say they have eliminated the major- which should put a dent thebegan population's District; interactive river modral education. Theinday ity of invasive porkers from 10 counties, and ability to atmultiply. Eastside School for an ed- eling trailer by Ann Kulczyk progress is being made in another seven The results have been good despite and Nate Ward from DNRC; baible insect presentation by some counties where the pigs have taken up resiuncooperative hindering sic surveying with Jody Mason Roubie private Younkinlandowners and Shelley dency. the effort, heof said. will continue and Dean Jensen from BLM; Mills MSU"We Extension Service to work Alan Live May,fish state director of thebyU.S. with those few folks to Krispie explain the imporcultural presentation and soil followed by Rice treats education presented Tyler HadDepartment of Agriculture's Wildlife tance ofwith whatants we're to do so weeducation can by Tracy Cumber andtrying banana bread dix and Dave Fuller was one ofService eight stations Division at in the Albuquerque, federal hunthopefully achieve statewide eradication 21st Annualsaid Outdoor Classroom.

and Kevin Farr from NRCS; owl pellet examination and education by Ron Selden and Lisa Flowers from MT FWP; horse education and safety by Glenn Guenther and Shaylene Piedalue of CMR Refuge; and live fish education by Tyler Haddix and Dave Fuller from MT FWP. A special thank you to the volunteers for making the day possible, to Ezzie’s for their donation of water and ice for the students and volunteers, and to Eastside School for the lunches they provided for the volunteers.

Kevin Farr ................................................ Ext. 130 Soil Conservationist Technician Levi Doll .................................................. Ext. 118 Civil Engineeer Douglas Jones ......................................... Ext. 122 Civil Engineer Technician John Fahlgren .......................................... Ext. 132 Range Conservationist

New Mexico makes progress against feral pigs And The Winners Are . . . County winners of the VCCD “Dig Deeper-Mysteries in the Soil” were presented with a $5 prize and certificate, and their posters were sent on to the MACD State competition.

ers tracked down and eliminated about 700

someday," May said. Feral pigs have made themselves at home across more than three quarters of the U.S. and are responsible for an estimated $1.5 billion in damages each year. In one year alone, federal managers trapped The Valley County Conservation District announces a new ground and killed water sampling program. Rural water users have expressed concernmore than 32,000 pigs from 28 andoilcollected thousands of samples about the potential effects on water quality andstates supply from to check for the nearly three dozen diseasdevelopment. Water users voiced concerns about chemical storage, esmanagement feral pigs are capable of carrying and production water disposal, frac water injection, waste passing accidents at well-heads or injection pits, accidents and/or spillson dur-to humans, livestock and other Jody Mason and Andrew Linder, Irle School ing chemical and product transportation and largewildlife. withdrawals of Introduced by Spanish explorers cenground water. Pictured are the made the Outdoor Classroom such a success. Back row(L-R): Kevin Farr ago, pigs began to volunteers expand who their The Montana Department of Natural Resourcesturies and ConservaNRCS, Tracy Cumber NRCS, Randy Dirkson DNRC, Nate Ward DNRC, Marc Kloker DNRC, Dave Fuller MT range. Hunters complicated matters by Glenn Guenther CMR Refuge, Tyler Haddix MT FWP & Ron Selden MT FWP. Front Row: Jody Mason tion (DNRC) and Montana Salinity Control Association (MSCA) are FWP, importing Eurasian boars to Weed the U.S. for BLM, Stone Tihista District, Ann Kulczyk DNRC, Shaylene Piedalue CMR Refuge & Lisa Flowers MT assisting the conservation district with this program.sport. The purpose of Generations inpictured the wild, theJensen pigs BLM, Roubie Younkin & Shelley Mills MSU Extension Service. FWP. Not are Dean this program is to establish a baseline of current conditions where have evolved into survivors, willing to eat water quality is potable or usable and/or identifyjust wells about that mayanything and capable of trahave oil and gas development impacts. versing some of the most rugged territoValley County will prioritize and select domesticry. and stockwater Pursuant to 76-15-702, as may assist conservation ing bison/buffalo to our wells to evaluate based on the proximity to a potential Conserva Rasource n c h eofrs Valley a n d faCounty r m e rs h ave c o m - of soil and water resources County. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert contamination such as active or abandoned oil/gasplained wells, injection for years feral and tion about Districtthe hasdamage the authorprevent Darwin or controlhelps ero- JohnThe District is working on trapper, not pictured, set a trail Michael Schmidt, a wildlife wells, waste management or chemical management areas. Landpigs can cause. the loss regulations of crops and sion ityBut to formulate in this district. a bison/buffalo ordinance camera to record the presence of feral hogs near a trap they just set in New owner interest and cooperation and well accessibility will be a part of governing the spread noxious weeds pigs Orleans the usebyofthe lands With this June authority, which provides terminol17. ValAn estimated 5 million swine, descendants of both escaped Jody Mason with Brielle Partridge, of the selection process. Selected wells must be registered with the towithin are proving be more challenging and wild ogy Eurasian boars its boundaries in the in leydomestic County pigs Conservation to protect our imported property by hunters, do Irleabout School $800 milGround Water Information Center (GWIC). In most cases, a well was times of drought. lion in damage year to nationwide. Damage outside farms and populainterest of conserving soil District, in an effort toa proandfarms residents under Monassigned a GWIC number when the well driller filed the Eradication well drill log and efforts in the northeastern control bring and the annual totalMCA to $1.5 billion. A preservative used to cure water resources and tecttion private property tana Statues 81-4-201 and/or through the DNRC water rights process. corner of the state will continue, but the new public baconprotection is being tested poison running for feralathogs. preventing and controlling rights asAnimals large; Scientists with U.S. Department of focus willforinclude twoIncounties New granted Each well selected in this program will be evaluated on-site Agriculture sodium nitrite may be the best erosion. pertinent in part, by thesay Montana 81-4-202 Penalties; 81-4-chance for controlling the big, proMexico's Bootheel region, officials said. field parameters and water availability. Well samples will be analific animals. Valley County Conservation Constitution, is formulating 215 Liability of owners of

Will Your Water Well Be Safe From Oil And Gas Development?

Bison Ordinance In The Works:

lyzed for drinking water quality and for indicators of contamination specific to energy development activities. Well sampling and lab fees total approximately $1,200 per well, but a DNRC grant covers most of the expense so Valley County residents can participate in this program for $40.00. A signed participation agreement from the well owner is also required. If you are interested in participating in this ground water sampling program, please contact Penny Shipp, Administrator for the Valley County Conservation District at 406-228-4321 x 101 or email vccdmt20@gmail.com to begin the sign-up process.

District is authorized to adopt regulations that include any means, measures, operations, and programs

a process to protect property owners from damages and/or danger from outside groups relocating or hous-

stock for trespass; 81-4-208 Killing of animal running at large – notice – posting and service.

Watch for the Valley County Conservation District booth at the Northeast Montana Fair August 2 – 5, 2014. We will have many giveaway and informational items as well as landowner plat books and other items for sale. Stop in and say hello to your local conservation district staff and express your local conservation concerns.

Dick Rohde with Natasha Chamberlain, Nashua High School

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ConTinueDFroM PaGe 2 nation farm and ranch. The raised cattle and horses, and grew hay, sugar beets and grains. Lee took a liking to horses, and as he grew he got involved in horsemanship. He rode the broncs, jockeyed and took part in local rodeos. He began announcing rodeo events in 1932, when the announcer wasn’t going to make it to the rodeo and he stepped up to take his place. This is where he became well known to many along the Hi-Line, as well as in the rodeo circuits. He left to serve during WWII and was in action in the South Pacific and Germany. He later went back to rodeo, retiring in 1953 due to health issues, and moved to Arizona. He died in 1996. John Russell Cloud Overcoming some difficult odds growing up, the Living inductee award for the first District 1 went to John Russell Cloud this year. He was born in November 1927. His family moved to Wolf Point shortly after the bottom dropped out of the economy and banks went dry in 1930. He went through high school working at a hog ranch. He eventually bought a share of N Bar N Ranch. His world shifted at 17 when his father died and he sold his share in ClouD the ranch. After high school he joined the Navy. He was on the USS Presley, discharged in 1946, and returned home. He received a horse, named Kid, and struggled with it because it enjoyed bucking. Kid was left behind when he went off to college in 1951 to obtain a degree in business administration. Kid was given away after no one could ride him. The horse became famous bucking at the rodeo finals in Madison Square Garden. Eventually he heard of a job working for First National Bank in Whitefish. He married a teacher there and they had three children. In 1958, he came to work for Glasgow First National Bank – and he continued working with horses. He stayed in Glasgow a short time and returned to Whitefish in 1962. He was instrumental in creating the Flathead Bank of Big Fork. John divorced in 1977, but remarried with Elaine “Pete” Cuff in 1979. They began ranching 160 acres west of Harlem and did so until retiring from ranching in the 1990s. Pete died from lung cancer in 1997. John later married a high school sweetheart. They live in Great Falls.

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July 2014 July 2014 July 2014

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CowboysUp! Up!Cloud, Cloud,lee, lee,Taylor Taylorin inhall hall AGAGPARTNERS PARTNERSLLC LLC Cowboys

waswas involved in the community. HeHe helped brother looking forfor a place to call home. HeHe waswas Neil By By Bonnie DaviDson Neil involved in the community. helped brother looking a place to call home. Bonnie DaviDson organize the Big Muddy Hereford Association andand born Sept. 7, 1897. When they found their way to TheThe GlasGow Courier organize the Big Muddy Hereford Association born Sept. 7, 1897. When they found their way to GlasGow Courier Scobey Saddle Club andand waswas a member of of it was 1914 andand they eventually claimed Contributing to the culture andand communities of of Montana Scobey Saddle Club a member Montana it was 1914 they eventually claimed thethe Contributing to the culture communities the Montana Stock Growers Association and the land near the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. They Montana over the years can be shown in a variety Montana over the years can be shown in a variety land near the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. They the Montana Stock Growers Association and the farm bureau. HeHe alsoalso served 12 12 years in in sold dairy cows, butbut thethe bigbig of ways. ButBut each year a few areare noticed farm bureau. served years sold dairy cows, of ways. each year a few noticed thethe Montana Legislature,and waswas called business waswas horses. in each of the 12 12 districts of the Montana Montana Legislature,and called business horses. in each of the districts of the Montana thethe “Iron Dukeâ€? forfor standing on on hishis They attempted to expand Cowboy Hall OfOf Fame & Western Heri“Iron Dukeâ€? standing They attempted to expand Cowboy Hall Fame & Western Hericonvictions. intointo Saskatchewan, butbut thethe tage Center. convictions. Saskatchewan, tage Center. Neil passed away on on May 2, 2, 1964, land wasn’t able to produce. Cowboys areare recognized forfor their Neil passed away May 1964, land wasn’t able to produce. Cowboys recognized their after suffering a severe heart attack while Neil was known for his work work, their personalities and their after suffering a severe heart attack while Neil was known for his work work, their personalities and their helping thethe neighbors with their cattle. with horses. HeHe would round Stop over thethe years. This year helping neighbors with their cattle. with horses. would round Stopbybyand andvisit visitwith withusus achievements achievements over years. This year While he he didn’t livelive to atoripe oldold age, he he up up thousands of horses. forfor District 1, 1, which includes Daniels, While didn’t a ripe age, thousands of horses. District which includes Daniels, about aboutyour yourSpring SpringNeeds Needs Phillips, did leave a footprint behind. Fae explained that her Roosevelt, Sheridan and Valley did leave a footprint behind. Fae explained that her Phillips, Roosevelt, Sheridan and Valley Don LeeLee daddad waswas extremely outgoing counties, three individuals were selected * Fertilizers Don extremely outgoing counties, three individuals were selected * Fertilizers Another lover of of horses recognized as well. HeHe would telltell stories forfor recognition. TheThe Living Award went Taylor Another lover horses recognized as well. would stories recognition. Living Award went lee Taylor * Soil lee * SoilSampling Sampling this year for the Legacy Award waswas Don and talk to just about anyone to to John Russell Cloud of Wolf Point/ this year for the Legacy Award Don and talk to just about anyone John Russell Cloud of Wolf Point/ Lee. HeHe wasn’t intointo rounding them up;up; he he who would listen. HeHe married *Chemicals Great Falls, andand Legacy awards went to to Lee. wasn’t rounding them who would listen. married *Chemicals Great Falls, Legacy awards went intointo speed andand probably adrenaline. ForFor Lee, Kenedy on on June 26,26, 1923, in Saskatoon, Don LeeLee of of Dodson andand Edmund “Neilâ€? Taylor speed probably adrenaline. Lee, Florence Kenedy June 1923, in Saskatoon, waswas Don Dodson Edmund “Neilâ€? Taylor Florence *Seed *Seed& &Seed SeedTreatments Treatments of Scobey. it was all about the races and the rodeos. Sask. Their honeymoon took them to Scobey, by Sask. Their honeymoon took them to Scobey, by it was all about the races and the rodeos. of Scobey. waswas born in 1912 on on a family homestead. train. They found a place in the Line Coulee comEdmund “Neilâ€? Taylor We born in 1912 a family homestead. train. They found a place in the Line Coulee com- LeeLee Edmund “Neilâ€? Taylor Weare areyour yourdealer dealerfor for HeHe worked on on thethe homestead thatthat waswas a combimunity in 1925, when their firstfirst daughter Margaret Like daughter, likelike father. Neil Taylor passed worked homestead a combimunity in 1925, when their daughter Margaret Like daughter, father. Neil Taylor passed seed corn &&alfalfa seed corn alfalfa waswas born. FaeFae followed in 1927. away 50 50 years ago, butbut hishis work with horses is still ConTinueD onon PaGe 3 3 born. followed in 1927. away years ago, work with horses is still ConTinueD PaGe June BOM BW Ad Ecommerce not for use in CT or RI Š ŠAd - Ecommerce - not for use in CT or RI June BOM BW – Round-Up Ready Varieties – – remembered. Last year hishis daughter, FaeFae (Taylor) – Round-Up Ready Varieties remembered. Last year daughter, (Taylor) Phillips, waswas given thethe Living Award andand inducted Phillips, given Living Award inducted intointo thethe hallhall of fame. While herher memory isn’t fully of fame. While memory isn’t fully intact, sheshe remembers herher beloved horse named intact, remembers beloved horse named Linda & Mark Nielsen, Linda & Mark Nielsen, Kit,Kit, who waswas given to to herher by by herher dad. SheShe alsoalso SERVING AREA âœŻâœŻ who given dad. SERVING AREA Owners Glasgow – 228-2571 Owners remembers her dad building a cart to hook onto Glasgow – 228-2571 remembers her dad building a cart to hook onto IVESTOCK P RODUCERS L LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS Iva Iva Murch, Manager Murch, Manager an an oldold mare named Daisy to get them fivefive miles Sales: – 263-2571 mare named Daisy to get them miles Sales: Gilbert Gilbert – 263-2571 263-7529 6868 YEARS ! ! FORFOR 263-7529 YEARS down the road for school. down the road for school. Dean Barnes, YardYard Manager Josh – 785-7006 Dean Barnes, Manager Josh – 785-7006 FaeFae took after herher dad. SheShe worked outdoors 1946 - 2014 took after dad. worked outdoors 263-1175 1946 - 2014 263-1175 Your Customer Owned Co-op with thethe horses and livestock. Neil came up to Choose from Your Customer Owned Co-op with horses and livestock. Neil came up to Ed Hinton, Auctioneer Choose from Ed Hinton, Auctioneer 10W-30, 5W-30 Montana the age5W-30 of 16 16 with hishis dad and older 10W-30, June - not for use inwith ordad RI Montana at10W-40 the age of and older 783-7285 JuneBOM BOMBW BWAdAd- Ecommerce - Ecommerce -atand not for use inCT CT or RI 783-7285

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BBranding randingdday ay ItItTakes TakesAA‘Degree’ ‘Degree’Of OfHelp Help

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owow many college he he waswas considerably quiet andand many college considerably quiet degrees does it take somewhat pleasant to to degrees does it take even even somewhat pleasant to brand 120120 calves? around. Except when oneone to brand calves? be be around. Except when There were folks with dude putput a brand on on crooked. There were folks with dude a brand crooked. degrees in farm/ranch manButBut thatthat passed over likelike a fast degrees in farm/ranch manpassed over a fast agement, financial managemoving prairie T-storm. agement, financial managemoving prairie T-storm. ment, teaching andand range One roper found great de-dement, teaching range One roper found great management, andand oneone feller light in dragging calves to the management, feller light in dragging calves to the even owned up up to having four wrasslers andand stopping even owned to having four women women wrasslers stopping degrees, all all involvjustjust exactly where degrees, involvexactly where virGil inging criminal justice the girls would be be virGil criminal justice the girls would andand probation stuff. in “cow flop� when vauPel probation stuff. in “cow flop� when vauPel It was quite a heady they satsat to hold thethe It was quite a heady they to hold bunch of smartness calfcalf down. Quite bunch of smartness down. Quite I found myself sur-suramusing to some. I found myself amusing to some. rounded by,by, indeed. NotNot quite to others. rounded indeed. quite to others. They had all Then the lastlast calfcalf They had all Then the gathered up up on on thethe waswas caught, branded gathered caught, branded south bench to help andand turned loose. south bench to help turned loose. Chris andand Carol TheThe calves in the penpen Chris Carol calves in the Christensen of Hinwere turned outout to to Christensen of Hinwere turned sdale brand a bunch their mommies sdale brand a bunch their mommies THANKS FORFOR findfind THANKS of calves. andand have lunch. of calves. have lunch. LISTENING LISTENING OfOf thethe 45 45 or so TheThe cowboys or so cowboys folks in attendance, and cowgirls hadhad folks in attendance, and cowgirls about halfhalf were teenage andand thethe same thought in mind andand about were teenage same thought in mind under, notnot quite oldold enough lined up up to get their only paypay under, quite enough lined to get their only forfor degrees. Hard workers forfor thethe day. A scrumpdelicious degrees. Hard workers day. A scrumpdelicious nonetheless. homemade meal of biscuits andand nonetheless. homemade meal of biscuits There were ropers, branders, andand pie.pie. There were ropers, branders, beans beans wrasslers, inoculators, cutters, Oh,Oh, andand to answer thethe queswrasslers, inoculators, cutters, to answer questaggers, counters andand sorters. How many degrees does it it taggers, counters sorters. tion: tion: How many degrees does Everyone had a specific job to take to brand 120 calves? Everyone had a specific job to take to brand 120 calves? do do to keep thethe operation runI conjured up up about 24.24. to keep operation runI conjured about ning smoothly. Including thethe four thatthat oneone guyguy ning smoothly. Including four One guy had a degree in told me he had. One guy had a degree in told me he had. roping ‘cause he he could rope Everyone loaded up up their roping ‘cause could rope Everyone loaded their from either sideside of his horse. in their trailers andand from either of his horse. horses horses in their trailers Learned it from a bunch of of headed offoff to the next branding Learned it from a bunch headed to the next branding Australians, I heard. Instead thatthat very afternoon, thus ending Australians, I heard. Instead very afternoon, thus ending of dropping hishis twine from hishis another good dayday in the great of dropping twine from another good in the great right sideside andand under thethe calf, Montana Cowboy Outdoors. right under calf, Montana Cowboy Outdoors. he he kinda houlihanded it right That’s it for now folks. kinda houlihanded it right That’s it for now folks. handed andand snagged thethe calfcalf Thanks forfor listening. handed snagged Thanks listening. on on thethe left.left. Sorta. It happened Cover photo: Brittany Sorta. It happened Cover photo: Brittany so so fastfast mymy eyes could barely Bealer, left,left, who hashas a teaching eyes could barely Bealer, who a teaching keep up. degree, and Kim Suta, who's keep up. degree, and Kim Suta, who's Someone must have working on on a livestock manSomeone must have working a livestock mandropped a valium in the boss’ degree, help brand dropped a valium in the boss’ agement agement degree, help brand coffee thatthat morning because calves in Hinsdale. coffee morning because calves in Hinsdale.

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Branding Day A Day In In The The A Good Good Day Great Outdoors // Page Page 11 11 Great Montana Montana Outdoors

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Hi-Line Farm & Ranch - July 2014