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Havre Daily News/File photo Riders herd longhorn cattle into the arena at the Great Northern Fairgroujnds during the 2018 Great Northern Fair.


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Improvements made at the Great Northern Fairgrounds Derek Hann dshann@havredailynews.com Since last year, the Great Northern Fair Board has made a number of improvements to the fairgrounds. “I think that we are making good progress, and we just need to keep chipping away at these things,” fair board chair Tyler Smith said. One of the large improvements to the fairground is that the food booth area, the 4-H Chuckwagon, the Bigger Better Barn and the RV campgrounds will all have free internet access, he said. He added that the internet is through Triangle Communications and has been long overdue on the fairgrounds. “We should have had internet access there quite a long time ago,” he said. Something that was brought to his attention last year, he said, was the condition of the pavement and the portable restroom on the west side of the fairgrounds, both of which have been fixed. Last year, the pavement was in significantly bad condition and created a tripping hazard to visitors, he said. “In my opinion somebody would have gotten hurt on it,” he said. Last winter was also hard on the pavement and left it in dire need, so the fair board had almost 9,000 sq. feet laid, he said. He added that he is excited about the paving improvements, espe-

cially by the food booths and the awning because that’s where it was needed most. Some of the other improvements include transportation of people to and from the parking area by the Hill County 4-H Club for this fair season, transporting; increased maintenance and general grounds keeping; hiring a new fairgrounds manager; and installing air conditioning in the community center. He added that, hopefully before the fair starts, they will be able to move the RV dump to a more convenient spot. Smith said he is also excited about the new fair office, which is in a remodeled section of the former H. Earl Clack Memorial Museum building on the north side of the fairgrounds. He added that the board was still in the process of moving into the new building at the time of this interview, hopefully competing the move before the fair starts. They started construction of the office May 15 with Clausen and Sons contracted to do the remodel. The building now has a dividing wall for the office as well as a new handicap accessible bathroom. “We had a water break in the old office and the old office just wasn’t laid out very well,” he said, adding that they were unable to hold their meetings in the old office. “It ends up being a shade bigger than what the old office was, but just a much

■ See Improvements Page 10 Havre Daily News/File photo Donors and 4-H Chuckwagon committee members pose for a photo July 18, 2018, outside the new building after celebrating its grand opening. The new Chuckwagon, owned and built by Hill County 4-H, is open for its second Great Northern Fair, and the fair board is making updates to the grounds as well including moving to a new fair office on the north side of the grounds, adding wi-fi to areas on the grounds, working on paving and adding transportation from the parking area to the fairgrounds.

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4-H Event Schedule Sunday, July 14 1 p.m. — Fair set up *Please note that all 4-H members, leaders and parents are expected to participate in fair set up — Meet in the Bigger Better Barn on the Great Northern Fairgrounds Tuesday, July 16 8:45 a.m. to noon — 4-H Interview Day at Havre Middle School Wednesday July 17 9 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions open to public 10 a.m. — 4-H Horse Show 4 p.m. — 4-H — Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing 5:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 7 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn final set-up 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon closes Thursday, July 18 7 a.m. — 4-H Market Animal weigh scale open 7 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions open to public 9:30 a.m. — 4-H Market Animal weigh scale closes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing Noon — 4-H Fair Superintendents meeting 1:15 p.m. — 4-H Livestock exhibitors meeting *All livestock, horse, cat, dog, rabbit and poultry members are required to attend 2 p.m. — 4-H Small Animal Show Cat Showmanship and Judging Rabbit Showmanship and Judging Pocket Pet Showmanship and Judging Poultry Showmanship and Judging Rabbit agility event 7 p.m. — Beef, Goat, Sheep and Swine exhibitors meeting with judge 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn close 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon closes Friday, July 19 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions

open to public 9 a.m. — 4-H Beef Show Beef Showmanship Breeding Beef Show Feeder/Market Beef classes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing 2 p.m. — 4-H Dog Show 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn close 11 p.m. — Chuckwagon closes Saturday, July 20 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions open to public   8 a.m. — 4-H Swine Show Swine Showmanship Swine Feeder/Market Classes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing 1 p.m. — 4-H Sheep and Goat Show Sheep Showmanship Breeding Sheep Show Feeder/Market Sheep classes Goat Showmanship Dairy Goat classes Feeder/Market Goat classes 3 p.m. — 4-H Round Robin Competition 5 p.m. — 4-H Market Sale set-up 7 p.m. — Large non-market animals may leave the barns to be taken home   **Includes horses and breeding projects 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn close 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon closes Sunday, July 21  8 a.m. — 9:30 a.m. —   4-H Appreciation Breakfast sponsored by CHS Big Sky 10 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions open to public   11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing 11:30 a.m. — Buyer Appreciation Lunch at Bigger Better Barn 1 p.m. — 4-H Market Sale in Bigger Better

Havre Daily News/File photo Barn 3:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 4:30 p.m. — Non-animal 4-H exhibits may be removed from the 4-H Chuckwagon

5 p.m. — Clean up: 4-H Chuckwagon, Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn *Please note that all 4-H members, leaders and parents are expected to participate in fair cleanup


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Tickets available for arena events, parking The Great Northern Fair Board is urging people to get their tickets for the arena events at this year’s Great Northern Fair: Wednesday Junior Rodeo at 5pm Tickets: $5/person Thursday Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo at 7pm Tickets: $5/kids (ages 6-12) $10/adults Friday  Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Ride at 7pm Tickets: $5/kids (ages 6-10) $15/adults Saturday  Jaycees Demo Derby/ Bump N Run at 6pm Tickets: $5/kids (ages 12 & under) $15/adults Sunday 

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Right: Cody FourColors Memorial Bullriding July 20, 2018. Below: Demolition Derby July 21, 2018 Indian Relay Races at 11 a.m., 3 p.m. Tickets: $20/person New this year is a grandstand pass thats gains entry to all events at a discounted price. $30 for children 6 to 12 and $50 for adults gains entry all five nights. Some rodeo events including slack for the Great Northern Ram Rodeo and Breakaway Roping Thursday during the day and Barrel Racing Friday during the day have free admission. Parking at the fair is $5 a day, with $20 tickets for parking for all five days available at the Chamber, Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods and Diesel Doctor at 3186 U.S. Highway 2 East.

Improvements ■ Continued from page 2 more usable space,” he said. The old office was 550 sq. feet and the new office is about 800 sq. feet. “I really am excited to move in,” he said.“I think that it’s better for the fairgrounds in its new location. There’s more access to it during the summer and we’ll keep traffic off of the black top a little bit and that should just help preserve its useful life.” Smith added that they will also be estab-

lishing a temporary office for the fair to allow people to purchase tickets for events without having to walk all the way to the new office. “That is going to be the biggest thing that is different to the public,” he said. In the future, the two focuses for improvements will be updating the bathrooms as well as working on better signage for the fairgrounds, he said.

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New manager takes over Great Northern Fairgrounds Rachel Jamieson rjamieson@havredailynews.com Editor’s note: A version of this story ran in Friday’s edition of the Havre Daily News. The Great Northern Fair Board was able to bring someone with considerable experience fixing and repairing things in to run the Great Northern Fairgrounds just in time for the fair. After a lengthy search, the Great Northern Fair Board hired Frank English as fairgrounds manager. English said he has been working since he was hired. “I am trying to make everything look better, but right now I am trying to make everything functional,” English said. “There are so many projects up here, you are jumping from this to that to the other trying to get as much as you can done.” Fair Board Chair Tyler Smith said English’s experience made him a good choice. “The board chose him because of his handy-man experience and his ability to make the required repairs around the grounds,” he said. English’s duties as a fairgrounds manager include coordinating the fairgrounds, helping people who use the fairgrounds and determining the type of work that needs to be done to upkeep the property. “I want to keep as many buildings up here as I can without tearing them down. I want to keep them and repair them, if it is feasible to repair them,” English said. Types of repair work English mentioned

I was born and raised here, so I want to make it a better place Frank English Great Northern Fairgrounds manager includ scraping paint to get rid of all the peeling paint. He would like to encapsulate buildings, if they are in good structure, putting tin on all the buildings, if money is available in the budget. English, who was born and raised in Havre, has a history in construction, having worked for Clausen & Sons out of high school for a few years, he said. Following his time in construction, he spent about five years working in oil fields. After his time in the oil fields, he was called to go to Iraq in 2003 for a couple years then came home in 2005. In Iraq, he worked as a heavy wheel vehicle mechanic, in convoy security and recovery. A few years ago, English started his own construction company with just himself as his own employee, being an independent contractor doing projects with drywall, concrete and more. He said the decision to start his own company made it easier to work for other people because his clients didn’t have to pay insurance on him since he is insured and licensed. English said the No. 1 priority to get done right now at the fairgrounds is to make sure to get everything safe and func-

tional. This includes getting all the fire extinguishers checked and hung up and to make the sure all the buildings have the right numbe of extinguishers in the proper places for safety. The other priority, he said, is to make sure everything is working. The water and plumbing systems have had problems in the barns, but are mostly fixed. One thing that is in the budget and in the works is filling the potholes as much they can. “There is a lot of hoops you have to jump through, I guess, to get things done and accomplished and a lot of logistics,” English said. Over a year ago when the job opportunity came up, English said, he felt this was his way to work as hard as he can and show people it can be done.

One big thing the fair board tasked English with is the entertainment category because he does production and has friends in the music field and is able to get bands that are available. He added that he is open to taking ideas from the public for entertainment and volunteers. English began as a county employee in June and said this is a full-time job for four months then for the rest of time will go to three-quarter time. In the time in between he will continue his independent contracting. “I was born and raised here, so I want to make it a better place. When the job came up I thought this was my opportunity to bust my butt, work as hard as I can, show people it can be done and we can make it a better place,” English said.


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Free entertainment set at 2019 Great Northern Fair Hill County 4-H set for Great Northern Fair Rachel Jamieson rjamieson@havredailynews.com

The Great Northern Fair is not just about the food and rides, but also includes other events throughout the week. “The week is going to be full of fun and excitement for everyone,” Great Northern Fair Board Vice President Chelby Gooch said. Along with featured events throughout the

week including the Northern Great Ram Open Rodeo, Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding, Havre Jaycees Demo Derby and Indian Relay races, other entertainment includes a juggler who will juggle hockey sticks on fire and more. Some rodeo competition at the outdoor arena will be free to the public. Slack from the open rodeo will run Thursday morning at 9:30. Right after that, at about 10:30 a.m., will

be the Great Northern Breakaway Roping, bringing competitors from Montana and surrounding states and provinces. Friday, the Great Northern Ram Barrel Race, with adult and youth races, will start at 10:30 a.m. Vendors will be located in the Commercial Building and many other activities will be held, from open class entries in the Community Center to 4-H exhibits and poultry, livestock and small animal entries in the

Bigger Better Barn, Horse Barn and Beef Barn. Three different free entertainment interactions also are set. All Creatures Barnyard Races will have up to five shows daily. The Hookey Circus Show will perform Friday and Saturday with three shows daily. The State Line Drive Band will perform two shows Saturday evening and one Sunday afternoon.

Jaycee Demolition Derby set to roll again Derek Hann dshann@havredailynews.com The Havre Jaycees Demolition Derby is coming back to the Great Northern Fair this year on Saturday, starting at 6 p.m. Trenton “T.J.” Daulton, a member of the Jaycees for the past 12 years who is in charge of this year’s Demolition Derby, said that this year will be great. “Goal is always to get a good car count and put out a good show,” he said. This year, the event will have four main heats and one championship heat. There will be three classes of derby, he said, full weld, chain stock — where vehicles will have no welding or bracing — and a Herby Derby. They will also be running the Bump

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Car 18 shows damage from competition in the Jaycee Demolition Derby at the 2018 Great Northern Fair. The annual tradition is back for the 2019 Great Northern Fair, with derby and bump’n’run heats scheduled for Saturday in the Great Northern Fair arena. ‘N’ Run races, he added, with two classes — modified and stock. The championship will award five places with cash prizes, with first place payout at $3,500, he said. “We’ve got our payouts up quite a bit,” he said. He added that payouts will be made for the chain stock, Herby Derby and Bump ‘N’ Run, but the payouts are not set yet.

“I’m excited to bring a good event to the Great Northern Fair,” he said. The Havre Jaycees run the entire event, a longstanding tradition for the service

club. The Jaycees plan the event and get the arena ready with some outside help. This year, the Jaycees are still looking for sponsors for the event. Daulton said

Derek Hann dshann@havredailynews.com Hill County 4-H has been gearing up for the Great Northern Fair, Hill County Extension Agent Jasmine Carbajal said. “I think it’s cool that our kids are starting to get interested in those possibilities with 4-H,” she said. “What’s really nice is the kiddos can pick any project.” The activities available at the fair through 4-H are done as individuals or in a group, she said, with individual activities and clubs doing work at the fair. The 4-H’ers work on their projects throughout the year and the fair is their time to share with everyone in the community. “That’s going to be pretty fun,” she said. I’m excited for that.” In the dog show, 4-H members take care of their dogs and bring them in to be judged based on the animal’s training, behavior and how obedience to the child, she said. That event will be on Friday, July 19, at 2 p.m. “I think it’s becoming more popular with the other counties,” she added. The requirements for the dog show is that the dog has to be registered, she said. She added that 4-H also had multiple workshops to help the children train their dogs over the past couple of months. Some of the exercises are seeing the dog stand, sit and basic obedience practices, she said. Like with larger animals, the children children need to have control over their dogs, she added. Carbajal added that a popular event is displaying Pocket Pets, which are animals such as hamsters and guinea pigs. Carbajal said that she appreciates the community members who are participating to be judges. A mixture of community members and extension agents from other counties will judge with a total of 28 judges this year. “We couldn’t do it without them,” she said. This year she is the only agent planning the event, she said, adding that she has been very busy with the fair. She said that she wanted to thank the office administrator and the 4-H leaders who have worked with her to help her with the workload. “We wouldn’t be able to do it without our great leaders, so it’s exciting when we have those leaders to help, and parents,” she said. This year, she added, is also one of the larger years, with 120 children registered for 4-H. “We’re just excited,” she said. “I think it’s going to be a great 4-H fair for our community this year, and we hope that people can come join us.”

Havre Daily News/ File photo Hill County 4-H is again primed up for the Great Northern Fair.


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Dreamland Carnival returns to Great Northern Fair Dreamland Carnival is returning to the Great Northern Fair with offerings of rides, games and concessions on the midway The carnival will be open Wednesday

from 4 to 11 p.m., Thursday and Friday 2 p.m. to midnight, Saturday noon to midnight and Sunday 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Advance carnival tickets are $20 and are on sale at Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods,

The Havre Area Chamber of Commerce office at 130 fifth Ave. and at the fair office on the north side of the fairgrounds. The fair is again charging $5 a day for

parking, with $20 tickets for parking for all five days available at the Chamber, Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods and Diesel Doctor at 3186 U.S. Highway 2 East, the fairgrounds Facebook page reports.

www.havredailynews.com interested parties can contact him at the Jaycees Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/HavreJCs/ or by texting or calling him at 399-3084. Drivers can either register ahead of time or register at the event in the pits.

GREAT NORTHERN FAIR Interested parties should contact him through Facebook or phone. Cost to register a vehicle for the competition, he added. If people are registering their vehicles at the event the cost of parking will be deducted from their registration.

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audience the best show they can. He added that all the money raised by the Jaycees stays within the community and goes toward community projects. “Being a non-profit, that’s what all of our money goes to,” he said.

Barrel racing hits Great Northern Fairgrounds arena Friday Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com Barrel racing fans will have a chance to enjoy added competition beyond the main rodeo when the Great Northern Ram Barrel Race starts at 10:30 a.m. Friday in the grandstand arena. Admission is free for spectators. For anyone thinking of racing in the event, entries begin at 9:30 a.m., and the cost is $40 per entry for adults and $20 per e n t r y f o r y o u t h , 1 8 a n d y o u n g e r. Competitors are allowed multiple entries, and youth also entering in the adult category can run once and have that time c o u n t i n b o t h c a t e go r i e s, o rg a n i z e r

Lindsay Lowe said. The adult category is a 4D race with $500 added and youth is a 3D with $100 added. The 4D and 3D designations add extra excitement because they allow for more placings across the board and in the heat of competition. In this type of race, and with the expected caliber of horses and riders, a hundredth of a second can change the entire leader board. Lowe said the split times on the 4D will be .5/.5/1 second, and the splits on the 3D will be .75 second. As an example of what the split times mean, in the 4D, the placings in the first division will be based on the fastest time.

Breakaway roping out Thursday in Great Northern Fairgrounds arena Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com

Havre Daily News/File photo People wander the midway and ride on a Dreamland Carnival ride at the 2018 Great Northern Fair. Dreamland Carnival is again providing the midway attractions at the Great Northern Fair, with the midway scheduled to open Wednesday at 4 p.m. Advance all-day tickets are available for $20 at Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods, The Havre Area Chamber of Commerce office at 130 fifth Ave. and at the fair office on the north side of the fairgrounds. Parking at the fair is $5 a day, with $20 tickets for parking for all five days available at the Chamber, Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods and Diesel Doctor at 3186 U.S. Highway 2 East.

The Jaycees do the inspection of the vehicles as well as the line judging. The club members check the safety of the events and make sure that everyone is out having a good time in a safe manner. He said his goal every year is to give the

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The Great Northern Breakaway Roping c o m p e t i t i o n w i l l s ta r t a t 10 : 3 0 a . m . Thursday, July 18 — or as soon as the rodeo slack is finished — in the outdoor arena at the Great Northern Fairgrounds. The event is open to all competitors, but is also approved as a semi-finals qualifier for The American, a rodeo competition televised on RFD-TV, and for the Canadian Finals Breakaway, which starts Oct. 31 in Red Deer, Alberta. Organizer Casey Solomon said she expects about 70 entries from surrounding states and provinces, but no limit has been set. Ropers can enter twice, and the competition format will have two full rounds and

a short go for the top times. The winner of the average will receive a black powder pistol and a share of the $1,000 added prize money. Other prizes have been donated by generous local businesses, Solomon said. Admission is free for spectators.

The winner of the second division will be the rider who ran the closest to — but not faster than — a half-second behind the fastest time. The split time for the 3D is a half-second after that and for the 4D is a full second after the 3D split time. Split times are all set according to the fastest time of the day so when a rider sets a new fastest time that can change the leader board through the other divisions. This means the rides that place in 2D and under depend on a bit of luck, but it also gives riders who might not be on the fastest horse or who have a not-good ride a chance to still place in the money

with payouts in four divisions for adults and three for youth. Organizers are also allowing a session of time-only runs for $5. This gives competitors a chance to run a practice race with all the sights and sounds of a rodeo around them. Because the event is sanctioned by the National Barrel Horse Association, organizers expect a good turnout of some top riders in the region. Though points can count for NBHA standings, Lowe said, barrel racers don’t need to be NBHA members to compete, and the competition is open to everyone.


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Ram Open Rodeo set to rock the arena Thursday

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Indian Relay racing comes to Great Northern Fair

Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com

Havre Daily News staff An event returning to the Great Northern Fair for the second year will give spectators some high-intensity Native American horse racing. Indian Relay Races will be in the fairground arena Sunday, July 21, at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. In an Indian relay, one rider completes the course, but on three different horses. Teams comprise the rider, two holders and a mugger. As the rider completes the first circuit on the first horse, the mugger grabs that horse, while an exchange holder holds the second horse and a back holder holds the third. The rider jumps form the first horse to the second, then repeats the process to the third horse on the next circuit. A key to wining the races is making seamless transitions. Many consider the sport to be the oldest competitive sport in North America, with the Shoshone and Bannock tribes’ website saying some tribal nations saying it has a history as far back as 500 years. The event has a circuit of races throughout the United States and Canada.

The 2019 Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo will headline the outdoor arena at the Great Northern Fair Thursday, July 18, at 7 p.m., but the rodeo committee has worked with local groups to offer two full days of rodeo action in the arena Thursday and Friday for the fair. The 2018 Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo will feature bull riding, saddle bronc, wild bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, team roping and ladies barrel racing, along with miniature bull riding and ladies breakaway roping. Rough stock is coming from contractors around the area so organizers can fill the entries with some of the best rough stock available, committee member Clint Solomon said. The Wild Ride Bronc Riding replaces bareback bronc riding, and it allows competitors a chance to ride bucking horses using regular riding saddles rather than specialized tack, and added prizes will be awarded to the rider with the best attire, committee member Casey Solomon said. Timed events during the rodeo — except breakaway roping — will allow competitors two entries and each run will vie for placing in these events. The miniature bull riding, with the Wicked Spur Mini Buckers, will be for youth ages 6-14 and less than 140 pounds. The bulls are true bucking bulls, Casey Solomon said. They’re just smaller than normal, and for the younger kids, they don’t put a flank strap on the bull. Each rodeo event has a $500 added payout, and the winner in each event, except mini bull riding and breakaway roping, will receive an engraved black powder pistol. Ladies breakaway roping will have a limit of 12 entrants during the evening competition, but the breakaway roping jackpot, which runs earlier in the day, will not have an entrant limit.

Havre Daily News/File photo The rider for Holds the Enemy relay team speeds out of the exchange area with opponents on his tail during the Indian Relay at the 2018 Great Northern Fair. Goes Ahead Pretty was the winner of the championship heat with Plain Feather and Holds the Enemy winning their respective consolation heats.

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson. The Great Northern Ram Rodeo is back for the 2019 Great Northern Fair, with slack Thursday morning in the arena and the main competition starting in the arena Thursday at 7 p.m. The other rodeo events include slack for the open rodeo at 9 a.m., and breakaway roping at 10:30 a.m., both Thursday in the outdoor arena. Friday will see National Barrel Horse Association sanctioned racing at 10:30 a.m., the Great Northern Longhorn Stampede preshow at 6:30 p.m. and the Cody FourColors

Memorial Bull Riding, 7 p.m. The day-time competitions will all be free for spectators. The rodeo tickets will be $10 for general admission, $5 for youth 6-10 years old and free for 5 and under. The bull riding tickets will be $15 for general admission, $5 for youth 6-10 years old and free for 5 and younger.

Junior Rodeo kicks off arena action at Great Northern Fair Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com Hi-Line Rodeo Team is hosting the Havre Junior Rodeo Wednesday, July 17, starting at 5 p.m. in the outdoor arena during the Great Northern Fair. This youth rodeo gives kids 4 to 18 years old an opportunity for competing in rodeo events that mirror those in the open rodeo. The Junior Rodeo gives spectators the f i rs t n i g h t o f ro d e o a ction, followed Thursday by breakaway roping at 10:30 a.m. and the Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo at 7 p.m., then Friday by NBHA barrel racing at 10:30 a.m. and the Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding at 7 p.m. Slack for the open rodeo will compete at 9:30 a.m. Thursday. The list of events at the Junior Rodeo

includes barrel racing, pole bending, sheep riding, steer riding, breakaway roping, goat tying, calf tying and chute dogging. Cost is $5 for spectators. “It’s just good family fun. We see a lot of young kids that are just getting started rodeoing,” said one of the event organizers Micah Gibson. The rodeo also will have fun events for young and older youth “that are not typical rodeo events, that we’ve added in that make for a good time,” including the boot race, flag race and monkey on a rope. Competitor check-in will be 2:30-4:45 p.m., and competitors are reminded that they will need a parent or guardian to sign them in. “This is a deal for any kid to come, Gibson said. “If kids are interested in rodeo, this is a good place to get started.”


Award-winning FourColors Memorial Bull Riding returns for third year Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com 
 The award-winning Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding competition will be returning to the Great Northern Fair Friday at 7 p.m. for its third year with the FourColors family spearheading the grandstand event. Started in 2017, the annual bull riding competition was conceived by the FourColors family to commemorate the life of their son and brother, Cody, an avid young professional bull rider who died in 2015. “We just wanted to have something — to have kind of a memorial for him,” his brother Justin FourColors said last year, and the FourColors family works throughout the year to raise money to put on the event, which includes a feed for competitors and event workers. The modest, Bull Riders Canadasanctioned bull riding event they planned, that included good payouts, prizes and a feed

for the bull riders and volunteers, was voted by the organization’s members as the BRC Event of the Year its first year. The event pits a limit of 40 bull riders against PRCA- and PBR-caliber bulls, the kind Cody FourColors’ family said he lived to ride. In the long round, with all 40 riders, will be followed by a short round with the top 10 riders. If fewer than 10 rides score, they will fill the slots with the longest rides. The top four rides in both the long round and the short go will win prize money — which includes $5,000 added payout — and trophy buckles will be awarded in both rounds. Added entertainment during the event will offer kids 6 to 14 years old, and within the 140pound weight limit, a chance to ride mini bucking bulls. Tickets for the bull riding competition, which also give spectators a front-row seat to the 6:30 p.m. longhorn stampede pre-show, at $15 for general admission, $5 for kids 6-10 years old, and free for kids 5 and younger.

Fair Schedule not available The general schedule of buildings and concessions at the 2019 Great Northern Fair were not available to the Havre Daily News by printing deadline.


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Ram Open Rodeo set to rock the arena Thursday

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Indian Relay racing comes to Great Northern Fair

Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com

Havre Daily News staff An event returning to the Great Northern Fair for the second year will give spectators some high-intensity Native American horse racing. Indian Relay Races will be in the fairground arena Sunday, July 21, at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. In an Indian relay, one rider completes the course, but on three different horses. Teams comprise the rider, two holders and a mugger. As the rider completes the first circuit on the first horse, the mugger grabs that horse, while an exchange holder holds the second horse and a back holder holds the third. The rider jumps form the first horse to the second, then repeats the process to the third horse on the next circuit. A key to wining the races is making seamless transitions. Many consider the sport to be the oldest competitive sport in North America, with the Shoshone and Bannock tribes’ website saying some tribal nations saying it has a history as far back as 500 years. The event has a circuit of races throughout the United States and Canada.

The 2019 Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo will headline the outdoor arena at the Great Northern Fair Thursday, July 18, at 7 p.m., but the rodeo committee has worked with local groups to offer two full days of rodeo action in the arena Thursday and Friday for the fair. The 2018 Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo will feature bull riding, saddle bronc, wild bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, team roping and ladies barrel racing, along with miniature bull riding and ladies breakaway roping. Rough stock is coming from contractors around the area so organizers can fill the entries with some of the best rough stock available, committee member Clint Solomon said. The Wild Ride Bronc Riding replaces bareback bronc riding, and it allows competitors a chance to ride bucking horses using regular riding saddles rather than specialized tack, and added prizes will be awarded to the rider with the best attire, committee member Casey Solomon said. Timed events during the rodeo — except breakaway roping — will allow competitors two entries and each run will vie for placing in these events. The miniature bull riding, with the Wicked Spur Mini Buckers, will be for youth ages 6-14 and less than 140 pounds. The bulls are true bucking bulls, Casey Solomon said. They’re just smaller than normal, and for the younger kids, they don’t put a flank strap on the bull. Each rodeo event has a $500 added payout, and the winner in each event, except mini bull riding and breakaway roping, will receive an engraved black powder pistol. Ladies breakaway roping will have a limit of 12 entrants during the evening competition, but the breakaway roping jackpot, which runs earlier in the day, will not have an entrant limit.

Havre Daily News/File photo The rider for Holds the Enemy relay team speeds out of the exchange area with opponents on his tail during the Indian Relay at the 2018 Great Northern Fair. Goes Ahead Pretty was the winner of the championship heat with Plain Feather and Holds the Enemy winning their respective consolation heats.

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson. The Great Northern Ram Rodeo is back for the 2019 Great Northern Fair, with slack Thursday morning in the arena and the main competition starting in the arena Thursday at 7 p.m. The other rodeo events include slack for the open rodeo at 9 a.m., and breakaway roping at 10:30 a.m., both Thursday in the outdoor arena. Friday will see National Barrel Horse Association sanctioned racing at 10:30 a.m., the Great Northern Longhorn Stampede preshow at 6:30 p.m. and the Cody FourColors

Memorial Bull Riding, 7 p.m. The day-time competitions will all be free for spectators. The rodeo tickets will be $10 for general admission, $5 for youth 6-10 years old and free for 5 and under. The bull riding tickets will be $15 for general admission, $5 for youth 6-10 years old and free for 5 and younger.

Junior Rodeo kicks off arena action at Great Northern Fair Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com Hi-Line Rodeo Team is hosting the Havre Junior Rodeo Wednesday, July 17, starting at 5 p.m. in the outdoor arena during the Great Northern Fair. This youth rodeo gives kids 4 to 18 years old an opportunity for competing in rodeo events that mirror those in the open rodeo. The Junior Rodeo gives spectators the f i rs t n i g h t o f ro d e o a ction, followed Thursday by breakaway roping at 10:30 a.m. and the Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo at 7 p.m., then Friday by NBHA barrel racing at 10:30 a.m. and the Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding at 7 p.m. Slack for the open rodeo will compete at 9:30 a.m. Thursday. The list of events at the Junior Rodeo

includes barrel racing, pole bending, sheep riding, steer riding, breakaway roping, goat tying, calf tying and chute dogging. Cost is $5 for spectators. “It’s just good family fun. We see a lot of young kids that are just getting started rodeoing,” said one of the event organizers Micah Gibson. The rodeo also will have fun events for young and older youth “that are not typical rodeo events, that we’ve added in that make for a good time,” including the boot race, flag race and monkey on a rope. Competitor check-in will be 2:30-4:45 p.m., and competitors are reminded that they will need a parent or guardian to sign them in. “This is a deal for any kid to come, Gibson said. “If kids are interested in rodeo, this is a good place to get started.”


Award-winning FourColors Memorial Bull Riding returns for third year Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com 
 The award-winning Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding competition will be returning to the Great Northern Fair Friday at 7 p.m. for its third year with the FourColors family spearheading the grandstand event. Started in 2017, the annual bull riding competition was conceived by the FourColors family to commemorate the life of their son and brother, Cody, an avid young professional bull rider who died in 2015. “We just wanted to have something — to have kind of a memorial for him,” his brother Justin FourColors said last year, and the FourColors family works throughout the year to raise money to put on the event, which includes a feed for competitors and event workers. The modest, Bull Riders Canadasanctioned bull riding event they planned, that included good payouts, prizes and a feed

for the bull riders and volunteers, was voted by the organization’s members as the BRC Event of the Year its first year. The event pits a limit of 40 bull riders against PRCA- and PBR-caliber bulls, the kind Cody FourColors’ family said he lived to ride. In the long round, with all 40 riders, will be followed by a short round with the top 10 riders. If fewer than 10 rides score, they will fill the slots with the longest rides. The top four rides in both the long round and the short go will win prize money — which includes $5,000 added payout — and trophy buckles will be awarded in both rounds. Added entertainment during the event will offer kids 6 to 14 years old, and within the 140pound weight limit, a chance to ride mini bucking bulls. Tickets for the bull riding competition, which also give spectators a front-row seat to the 6:30 p.m. longhorn stampede pre-show, at $15 for general admission, $5 for kids 6-10 years old, and free for kids 5 and younger.

Fair Schedule not available The general schedule of buildings and concessions at the 2019 Great Northern Fair were not available to the Havre Daily News by printing deadline.


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Dreamland Carnival returns to Great Northern Fair Dreamland Carnival is returning to the Great Northern Fair with offerings of rides, games and concessions on the midway The carnival will be open Wednesday

from 4 to 11 p.m., Thursday and Friday 2 p.m. to midnight, Saturday noon to midnight and Sunday 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. Advance carnival tickets are $20 and are on sale at Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods,

The Havre Area Chamber of Commerce office at 130 fifth Ave. and at the fair office on the north side of the fairgrounds. The fair is again charging $5 a day for

parking, with $20 tickets for parking for all five days available at the Chamber, Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods and Diesel Doctor at 3186 U.S. Highway 2 East, the fairgrounds Facebook page reports.

www.havredailynews.com interested parties can contact him at the Jaycees Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/HavreJCs/ or by texting or calling him at 399-3084. Drivers can either register ahead of time or register at the event in the pits.

GREAT NORTHERN FAIR Interested parties should contact him through Facebook or phone. Cost to register a vehicle for the competition, he added. If people are registering their vehicles at the event the cost of parking will be deducted from their registration.

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audience the best show they can. He added that all the money raised by the Jaycees stays within the community and goes toward community projects. “Being a non-profit, that’s what all of our money goes to,” he said.

Barrel racing hits Great Northern Fairgrounds arena Friday Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com Barrel racing fans will have a chance to enjoy added competition beyond the main rodeo when the Great Northern Ram Barrel Race starts at 10:30 a.m. Friday in the grandstand arena. Admission is free for spectators. For anyone thinking of racing in the event, entries begin at 9:30 a.m., and the cost is $40 per entry for adults and $20 per e n t r y f o r y o u t h , 1 8 a n d y o u n g e r. Competitors are allowed multiple entries, and youth also entering in the adult category can run once and have that time c o u n t i n b o t h c a t e go r i e s, o rg a n i z e r

Lindsay Lowe said. The adult category is a 4D race with $500 added and youth is a 3D with $100 added. The 4D and 3D designations add extra excitement because they allow for more placings across the board and in the heat of competition. In this type of race, and with the expected caliber of horses and riders, a hundredth of a second can change the entire leader board. Lowe said the split times on the 4D will be .5/.5/1 second, and the splits on the 3D will be .75 second. As an example of what the split times mean, in the 4D, the placings in the first division will be based on the fastest time.

Breakaway roping out Thursday in Great Northern Fairgrounds arena Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com

Havre Daily News/File photo People wander the midway and ride on a Dreamland Carnival ride at the 2018 Great Northern Fair. Dreamland Carnival is again providing the midway attractions at the Great Northern Fair, with the midway scheduled to open Wednesday at 4 p.m. Advance all-day tickets are available for $20 at Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods, The Havre Area Chamber of Commerce office at 130 fifth Ave. and at the fair office on the north side of the fairgrounds. Parking at the fair is $5 a day, with $20 tickets for parking for all five days available at the Chamber, Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods and Diesel Doctor at 3186 U.S. Highway 2 East.

The Jaycees do the inspection of the vehicles as well as the line judging. The club members check the safety of the events and make sure that everyone is out having a good time in a safe manner. He said his goal every year is to give the

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The Great Northern Breakaway Roping c o m p e t i t i o n w i l l s ta r t a t 10 : 3 0 a . m . Thursday, July 18 — or as soon as the rodeo slack is finished — in the outdoor arena at the Great Northern Fairgrounds. The event is open to all competitors, but is also approved as a semi-finals qualifier for The American, a rodeo competition televised on RFD-TV, and for the Canadian Finals Breakaway, which starts Oct. 31 in Red Deer, Alberta. Organizer Casey Solomon said she expects about 70 entries from surrounding states and provinces, but no limit has been set. Ropers can enter twice, and the competition format will have two full rounds and

a short go for the top times. The winner of the average will receive a black powder pistol and a share of the $1,000 added prize money. Other prizes have been donated by generous local businesses, Solomon said. Admission is free for spectators.

The winner of the second division will be the rider who ran the closest to — but not faster than — a half-second behind the fastest time. The split time for the 3D is a half-second after that and for the 4D is a full second after the 3D split time. Split times are all set according to the fastest time of the day so when a rider sets a new fastest time that can change the leader board through the other divisions. This means the rides that place in 2D and under depend on a bit of luck, but it also gives riders who might not be on the fastest horse or who have a not-good ride a chance to still place in the money

with payouts in four divisions for adults and three for youth. Organizers are also allowing a session of time-only runs for $5. This gives competitors a chance to run a practice race with all the sights and sounds of a rodeo around them. Because the event is sanctioned by the National Barrel Horse Association, organizers expect a good turnout of some top riders in the region. Though points can count for NBHA standings, Lowe said, barrel racers don’t need to be NBHA members to compete, and the competition is open to everyone.


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Free entertainment set at 2019 Great Northern Fair Hill County 4-H set for Great Northern Fair Rachel Jamieson rjamieson@havredailynews.com

The Great Northern Fair is not just about the food and rides, but also includes other events throughout the week. “The week is going to be full of fun and excitement for everyone,” Great Northern Fair Board Vice President Chelby Gooch said. Along with featured events throughout the

week including the Northern Great Ram Open Rodeo, Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding, Havre Jaycees Demo Derby and Indian Relay races, other entertainment includes a juggler who will juggle hockey sticks on fire and more. Some rodeo competition at the outdoor arena will be free to the public. Slack from the open rodeo will run Thursday morning at 9:30. Right after that, at about 10:30 a.m., will

be the Great Northern Breakaway Roping, bringing competitors from Montana and surrounding states and provinces. Friday, the Great Northern Ram Barrel Race, with adult and youth races, will start at 10:30 a.m. Vendors will be located in the Commercial Building and many other activities will be held, from open class entries in the Community Center to 4-H exhibits and poultry, livestock and small animal entries in the

Bigger Better Barn, Horse Barn and Beef Barn. Three different free entertainment interactions also are set. All Creatures Barnyard Races will have up to five shows daily. The Hookey Circus Show will perform Friday and Saturday with three shows daily. The State Line Drive Band will perform two shows Saturday evening and one Sunday afternoon.

Jaycee Demolition Derby set to roll again Derek Hann dshann@havredailynews.com The Havre Jaycees Demolition Derby is coming back to the Great Northern Fair this year on Saturday, starting at 6 p.m. Trenton “T.J.” Daulton, a member of the Jaycees for the past 12 years who is in charge of this year’s Demolition Derby, said that this year will be great. “Goal is always to get a good car count and put out a good show,” he said. This year, the event will have four main heats and one championship heat. There will be three classes of derby, he said, full weld, chain stock — where vehicles will have no welding or bracing — and a Herby Derby. They will also be running the Bump

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Car 18 shows damage from competition in the Jaycee Demolition Derby at the 2018 Great Northern Fair. The annual tradition is back for the 2019 Great Northern Fair, with derby and bump’n’run heats scheduled for Saturday in the Great Northern Fair arena. ‘N’ Run races, he added, with two classes — modified and stock. The championship will award five places with cash prizes, with first place payout at $3,500, he said. “We’ve got our payouts up quite a bit,” he said. He added that payouts will be made for the chain stock, Herby Derby and Bump ‘N’ Run, but the payouts are not set yet.

“I’m excited to bring a good event to the Great Northern Fair,” he said. The Havre Jaycees run the entire event, a longstanding tradition for the service

club. The Jaycees plan the event and get the arena ready with some outside help. This year, the Jaycees are still looking for sponsors for the event. Daulton said

Derek Hann dshann@havredailynews.com Hill County 4-H has been gearing up for the Great Northern Fair, Hill County Extension Agent Jasmine Carbajal said. “I think it’s cool that our kids are starting to get interested in those possibilities with 4-H,” she said. “What’s really nice is the kiddos can pick any project.” The activities available at the fair through 4-H are done as individuals or in a group, she said, with individual activities and clubs doing work at the fair. The 4-H’ers work on their projects throughout the year and the fair is their time to share with everyone in the community. “That’s going to be pretty fun,” she said. I’m excited for that.” In the dog show, 4-H members take care of their dogs and bring them in to be judged based on the animal’s training, behavior and how obedience to the child, she said. That event will be on Friday, July 19, at 2 p.m. “I think it’s becoming more popular with the other counties,” she added. The requirements for the dog show is that the dog has to be registered, she said. She added that 4-H also had multiple workshops to help the children train their dogs over the past couple of months. Some of the exercises are seeing the dog stand, sit and basic obedience practices, she said. Like with larger animals, the children children need to have control over their dogs, she added. Carbajal added that a popular event is displaying Pocket Pets, which are animals such as hamsters and guinea pigs. Carbajal said that she appreciates the community members who are participating to be judges. A mixture of community members and extension agents from other counties will judge with a total of 28 judges this year. “We couldn’t do it without them,” she said. This year she is the only agent planning the event, she said, adding that she has been very busy with the fair. She said that she wanted to thank the office administrator and the 4-H leaders who have worked with her to help her with the workload. “We wouldn’t be able to do it without our great leaders, so it’s exciting when we have those leaders to help, and parents,” she said. This year, she added, is also one of the larger years, with 120 children registered for 4-H. “We’re just excited,” she said. “I think it’s going to be a great 4-H fair for our community this year, and we hope that people can come join us.”

Havre Daily News/ File photo Hill County 4-H is again primed up for the Great Northern Fair.


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Tickets available for arena events, parking The Great Northern Fair Board is urging people to get their tickets for the arena events at this year’s Great Northern Fair: Wednesday Junior Rodeo at 5pm Tickets: $5/person Thursday Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo at 7pm Tickets: $5/kids (ages 6-12) $10/adults Friday  Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Ride at 7pm Tickets: $5/kids (ages 6-10) $15/adults Saturday  Jaycees Demo Derby/ Bump N Run at 6pm Tickets: $5/kids (ages 12 & under) $15/adults Sunday 

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Right: Cody FourColors Memorial Bullriding July 20, 2018. Below: Demolition Derby July 21, 2018 Indian Relay Races at 11 a.m., 3 p.m. Tickets: $20/person New this year is a grandstand pass thats gains entry to all events at a discounted price. $30 for children 6 to 12 and $50 for adults gains entry all five nights. Some rodeo events including slack for the Great Northern Ram Rodeo and Breakaway Roping Thursday during the day and Barrel Racing Friday during the day have free admission. Parking at the fair is $5 a day, with $20 tickets for parking for all five days available at the Chamber, Gary & Leo’s Fresh Foods and Diesel Doctor at 3186 U.S. Highway 2 East.

Improvements ■ Continued from page 2 more usable space,” he said. The old office was 550 sq. feet and the new office is about 800 sq. feet. “I really am excited to move in,” he said.“I think that it’s better for the fairgrounds in its new location. There’s more access to it during the summer and we’ll keep traffic off of the black top a little bit and that should just help preserve its useful life.” Smith added that they will also be estab-

lishing a temporary office for the fair to allow people to purchase tickets for events without having to walk all the way to the new office. “That is going to be the biggest thing that is different to the public,” he said. In the future, the two focuses for improvements will be updating the bathrooms as well as working on better signage for the fairgrounds, he said.

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New manager takes over Great Northern Fairgrounds Rachel Jamieson rjamieson@havredailynews.com Editor’s note: A version of this story ran in Friday’s edition of the Havre Daily News. The Great Northern Fair Board was able to bring someone with considerable experience fixing and repairing things in to run the Great Northern Fairgrounds just in time for the fair. After a lengthy search, the Great Northern Fair Board hired Frank English as fairgrounds manager. English said he has been working since he was hired. “I am trying to make everything look better, but right now I am trying to make everything functional,” English said. “There are so many projects up here, you are jumping from this to that to the other trying to get as much as you can done.” Fair Board Chair Tyler Smith said English’s experience made him a good choice. “The board chose him because of his handy-man experience and his ability to make the required repairs around the grounds,” he said. English’s duties as a fairgrounds manager include coordinating the fairgrounds, helping people who use the fairgrounds and determining the type of work that needs to be done to upkeep the property. “I want to keep as many buildings up here as I can without tearing them down. I want to keep them and repair them, if it is feasible to repair them,” English said. Types of repair work English mentioned

I was born and raised here, so I want to make it a better place Frank English Great Northern Fairgrounds manager includ scraping paint to get rid of all the peeling paint. He would like to encapsulate buildings, if they are in good structure, putting tin on all the buildings, if money is available in the budget. English, who was born and raised in Havre, has a history in construction, having worked for Clausen & Sons out of high school for a few years, he said. Following his time in construction, he spent about five years working in oil fields. After his time in the oil fields, he was called to go to Iraq in 2003 for a couple years then came home in 2005. In Iraq, he worked as a heavy wheel vehicle mechanic, in convoy security and recovery. A few years ago, English started his own construction company with just himself as his own employee, being an independent contractor doing projects with drywall, concrete and more. He said the decision to start his own company made it easier to work for other people because his clients didn’t have to pay insurance on him since he is insured and licensed. English said the No. 1 priority to get done right now at the fairgrounds is to make sure to get everything safe and func-

tional. This includes getting all the fire extinguishers checked and hung up and to make the sure all the buildings have the right numbe of extinguishers in the proper places for safety. The other priority, he said, is to make sure everything is working. The water and plumbing systems have had problems in the barns, but are mostly fixed. One thing that is in the budget and in the works is filling the potholes as much they can. “There is a lot of hoops you have to jump through, I guess, to get things done and accomplished and a lot of logistics,” English said. Over a year ago when the job opportunity came up, English said, he felt this was his way to work as hard as he can and show people it can be done.

One big thing the fair board tasked English with is the entertainment category because he does production and has friends in the music field and is able to get bands that are available. He added that he is open to taking ideas from the public for entertainment and volunteers. English began as a county employee in June and said this is a full-time job for four months then for the rest of time will go to three-quarter time. In the time in between he will continue his independent contracting. “I was born and raised here, so I want to make it a better place. When the job came up I thought this was my opportunity to bust my butt, work as hard as I can, show people it can be done and we can make it a better place,” English said.


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Improvements made at the Great Northern Fairgrounds Derek Hann dshann@havredailynews.com Since last year, the Great Northern Fair Board has made a number of improvements to the fairgrounds. “I think that we are making good progress, and we just need to keep chipping away at these things,” fair board chair Tyler Smith said. One of the large improvements to the fairground is that the food booth area, the 4-H Chuckwagon, the Bigger Better Barn and the RV campgrounds will all have free internet access, he said. He added that the internet is through Triangle Communications and has been long overdue on the fairgrounds. “We should have had internet access there quite a long time ago,” he said. Something that was brought to his attention last year, he said, was the condition of the pavement and the portable restroom on the west side of the fairgrounds, both of which have been fixed. Last year, the pavement was in significantly bad condition and created a tripping hazard to visitors, he said. “In my opinion somebody would have gotten hurt on it,” he said. Last winter was also hard on the pavement and left it in dire need, so the fair board had almost 9,000 sq. feet laid, he said. He added that he is excited about the paving improvements, espe-

cially by the food booths and the awning because that’s where it was needed most. Some of the other improvements include transportation of people to and from the parking area by the Hill County 4-H Club for this fair season, transporting; increased maintenance and general grounds keeping; hiring a new fairgrounds manager; and installing air conditioning in the community center. He added that, hopefully before the fair starts, they will be able to move the RV dump to a more convenient spot. Smith said he is also excited about the new fair office, which is in a remodeled section of the former H. Earl Clack Memorial Museum building on the north side of the fairgrounds. He added that the board was still in the process of moving into the new building at the time of this interview, hopefully competing the move before the fair starts. They started construction of the office May 15 with Clausen and Sons contracted to do the remodel. The building now has a dividing wall for the office as well as a new handicap accessible bathroom. “We had a water break in the old office and the old office just wasn’t laid out very well,” he said, adding that they were unable to hold their meetings in the old office. “It ends up being a shade bigger than what the old office was, but just a much

■ See Improvements Page 10 Havre Daily News/File photo Donors and 4-H Chuckwagon committee members pose for a photo July 18, 2018, outside the new building after celebrating its grand opening. The new Chuckwagon, owned and built by Hill County 4-H, is open for its second Great Northern Fair, and the fair board is making updates to the grounds as well including moving to a new fair office on the north side of the grounds, adding wi-fi to areas on the grounds, working on paving and adding transportation from the parking area to the fairgrounds.

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4-H Event Schedule Sunday, July 14 1 p.m. — Fair set up *Please note that all 4-H members, leaders and parents are expected to participate in fair set up — Meet in the Bigger Better Barn on the Great Northern Fairgrounds Tuesday, July 16 8:45 a.m. to noon — 4-H Interview Day at Havre Middle School Wednesday July 17 9 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions open to public 10 a.m. — 4-H Horse Show 4 p.m. — 4-H — Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing 5:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 7 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn final set-up 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon closes Thursday, July 18 7 a.m. — 4-H Market Animal weigh scale open 7 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions open to public 9:30 a.m. — 4-H Market Animal weigh scale closes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing Noon — 4-H Fair Superintendents meeting 1:15 p.m. — 4-H Livestock exhibitors meeting *All livestock, horse, cat, dog, rabbit and poultry members are required to attend 2 p.m. — 4-H Small Animal Show Cat Showmanship and Judging Rabbit Showmanship and Judging Pocket Pet Showmanship and Judging Poultry Showmanship and Judging Rabbit agility event 7 p.m. — Beef, Goat, Sheep and Swine exhibitors meeting with judge 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn close 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon closes Friday, July 19 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions

open to public 9 a.m. — 4-H Beef Show Beef Showmanship Breeding Beef Show Feeder/Market Beef classes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing 2 p.m. — 4-H Dog Show 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn close 11 p.m. — Chuckwagon closes Saturday, July 20 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions open to public   8 a.m. — 4-H Swine Show Swine Showmanship Swine Feeder/Market Classes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing 1 p.m. — 4-H Sheep and Goat Show Sheep Showmanship Breeding Sheep Show Feeder/Market Sheep classes Goat Showmanship Dairy Goat classes Feeder/Market Goat classes 3 p.m. — 4-H Round Robin Competition 5 p.m. — 4-H Market Sale set-up 7 p.m. — Large non-market animals may leave the barns to be taken home   **Includes horses and breeding projects 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn close 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon closes Sunday, July 21  8 a.m. — 9:30 a.m. —   4-H Appreciation Breakfast sponsored by CHS Big Sky 10 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions open to public   11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon opens to public — concessions and exhibit viewing 11:30 a.m. — Buyer Appreciation Lunch at Bigger Better Barn 1 p.m. — 4-H Market Sale in Bigger Better

Havre Daily News/File photo Barn 3:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn concessions close 4:30 p.m. — Non-animal 4-H exhibits may be removed from the 4-H Chuckwagon

5 p.m. — Clean up: 4-H Chuckwagon, Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn *Please note that all 4-H members, leaders and parents are expected to participate in fair cleanup


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Havre Daily News/File photo Riders herd longhorn cattle into the arena at the Great Northern Fairgroujnds during the 2018 Great Northern Fair.

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