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Fair and 4-H Schedules Great Northern Fair Tuesday, July 17 8 a.m.-7 p. m. — Open class entries Wednesday, July 18 Carnival opens today Noon — Food booths open Commercial building open Open class exhibits open 5 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Junior Rodeo 9 p.m. — Commercial building, barns and exhibit buildings close Thursday, July 19 10 a.m. — Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo slack, arena Noon — Ladies Breakaway Roping, arena entertainment Food booths open Commercial building open Open class exhibits open 7 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo 9 p.m. — Commercial building, barns and exhibit buildings close Friday, July 20 Noon — 4D Barrel Racing, arena entertainment Food booths open Commercial building open

Open class exhibits open 2 p.m. & 6 p.m. — “Sedition in Hill Co.” presentation, Faber Schoolhouse 6:30 p.m. — Longhorn stampede in arena 7 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding 9 p.m. — Commercial building, barns and exhibit buildings close Saturday, July 21 Noon — Food booths open Commercial building open Open class exhibits open Premium money available for open class exhibits 4 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Ribbon Cutting 6:30 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Demo Derby 9 p.m. — Commercial building, barns and exhibit buildings close Sunday, , July 22 Noon — Food booths open Commercial building open Open class exhibits open 2:30 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Indian Relay Racing 4:30 p.m. — Exhibit removal 5 p.m. — Exhibit buildings close Carnival closes

Hill County 4-H Wednesday, July 18 10 a.m. — 4-H Horse Show 11 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 4 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public 5:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close 7 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Final Set-Up 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Closes Thursday, July 19 7 a.m. — 4-H Market Animal Weigh Scale Open 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 9:30 a.m. — 4-H Market Animal Weigh Scale Closes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public (Concessions and Exhibit Viewing) 12 p.m. — 4-H Fair Superintendent Meeting 1:15 p.m. — 4-H Livestock Exhibitors Meeting 2 p.m. — 4-H Small Animal Show Cat Showmanship and Judging Rabbit Showmanship and Judging Poultry Showmanship and Judging Rabbit Agility Event 7 p.m. — Beef, Swine and Sheep Exhibitors Meeting with Judge 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn Close 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Closes Friday, July 20 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 9 a.m. — 4-H Beef Show Beef Showmanship Breeding Beef Show Feeder/Market Beef Classes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public (Concessions and Exhibit Viewing) 2 p.m. — 4-H Cloverbud Large Animal Experience 3-5 p.m. — 4-H Obstacle Course 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close

9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn Close 11 p.m. — Chuckwagon Closes Saturday, July 21 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 8 a.m. — 4-H Swine Show Swine Showmanship Swine Feeder/Market Classes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public 1 p.m. — 4-H Sheep and Goat Show Sheep Showmanship Breeding Sheep Show Feeder/Market Sheep Classes Goat Showmanship Dairy Goat Classes 3 p.m. — 4-H Round Robin Competition 3:30 p.m. — 4-H Pinewood Derby Car Event 5 p.m. — 4-H Market Sale Set Up 7 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close 7 p.m. — Large Non-Market Animals May Leave the Barns to be Taken Home 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn Close 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Closes Sunday, , July 22 8-9:30 a.m. — 4-H Appreciation Breakfast Sponsored by CHS Big Sky 10 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public 11:30 a.m. — Buyer Appreciation Lunch at 4-H Chuckwagon 1 p.m. — 4-H Market Sale in Bigger Better Barn 3:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close 4:30 p.m. — Non-Animal 4-H Exhibits may be removed from the 4-H Chuckwagon 5 p.m. — Clean Up: 4-H Chuckwagon, Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn. Please note that all 4-H members, leaders and parents are expected to participate in fair cleanup


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Brand-new Chuckwagon continues 4-H tradition at fairgrounds Derek Hann Dshann@havredailynews.com The new 4-H Chuckwagon is set to open its doors to the public during this year’s Great Northern Fair. The building has been in the process of being built for the past six years, with 4-H announcing plans for the construction in 2012 and fundraising ever since. The new building should be ready to operate by the time of the fair and a ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held the first day of the fair, Wednesday, July 18, at 4 p.m. The old building was built in the early 1950s with an addition constructed in the 1970s. The old building also had problems, said Carrie Molitor, council president for Hill County 4-H, with holes in the ceiling and floors and a large amount of work that had to go into the pipes and wiring just to keep the building operable. Molitor said that it is wonderful to finally have the project complete and that she can’t wait to show the public what the community helped 4-H build. She added that the Chuckwagon project had wonderful contributors and donors. “Everyone seemed to have stepped up and chipped in,” Molitor said. She said that Wally Duchscher, co-owner of Duchscher Kapperud Insurance, and Jeff Ralph, owner of Havre’s McDonald's with his wife, Norma Ralph, contributed to the

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Jaycees rev up demo derby for yet another fair

Drivers compete July 23 in the Havre Jaycees Demolition Derby at the 2017 Great Northern Fair. Havre Daily News/Ryan Welch Trucks and equipment stand outside of Hill County 4-H Chuckwagon in June as work progresses to finish the buiding in time for this year’s Great Northern Fair. Chuckwagon project and were a great help. “Both of them are great assets to the community and to 4-H,” Molitor said. She added that the new building can be used for by both 4-H and the community for many different events. She said that the building will be a place for teaching the kids in 4-H, be it cooking in the new kitchen or quilting lessons, and that when 4-H is not using the building it can be rented out for community members to use for their own personal events. Molitor said that she “wants to let the community know how much we appreciate them and that we couldn’t have done it without them.”

Early last year the 4-H committee announced that construction of the building would start with Clausen and Sons as the lead contractor in the project. The new building is a 50-by-140 foot steel structure with two bathrooms, a commercial kitchen, a storage area as well as two exhibit areas. Unlike the old building, which was only operated five times a year, the new Chuckwagon will be open all year, with people able to rent the facility for events, said Ralph. Ralph, who is active in 4-H, said he had been involved in the project for the past twoand-a-half years, and he had contributed both time and money to the project. He added that

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Derek Hann Dshann@havredailynews.com The Havre Jaycees Demolition Derby comes back to the Great Northern fair this year, Saturday, July 21, starting at 6:30 p.m. Trenton “T.J.” Daulton, who is in charge of this year’s Demolition Derby and has been a member of the Jaycees for 11 years, said this year will be a great year for the event with four main consolation heats and one championship heat. He added that, depending on turnout, the Jaycees plan to have 10 cars in the championship heat. Daulton said this year they will run three classes, with the main class being weld cars. There will also be a chain stock class, where cars have no welding or bracing. “Pull the interior out, drop a gas tank in and run it, chain the doors shut,” Daulton said. He added that this year there will also be a Herby Derby, compact cars with the

same rules as the weld cars, but small vehicles such as the AMC Gremlin and Ford Festiva. Bump ’N’ Run races will fill some open time and keep the crowd entertained. The schedule is to run the modified heats and the stock heats, with a Bump ’N’ Run race in between, then the chain stock, followed by the consolidation heat, then the Herby Derby and lastly the championship. The championship will award five places with cash prizes: first place $3,000, second place $2,000, third place $900, fourth place $450 and fifth place $250. The chain stock class will also have cash prizes with first place being awarded $1,000 and second $500. The Herby Derby will have cash prizes which will be determined after registration based on the number of vehicles that enter. The Havre Jaycees run the entire event, a longstanding tradition for the service club. The Jaycees plan the event as well as get the arena ready with some outside help.

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson.

In the past, Trevor Smith has helped the Jaycees with preparations, Daulton said. He said the Jaycees do the inspection of the vehicles as well as the line judging. Daulton added that you can see the Jaycees’ members around the arena with flags and with fire extinguishers. He said the club members check the safety of the events and make sure that everyone is out having a good time in a safe manner. “As safe as possible with cars running into each other — on purpose,” Daulton said, laughing. “We want to make sure that we are putting on a great event for the community to come out to during the Great Northern Fair,” he added. “We really appreciate all of the sponsorships we’ve got this year, that has helped us out. … We’ve had some awesome sponsors this year.” Daulton said he also wanted to thank the Great Northern Fair for letting the Jaycees have the event every year. People who are interested in registering for the demo derby can register at the event, but if people want to preregister they can call Daulton at 399-3084 or get in contact on the Jaycees Facebook page https:// www.facebook.com/HavreJCs/, or they can contact Daulton directly on his Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/trenton. daulton/.


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Food: Out-of-area vendors will sell treats alongside the long-time local favorites ■ Continued from page 9 ple at the Great Northern Fair seem to like the Rainbow sno-cones — maybe because of their vibrant colors, she said. The Boys & Girls Club of the Hi-Line runs a food booth that was donated to them, Executive Director Krista Solomon said. Steak on a Stick will be their featured food, as it was when the booth was donated. “We tried to change (the dish) but we brought it back by popular demand,” Solomon said, adding that along with that dish they will have Mason’s hot dogs and peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches. The Boy Scouts, who took over the Knights of Columbus booth this year after helping work it for many years, will have food including Rocky Mountain hotdogs, nacho chips and cheese, corn on the cob, Gary & Leo’s bratwursts and lemonade, co-chair Jenn Thompson said. The booth will be staffed and run by Havre and Hi-Line area Scouts, she added. Another area group that has a long history serving food at the fair is the Havre Jaycees. “(We have had a booth) for a long time,” member Kyle Gooch said. “Longer than I have been a member.” The Jaycees’ booth will be serving old favorites like hot dogs, Pizza Hut pizza,

root beer floats, and a new item for this year — onion rings, Gooch added. Another group that has had a booth at the fair over the years is The Optimist Club who often have new items on their menu Newer eats and brand-new treats The Rollin’ Donut, a food-truck based out of Billings, will be travelling to Havre for about their sixth year at the fair, said Nadine Nafts, who owns the truck with her husband, Nash. Nafts added that they like to come to the Great Northern Fair, because “we just have fun … there are a lot of good people.” A more recent face at the fair is Citrus Cyclones, who will be coming up for their second year at the Great Northern Fair, said Jo Bingham. Citrus Cyclones is based in Bainville, Bingham said, adding that they provide a fruit-based drink that uses a press and presses the fruits to make it to a customer’s liking. A new booth that will be at this year’s fair is an ice-cream vendor coming all the way from Jefferson, Missouri. Adobe Flats Warrior Ice Cream will be joining the Great Northern fair for the first time, owner Aaron Hauzer said, add-

ing that they they wanted to come up north because they thought it would be a good idea to try a new event. The favorite ice cream people have at their business seems to be strawberry, Hauzer added. The second new vender of the 2018 fair is Little Em’s Kettlecorn out of Billings. The food truck, which is run by Emily Ehresman and and her husband, Shane Cervantez, is a brand-new venture. “ I t i s o u r f i r s t ye a r p o p p i n g , ” Ehresman said, adding that she is really enjoying it because they get to meet the most interesting people.

Ehresman, who is a carpenter by trade, said her husband encouraged her to try something new since her job was hard on her body, and opening a food truck was a dream of his, she added, so they decided to go for it. They sell 11 different gourmet flavors, including a mix, which Ehresman said is popular, where they mix a bunch of the flavors together and call it “Skettle Corn.” They are looking forward to getting established, she added, and hope the Great Northern Fair is a venue they can keep coming back to year after year.

Indian Relay Racing comes to Great Northern Fair Kristen Takeuchi ktakeuchi@havredailynews.com A new event to the Great Northern Fair this year will be the Indian Relay Races. The races, which will be held Sunday, July 22, at 2:30 p.m., will be held in conjunction with the fair at the Great Northern Fairgrounds, and the masters of ceremony for the event will be Daryl Wright II and Wade Colliflower. The organizer of the event, Tim “J.R.” Rosette Jr., said that he decided to plan the Indian Relay when he was talking to fair board member Ron Konesky. “Ron and I were talking outside one day and it just came about,” he said. “Indian Relay is a centuries-old form of horse racing that shows the athleticism of both the rider and his horses. Riding bareback, the rider makes three laps around the track, each lap on a different horse possessing both speed and skill,” the official website for the Horse Nations Indian Relay Council says. The relay races will be held at the fairgrounds, Rosette said, adding that they are busy working on the construction of the halfmile track they are making for the competition.

“I am happy that (the relay) is finally in Havre,” he said. “There are a couple of teams out of Fort Belknap that are coming that are good.” He is also hoping that this will become an annual event, he added. Though there are a couple of Indian Relay circuits around, this one does not belong to any of them, Rosette added. By early July, 14 teams had signed up and 15 should be signed up by the fair, he said, with one of them making the trip from out of state. Teams will vie for $10,000 in cash and prizes awarded in three timed heats, two consolation heats and one championship heat. Four other races also are set. The Warriors Race is a 100-yard dash, the Chiefs Race is for participants 55-years-old and older, the Women’s Race for women-only and the Kids Race for children 12 and younger, Rosette said. Each of these races has a $500 added prize. Doors open for the event at 1:30 p.m. and people who would like more information can contact Rosette at 399-6320. “Come early’” he added. “It is one of the most exciting things you will see.”

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he is very happy with the work done and the future of the building. He said that the building will be used for a variety of things from small, more personal events, to wedding receptions and large public events. “(It) allows us to use the kitchen like never before,” Ralph said. He said he designed the kitchen and it is all brand-new and a state-of-the art commercial kitchen. He said the new building will also allow the program to teach kids how to cook as well as open up different things for the community. The Chuckwagon will also open up new possibilities for the 4-H program, providing the program more space for activities. “Thank-you to the community for making it come true. Thank-you to the (Lon and Stacey) Waid family because they started this many years ago,” Ralph said. “Thank you to the many donors who had come through for the kids.” Duchscher said that he is not involved in the 4-H committee but has always been a strong 4-H supporter. He added that at first he had initially gave them some money during the program’s fundraising events, like many others in the community have, but the program had called up his office in March of this year to get an estimate on the insurance for the building. He said he went to a committee meeting that same month to present the insurance options and what they should be looking for to cover the building, but at the time the council was unsure if the building would reach completion. Duchscher said the building had been up but 4-H had run out of money

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Finishing work is done in June on the Hill County 4-H Chuckwagon. for the kitchen and were concerned that the project would have to be put on hold. He said he spoke up, saying, “You know, the parents and nonparents, and local people and kids, 4-H kids, have been giving money and doing projects for this for four, five, six years now. I go to the 4-H sales and a lot of the kids were giving a percentage of their

receipts for their animals to the Chuckwagon. … It would be sad at this point to shut this thing down when everybody has worked so hard to make it a reality.” Duchscher said he then offered to pay for

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Havre Daily News/Ryan Welch the kitchen and whatever else they needed for it. Duchscher added that Ralph did a fine job on designing the kitchen and that he was very excited to see it be used in this year’s fair.


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Award-winning memorial bull riding event a labor of love Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com The award-winning Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding competition will be returning to the Great Northern Fair for a second year with the FourColors family spearheading the event which, for them, is a labor of love. Started in 2017, the annual event was conceived by the FourColors family to commemorate the life of their son and brother, Cody, an avid professional bull rider who died in 2015. “We just wanted to have something — to have kind of a memorial for him,” his brother Justin FourColors said. And the modest, Bull Riders Canadasanctioned bull riding event they planned, that included good payouts, prizes and a feed for the bull riders and volunteers, was voted by BRC members as the 2017 BRC Event of the Year. The FourColors family decided to continue the competition this year, bringing more bull riding thrills to the fair. “We’re definitely going to have some good bulls,” FourColors said. “These are PRCA-, PBR-caliber bulls.” They are bulls, in fact, that Cody FourColors lived to ride. FourColors got started at 8 or 9 years old said his mother, Luanne FourColors, riding steers at local junior rodeos, including the Havre and Rocky Boy’s Indian Reservation rodeos, but because he grew tall early he had to switch to bulls early as well. He joined the youth rodeo association on Rocky Boy which had junior bull riding. Though he went on to make a name for himself in bull riding, some of his early success came as a heeler team roping with Jade Nystrom in high school rodeo, his mother said. The pair made it to finals in the Montana High School Rodeo Association that first year, she

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Try a traditional taste and a new nibble Fair food brings wellknown dishes and brand-new snacks Kristen Takeuchi Ktakeuchi@havredailynews.com

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Kane Larsen competes July 21 in the Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding at the 2017 Great Northern Fair.

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The 2018 Great Northern Fair food booths will include old favorites that have been around for as long as some people can remember, a few some-what new kids on the block and two brand-new vendors. A beer garden has been hosted by Havre Youth Baseball since 1972, said organizer Kelly Compton, and it is open to ages 21 and older, serving beer and alcohol. Friday and Saturday the Beer Garden will also have live music by the Crawford Brothers Band, sponsored by Lodestar Land and Home, she added. There is also one bleacher designated for ages 21 and older in the arena so peop l e c a n d r i n k t h e i r b e e r a t eve n t s, Compton said. Havre Lions Club has had a booth since about 1976, member Steve Jamruszka said. The group’s booth will include cheese fries, beverages and their well-known Pronto Pups — “not to be confused with corn dogs,” he added. The Havre Rotary Club, another longtime food vendor at the fair, used to have a mobile booth but now has a permanent stand, member Kaydee Ruiz said. Their booth includes barbecue corn, onions and fresh-made lemonade, she added. Montana State University-Northern will have their representation in the form of food booths organized by the football team and the Business Professionals

Association. The Northern football team will be serving up their Vikings, fried Swedish meatballs, coach Andrew Rolin said. It is his first year as coach, Rolin added, so he is learning the ropes about the food booth and the well-known food they are serving, but he said he will definitely be there working it some of the nights. There might also be some football players working along with the coaches, he said. The Northern Business Professionals Association provides a scone booth, Northern professor Lanny Wilke said. “They have become some kind of an institution,” he added. “I don’t know why … but some people come just for the scones.” The booth is staffed by volunteers, Wilke said, adding that the organization is helped a lot by the Chi Alpha group at Northern and their supervisor Tyler Boyce. Solomon Shaved Ice has been serving their shaved ice for about 10 years at the fair, said Lori Solomon, who runs the business with her husband, Todd. It is a local business, Solomon said, which they started out by making shaved ice at the kid’s baseball games to support the youth baseball league. Half the money they make at the fair goes back to the fair, she said, and the rest of it goes to a charity or affiliation. This year, Solomon added, they are going to use the money to surprise a family with a front-load washer and dryer which they greatly need. Solomon said she would like to encourage the public to try their booth because their money stays in the community — they like to give back. Another shaved ice booth is Glacier S h ave d I c e, w h i c h i s b a s e d i n t h e

Havre Daily News/File photo A Great Northern Fairgoer buys a caramel apple at the 2016 Great Northern Fair. The 2018 fair has a list of old traditions along with some new entries at the food booths.

Flathead area and has been coming up to the fair for about 11 years. One of the owners, Sarah Nickel, said they started coming to the Great Northern

Fair because she has family in the Havre area and it was a good excuse to visit. She added that she has found that peo-

■ See Food Page 10


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Junior rodeo kicks of 2018 arena events at Great Northern Fair Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com

The Havre Junior Rodeo is set as the first of the 2018 Great Northern Fair’s line-up of evening arena entertainment, starting at 5 p.m. Wednesday, July 18. This youth rodeo gives kids 4 to 18 years ols an opportunity for competing

in rodeo events that mirror those in the open rodeo The list includes barrel racing, pole bending, sheep riding, steer riding, breakaway roping, goat tying, calf tying and chute dogging. Events also include the boot race, flag race, team roping and monkey on a rope. Cost is $5 for spectators.

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Kenzi Kallenberger competes in goat tying July 19 in the 2017 Great Northern Fair Junior Rodeo. In the goat tying event, competitors race their horse over the starting line, dismount near a goat tethered in the middle of the arena, tip and hold the goat to the ground and work to tie together three of the goat's legs with a knot called a half-hitch or hooey. The timer stops when the competitor throws her hands in the air, but the time isn't considered a qualified ride until the competitor steps away from the goat and it stays tied for a set time of a few seconds — such as 6 second under National High School Rodeo Association rules.

Rodeo: Admission is free to rodeo slack, ladies breakaway roping, 4D barrel racing ■ Continued from page 6 a second round of mini bull riding will be held. The Great Northern 4D Barrel Race that starts at noon Friday is a National Barrel Horse Association-sanctioned event with $1,000 added payout. A 4D barrel race pays in

four divisions based on time increments starting with the fastest run at the event — winner of division 1, or the 1D. First place in the 2D will go to the run that is closest to a half-second after the fastest 1D run. First place in the 3D will be the

run closest to one second after the fastest time, and first in 4D will be the run closest to the two-second mark. Winner placings and payouts can change up until the last run is over. The day-time competitions will all be free

for spectators. The rodeo tickets will be $10 for general admission, $5 for youth 6-10 years old and free for 5 and under. The bull riding tickets will be $15 for general admission, $5 for youth 6-10 years old and free for 5 and under.

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added. But Cody didn’t stick with roping. By the time he was about 16, he had given it up to ride bulls like his father, Jerry FourColors Sr. “He gave up the roping and I remember him saying roping is for old men,” Luanne FourColors said, laughing. “It took him a couple years,” she added, “to really get his groove, I guess you could say,” but his success came quickly. He joined the United Indian Rodeo Association, the Montana region for the Indian National Finals Rodeo, and qualified for the INFR through both his regiona l p o i n t s a n d h i s p o i n t s i n I N F Rsanctioned tour rodeos in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and South Dakota. At 17, his mother said, he was the youngest bull rider at the finals, and even if they hadn’t wanted to go to watch him compete, his parents would have had to go just to sign paperwork for him. After high school, FourColors joined the rodeo team at Montana State University-Northern, and while he was still a college student he received an invitation as one of the five top Indian bull riders, from the Professional Bull Riders to compete in the PBR circuit, Luanne FourColors said. The young bull rider came by his talent naturally, but talent alone didn’t make Cody successful. He studied the sport constantly, his mother said. He wrote notes for each ride — his score and placing, the bull’s name, how it bucked — and he attached the notes to

GREAT NORTHERN FAIR photos of himself riding the bull. He also analyzed each ride with his father, whom he talked to after every ride. “If his dad wasn’t with him at the rodeo or wherever he was riding, then he would call him and tell him what happened and then they’d still discuss the r i d e ove r t h e p h o n e, ” s a i d Lu a n n e FourColors, who grew up around horses and rodeo. “And I was lucky that he allowed me as his mother to travel with him. Not too many bull riders travel the rodeo world with their mothers,” she added. “... A lot of the time it would just be him and I traveling down the road.” Later, he was in a serious relationship, and his girlfriend, and eventually their two children, traveled with him, as well, she said. Sometime after Cody FourColors died in December 2015 Justin came up with the idea for the bull riding event to honor is brother, Luanne FourColors said, and the rest of the family came on board to make it happen. “We waited for over a year because of cultural and spiritual reasons per our spiritual ways,” she said about why 2017 was the first year for the bull riding. The FourColors family is Chippewa Cree from Rocky Boy. Things fell together when they were able to work the bull riding event into the Great Northern Fair schedule on a date that fell just a few days from Cody’s birthday. The success of the first Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding and

good experience from spending time with the bull riders and other rodeo people inspired the family to host the event again this year. The family raises pretty much all the money on their own, Justin FourColors said, mostly by holding food sales and raffles. The event this year will mirror last year’s with a 40-rider limit, a long round followed by a short round with the top 10 riders. If fewer than 10 rides score, they will fill the slots with the longest rides, he said. The bulls will be coming from local sources, he added, including from Crasco Bucking Bulls in Malta, Clint Solomon in Havre and Bird Bucking Bulls in Cut Bank, as well as a PBR contractor in North Dakota. The top four rides in both the long round and the short go will win prize money — which includes $5,000 added payout — and trophy buckles will be awarded in both rounds. And the FourColors family will host a

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2018 Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding

Tickets: $15 general, $5 6-10, free 5-under Longhorn stampede: 6:30 p.m. Bull Riding: 7 p.m. Mini-bull riding, with kids 6-14 years, will be held sometime during the event.

feed again this year for the bull riders and volunteers who work the event. “I’m a rodeo cowboy, too,” Justin FourColors said, “and I’ve been to some nice places where they treated us good, and I kind of know what to do to take care them. Bull riders are always on the road, and I wanted to feed them, make them feel welcome and put up a lot of money so they can keep going.”


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All-day rodeo action at 2018 Great Northern Fair Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com The Great Northern Rodeo Committee has worked with local groups to offer two full days of rodeo action in the arena Thursday and Friday, July 19-20, during the fair. The evening events will see the 2018 Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo Thursday, July 19, and the return of the award-winning Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding Friday, July 20, with action getting underway both nights at 7 p.m. at the outdoor arena. But events start earlier in the day both days, with the open rodeo slack starting at 10 a.m. Thursday and the Ladies Breakaway Roping jackpot and national qualifier starting at noon, or later depending on when slack ends. Friday’s action begins with a 4D barrel race at noon. The 2018 Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo will feature bull riding, saddle bronc, wild bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, team roping and ladies barrel racing, along with miniature bull riding and a limited entry of breakaway ropers. The wild bronc riding replaces bareback bronc riding, and it allows competitors a chance to ride rough stock using regular riding saddles rather than specialized tack. The miniature bull riding will be for youth ages 6-14 and less than 140 pounds. Rodeo events have a $500 added payout, and the winner in each event, except mini bull riding and breakaway roping, will receive an engraved black powder pistol. Ladies breakaway roping will have a limit of 12 entrants during the evening competition, but the breakaway roping jackpot earlier in the day will not have an entrant limit. The Great Northern Ladies Breakaway Roping will have two full rounds and a Top 10 short go with competitors vying for a share of the $1,000 added payout and a black powder pistol for the winner. Another draw for competitors, rodeo coorganizer Casey Solomon said, is that the event has been approved as a semi-finals qualifier for The American, a rodeo competition televised on RFD-TV. The television network announced June 1 the event would be added to the rodeo’s line-up of events with an $85,000 payout the first year. The main event Friday evening will be the 2018 Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding, which is organized by the FourColors family. This will be the second year for the event, which is sanctioned by Bull Riders Canada Inc. BRC members voted the 2017 inaugural competition the event of the year. The bull riding will again be a BRCsanctioned event, though nonmembers will be eligible for nonmember quick permits for the Havre event. The bull riders will have a chance at two rounds of competition: the long round for all 40 competitor and a short round with the Top 10. Payout will go to the top four scoring riders in each round. Though the bull riding starts at 7 p.m., the pre-show long horn cattle drive will start at 6:30 p.m., and at some point in the evening

■ See Rodeo Page 8

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson J.C. Crowley throws a loop at his calf, aiming to catch its head, July 20 in the Great Northern Ram Rodeo at the 2017 Great Northern Fair. Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Caiden Whitebear catches the head on his bulldogging steer July 20 at the Great Northern Ram Rodeo at the 2017 Great Northern Fair.

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Grant Finkbeiner clears the chute on his wild bronc July 20 in the Great Northern Ram Rodeo at the 2017 Great Northern Fair.


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GREAT NORTHERN FAIR

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All-day rodeo action at 2018 Great Northern Fair Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com The Great Northern Rodeo Committee has worked with local groups to offer two full days of rodeo action in the arena Thursday and Friday, July 19-20, during the fair. The evening events will see the 2018 Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo Thursday, July 19, and the return of the award-winning Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding Friday, July 20, with action getting underway both nights at 7 p.m. at the outdoor arena. But events start earlier in the day both days, with the open rodeo slack starting at 10 a.m. Thursday and the Ladies Breakaway Roping jackpot and national qualifier starting at noon, or later depending on when slack ends. Friday’s action begins with a 4D barrel race at noon. The 2018 Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo will feature bull riding, saddle bronc, wild bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, team roping and ladies barrel racing, along with miniature bull riding and a limited entry of breakaway ropers. The wild bronc riding replaces bareback bronc riding, and it allows competitors a chance to ride rough stock using regular riding saddles rather than specialized tack. The miniature bull riding will be for youth ages 6-14 and less than 140 pounds. Rodeo events have a $500 added payout, and the winner in each event, except mini bull riding and breakaway roping, will receive an engraved black powder pistol. Ladies breakaway roping will have a limit of 12 entrants during the evening competition, but the breakaway roping jackpot earlier in the day will not have an entrant limit. The Great Northern Ladies Breakaway Roping will have two full rounds and a Top 10 short go with competitors vying for a share of the $1,000 added payout and a black powder pistol for the winner. Another draw for competitors, rodeo coorganizer Casey Solomon said, is that the event has been approved as a semi-finals qualifier for The American, a rodeo competition televised on RFD-TV. The television network announced June 1 the event would be added to the rodeo’s line-up of events with an $85,000 payout the first year. The main event Friday evening will be the 2018 Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding, which is organized by the FourColors family. This will be the second year for the event, which is sanctioned by Bull Riders Canada Inc. BRC members voted the 2017 inaugural competition the event of the year. The bull riding will again be a BRCsanctioned event, though nonmembers will be eligible for nonmember quick permits for the Havre event. The bull riders will have a chance at two rounds of competition: the long round for all 40 competitor and a short round with the Top 10. Payout will go to the top four scoring riders in each round. Though the bull riding starts at 7 p.m., the pre-show long horn cattle drive will start at 6:30 p.m., and at some point in the evening

■ See Rodeo Page 8

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson J.C. Crowley throws a loop at his calf, aiming to catch its head, July 20 in the Great Northern Ram Rodeo at the 2017 Great Northern Fair. Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Caiden Whitebear catches the head on his bulldogging steer July 20 at the Great Northern Ram Rodeo at the 2017 Great Northern Fair.

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Grant Finkbeiner clears the chute on his wild bronc July 20 in the Great Northern Ram Rodeo at the 2017 Great Northern Fair.


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Junior rodeo kicks of 2018 arena events at Great Northern Fair Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com

The Havre Junior Rodeo is set as the first of the 2018 Great Northern Fair’s line-up of evening arena entertainment, starting at 5 p.m. Wednesday, July 18. This youth rodeo gives kids 4 to 18 years ols an opportunity for competing

in rodeo events that mirror those in the open rodeo The list includes barrel racing, pole bending, sheep riding, steer riding, breakaway roping, goat tying, calf tying and chute dogging. Events also include the boot race, flag race, team roping and monkey on a rope. Cost is $5 for spectators.

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Kenzi Kallenberger competes in goat tying July 19 in the 2017 Great Northern Fair Junior Rodeo. In the goat tying event, competitors race their horse over the starting line, dismount near a goat tethered in the middle of the arena, tip and hold the goat to the ground and work to tie together three of the goat's legs with a knot called a half-hitch or hooey. The timer stops when the competitor throws her hands in the air, but the time isn't considered a qualified ride until the competitor steps away from the goat and it stays tied for a set time of a few seconds — such as 6 second under National High School Rodeo Association rules.

Rodeo: Admission is free to rodeo slack, ladies breakaway roping, 4D barrel racing ■ Continued from page 6 a second round of mini bull riding will be held. The Great Northern 4D Barrel Race that starts at noon Friday is a National Barrel Horse Association-sanctioned event with $1,000 added payout. A 4D barrel race pays in

four divisions based on time increments starting with the fastest run at the event — winner of division 1, or the 1D. First place in the 2D will go to the run that is closest to a half-second after the fastest 1D run. First place in the 3D will be the

run closest to one second after the fastest time, and first in 4D will be the run closest to the two-second mark. Winner placings and payouts can change up until the last run is over. The day-time competitions will all be free

for spectators. The rodeo tickets will be $10 for general admission, $5 for youth 6-10 years old and free for 5 and under. The bull riding tickets will be $15 for general admission, $5 for youth 6-10 years old and free for 5 and under.

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added. But Cody didn’t stick with roping. By the time he was about 16, he had given it up to ride bulls like his father, Jerry FourColors Sr. “He gave up the roping and I remember him saying roping is for old men,” Luanne FourColors said, laughing. “It took him a couple years,” she added, “to really get his groove, I guess you could say,” but his success came quickly. He joined the United Indian Rodeo Association, the Montana region for the Indian National Finals Rodeo, and qualified for the INFR through both his regiona l p o i n t s a n d h i s p o i n t s i n I N F Rsanctioned tour rodeos in Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and South Dakota. At 17, his mother said, he was the youngest bull rider at the finals, and even if they hadn’t wanted to go to watch him compete, his parents would have had to go just to sign paperwork for him. After high school, FourColors joined the rodeo team at Montana State University-Northern, and while he was still a college student he received an invitation as one of the five top Indian bull riders, from the Professional Bull Riders to compete in the PBR circuit, Luanne FourColors said. The young bull rider came by his talent naturally, but talent alone didn’t make Cody successful. He studied the sport constantly, his mother said. He wrote notes for each ride — his score and placing, the bull’s name, how it bucked — and he attached the notes to

GREAT NORTHERN FAIR photos of himself riding the bull. He also analyzed each ride with his father, whom he talked to after every ride. “If his dad wasn’t with him at the rodeo or wherever he was riding, then he would call him and tell him what happened and then they’d still discuss the r i d e ove r t h e p h o n e, ” s a i d Lu a n n e FourColors, who grew up around horses and rodeo. “And I was lucky that he allowed me as his mother to travel with him. Not too many bull riders travel the rodeo world with their mothers,” she added. “... A lot of the time it would just be him and I traveling down the road.” Later, he was in a serious relationship, and his girlfriend, and eventually their two children, traveled with him, as well, she said. Sometime after Cody FourColors died in December 2015 Justin came up with the idea for the bull riding event to honor is brother, Luanne FourColors said, and the rest of the family came on board to make it happen. “We waited for over a year because of cultural and spiritual reasons per our spiritual ways,” she said about why 2017 was the first year for the bull riding. The FourColors family is Chippewa Cree from Rocky Boy. Things fell together when they were able to work the bull riding event into the Great Northern Fair schedule on a date that fell just a few days from Cody’s birthday. The success of the first Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding and

good experience from spending time with the bull riders and other rodeo people inspired the family to host the event again this year. The family raises pretty much all the money on their own, Justin FourColors said, mostly by holding food sales and raffles. The event this year will mirror last year’s with a 40-rider limit, a long round followed by a short round with the top 10 riders. If fewer than 10 rides score, they will fill the slots with the longest rides, he said. The bulls will be coming from local sources, he added, including from Crasco Bucking Bulls in Malta, Clint Solomon in Havre and Bird Bucking Bulls in Cut Bank, as well as a PBR contractor in North Dakota. The top four rides in both the long round and the short go will win prize money — which includes $5,000 added payout — and trophy buckles will be awarded in both rounds. And the FourColors family will host a

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2018 Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding

Tickets: $15 general, $5 6-10, free 5-under Longhorn stampede: 6:30 p.m. Bull Riding: 7 p.m. Mini-bull riding, with kids 6-14 years, will be held sometime during the event.

feed again this year for the bull riders and volunteers who work the event. “I’m a rodeo cowboy, too,” Justin FourColors said, “and I’ve been to some nice places where they treated us good, and I kind of know what to do to take care them. Bull riders are always on the road, and I wanted to feed them, make them feel welcome and put up a lot of money so they can keep going.”


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Award-winning memorial bull riding event a labor of love Pam Burke community@havredailynews.com The award-winning Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding competition will be returning to the Great Northern Fair for a second year with the FourColors family spearheading the event which, for them, is a labor of love. Started in 2017, the annual event was conceived by the FourColors family to commemorate the life of their son and brother, Cody, an avid professional bull rider who died in 2015. “We just wanted to have something — to have kind of a memorial for him,” his brother Justin FourColors said. And the modest, Bull Riders Canadasanctioned bull riding event they planned, that included good payouts, prizes and a feed for the bull riders and volunteers, was voted by BRC members as the 2017 BRC Event of the Year. The FourColors family decided to continue the competition this year, bringing more bull riding thrills to the fair. “We’re definitely going to have some good bulls,” FourColors said. “These are PRCA-, PBR-caliber bulls.” They are bulls, in fact, that Cody FourColors lived to ride. FourColors got started at 8 or 9 years old said his mother, Luanne FourColors, riding steers at local junior rodeos, including the Havre and Rocky Boy’s Indian Reservation rodeos, but because he grew tall early he had to switch to bulls early as well. He joined the youth rodeo association on Rocky Boy which had junior bull riding. Though he went on to make a name for himself in bull riding, some of his early success came as a heeler team roping with Jade Nystrom in high school rodeo, his mother said. The pair made it to finals in the Montana High School Rodeo Association that first year, she

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Try a traditional taste and a new nibble Fair food brings wellknown dishes and brand-new snacks Kristen Takeuchi Ktakeuchi@havredailynews.com

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson Kane Larsen competes July 21 in the Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding at the 2017 Great Northern Fair.

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The 2018 Great Northern Fair food booths will include old favorites that have been around for as long as some people can remember, a few some-what new kids on the block and two brand-new vendors. A beer garden has been hosted by Havre Youth Baseball since 1972, said organizer Kelly Compton, and it is open to ages 21 and older, serving beer and alcohol. Friday and Saturday the Beer Garden will also have live music by the Crawford Brothers Band, sponsored by Lodestar Land and Home, she added. There is also one bleacher designated for ages 21 and older in the arena so peop l e c a n d r i n k t h e i r b e e r a t eve n t s, Compton said. Havre Lions Club has had a booth since about 1976, member Steve Jamruszka said. The group’s booth will include cheese fries, beverages and their well-known Pronto Pups — “not to be confused with corn dogs,” he added. The Havre Rotary Club, another longtime food vendor at the fair, used to have a mobile booth but now has a permanent stand, member Kaydee Ruiz said. Their booth includes barbecue corn, onions and fresh-made lemonade, she added. Montana State University-Northern will have their representation in the form of food booths organized by the football team and the Business Professionals

Association. The Northern football team will be serving up their Vikings, fried Swedish meatballs, coach Andrew Rolin said. It is his first year as coach, Rolin added, so he is learning the ropes about the food booth and the well-known food they are serving, but he said he will definitely be there working it some of the nights. There might also be some football players working along with the coaches, he said. The Northern Business Professionals Association provides a scone booth, Northern professor Lanny Wilke said. “They have become some kind of an institution,” he added. “I don’t know why … but some people come just for the scones.” The booth is staffed by volunteers, Wilke said, adding that the organization is helped a lot by the Chi Alpha group at Northern and their supervisor Tyler Boyce. Solomon Shaved Ice has been serving their shaved ice for about 10 years at the fair, said Lori Solomon, who runs the business with her husband, Todd. It is a local business, Solomon said, which they started out by making shaved ice at the kid’s baseball games to support the youth baseball league. Half the money they make at the fair goes back to the fair, she said, and the rest of it goes to a charity or affiliation. This year, Solomon added, they are going to use the money to surprise a family with a front-load washer and dryer which they greatly need. Solomon said she would like to encourage the public to try their booth because their money stays in the community — they like to give back. Another shaved ice booth is Glacier S h ave d I c e, w h i c h i s b a s e d i n t h e

Havre Daily News/File photo A Great Northern Fairgoer buys a caramel apple at the 2016 Great Northern Fair. The 2018 fair has a list of old traditions along with some new entries at the food booths.

Flathead area and has been coming up to the fair for about 11 years. One of the owners, Sarah Nickel, said they started coming to the Great Northern

Fair because she has family in the Havre area and it was a good excuse to visit. She added that she has found that peo-

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Food: Out-of-area vendors will sell treats alongside the long-time local favorites ■ Continued from page 9 ple at the Great Northern Fair seem to like the Rainbow sno-cones — maybe because of their vibrant colors, she said. The Boys & Girls Club of the Hi-Line runs a food booth that was donated to them, Executive Director Krista Solomon said. Steak on a Stick will be their featured food, as it was when the booth was donated. “We tried to change (the dish) but we brought it back by popular demand,” Solomon said, adding that along with that dish they will have Mason’s hot dogs and peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches. The Boy Scouts, who took over the Knights of Columbus booth this year after helping work it for many years, will have food including Rocky Mountain hotdogs, nacho chips and cheese, corn on the cob, Gary & Leo’s bratwursts and lemonade, co-chair Jenn Thompson said. The booth will be staffed and run by Havre and Hi-Line area Scouts, she added. Another area group that has a long history serving food at the fair is the Havre Jaycees. “(We have had a booth) for a long time,” member Kyle Gooch said. “Longer than I have been a member.” The Jaycees’ booth will be serving old favorites like hot dogs, Pizza Hut pizza,

root beer floats, and a new item for this year — onion rings, Gooch added. Another group that has had a booth at the fair over the years is The Optimist Club who often have new items on their menu Newer eats and brand-new treats The Rollin’ Donut, a food-truck based out of Billings, will be travelling to Havre for about their sixth year at the fair, said Nadine Nafts, who owns the truck with her husband, Nash. Nafts added that they like to come to the Great Northern Fair, because “we just have fun … there are a lot of good people.” A more recent face at the fair is Citrus Cyclones, who will be coming up for their second year at the Great Northern Fair, said Jo Bingham. Citrus Cyclones is based in Bainville, Bingham said, adding that they provide a fruit-based drink that uses a press and presses the fruits to make it to a customer’s liking. A new booth that will be at this year’s fair is an ice-cream vendor coming all the way from Jefferson, Missouri. Adobe Flats Warrior Ice Cream will be joining the Great Northern fair for the first time, owner Aaron Hauzer said, add-

ing that they they wanted to come up north because they thought it would be a good idea to try a new event. The favorite ice cream people have at their business seems to be strawberry, Hauzer added. The second new vender of the 2018 fair is Little Em’s Kettlecorn out of Billings. The food truck, which is run by Emily Ehresman and and her husband, Shane Cervantez, is a brand-new venture. “ I t i s o u r f i r s t ye a r p o p p i n g , ” Ehresman said, adding that she is really enjoying it because they get to meet the most interesting people.

Ehresman, who is a carpenter by trade, said her husband encouraged her to try something new since her job was hard on her body, and opening a food truck was a dream of his, she added, so they decided to go for it. They sell 11 different gourmet flavors, including a mix, which Ehresman said is popular, where they mix a bunch of the flavors together and call it “Skettle Corn.” They are looking forward to getting established, she added, and hope the Great Northern Fair is a venue they can keep coming back to year after year.

Indian Relay Racing comes to Great Northern Fair Kristen Takeuchi ktakeuchi@havredailynews.com A new event to the Great Northern Fair this year will be the Indian Relay Races. The races, which will be held Sunday, July 22, at 2:30 p.m., will be held in conjunction with the fair at the Great Northern Fairgrounds, and the masters of ceremony for the event will be Daryl Wright II and Wade Colliflower. The organizer of the event, Tim “J.R.” Rosette Jr., said that he decided to plan the Indian Relay when he was talking to fair board member Ron Konesky. “Ron and I were talking outside one day and it just came about,” he said. “Indian Relay is a centuries-old form of horse racing that shows the athleticism of both the rider and his horses. Riding bareback, the rider makes three laps around the track, each lap on a different horse possessing both speed and skill,” the official website for the Horse Nations Indian Relay Council says. The relay races will be held at the fairgrounds, Rosette said, adding that they are busy working on the construction of the halfmile track they are making for the competition.

“I am happy that (the relay) is finally in Havre,” he said. “There are a couple of teams out of Fort Belknap that are coming that are good.” He is also hoping that this will become an annual event, he added. Though there are a couple of Indian Relay circuits around, this one does not belong to any of them, Rosette added. By early July, 14 teams had signed up and 15 should be signed up by the fair, he said, with one of them making the trip from out of state. Teams will vie for $10,000 in cash and prizes awarded in three timed heats, two consolation heats and one championship heat. Four other races also are set. The Warriors Race is a 100-yard dash, the Chiefs Race is for participants 55-years-old and older, the Women’s Race for women-only and the Kids Race for children 12 and younger, Rosette said. Each of these races has a $500 added prize. Doors open for the event at 1:30 p.m. and people who would like more information can contact Rosette at 399-6320. “Come early’” he added. “It is one of the most exciting things you will see.”

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he is very happy with the work done and the future of the building. He said that the building will be used for a variety of things from small, more personal events, to wedding receptions and large public events. “(It) allows us to use the kitchen like never before,” Ralph said. He said he designed the kitchen and it is all brand-new and a state-of-the art commercial kitchen. He said the new building will also allow the program to teach kids how to cook as well as open up different things for the community. The Chuckwagon will also open up new possibilities for the 4-H program, providing the program more space for activities. “Thank-you to the community for making it come true. Thank-you to the (Lon and Stacey) Waid family because they started this many years ago,” Ralph said. “Thank you to the many donors who had come through for the kids.” Duchscher said that he is not involved in the 4-H committee but has always been a strong 4-H supporter. He added that at first he had initially gave them some money during the program’s fundraising events, like many others in the community have, but the program had called up his office in March of this year to get an estimate on the insurance for the building. He said he went to a committee meeting that same month to present the insurance options and what they should be looking for to cover the building, but at the time the council was unsure if the building would reach completion. Duchscher said the building had been up but 4-H had run out of money

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Finishing work is done in June on the Hill County 4-H Chuckwagon. for the kitchen and were concerned that the project would have to be put on hold. He said he spoke up, saying, “You know, the parents and nonparents, and local people and kids, 4-H kids, have been giving money and doing projects for this for four, five, six years now. I go to the 4-H sales and a lot of the kids were giving a percentage of their

receipts for their animals to the Chuckwagon. … It would be sad at this point to shut this thing down when everybody has worked so hard to make it a reality.” Duchscher said he then offered to pay for

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Havre Daily News/Ryan Welch the kitchen and whatever else they needed for it. Duchscher added that Ralph did a fine job on designing the kitchen and that he was very excited to see it be used in this year’s fair.


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Brand-new Chuckwagon continues 4-H tradition at fairgrounds Derek Hann Dshann@havredailynews.com The new 4-H Chuckwagon is set to open its doors to the public during this year’s Great Northern Fair. The building has been in the process of being built for the past six years, with 4-H announcing plans for the construction in 2012 and fundraising ever since. The new building should be ready to operate by the time of the fair and a ribbon-cutting ceremony will be held the first day of the fair, Wednesday, July 18, at 4 p.m. The old building was built in the early 1950s with an addition constructed in the 1970s. The old building also had problems, said Carrie Molitor, council president for Hill County 4-H, with holes in the ceiling and floors and a large amount of work that had to go into the pipes and wiring just to keep the building operable. Molitor said that it is wonderful to finally have the project complete and that she can’t wait to show the public what the community helped 4-H build. She added that the Chuckwagon project had wonderful contributors and donors. “Everyone seemed to have stepped up and chipped in,” Molitor said. She said that Wally Duchscher, co-owner of Duchscher Kapperud Insurance, and Jeff Ralph, owner of Havre’s McDonald's with his wife, Norma Ralph, contributed to the

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Jaycees rev up demo derby for yet another fair

Drivers compete July 23 in the Havre Jaycees Demolition Derby at the 2017 Great Northern Fair. Havre Daily News/Ryan Welch Trucks and equipment stand outside of Hill County 4-H Chuckwagon in June as work progresses to finish the buiding in time for this year’s Great Northern Fair. Chuckwagon project and were a great help. “Both of them are great assets to the community and to 4-H,” Molitor said. She added that the new building can be used for by both 4-H and the community for many different events. She said that the building will be a place for teaching the kids in 4-H, be it cooking in the new kitchen or quilting lessons, and that when 4-H is not using the building it can be rented out for community members to use for their own personal events. Molitor said that she “wants to let the community know how much we appreciate them and that we couldn’t have done it without them.”

Early last year the 4-H committee announced that construction of the building would start with Clausen and Sons as the lead contractor in the project. The new building is a 50-by-140 foot steel structure with two bathrooms, a commercial kitchen, a storage area as well as two exhibit areas. Unlike the old building, which was only operated five times a year, the new Chuckwagon will be open all year, with people able to rent the facility for events, said Ralph. Ralph, who is active in 4-H, said he had been involved in the project for the past twoand-a-half years, and he had contributed both time and money to the project. He added that

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Derek Hann Dshann@havredailynews.com The Havre Jaycees Demolition Derby comes back to the Great Northern fair this year, Saturday, July 21, starting at 6:30 p.m. Trenton “T.J.” Daulton, who is in charge of this year’s Demolition Derby and has been a member of the Jaycees for 11 years, said this year will be a great year for the event with four main consolation heats and one championship heat. He added that, depending on turnout, the Jaycees plan to have 10 cars in the championship heat. Daulton said this year they will run three classes, with the main class being weld cars. There will also be a chain stock class, where cars have no welding or bracing. “Pull the interior out, drop a gas tank in and run it, chain the doors shut,” Daulton said. He added that this year there will also be a Herby Derby, compact cars with the

same rules as the weld cars, but small vehicles such as the AMC Gremlin and Ford Festiva. Bump ’N’ Run races will fill some open time and keep the crowd entertained. The schedule is to run the modified heats and the stock heats, with a Bump ’N’ Run race in between, then the chain stock, followed by the consolidation heat, then the Herby Derby and lastly the championship. The championship will award five places with cash prizes: first place $3,000, second place $2,000, third place $900, fourth place $450 and fifth place $250. The chain stock class will also have cash prizes with first place being awarded $1,000 and second $500. The Herby Derby will have cash prizes which will be determined after registration based on the number of vehicles that enter. The Havre Jaycees run the entire event, a longstanding tradition for the service club. The Jaycees plan the event as well as get the arena ready with some outside help.

Havre Daily News/Colin Thompson.

In the past, Trevor Smith has helped the Jaycees with preparations, Daulton said. He said the Jaycees do the inspection of the vehicles as well as the line judging. Daulton added that you can see the Jaycees’ members around the arena with flags and with fire extinguishers. He said the club members check the safety of the events and make sure that everyone is out having a good time in a safe manner. “As safe as possible with cars running into each other — on purpose,” Daulton said, laughing. “We want to make sure that we are putting on a great event for the community to come out to during the Great Northern Fair,” he added. “We really appreciate all of the sponsorships we’ve got this year, that has helped us out. … We’ve had some awesome sponsors this year.” Daulton said he also wanted to thank the Great Northern Fair for letting the Jaycees have the event every year. People who are interested in registering for the demo derby can register at the event, but if people want to preregister they can call Daulton at 399-3084 or get in contact on the Jaycees Facebook page https:// www.facebook.com/HavreJCs/, or they can contact Daulton directly on his Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/trenton. daulton/.


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GREAT NORTHERN FAIR

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Fair and 4-H Schedules Great Northern Fair Tuesday, July 17 8 a.m.-7 p. m. — Open class entries Wednesday, July 18 Carnival opens today Noon — Food booths open Commercial building open Open class exhibits open 5 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Junior Rodeo 9 p.m. — Commercial building, barns and exhibit buildings close Thursday, July 19 10 a.m. — Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo slack, arena Noon — Ladies Breakaway Roping, arena entertainment Food booths open Commercial building open Open class exhibits open 7 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Great Northern Ram Open Rodeo 9 p.m. — Commercial building, barns and exhibit buildings close Friday, July 20 Noon — 4D Barrel Racing, arena entertainment Food booths open Commercial building open

Open class exhibits open 2 p.m. & 6 p.m. — “Sedition in Hill Co.” presentation, Faber Schoolhouse 6:30 p.m. — Longhorn stampede in arena 7 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Cody FourColors Memorial Bull Riding 9 p.m. — Commercial building, barns and exhibit buildings close Saturday, July 21 Noon — Food booths open Commercial building open Open class exhibits open Premium money available for open class exhibits 4 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Ribbon Cutting 6:30 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Demo Derby 9 p.m. — Commercial building, barns and exhibit buildings close Sunday, , July 22 Noon — Food booths open Commercial building open Open class exhibits open 2:30 p.m. — Arena entertainment, Indian Relay Racing 4:30 p.m. — Exhibit removal 5 p.m. — Exhibit buildings close Carnival closes

Hill County 4-H Wednesday, July 18 10 a.m. — 4-H Horse Show 11 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 4 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public 5:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close 7 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Final Set-Up 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Closes Thursday, July 19 7 a.m. — 4-H Market Animal Weigh Scale Open 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 9:30 a.m. — 4-H Market Animal Weigh Scale Closes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public (Concessions and Exhibit Viewing) 12 p.m. — 4-H Fair Superintendent Meeting 1:15 p.m. — 4-H Livestock Exhibitors Meeting 2 p.m. — 4-H Small Animal Show Cat Showmanship and Judging Rabbit Showmanship and Judging Poultry Showmanship and Judging Rabbit Agility Event 7 p.m. — Beef, Swine and Sheep Exhibitors Meeting with Judge 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn Close 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Closes Friday, July 20 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 9 a.m. — 4-H Beef Show Beef Showmanship Breeding Beef Show Feeder/Market Beef Classes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public (Concessions and Exhibit Viewing) 2 p.m. — 4-H Cloverbud Large Animal Experience 3-5 p.m. — 4-H Obstacle Course 7:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close

9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn Close 11 p.m. — Chuckwagon Closes Saturday, July 21 8 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 8 a.m. — 4-H Swine Show Swine Showmanship Swine Feeder/Market Classes 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public 1 p.m. — 4-H Sheep and Goat Show Sheep Showmanship Breeding Sheep Show Feeder/Market Sheep Classes Goat Showmanship Dairy Goat Classes 3 p.m. — 4-H Round Robin Competition 3:30 p.m. — 4-H Pinewood Derby Car Event 5 p.m. — 4-H Market Sale Set Up 7 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close 7 p.m. — Large Non-Market Animals May Leave the Barns to be Taken Home 9:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn Close 11 p.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Closes Sunday, , July 22 8-9:30 a.m. — 4-H Appreciation Breakfast Sponsored by CHS Big Sky 10 a.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Open to Public 11 a.m. — 4-H Chuckwagon Opens to Public 11:30 a.m. — Buyer Appreciation Lunch at 4-H Chuckwagon 1 p.m. — 4-H Market Sale in Bigger Better Barn 3:30 p.m. — Bigger Better Barn Concessions Close 4:30 p.m. — Non-Animal 4-H Exhibits may be removed from the 4-H Chuckwagon 5 p.m. — Clean Up: 4-H Chuckwagon, Bigger Better Barn and Beef Barn. Please note that all 4-H members, leaders and parents are expected to participate in fair cleanup

Great Northern Fair 2018  
Great Northern Fair 2018  
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