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2018 Wedding Trends: It’s about color, creativity and lasting memories Given enough research it seems you can find any look, destination, food or activity trending this year. The Havre Daily News looked at a large sampling of lists and found some common threads among the top trends this year. And even if

being trendy isn’t one of your priorities, contributers had some great ideas for helping make your wedding unique and personal. The message this year is that wedding style is about color, creativity and giving your guests an experience to remember.

Color is Back Designers from interior décor to wedding planners are calling that brilliant and dark purple color Ultra Violet the color of the year, but wedding advisers are telling couples to go wild and go personal. Corals, bright pinks, purples, blues, jewel tones, metalics, pairings of mint and burgundy, cherry red and aqua, pink flamingo and kelly green, lemon yellow and tangy orange, or any colors that suit your personal tastes can be worked together the experts are saying. “We think the pendulum is moving back towards color and vibrancy,” Alison Laesser-Keck and Bryan Keck of Alison & Bryan told Brides. com. This look isn’t limited to tablecloths and floral arrangements, either, because candles, glasses or dinnerware, flower vessels and other decorations can add splashes of accents to the look, even in floral prints rather than solids.

Floral Arrangements, Backdrops & Embellishments

Cascading floral arrangements are the thing for 2018 with Amaranthus named as a go-to look by several experts, but wheat and pampas grass accents made the list as well. The unique florals trending from several sources this year are hanging floral arrangements — over the head table or as part of the ceremony’s backdrop for example. “Couples are keeping their guest tables simple and focusing more on ceiling treatments,” Chezelle Rodriguez of CD Weddings in Puerto Rico told Weddingwire.com. This display, she added, can be accented by understated centerpieces in a small cluster of vases with just one or two types of flowers. Greenery is another big hit this year, from cuts greens to define areas or create screen to using living potted plants at the ceremony and reception, greenery is versitile. "Freshly cut foliage fronted with a laser-cut painted wood veneer or stained latticework covered in climbing clematis are just a few snap-worthy ways of transforming the bar experience," wedding planner Calder Clark told Marthastewartweddings.com. Potted plants used in the wedding or reception can be wrapped in color-coordinating fabrics if the pots themselves don’t match your color theme. Another oft-mentioned decoration is balloons, bundled in arrangements around the room, or to create a whimsical archway.

By Pam Burke, Havre Daily News

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How couples can benefit from hiring local wedding vendors (METRO) Local vendors are often a go-to choice when couples are planning their wedding ceremonies and receptions. As the "shop local" movement grows in popularity, weddings present a prime opportunity to embrace this movement. Couples may have different ideas regarding where to tie the knot, but local vendors can be hired regardless of geography. Brides magazine says the biggest factor influencing wedding location is the size of the guest list and the number of people who wouldn't be able to attend if the wedding was in a particular locale. Hometowns might be the traditional choice regarding wedding location, but the XO Group says one in four couples now host destination weddings. Once couples choose a town or city to host their weddings, they can begin exploring the benefits of working with locally-based vendors.

Familiarity Local vendors will be familiar with the area and possibly even the location where the wedding will be held. That can help couples avoid having to give directions, discuss venue protocols, and handle other tasks that must be worked out with non-local vendors. For example, local photographers familiar with a particular venue will know all of the best places to get shots, and some vendors may have preexisting relationships with venue representatives that could ensure wedding day operations go smoothly.

Proximity In fact, archways themselves are popular among the experts. From modern geometric to rustic in style, draped with decoration or left as a minimalist statement, an archway can create an intimate setting overhead or a stunning backdrop to a scene.

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February 2018

Local vendors can meet with brides and grooms more readily throughout the planning process, making things less stressful on the happy couple. This also makes it easier to drop off deposits, attend meetings, make fitting appointments, or attend styling sessions.

Savings Couples who travel for their weddings and employ local vendors will not have to pack as much. Using local vendors eliminates the need to bring along bulky dresses, decorative items, flowers, and much more. Plus, couples needn't pay to transport and house vendors brought along from back home.

Environment Individuals who take great strides to conserve resources by reducing their energy consumption and protecting the environment often find that shopping local is beneficial. Local vendors are more likely to source their materials from other local businesses, reducing their carbon footprints along the way. For example, local caterers may rely on local farmers for their foods, affording couples the chance to host eco-friendly or even farm-totable weddings.

Customization Working with local vendors often translates into getting more personalized service and attention than mass retailers or merchants can provide. Going local when choosing wedding vendors is an increasingly popular choice among couples about to tie the knot.

While celestial themes, from starry lace dresses to a starry night receptions, and bohemian style, ala Stevie Nicks, were a big hit among the experts, the advice most offered was to go with a style that is authentic — whether that is to showcase

Living centerpieces set receptions apart (METRO) Weddings are special occasions for all involved. Guests may look forward to the ceremony and festivities to follow, and couples who are hosting do not want to disappoint. Brides and grooms often look for new and innovative ideas to set their weddings apart from ones they may have attended in the past. While budget often determines what couples can and can't do at their wedding receptions, brides- and groomsto-be can prioritize certain components if they are looking to impress. Centerpieces are one aspect of the reception where couples can get creative without breaking the bank. Flowers are popular centerpieces at weddings. But even with cost-cutting measures, such as choosing in-season blooms, bumping up the filler-to-flower ratio and opting for low-profile centerpieces instead of towering alternatives, couples can expect to pay around $2,000 on wedding flowers, offers The Knot, a go-to resource for wedding planning. But opting for the following clever living centerpiece alternatives might not only impress guests, but also do so on budget.

· Choose potted plants. Potted plants can serve as both favors and reception centerpieces. Live plants also can be an eco-conscious decision for couples who are interested in incorporating "green" elements into their wed-

n See Wedding Trends Page 5

Photo by METRO Creative Local vendors have intimate knowledge of the areas they serve, and that can make for a more personalized, eco-friendly wedding.

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dings. Couples tying the knot in the autumn can place mums inside of a hollowed pumpkin or gourd. Spring and summer weddings can be enhanced by miniature rose bushes. Winter weddings may be dressed up with small evergreen trees or potted holly.

· Marine life draws attention. Couples can opt for inexpensive freshwater fish to add ambiance and a focal point for the reception tables. Small goldfish bowls can be decorated with gravel that matches the color of the w e d d i n g theme. One lucky guest at each table can take home the miniature aquarium after the festivities.

· Butterflies are whimsical. Some cultures or religions view butterflies as a symbol of endurance, change, hope, and vitality. Incorporating butterflies into reception centerpieces can make guests feel like they are stepping into a living garden. Small, mesh-lined cages filled with foliage and butterflies might add that special touch. Living centerpieces offer something different from floral centerpieces. However, because live plants and animals may be part of the display, couples need to account for their welfare. This means ensuring they will be cared for after the wedding, or in the event of butterflies, released into the evening sky.


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After the Wedding Checklist o Return all rented tuxedoes. o Return all rented equipment. o Return all borrowed accessories. o Write thank-you cards. o Preserve your bridal bouquet. o Send your wedding gown to the cleaners and have it sealed in a vacuum bag or box. o Decide on filing taxes jointly or separately, and update your tax forms at work.

o Add your spouse to your employer's health insurance. o Make your spouse the beneficiary of any retirement and 401(k) plans. o Purchase life insurance. o Start financial planning and consider meeting with an accountant and financial advisor for strategies that fit your goals as a married couple.

Name Change Check List o SOCIAL SECURITY CARD o DRIVER'S LICENSE o PASSPORT o BANK ACCOUNTS o CREDIT CARDS o SAFE DEPOSIT BOX o INVESTMENTS o LOANS o WILL o PROPERTY TITLES o UTILITY COMPANIES

o POST OFFICE o MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS o CAR REGISTRATION o INSURANCE POLICIES o VOTER REGISTRATION o DOCTORS o DENTIST o EMPLOYEE RECORDS o SCHOOL RECORDS o CLUB MEMBERSHIPS o ANYONE WHO BILLS YOU

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How to Publish Your

Engagement & Wedding Announcement In The Havre Daily News

Use this guide to help you format your announcement to be published on Fridays in the Havre Daily News Community section. Deadline is 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, prior to the requested Friday publication.

Engagement announcement suggested content: Full name of bride-to-be and groom-to-be, bride's parents' names and city, groom's parents' names and city, bride's education and year(s) of graduation, bride's employment and city, groom's education and year(s) of graduation, groom's employment and city, wedding date and location, couple's future home city.

Wedding announcement suggested content: Full maiden name of bride, full name of groom, noting if the bride is keeping her maiden name; wedding date, time and location; bride's and groom's parents' names and city; first and last name and title of officiant; name and city of maid or matron of honor, of best man; name and city of bridesmaids and groomsmen, flower girl, ringbearer, candlelighters, ushers and musicians; location of reception and hosts; bride's and groom's education and year(s) of graduation; bride's and groom's employer and city; honeymoon location; and couple's new home city.

Call 406-265-6795 with any questions or for more info. You may submit your photo and announcement these ways: Deliver in person: 119 Second Street, Havre, MT 59501 Email: smantle@havredailynews.com Mail: P.O. Box 431, Havre, MT 59501 Fax: 406-265-6798

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How to file for a marriage in Montana

By Tim Leeds, Havre Daily News

One part of the often-lengthy planning in holding a wedding has fairly simple requirements in Montana: to receive a marriage license, people need to fill out an application with a clerk of District Court in the state, swear the information is true, pay the $53 fee and either have a blood test completed or sign a waiver of that requirement, then get married within six months. Same-sex marriages have been legal in the state of Montana since 2014. The requirements are still all the same. On the state application, everything is gender neutral and now refers to applicants as spouse 1 and spouse 2. While people in Montana can have a common-law marriage, going through the official steps can save some trouble later on. Common-law marriages result from actions of a couple — typically living together as husband and wife while of legal age and not being legally married to someone else — holding themselves forth as a married couple and having an agreement to be married, says a brochure by Montana Legal Services Association. But common-law marriages

have been known to cause troubles with applying for or receiving insurance or Social Security benefits and other issues because of a lack of a license to prove a marriage exists. In Montana, people also can be married without a ceremony by filing a written declaration of marriage with a clerk of court. Even that could cause problems depending on whether it would be recognized under rules in other states, including by insurance companies. The requirements in Montana to apply for a marriage license are fairly simple and straightforward. Residents of the state don’t even have to apply for marriage in the county where the ceremony will be performed. A license issued in Hill County, for example, can be used in any Montana county. If one person is a nonresident, that person’s section of the application may be completed before an official authorized to accept such applications in the county and state where the party resides, the law states. The application is fairly simple, requiring information including the names of the parties, their resi-

dence and address, names of the parents and their birthplaces, race, education and information about any previous marriage and its termination. The participants are required to swear under oath that the information provided is true, and state law specifies that the parties must pay the filing fee. The law requires that the parties applying provide satisfactory proof that they will be at least 18 years old when the license is issued, or will be 16 and have judicial approval of the marriage, generally with the consent of the parties’ parents. The parties must also be able to provide proof that their marriage is not prohibited under state law, such as a marriage between first cousins or an uncle and a niece. Montana law does specify that any female applicant applying for a marriage license must submit a blood test confirming immunity to rubella, but also allows the parties of the marriage to request a waiver of the requirement after reading information about the need to ensure rubella immunity to protect any children conceived. Infection of a woman with the rubella virus

during early pregnancy can lead to complications with the pregnancy or a variety of congenital defects, the waiver reads. The waivers are available at the time of application. The marriage must take place within 180 days of the application being completed, though there is no waiting period before the ceremony can take place. Once the marriage is completed and the license issued, it is kept on record both in the county where it was filed and on the state level. Another issue people might need to remember is taken care of after the marriage: making sure any

name changes are on record. If a name is changed due to marriage — such as the woman taking the family name of the husband — it is important that the change is recorded by any agencies or entities that need to know. That would include the Social Security Administration, for recording income and issuing benefits; insurance companies; bank and other financial accounts including mortgages, and making sure names — and addresses — are correct on driver’s licenses, passports and other identification, as well as any other documents or entities that require a name to be on file.


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wedding

tech ideas

for that new-fashioned ceremony

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A photographer and a reporter

get married

By Pam Burke, Havre Daily News

Robot videographers, 3D printed cakes and driverless limo service probably aren't feasible features for your wedding, but that doesn't mean that you can't make your special day even better with a little high-tech enhancement. Even if tech isn’t your thing, check out this list of five accessible, high-tech wedding features.

1.

Drone technology is becoming more commonplace and many wedding photographers offer aerial shots and video of the ceremony, reception and other wedding activities, or even to give a sense of the beauty of the wedding day.

2.

For a different view of the wedding — going from a bird’s eye view to the bride's eye — Theknot.com recommends putting a mini camera, such as a GoPro, in the bridal bouquet. This camera can capture the walk down the aisle and provide a front-row view

of the couple's exchange of vows.

3.

Video can also help family and friends unable to travel to the wedding location still feel like part of the day by live-streaming the ceremony and reception with a phone or tablet. Theknot.com recommends dividing the live-streams into smaller captures with one for the ceremony, one for toasts and cake cutting, and another for the first dance.

4.

Mashable.com suggested giving the old-favorite photo booth a high-tech upgrade to a GIF booth. The digital camera takes quick bursts of photos which are then strung together to form a stopmotion-style clip. These GIFs can be instantly uploaded to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and other social media sites by the guests themselves. PCMag.com says websites like U.S.-based Gifyyy.com capture looping animations that can be sent

straight to the guests' smartphones, and PinkShutter turns four photos into a loop.

5.

High-tech guestbooks come in different forms. An interactive digital guestbook has guests scan a QR code — a Quick Response Code that is a type of matrix barcode — and type a short message, which can be retrieved and compiled with other wedding mementos later. And with apps, such as Guest — which will require a dedicated iPad — wedding guests can tap the screen and follow prompts to add a photo and message. Bonus tips: A Snapchat geofilter can make the day more interactive you and your guests, and selfie sticks can help guests catch those random shots and video clips to add to your visual mementos. Also, a multi-port charging station can help guests keep their gadgets going for the duration of the celebration.

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By Paul Dragu, Havre Daily News

Teresa and I met while working at Havre Daily News, she a photographer, and me, a reporter. It sort of was love at first sight — and it sort of wasn’t. We were married Valentine’s Day of 2018. If I had a nickel for every time people told me how interesting it is that a photographer and a writer got together, I’d be the only reporter above the poverty line. You would think reporters and photographers get together all the time. After all, the workplace is one of the most common places people meet. And then, there’s the complimentary aspect. “With your dazzling pictures and my mesmerizingly captivating words, we can take over the world.” We’re still working out the details on world domination. Blueprints for Phase 1 are nearly complete. Being a word guy doesn’t mean I don’t appreciate good imagery. The thing about Teresa’s photography is you can have doublepaned cataracts and still be blown away by her pictures. These days she has a portrait photography business and I’m still always baffled when people who’d like great pictures go to anyone else. I’ve been accused of being biased, but it still seems like a no-brainer to me. Anyway, back to my story. I remember one morning at work, our proof reader was looking over a page, and on that black- and-white pre-newspaper page — smack dab in the middle — was one of Teresa’s photos. Our proofer pointed out how awesome the picture was. As one who is always looking for an excuse to take a break from real work — this might help explain why reporters

are paid in milk duds and confederate dollars — I walked over to gaze. Sure enough, the picture was amazing. I’d seen great pictures before, but I guess I’d never seen such great pictures by someone I actually knew, someone I could touch. Teresa and I clicked on assignment right away. I would do all the talking and engaging, and she would use those opportunities to take pictures. She likes being invisible, and my big, yammering mouth helped her do that. One thing I’ve learned drives photographers crazy — there are many things actually, as photographers are a temperamental breed — is when reporters obliviously block the shot. But it turned out I was a natural at getting out of the way. It was love at first work. After six months of working together and fighting our urges to get together, I decided to ask her to be my girlfriend. On September 2016, I wrote Teresa a letter outlining the top seven reasons she should be my girlfriend. Maybe there were only five reasons. Somewhere at the top of those top three reasons was my ability to get out of the shot. After rewriting the letter about 20 times, and finishing with a request to check "yes" or no," I pressed “send.” I still have the letter. We sometimes look at it and laugh about how much things have changed. At the time, I lived in an attic apartment on the corner of Sixth and Seventh. It was a cubbyhole of a place with slanted ceilings on both sides that meant I had to bend down when moving around, including in the shower. When I first moved in, the DMV lady told me a ghost

that wears suspenders lives there. I’d never seen the ghost but the place did smell funky. The only thing that almost made up for the awkward showers and the noisy college kid next door in my haunted place made for gnomes was the cheap rent and a big double window that led to the roof. That Sunday, a day after I sent her my letter asking if she’d go steady with me, Teresa came over. I’d been nervous all day. I couldn’t focus on the football games I was watching and I’d banged my head on the ceiling several times. What would she say? After she came over, we got a green blanket to wrap in, stepped through the big double window, sat down on the roof, leaned back and peered at the cool night sky and talked. Teresa told me about her last serious relationship. It wasn’t a great deal, and she wanted me to know everything. I listened and then hugged her as she cried. I told her about my previous relationship. Then I reminded her about the two reasons she should be my girlfriend. Before the night ended, we had stepped off the roof of my apartment as a couple. It was

official. She checked “yes.” —— We have dated 16 months. During that time, we’ve had five and a half arguments, two halves of a breakup, and one painfully inane conversation after Donald Trump was elected president that may or may have not mentioned breaking up. One of the many things I have loved about Teresa is, despite her creative brilliance, she can be admiringly practical. We’ve decided to break up the phase where we go from boyfriend and girlfriend to husband and wife into two parts. Instead of waiting until our close friends and family can travel thousands of miles — my family is in Atlanta, hers in Salt Lake City — we’ve decided to have a private ceremony in our church, officiated by our pastor, in the middle of the week, Valentine’s Day. The kids were there — all nice and dressed up in black and white — Teresa’s parents and her younger sister, and our very few local close friends. In the summer we plan to have a post-wedding continuation ceremony, a party. There will be warmth — relational and climate — food, music, and friends we haven’t seen in a long time.


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Transportation for your Wedding party By Paul Dragu, Havre Daily News Although the Hi-Line is not brimming with options for party transportation, there is at least one local dad-and-son duo people can call. Chad Surber, together with his father, operates Surber Transportation LLC, based in Chinook. Be it shuttle services to the ceremony and the reception, or just one or the other, Surber Transportation can do it.

There are various reasons to book wedding transportation

Providing transportation, like a shuttle bus, ensures that friends and family have a safe ride at the end of the night. Out-of-town guests will appreciate not having to think about directions to their hotel after a night of celebrating, and there is less stress on them related to navigating a new town. Also, running transportation from hotels to the venue at specific times makes it more likely that guests will be on time. A waiting chauffeur serves as a reminder to keep wedding parties on time. Transportation keeps everyone together and creates opportunities to make beautiful memories — wedding day is a great

time to enjoy with everyone, celebrating marriage and all of the friends who attend. Chad Surber said, since the business’ start in 2012, Surber Transportation has driven customers all over the Hi-Line in their two buses, and beyond. Prairie Farms, Beaver Creek Park, and as far as Lewistown — Surber said they’ve shuttled parties everywhere. The transportation company has two options, a 15-passenger party bus with limousine-style benches, and a 30-passenger party bus, also with similar seating. Surber Transportation charges $50 an hour for the 15-passenger bus and $100 for the 30-passenger bus. A minimum of $200, for the smaller bus, and $300, for the larger bus, is required. The business was something of an accident, Surber said. He bought the 15-passenger van and someone asked if he provided shuttling services. “I guess I could,” he said he remembers saying. Not surprisingly, June through August is wedding busy season. A few parties have already booked Surber Transportation.

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Wedding Trends: Lee: 'Food will continue to be the real centerpiece' ■ From Page 2 why you chose the wedding location or what is special about the two of you as a couple. “An easy way to make a destination wedding feel entirely new is to embrace the local culture," Lynn Easton, the planner behind Easton Events said to Marthastewartweddings.com. But even if you are staying in your hometown for the wedding, treat guests to food, décor and embellishments that bring out the local lore, activities and culture. The experts emphasized getting creative with signage, whether it’s a sign welcoming guests to the reception, or signs directing people the next venue or the right table. Can it be painted on old wood, written in colored chalk on chalkboards, illuminated with neon, made to look like street signs, embossed on leather or cut from metal? Can this look be used in the invitations and place cards?

Anyone can be a Foodie That emphasis on culture, the unusual and providing an experience for guests extends to food as well. Interactive stations can give guests a chance to mingle while dishing up, or creating their own drink or appetizer, or sampling from different styles of food. Or work on presentation, making the

food display look like something from a Renaissance painting. Maybe you can go with an all-local menu, have doughnuts instead of cake, or challenge guests to create a signature drink or hors d’oeuvres, The trend is for couples to offer a chance at what Theknot.com called experiential dining — “like a hanging installation of nibbles, open-fire cooking or a chef plating something in real time.” "Food will continue to be the real centerpiece of the reception," Annie Lee of Daughter of Design in New York City told Theknot.com.

It’s About the Guests, Too One of the major trends for weddings is a shift in focus from the bride and groom to the guests, making the experience special for them as well. Whether it’s offering the next generation in photo booths — a GIF booth that creates a short animation — or culture lessons or exciting music Alison Laesser-Keck and Bryan Keck told Brides. com that they are excited about custom experiences this year. “Investing into a quality experience,” they said. “Communal experiences that make people feel different going out than when they went in.” The idea, Weddingwire.com says, is more about creating a vibe or mood for your big day.

“It’s not just about personalizing the wedding to the couple,” Beth Bernstein of SQN Events says. “It’s about who their guests are and what they mean to them.”

Let’s Not Forget the Clothes It looks as if the trend in wedding gowns is pretty much anything goes, as long as the bride feels like the dress captures and expresses who she is. “Take risks — especially with fashion,” LaesserKeck and Keck said. “We’d love for couples to just own it and wear dresses and suits that they love and are an expression of their personalities” Four wedding dress styles mentioned on more than one site are bell-sleeves, celestial themed fabrics, Bohemian-look and florals, prints or a few added flowers. And for bridesmaids, the outside the box “dress” was actually pants, both separates and jumpsuits. As for the men, that call to add color applies to the tuxedos as well. Navy is the new black and burgundy is the new navy, the experts said, but if the groom and groomsmen are more traditionalists, the color can be added as an accent in the tie, cummerbund, kerchief or collar.

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Dale and Carrigan Cummings ~ July 15, 2017

Casey and Candice Delaney ~ May 20, 2017

Brice and Lisa Wood ~ September 9, 2017 Photo by Merry Character Photography

Megan Quintero, daughter of Roger & Julianne LaSmith, married Blake Walsh, son of Mark & Shari Walsh, in Seattle on May 28, 2017

Jack and Brianna Hanson ~ June 10, 2017 Photo by Jacqueline Photography

Josh and Jasmine Miller ~ June 17, 2017


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Dale and Carrigan Cummings ~ July 15, 2017

Casey and Candice Delaney ~ May 20, 2017

Brice and Lisa Wood ~ September 9, 2017 Photo by Merry Character Photography

Megan Quintero, daughter of Roger & Julianne LaSmith, married Blake Walsh, son of Mark & Shari Walsh, in Seattle on May 28, 2017

Jack and Brianna Hanson ~ June 10, 2017 Photo by Jacqueline Photography

Josh and Jasmine Miller ~ June 17, 2017


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Transportation for your Wedding party By Paul Dragu, Havre Daily News Although the Hi-Line is not brimming with options for party transportation, there is at least one local dad-and-son duo people can call. Chad Surber, together with his father, operates Surber Transportation LLC, based in Chinook. Be it shuttle services to the ceremony and the reception, or just one or the other, Surber Transportation can do it.

There are various reasons to book wedding transportation

Providing transportation, like a shuttle bus, ensures that friends and family have a safe ride at the end of the night. Out-of-town guests will appreciate not having to think about directions to their hotel after a night of celebrating, and there is less stress on them related to navigating a new town. Also, running transportation from hotels to the venue at specific times makes it more likely that guests will be on time. A waiting chauffeur serves as a reminder to keep wedding parties on time. Transportation keeps everyone together and creates opportunities to make beautiful memories — wedding day is a great

time to enjoy with everyone, celebrating marriage and all of the friends who attend. Chad Surber said, since the business’ start in 2012, Surber Transportation has driven customers all over the Hi-Line in their two buses, and beyond. Prairie Farms, Beaver Creek Park, and as far as Lewistown — Surber said they’ve shuttled parties everywhere. The transportation company has two options, a 15-passenger party bus with limousine-style benches, and a 30-passenger party bus, also with similar seating. Surber Transportation charges $50 an hour for the 15-passenger bus and $100 for the 30-passenger bus. A minimum of $200, for the smaller bus, and $300, for the larger bus, is required. The business was something of an accident, Surber said. He bought the 15-passenger van and someone asked if he provided shuttling services. “I guess I could,” he said he remembers saying. Not surprisingly, June through August is wedding busy season. A few parties have already booked Surber Transportation.

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Wedding Trends: Lee: 'Food will continue to be the real centerpiece' ■ From Page 2 why you chose the wedding location or what is special about the two of you as a couple. “An easy way to make a destination wedding feel entirely new is to embrace the local culture," Lynn Easton, the planner behind Easton Events said to Marthastewartweddings.com. But even if you are staying in your hometown for the wedding, treat guests to food, décor and embellishments that bring out the local lore, activities and culture. The experts emphasized getting creative with signage, whether it’s a sign welcoming guests to the reception, or signs directing people the next venue or the right table. Can it be painted on old wood, written in colored chalk on chalkboards, illuminated with neon, made to look like street signs, embossed on leather or cut from metal? Can this look be used in the invitations and place cards?

Anyone can be a Foodie That emphasis on culture, the unusual and providing an experience for guests extends to food as well. Interactive stations can give guests a chance to mingle while dishing up, or creating their own drink or appetizer, or sampling from different styles of food. Or work on presentation, making the

food display look like something from a Renaissance painting. Maybe you can go with an all-local menu, have doughnuts instead of cake, or challenge guests to create a signature drink or hors d’oeuvres, The trend is for couples to offer a chance at what Theknot.com called experiential dining — “like a hanging installation of nibbles, open-fire cooking or a chef plating something in real time.” "Food will continue to be the real centerpiece of the reception," Annie Lee of Daughter of Design in New York City told Theknot.com.

It’s About the Guests, Too One of the major trends for weddings is a shift in focus from the bride and groom to the guests, making the experience special for them as well. Whether it’s offering the next generation in photo booths — a GIF booth that creates a short animation — or culture lessons or exciting music Alison Laesser-Keck and Bryan Keck told Brides. com that they are excited about custom experiences this year. “Investing into a quality experience,” they said. “Communal experiences that make people feel different going out than when they went in.” The idea, Weddingwire.com says, is more about creating a vibe or mood for your big day.

“It’s not just about personalizing the wedding to the couple,” Beth Bernstein of SQN Events says. “It’s about who their guests are and what they mean to them.”

Let’s Not Forget the Clothes It looks as if the trend in wedding gowns is pretty much anything goes, as long as the bride feels like the dress captures and expresses who she is. “Take risks — especially with fashion,” LaesserKeck and Keck said. “We’d love for couples to just own it and wear dresses and suits that they love and are an expression of their personalities” Four wedding dress styles mentioned on more than one site are bell-sleeves, celestial themed fabrics, Bohemian-look and florals, prints or a few added flowers. And for bridesmaids, the outside the box “dress” was actually pants, both separates and jumpsuits. As for the men, that call to add color applies to the tuxedos as well. Navy is the new black and burgundy is the new navy, the experts said, but if the groom and groomsmen are more traditionalists, the color can be added as an accent in the tie, cummerbund, kerchief or collar.

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wedding

tech ideas

for that new-fashioned ceremony

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A photographer and a reporter

get married

By Pam Burke, Havre Daily News

Robot videographers, 3D printed cakes and driverless limo service probably aren't feasible features for your wedding, but that doesn't mean that you can't make your special day even better with a little high-tech enhancement. Even if tech isn’t your thing, check out this list of five accessible, high-tech wedding features.

1.

Drone technology is becoming more commonplace and many wedding photographers offer aerial shots and video of the ceremony, reception and other wedding activities, or even to give a sense of the beauty of the wedding day.

2.

For a different view of the wedding — going from a bird’s eye view to the bride's eye — Theknot.com recommends putting a mini camera, such as a GoPro, in the bridal bouquet. This camera can capture the walk down the aisle and provide a front-row view

of the couple's exchange of vows.

3.

Video can also help family and friends unable to travel to the wedding location still feel like part of the day by live-streaming the ceremony and reception with a phone or tablet. Theknot.com recommends dividing the live-streams into smaller captures with one for the ceremony, one for toasts and cake cutting, and another for the first dance.

4.

Mashable.com suggested giving the old-favorite photo booth a high-tech upgrade to a GIF booth. The digital camera takes quick bursts of photos which are then strung together to form a stopmotion-style clip. These GIFs can be instantly uploaded to Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and other social media sites by the guests themselves. PCMag.com says websites like U.S.-based Gifyyy.com capture looping animations that can be sent

straight to the guests' smartphones, and PinkShutter turns four photos into a loop.

5.

High-tech guestbooks come in different forms. An interactive digital guestbook has guests scan a QR code — a Quick Response Code that is a type of matrix barcode — and type a short message, which can be retrieved and compiled with other wedding mementos later. And with apps, such as Guest — which will require a dedicated iPad — wedding guests can tap the screen and follow prompts to add a photo and message. Bonus tips: A Snapchat geofilter can make the day more interactive you and your guests, and selfie sticks can help guests catch those random shots and video clips to add to your visual mementos. Also, a multi-port charging station can help guests keep their gadgets going for the duration of the celebration.

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By Paul Dragu, Havre Daily News

Teresa and I met while working at Havre Daily News, she a photographer, and me, a reporter. It sort of was love at first sight — and it sort of wasn’t. We were married Valentine’s Day of 2018. If I had a nickel for every time people told me how interesting it is that a photographer and a writer got together, I’d be the only reporter above the poverty line. You would think reporters and photographers get together all the time. After all, the workplace is one of the most common places people meet. And then, there’s the complimentary aspect. “With your dazzling pictures and my mesmerizingly captivating words, we can take over the world.” We’re still working out the details on world domination. Blueprints for Phase 1 are nearly complete. Being a word guy doesn’t mean I don’t appreciate good imagery. The thing about Teresa’s photography is you can have doublepaned cataracts and still be blown away by her pictures. These days she has a portrait photography business and I’m still always baffled when people who’d like great pictures go to anyone else. I’ve been accused of being biased, but it still seems like a no-brainer to me. Anyway, back to my story. I remember one morning at work, our proof reader was looking over a page, and on that black- and-white pre-newspaper page — smack dab in the middle — was one of Teresa’s photos. Our proofer pointed out how awesome the picture was. As one who is always looking for an excuse to take a break from real work — this might help explain why reporters

are paid in milk duds and confederate dollars — I walked over to gaze. Sure enough, the picture was amazing. I’d seen great pictures before, but I guess I’d never seen such great pictures by someone I actually knew, someone I could touch. Teresa and I clicked on assignment right away. I would do all the talking and engaging, and she would use those opportunities to take pictures. She likes being invisible, and my big, yammering mouth helped her do that. One thing I’ve learned drives photographers crazy — there are many things actually, as photographers are a temperamental breed — is when reporters obliviously block the shot. But it turned out I was a natural at getting out of the way. It was love at first work. After six months of working together and fighting our urges to get together, I decided to ask her to be my girlfriend. On September 2016, I wrote Teresa a letter outlining the top seven reasons she should be my girlfriend. Maybe there were only five reasons. Somewhere at the top of those top three reasons was my ability to get out of the shot. After rewriting the letter about 20 times, and finishing with a request to check "yes" or no," I pressed “send.” I still have the letter. We sometimes look at it and laugh about how much things have changed. At the time, I lived in an attic apartment on the corner of Sixth and Seventh. It was a cubbyhole of a place with slanted ceilings on both sides that meant I had to bend down when moving around, including in the shower. When I first moved in, the DMV lady told me a ghost

that wears suspenders lives there. I’d never seen the ghost but the place did smell funky. The only thing that almost made up for the awkward showers and the noisy college kid next door in my haunted place made for gnomes was the cheap rent and a big double window that led to the roof. That Sunday, a day after I sent her my letter asking if she’d go steady with me, Teresa came over. I’d been nervous all day. I couldn’t focus on the football games I was watching and I’d banged my head on the ceiling several times. What would she say? After she came over, we got a green blanket to wrap in, stepped through the big double window, sat down on the roof, leaned back and peered at the cool night sky and talked. Teresa told me about her last serious relationship. It wasn’t a great deal, and she wanted me to know everything. I listened and then hugged her as she cried. I told her about my previous relationship. Then I reminded her about the two reasons she should be my girlfriend. Before the night ended, we had stepped off the roof of my apartment as a couple. It was

official. She checked “yes.” —— We have dated 16 months. During that time, we’ve had five and a half arguments, two halves of a breakup, and one painfully inane conversation after Donald Trump was elected president that may or may have not mentioned breaking up. One of the many things I have loved about Teresa is, despite her creative brilliance, she can be admiringly practical. We’ve decided to break up the phase where we go from boyfriend and girlfriend to husband and wife into two parts. Instead of waiting until our close friends and family can travel thousands of miles — my family is in Atlanta, hers in Salt Lake City — we’ve decided to have a private ceremony in our church, officiated by our pastor, in the middle of the week, Valentine’s Day. The kids were there — all nice and dressed up in black and white — Teresa’s parents and her younger sister, and our very few local close friends. In the summer we plan to have a post-wedding continuation ceremony, a party. There will be warmth — relational and climate — food, music, and friends we haven’t seen in a long time.


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After the Wedding Checklist o Return all rented tuxedoes. o Return all rented equipment. o Return all borrowed accessories. o Write thank-you cards. o Preserve your bridal bouquet. o Send your wedding gown to the cleaners and have it sealed in a vacuum bag or box. o Decide on filing taxes jointly or separately, and update your tax forms at work.

o Add your spouse to your employer's health insurance. o Make your spouse the beneficiary of any retirement and 401(k) plans. o Purchase life insurance. o Start financial planning and consider meeting with an accountant and financial advisor for strategies that fit your goals as a married couple.

Name Change Check List o SOCIAL SECURITY CARD o DRIVER'S LICENSE o PASSPORT o BANK ACCOUNTS o CREDIT CARDS o SAFE DEPOSIT BOX o INVESTMENTS o LOANS o WILL o PROPERTY TITLES o UTILITY COMPANIES

o POST OFFICE o MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTIONS o CAR REGISTRATION o INSURANCE POLICIES o VOTER REGISTRATION o DOCTORS o DENTIST o EMPLOYEE RECORDS o SCHOOL RECORDS o CLUB MEMBERSHIPS o ANYONE WHO BILLS YOU

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How to Publish Your

Engagement & Wedding Announcement In The Havre Daily News

Use this guide to help you format your announcement to be published on Fridays in the Havre Daily News Community section. Deadline is 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, prior to the requested Friday publication.

Engagement announcement suggested content: Full name of bride-to-be and groom-to-be, bride's parents' names and city, groom's parents' names and city, bride's education and year(s) of graduation, bride's employment and city, groom's education and year(s) of graduation, groom's employment and city, wedding date and location, couple's future home city.

Wedding announcement suggested content: Full maiden name of bride, full name of groom, noting if the bride is keeping her maiden name; wedding date, time and location; bride's and groom's parents' names and city; first and last name and title of officiant; name and city of maid or matron of honor, of best man; name and city of bridesmaids and groomsmen, flower girl, ringbearer, candlelighters, ushers and musicians; location of reception and hosts; bride's and groom's education and year(s) of graduation; bride's and groom's employer and city; honeymoon location; and couple's new home city.

Call 406-265-6795 with any questions or for more info. You may submit your photo and announcement these ways: Deliver in person: 119 Second Street, Havre, MT 59501 Email: smantle@havredailynews.com Mail: P.O. Box 431, Havre, MT 59501 Fax: 406-265-6798

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How to file for a marriage in Montana

By Tim Leeds, Havre Daily News

One part of the often-lengthy planning in holding a wedding has fairly simple requirements in Montana: to receive a marriage license, people need to fill out an application with a clerk of District Court in the state, swear the information is true, pay the $53 fee and either have a blood test completed or sign a waiver of that requirement, then get married within six months. Same-sex marriages have been legal in the state of Montana since 2014. The requirements are still all the same. On the state application, everything is gender neutral and now refers to applicants as spouse 1 and spouse 2. While people in Montana can have a common-law marriage, going through the official steps can save some trouble later on. Common-law marriages result from actions of a couple — typically living together as husband and wife while of legal age and not being legally married to someone else — holding themselves forth as a married couple and having an agreement to be married, says a brochure by Montana Legal Services Association. But common-law marriages

have been known to cause troubles with applying for or receiving insurance or Social Security benefits and other issues because of a lack of a license to prove a marriage exists. In Montana, people also can be married without a ceremony by filing a written declaration of marriage with a clerk of court. Even that could cause problems depending on whether it would be recognized under rules in other states, including by insurance companies. The requirements in Montana to apply for a marriage license are fairly simple and straightforward. Residents of the state don’t even have to apply for marriage in the county where the ceremony will be performed. A license issued in Hill County, for example, can be used in any Montana county. If one person is a nonresident, that person’s section of the application may be completed before an official authorized to accept such applications in the county and state where the party resides, the law states. The application is fairly simple, requiring information including the names of the parties, their resi-

dence and address, names of the parents and their birthplaces, race, education and information about any previous marriage and its termination. The participants are required to swear under oath that the information provided is true, and state law specifies that the parties must pay the filing fee. The law requires that the parties applying provide satisfactory proof that they will be at least 18 years old when the license is issued, or will be 16 and have judicial approval of the marriage, generally with the consent of the parties’ parents. The parties must also be able to provide proof that their marriage is not prohibited under state law, such as a marriage between first cousins or an uncle and a niece. Montana law does specify that any female applicant applying for a marriage license must submit a blood test confirming immunity to rubella, but also allows the parties of the marriage to request a waiver of the requirement after reading information about the need to ensure rubella immunity to protect any children conceived. Infection of a woman with the rubella virus

during early pregnancy can lead to complications with the pregnancy or a variety of congenital defects, the waiver reads. The waivers are available at the time of application. The marriage must take place within 180 days of the application being completed, though there is no waiting period before the ceremony can take place. Once the marriage is completed and the license issued, it is kept on record both in the county where it was filed and on the state level. Another issue people might need to remember is taken care of after the marriage: making sure any

name changes are on record. If a name is changed due to marriage — such as the woman taking the family name of the husband — it is important that the change is recorded by any agencies or entities that need to know. That would include the Social Security Administration, for recording income and issuing benefits; insurance companies; bank and other financial accounts including mortgages, and making sure names — and addresses — are correct on driver’s licenses, passports and other identification, as well as any other documents or entities that require a name to be on file.


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2018 Wedding Trends: It’s about color, creativity and lasting memories Given enough research it seems you can find any look, destination, food or activity trending this year. The Havre Daily News looked at a large sampling of lists and found some common threads among the top trends this year. And even if

being trendy isn’t one of your priorities, contributers had some great ideas for helping make your wedding unique and personal. The message this year is that wedding style is about color, creativity and giving your guests an experience to remember.

Color is Back Designers from interior décor to wedding planners are calling that brilliant and dark purple color Ultra Violet the color of the year, but wedding advisers are telling couples to go wild and go personal. Corals, bright pinks, purples, blues, jewel tones, metalics, pairings of mint and burgundy, cherry red and aqua, pink flamingo and kelly green, lemon yellow and tangy orange, or any colors that suit your personal tastes can be worked together the experts are saying. “We think the pendulum is moving back towards color and vibrancy,” Alison Laesser-Keck and Bryan Keck of Alison & Bryan told Brides. com. This look isn’t limited to tablecloths and floral arrangements, either, because candles, glasses or dinnerware, flower vessels and other decorations can add splashes of accents to the look, even in floral prints rather than solids.

Floral Arrangements, Backdrops & Embellishments

Cascading floral arrangements are the thing for 2018 with Amaranthus named as a go-to look by several experts, but wheat and pampas grass accents made the list as well. The unique florals trending from several sources this year are hanging floral arrangements — over the head table or as part of the ceremony’s backdrop for example. “Couples are keeping their guest tables simple and focusing more on ceiling treatments,” Chezelle Rodriguez of CD Weddings in Puerto Rico told Weddingwire.com. This display, she added, can be accented by understated centerpieces in a small cluster of vases with just one or two types of flowers. Greenery is another big hit this year, from cuts greens to define areas or create screen to using living potted plants at the ceremony and reception, greenery is versitile. "Freshly cut foliage fronted with a laser-cut painted wood veneer or stained latticework covered in climbing clematis are just a few snap-worthy ways of transforming the bar experience," wedding planner Calder Clark told Marthastewartweddings.com. Potted plants used in the wedding or reception can be wrapped in color-coordinating fabrics if the pots themselves don’t match your color theme. Another oft-mentioned decoration is balloons, bundled in arrangements around the room, or to create a whimsical archway.

By Pam Burke, Havre Daily News

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How couples can benefit from hiring local wedding vendors (METRO) Local vendors are often a go-to choice when couples are planning their wedding ceremonies and receptions. As the "shop local" movement grows in popularity, weddings present a prime opportunity to embrace this movement. Couples may have different ideas regarding where to tie the knot, but local vendors can be hired regardless of geography. Brides magazine says the biggest factor influencing wedding location is the size of the guest list and the number of people who wouldn't be able to attend if the wedding was in a particular locale. Hometowns might be the traditional choice regarding wedding location, but the XO Group says one in four couples now host destination weddings. Once couples choose a town or city to host their weddings, they can begin exploring the benefits of working with locally-based vendors.

Familiarity Local vendors will be familiar with the area and possibly even the location where the wedding will be held. That can help couples avoid having to give directions, discuss venue protocols, and handle other tasks that must be worked out with non-local vendors. For example, local photographers familiar with a particular venue will know all of the best places to get shots, and some vendors may have preexisting relationships with venue representatives that could ensure wedding day operations go smoothly.

Proximity In fact, archways themselves are popular among the experts. From modern geometric to rustic in style, draped with decoration or left as a minimalist statement, an archway can create an intimate setting overhead or a stunning backdrop to a scene.

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February 2018

Local vendors can meet with brides and grooms more readily throughout the planning process, making things less stressful on the happy couple. This also makes it easier to drop off deposits, attend meetings, make fitting appointments, or attend styling sessions.

Savings Couples who travel for their weddings and employ local vendors will not have to pack as much. Using local vendors eliminates the need to bring along bulky dresses, decorative items, flowers, and much more. Plus, couples needn't pay to transport and house vendors brought along from back home.

Environment Individuals who take great strides to conserve resources by reducing their energy consumption and protecting the environment often find that shopping local is beneficial. Local vendors are more likely to source their materials from other local businesses, reducing their carbon footprints along the way. For example, local caterers may rely on local farmers for their foods, affording couples the chance to host eco-friendly or even farm-totable weddings.

Customization Working with local vendors often translates into getting more personalized service and attention than mass retailers or merchants can provide. Going local when choosing wedding vendors is an increasingly popular choice among couples about to tie the knot.

While celestial themes, from starry lace dresses to a starry night receptions, and bohemian style, ala Stevie Nicks, were a big hit among the experts, the advice most offered was to go with a style that is authentic — whether that is to showcase

Living centerpieces set receptions apart (METRO) Weddings are special occasions for all involved. Guests may look forward to the ceremony and festivities to follow, and couples who are hosting do not want to disappoint. Brides and grooms often look for new and innovative ideas to set their weddings apart from ones they may have attended in the past. While budget often determines what couples can and can't do at their wedding receptions, brides- and groomsto-be can prioritize certain components if they are looking to impress. Centerpieces are one aspect of the reception where couples can get creative without breaking the bank. Flowers are popular centerpieces at weddings. But even with cost-cutting measures, such as choosing in-season blooms, bumping up the filler-to-flower ratio and opting for low-profile centerpieces instead of towering alternatives, couples can expect to pay around $2,000 on wedding flowers, offers The Knot, a go-to resource for wedding planning. But opting for the following clever living centerpiece alternatives might not only impress guests, but also do so on budget.

· Choose potted plants. Potted plants can serve as both favors and reception centerpieces. Live plants also can be an eco-conscious decision for couples who are interested in incorporating "green" elements into their wed-

n See Wedding Trends Page 5

Photo by METRO Creative Local vendors have intimate knowledge of the areas they serve, and that can make for a more personalized, eco-friendly wedding.

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dings. Couples tying the knot in the autumn can place mums inside of a hollowed pumpkin or gourd. Spring and summer weddings can be enhanced by miniature rose bushes. Winter weddings may be dressed up with small evergreen trees or potted holly.

· Marine life draws attention. Couples can opt for inexpensive freshwater fish to add ambiance and a focal point for the reception tables. Small goldfish bowls can be decorated with gravel that matches the color of the w e d d i n g theme. One lucky guest at each table can take home the miniature aquarium after the festivities.

· Butterflies are whimsical. Some cultures or religions view butterflies as a symbol of endurance, change, hope, and vitality. Incorporating butterflies into reception centerpieces can make guests feel like they are stepping into a living garden. Small, mesh-lined cages filled with foliage and butterflies might add that special touch. Living centerpieces offer something different from floral centerpieces. However, because live plants and animals may be part of the display, couples need to account for their welfare. This means ensuring they will be cared for after the wedding, or in the event of butterflies, released into the evening sky.


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