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HAVERFORD SC HOOL Tod ay

125 Years of Football at Haverford 路 Extraordinary Educators 路 Annual Report

Fall 2012


Front cover: VI Formers Jeffrey Green and Reilly Hupfeldt escort kindergartener Henry Bernstein to the opening day assembly on Sept. 5. Photo by Linda Walters. Back cover: Middle School Physical Education teacher Jay Wright ’96 gathers with students for a group photo on Sabol Field in May, 2012. Photo by Tim Stay. Above: The Class of 2013 with Headmaster Joe Cox: (front row, from left) Josh White, Alanmichael Wiedmer, Dante Clementi, Ben Grobman, Sam Bowen, Kerry Kynett, Andrew Wiener, Mike Green, (second row) Matt Galetta, Chris Wiener, Carlo deMarco, Roby Burch, Billy Seltzer, Josh Collins, Dequan Freeman, Amar Patel, Josh Pau, Austin Merritt, Timmy Brooks, Sam Turner, Alex Dawejko, (third row) Connor Curry, Niticon Davis, Grayson Sessa, Michael Maggio, Mario Maggio, Lucas Elek, Jimmy Jameson, Michael Zivik, Tyler Ruch, Danny Rubenstein, Samuel Blitzer, Harry Rosenberg, Gavin McBride, (fourth row) D.J. Conner, Henry Scales, Jeffrey Green, Tyler Miller, Henry Brooks, Stephen Fitzgerald, Tommy Curry, Matt Cook, Frank Gentile, Fisher Pressman, Scott Jaster, Bradley Scherer, Darren Watson, Brandon Owens, (fifth row) Ben Rohr, Kiran Jagtiani, Max Schmidt, Travis Chou, Ryan Kinsey, Elias Economou, Ros McDermott, Alex Ware, Jack Kling, Vincent Bellwoar, Connor Fairman, Will Oliver, Jason Shein, (sixth row) Chaney Jones, Keenan Mosimann, Erich Prince, Jake Mullin, Tyler Brooks, Evan Kuritzkes, Peter Thompson, Wick Egan, Sam Bloch, Patrick Somers, Drew Field, J.J. House, James Tarte, Matt Galambos, (seventh row) Hannibal Mathis, Jack Armstrong, Aron Morgan, Chris Morgan, Reilly Hupfeldt, Brett Campbell, Pat Valentine, Isaiah Jones, Joseph Solomon, Peter Aspinall, Henri Mattila, Trevor Atkins, Garrett Grubb, Jordan Lieb, (back row) Jake Landman, Alex Dubow, John McMichael, Gerard Hoeltzel, James Shecter, Eric Senior, Colin Meehan, Kip Taviano, Stewart Denious, Jason Tabas, Max Freundlich, Sama’j Reed, Avery Bass, and Michael O’Malley. Photo by Linda Walters.


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Contents features

Service Learning: IBSC China 2012

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By Jini Loos

125 Years of Football at Haverford

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By Michael Bradley ’79

Extraordinary Educators The 2011-12 Annual Report

spotlights

The Notables tour Bermuda

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By Dr. Bill Ehrhart

Student Spotlight: Diego Fernandez ’13 Meet the new faculty Faculty Spotlight: Antonio Fink

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By Dawn Blake

Profiles in Service: Dr. Richard Roberts ’51

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By Edwin “Arnie” Forrest ’51

Paris Reception and Global Readiness

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By Keren White

departments

From the Headmaster Around the Quad Go Fords Alumni Reflections: The true loves of my life

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By Eileen Buckwalter

HAVERFORD S C H O O L To d a y


Becoming Extraordinary Dear Haverford, I hope this letter finds you well, and enjoying the crispness of late autumn! This issue of Haverford School Today includes the 2011-12 Annual Report. Thank you for your support! This is our small way of recognizing you for your meaningful contributions. We always aim to make sure the record is correct; this year, we sent an electronic version of the Annual Report to known email addresses in our database to ask for corrections in advance of printing. If you did not receive it, I encourage you take a moment to verify that we have your current email address; you can do this online by signing into the Alumni or Parent Directory on www.haverford.org, or by contacting Disty Lengel at dlengel@haverford. org or 484-417-2728. Also, please take a minute to add communications@haverford.org to your “Trusted Senders” email list, and if you do notice any errors in this magazine, please let us know. In addition to the Annual Report, our feature article explores some of the ways that Haverford faculty and staff members strive to earn distinction as “Extraordinary Educators.” In this effort, our faculty and staff collaborate using many methods and measurements to learn and hone their craft and provide the most caring and engaging

educational environment and experience possible to Haverford boys in all areas of School life. Our educators are extraordinarily committed to preparing boys for life each and every day, and to creating a community that inspires boys to make a real difference in the world. On a personal note, I would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to former colleague Meghan Vaughan (pictured, far right). Meghan accepted a position in July as a Communications Specialist in Haverford College’s Admissions Office. During the past four years, Meghan grew into a force in our communications office, and she will be a boon to the College. Meanwhile, we were pleased to add Jon Stephanik, Haverford’s new Head Coach in crew, to our team as Associate Director of Marketing. Jon’s professional expertise in marketing has already been proven in his first three months here. In addition, we are excited to welcome Tara Hammond as our new Associate Director of Communications, Visual Design and Brand Manager. Tara has extensive design and project management experience in several industries, including independent schools, and brings with her an excellent design portfolio and creative spark. For the record, Dawn Blake and Deva Yeatman worked tirelessly to pick up the

managing editor Tim Stay | editor Dawn Blake | editor Deva Yeatman alumni editor Andrew Bailey ’02 | designers Tim Stay, Dawn Blake, Deva Yeatman photographers Andrew Bailey ’02, Dawn Blake, Jim Roese, George Scarino, Tim Stay, Meghan Vaughan, Linda Walters, George Wood ’75, Deva Yeatman printer Pemcor, LLC., Lancaster, Pa.

special thanks Thank you to everyone who contributed to this magazine. Special thanks to Andrew Bailey ’02, Michael Bradley ’79, Charles Brown, Eileen Buckwalter, Sam Caldwell, Megan Connolly, Dr. Joe Cox, Becca Davis, Dr. Bill Ehrhart, Antonio Fink, Arnie Forrest ’51, Chris Fox, David Gold, Luqman Kolade, Disty Lengel, Jini Loos, Brian McBride ’82, Candy Montgomery, Bill Palmer, Julie Pizzutillo, Maryanne Quinn, Dr. Richard Roberts ’51, Joe Scornavacchi, Cindy Shaw, Dan Slack, John Stoviak ’69, John Stroud, Karen Suter, Mark Thorburn, Keren White, and George Wood ’75. headmaster Joseph T. Cox, Ph. D.; assistant headmaster Mark Thorburn; associate headmaster Brian McBride ’82; chief financial officer David S. Gold; director of development Charles D. Brown; dir. of marketing and communications Tim Stay; associate dir. of communications Dawn Blake; associate dir. of electronic communications Deva Yeatman; associate dir. of marketing Jon Stephanik; dir. of alumni relations Andrew Bailey ’02

Editorial Office: Wilson Hall Room 005, 450 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, PA 19041 Contact: Tim Stay, Director of Marketing and Communications; 484-417-2763; tstay@haverford.org Haverford School Today is published for alumni, parents, grandparents, and friends of The Haverford School. Nonprofit postage paid at Wayne, Pa., and additional mailing offices. Please send address changes to Disty Lengel by email at dlengel@haverford.org, or by mail to 450 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, PA 19041. If you wish to reprint any portion of Haverford School Today’s contents, please request permission in advance. Copyright © 2012 The Haverford School (all rights reserved).

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slack while we were short-staffed, and have been invaluable in this transition period. A final word – much to her chagrin, I must take a moment to publicly congratulate Dawn Blake, who received The Haverford School Staff Recognition Award in June. Dawn often goes above and beyond the call of duty, working behind the scenes to bolster the School’s reputation. Dawn leverages her extensive media and PR network to increase news coverage about Haverford, and writes and mines for news stories to share with the community. In addition, among other things, she is responsible for the wealth of photos available to you online at www.haverfordschool.smugmug.com (password: fordsphotos). Dawn, thank you for inspiring us and for your dedicated service to The Haverford School! – Tim Stay, Managing Editor

board of trustees, 2012-13

Mr. John F. Stoviak ’69, Chairman Mr. William C. Yoh ’89, P’18, ’24, Vice Chairman Mr. David B. Ford Jr. ’93, P’24, Treasurer Mr. Robert C. Clothier III, Esq. ’79, P’17 Secretary Mrs. Elizabeth M. Anderson P’14 Mr. Kenneth L. Brier ’68, ’09 Dr. Joseph T. Cox, Headmaster Dr. John A. DeFlaminis Mr. Randall T. Drain Jr. ’01 Mr. Richard W. Graham II ’52 Mr. Richard J. Green ’69, P’13 Mr. Robert T. Hastings ’86, P’23 Mrs. Kim Keszeli P’15, P’23 Mr. Michael S. Lewis ’99 Mr. John J. Lynch P’10, P’12 Mr. David J. Martinelli ’79, P’16, ’17 Mr. George C. McFarland Jr. ’77, P’12 Dr. Richard Melvoin Mrs. Sharon Merhige P’16, ’18 Ms. Leslie Muhlfelder Freemann P’16 Mr. Albert C. Oehrle ’58 Mrs. Jennifer N. Pechet P’15, ’17 Mrs. Amy Petersen P’15 Mrs. Caroline Rogers P’06, ’08 Mr. Peter Rohr P’12, ’13, ’15 Mr. Vincent A. Rossi P’14, ’15 Mr. Kenneth W. Schwenke P’07, ’10, ’12 Mr. Mark D. Turner P’13, ’15 Mr. John C. Wilkins ’95 Mr. Carter D. Williams ’86, P’17 Mr. Thomas L. Williams P’17


Upcoming School Events » NOV

Parents’ Gala Dinner and Auction: “Haverford Goes Gatsby” @ Hilton Philadelphia City Avenue 4200 City Ave., Phila, PA 19131 Time: 6 p.m.

NOV

Annual Can Drive Nov. 5-19

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Haverford/EA Day @ The Haverford School Time: 7:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Visit www.haverford.org/eaday for more information about the event.

NOV

Thanksgiving Holiday Nov. 21-23

DEC

Winter Break* Dec. 21-Jan. 4 *Begins at end of day on Dec. 21

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Did you know? You can find find past issues of Haverford School Today and other school publications online at:

www.haverford.org/publications

19041 Kind words Just finished a cover-to-cover read. A great publication, easy to read, informative, fantastic photography, and especially fine paper stock. Can’t wait for winter issue, does that also bring snow? I’ll wait. Thanks! – George Blythe ’56

Dear George: Thank you for your kind words! A bonus: we have moved to a quarterly magazine, so now you’ll receive Haverford news four times a year. We hope you enjoy the fall issue, and you can look forward to a winter issue in late December or early January as well. We’ll try not to bring too much snow!

Alumni stories I look forward to receiving Haverford School Today magazine each season and I read with interest when it arrives in my mailbox. Fine reporting. I would love to see more alumni stories as well. – Anonymous

Dear Anonymous: Thank you for the feedback and we will aim to heed your request. Look for more alumni sidebars and spotlights in future issues. The men of Haverford are doing wonderful things with their lives and we look forward to sharing their stories. To that end, if you have ideas for stories whether about yourself, a classmate, or a Haverfordian you’ve met or heard about, please send them our way. We also encourage guest writing submissions for consideration if you are so inclined. As usual, we appreciate your candid thoughts, ideas, memories, suggestions, and corrections. Keep the letters coming! – The Editors

Corrections Please accept our regrets for the following error, and let the record stand corrected: On page 37 of the Summer 2012 HST, we mistakenly wrote “the late Charles Dethier;” we are happy to report that past faculty member Charles Dethier is alive and well. We apologize to those for whom we caused alarm with this statement. Incidentally, Headmaster

Joe Cox and Senior Associate Director of Development George Wood ’75 had the distinct pleasure of meeting Charles, while traveling in Maine for the August Haverford School reception. Read more about Joe and George’s visit in the Headmaster’s letter (next page). If you notice any errors in this issue of Haverford School Today, please accept our sincere apologies in advance. We do appreciate your feedback so that we may correct the record in upcoming issues. Please don’t hesitate to contact us.

On deck: Leadership Looking forward to the winter issue of HST? We are working on a broad theme of “Leadership,” where we intend to shine the spotlight on the Joe Cox years at Haverford and the development of leadership programs and curriculum. If you have thoughts, memories, or stories to share about Joe Cox, please contact us as soon as possible via email at communications@haverford.org. We welcome any and all submissions.

Class Notes deadline – Nov. 15 Don’t forget! Our winter issue will include the return of class notes, so please be sure to send us your news. The deadline for winter notes is Nov. 15; simply submit your notes to us online at: www.haverford.org/classnotes . Tim Stay, Managing Editor

tstay@haverford.org

haverford.org

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FROM THE HEADMASTER

Extraordinary Educators By Joseph T. Cox, Ph.D.

The Haverford School has had more than its fair share of extraordinary educators, and, I would argue, continues to lead with a high percentage of truly life-changing and effective teachers today. There is a human tendency to think that the past was always more glorious than it was, and I have to admit, I am sometimes skeptical of the effusive praise I hear of the academic giants in Haverford’s history. I know they were great teachers and exceptional men and women, but I have been around organizations too long to completely buy into the myths that persist in keeping certain personalities, especially teachers, so high on the pedestals of student recollection. However, in the case of past Haverford extraordinary educators, there seems to be a disproportionate greatness. This summer, George Wood ’75 and I had the good fortune to visit one of Haverford’s legendary educators, Charlie Dethier. Our car trip took about an hour, and George filled every minute of that trip enthusiastically extolling Mr. Dethier’s service to The Haverford School and his influence on young George. It was a visit of atonement, of sorts, since an earlier issue of Haverford School Today had reported that Mr. Dethier was no longer with us. I was glad to see him at 94, in excellent health in body and mind. George’s hour of effusive praise did not come close to matching Mr. Dethier’s demonstrative love of his chosen profession and his service to Haverford as a teacher, coach, and administrator. I left knowing I had been in the presence of an extraordinarily exceptional educator. Charles Dethier is the son of a classical musician of Belgian descent who grew up in New York City where his father played violin for the New York Philharmonic. He graduated from the all-boys Collegiate School and attended Princeton. He began his duties at The Haverford School in 1938, a dedicated career in education that, except for his departure to serve during World War II, extended until his retirement in 1982. In retirement, he continued his service to Haverford as a member of the Board of Trustees until he moved with his wife to the family home in Blue Hill, Maine. Mr. Dethier taught English in the Upper and Middle Schools, served simultaneously as the School’s Registrar and College Counselor, and was Head of the Lower School. He coached, taught, and administered to six decades of Haverfordians during his distinguished career. He is a tall, elegant, articulate, and physically fit man who just gave up

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regular rounds of golf two years ago, and his recall of Haverford history is photographic. In the last contract letter Dr. Severinghaus wrote for Mr. Dethier, he amplified his appreciation and respect for a valued colleague. In a touching personal note, Dr. Severinghaus wrote, “I shall always be grateful for the privilege of having been your colleague during a quarter of a century. Even more shall Vail and I cherish those deep personal associations we have had with you, Maizie, and the children.” Two decades later, upon Mr. Dethier’s retirement, Mr. Parker with uncharacteristic candor and enthusiasm wrote in bold black ink, “Damn good (underlined) man!” Davis R. Parker went on to beg those of us looking at this historical record to, “Pardon my French.” Mr. Charles P. Dethier, BA Princeton, MA Columbia, graduate work at Penn, was very respected among his colleagues, but the true test of an extraordinary educator is the impact he or she has on the students they taught. George Wood saw Mr. Dethier as a teacher no boy wanted to disappoint and remembers him replacing the feared Dr. Webber as Head of the Lower School. On our drive to Blue Hill, George told me that boys especially appreciated Mr. Dethier’s patience and sense of humor. Jim Buck ’77 went so far as to label his sense of humor as “quirky,” while adding that Mr. Dethier’s style of governance was, to Lower School age children like himself, a breath of fresh air. He readied boys for more

“I have been around organizations too long to completely buy into the myths that persist in keeping certain personalities, especially teachers, so high on the pedestals of student recollection. However, in the case of past Haverford extraordinary educators, there seems to be a disproportionate greatness.”


collegial interactions with teachers and coaches that would come in the Middle and Upper School years. Unlike many of the teachers of that era, Mr. Dethier did not base his authority on harsh discipline and fear. Hugh Snyder ’61, was recently in my office and talked about how authority was the coin of the realm in the Haverford he attended, but Mr. Dethier’s authority came through love and gentle humor, not fear. On the playing fields, Hugh said he even let boys call him, “Charlie.” The boys always knew he was on their side wanting them to be their best. George shared the story of when in sixth grade, he had to give the class gift talk in an assembly. George was nervous (can you ever imagine George at a loss of words?!) and knew he had not done his best, but Mr. Dethier sought him out after the talk to reassure him. It was a typical Dethier random act of kindness that stayed with George to this day. George also remembers Mr. Dethier’s presence at all of his squash matches. Mr. Dethier had coached legendary squash teams in the ’50s and ’60s and, although he was no longer the varsity squash coach, he still made time to attend all of George’s matches in the ’70s. His interest and support of the boys was legendary and very much appreciated. Mr. Dethier’s life of selfless service as a teacher perhaps influenced his sons to follow in his footsteps. Both sons are academics: Brock ’70, an English teacher like his Dad, teaches at Utah State University, and David ’68 is a geosciences professor

at Williams College, where, ironically, he was my stepson Andrew’s most influential faculty advisor. David Dethier inspired Andy to focus on environmental issues, which led to a Fulbright Scholarship in China, and two years working for an environmental think tank in Washington, D.C. Thanks to an inspiring college teacher named Dethier, Andy is currently working toward a JD/MBA at Stanford, which he will use to continue his work in environmental issues. Extraordinary educators touch the future. Always dressed in a tweed coat with patches and gray flannels, to George, Mr. Dethier had the look and the temperament of “Mr. Chips.” Respected by all, loved but not feared, Mr. Dethier taught George’s dad who had graduated in 1939 and was a positive presence in George’s Haverford education almost 40 years later – a lifelong, affirmative impact on students that continues to resonate. Our drive back to the hotel was filled with even more of George’s fond memories of Mr. Dethier, an incredibly insightful and caring man. For me, my time with this extraordinary man was an unforgettable moment of the past summer and an experience that demonstrated to me all that we hope for in all our teachers. This summer I worked on a chapter for a book being edited by a French professor on current English and history teacher, Dr. William D. Ehrhart. I was asked to describe Bill as a teacher and to make some connections between his poetry and prose and his work in the classroom. I asked some students to tell me why they considered Bill an extraordinary teacher. Current VI Former Lucas Elek shared the following reflection: “At one of the lower points of my life, Dr. Ehrhart took me in his room one afternoon and cured my blues with a marathon of Monty Python until I was laughing right along with him. The experience was honest, insightful, and came with the rare gift of genuine human kindness. I know I am not unique in receiving such a wonderful gift.” Extraordinary educators are the wonderful gifts of genuine human kindness we give to students at The Haverford School. Sincerely,

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Around the Quad News & Notes from around The Haverford School Campus

Summer in motion: Campus improvements Class of 1975 Field (above) The Class of 1975 field now boasts new field turf, a retaining wall, storm water drainage, site leveling, ball netting, and a new gate. The grass areas on both sides of the sidewalk between the ’75 Field and the tennis courts will receive decorative stone as a finishing touch. In addition, a new scoreboard has been ordered. Laserna Plaza (below, left) New bleachers and landscaping have

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been completed for the viewing area overlooking Memorial Field, which honors legenday past faculty member and soccer coach Rafael Laserna. Maj. Gen. Smedley D. Butler Class of 1898 Bench (below, center) A cobblestone perimeter and decorative stone embraces the new 360 degree wooden bench honoring Smedley Butler adjacent to the amphitheater.

FORDSStore (below, right) The new FORDSStore, an upgrade from the old Cafe & Spirit Wear Shop, is conveniently located adjacent the Lower/ Middle School drop-off circle. The store features an expanded selection of food and merchandise. Be sure to stop by and visit Store Manager Terance Scott and General Manager of Dining Services Garrett O’Neill, and stock up on some new Fords gear next time you are on campus, or online at: www.haverford.org/fordsstore.


AROUND THE QUAD

Fall Arts Calendar OCT Upper School Play 25 @ Centennial Hall Oct. 24 & 25: 7 p.m. Oct. 26 & 27: 7:30 p.m. NOV Haverford Conservatory Recital 11 Location TBD Time: 1:30-4:30 p.m. NOV Academy of Vocal Arts 13 @ Centennial Hall Nov. 13 & 15: 7:30-10:30 p.m. NOV Delaware County Youth Orchestra 18 @ Centennial Hall Time: 3-5 p.m. DEC MS/US Winter Concert 13 @ Centennial Hall Time: 7:30-9:30 p.m. DEC Lower School Winter Concert 17 @ Centennial Hall Time: 7-9 p.m. DEC Winter Concert (Snow date) 19 @ Centennial Hall Time: 7:30-9:30 p.m.

» www.haverford.org/arts CENTER STAGE

“One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” Oct. 24-27 Randle P. McMurphy (Haverford senior Tyler Brooks) contrives to serve a short sentence in a mental institution rather in prison. This, he learns, was a mistake. He clashes with Nurse Ratchet, a fierce opponent. Quickly, he takes over the yard and accomplishes what the medical profession has been unable to do for 12 years – he makes a presumed deaf and dumb Indian talk (Haverford sophomore Kory Calicat-Wayns). He leads others out of introversion and stages a revolt so that they can see the World Series on television, and arranges a rollicking midnight party with liquor and women. For one offense, the head nurse has him submit to electroshock treatment. The party is too horrid for her and she forces him to submit to something much, much worse.

The 2011-12 Notables enjoy their summer tour of the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club in style.

The Notables Tour Bermuda in Summer 2012 By Dr. Bill Ehrhart, Upper School history and English teacher Taking a tip from Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart’s 1938 Broadway musical, “The Boys from Syracuse,” The Haverford School Notables sang for their supper on a recent concert tour of Bermuda. Indeed, they sang for quite a few suppers, along with several lunches and a couple of breakfasts. Over five days in June, the boys performed 10 times in venues ranging from the Anglican Cathedral of the Most Holy Trinity to the Royal Bermuda Yacht Club, from the Harbour Nights Street Festival to the Hog Penny Tavern. Not surprisingly, the settings for their performances were usually spectacular. Tucker’s Point and the Coral Beach & Tennis Club both overlook white sand beaches and paleblue ocean. The RBYC perches on Hamilton Harbour. The Sunday morning service at the cathedral, during which the Notables joined members of the church’s regular choir as well as performing several hymns by themselves, was broadcast live on Bermuda’s national radio station. Perhaps the two most fascinating shows, however, were both impromptu. While the boys were relaxing one sunny afternoon around the swimming pool of the Fairmont Hamilton Princess Hotel, a woman who had heard them sing the day before asked them to sing something then and there for her husband, who had not heard them the previous day. And sing they did, some of them still in the water, to the delight of the other bathers. The second impromptu performance came at the Royal Naval Dockyard. The boys were treated to a personal tour of Chicane, a 1926 Scottish-built cutter my college classmate Reid Kempe and his wife, Lucia, are restoring to pristine condition with the help of shipwrights Joe Postich and Wendy Bliss. As a thank-you for the tour, the boys sang for Reid, Wendy, and Joe, moving Wendy so deeply that she burst into tears. There were, in fact, lots of tears on this trip – and a lot of laughter, too – this being the last official duty of Notables Director Michael Stairs, retiring after 25 years at The Haverford School. Everyone realized that this trip would be special, and it was. It was also a lot of fun. The boys got several afternoons at the beach, and a lot of “pool time.” And thanks to Bermudian Lynanne Bolton, who created a wonderful scavenger hunt for the boys in downtown Hamilton, everyone learned a lot about Bermuda’s culture and history, including why a very hot day is called a “Sally Bassett” (she was a slave burned alive for attempted murder in 1730), what the Birdcage is (a police kiosk at the intersection of Front and Queen streets), what the motto Sparsa Collegit on the haverford.org

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AROUND THE QUAD

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: 2012-13 SEVERINGHAUS SCHOLAR

10 things you didn’t know about V Former Diego Fernandez ... 1 I’ve been playing the guitar since sixth grade. 2 I like basketball and soccer. Players I admire

include point guard Ricky Rubio, who plays for the Minnesota Timberwolves, and Andrés Iniesta, a central midfielder for La Liga club FC Barcelona and the Spanish national team.

3 My favorite TV show is How I Met Your Mother. 4 The movie I’ve seen the most times is Gran Torino with Clint Eastwood – I really like the ending.

5 My favorite color is dark blue – it’s the sports color at my school in Spain, Sacred Heart.

6 This is my fourth time in the

U.S. I’ve also visited Canada, France, Portugal, and Andorra.

7 I ski in the winter and

Notables Hamilton coat-of-arms means (“Collect the Scattered,” a reference to the original English settlers of Bermuda, who were survivors of a shipwreck), and how to make a Dark & Stormy, Bermuda’s national drink (Gosling’s rum and ginger beer). Big-time thanks go to Brenda Helber, who did the heavy lifting of organizing the trip and making everything work so smoothly, to former Baldwin School teacher Suzanne Valutas, who gave Brenda lots of help, and also to Paul and Francie Rogers, Reid Blynn, and Anne Ehrhart, who chaperoned the trip (a tough job, but somebody had to do it). Thanks to Michael Stairs for a melodious conclusion to 25 amazing years. And especially to the boys themselves – led by VI Formers Andrew Helber, Peter Rogers, and Remi Yang – who wowed audiences the length and breadth of Bermuda with their magnificent singing.

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go to the beach in the summer. My “getaway” sport is golf. Madrid is a large city and playing golf is a way to get out and see the countryside.

8 I love Chicago-style

pizza from Papa Murphy’s – it’s double-decker layers of sauce, cheese, and meat.

9 Some of my favorite

bands are: Arctic Monkeys, All-American Rejects, and The Script.

10 Someday, I’d like to jump

out of an airplane. It would be cool to be an Army pilot, but you have to have perfect vision and I wear lenses.


AROUND THE QUAD

Service Learning: IBSC China 2012 By Jini Loos, Service Learning Director While many were basking in the sun, enjoying leisure time, and just resting up, three students from Haverford were committed to an entirely different experience during the summer of 2012. Bryan Rodriguez, Ben Quan, and Nathan Kidambi journeyed to Hong Kong and then to Mainland China for a cultural experience that shifted all of their lives.   St. Paul’s College, an independent boys’ school in Hong Kong, led a Community Awareness and Service Learning program that brought together boys from five member schools through the International Boys’ Schools Coalition (IBSC).  The program opened with cultural exchange learning with students from St. Paul’s and hands-on service work with refugees, immigrants, and ethnic minorities in Hong Kong.   St. Paul’s daylong Youth Service Learning Conference offered shared presentations of service projects from nearly 20 schools from Hong Kong, China, Australia, and the United States, which were streamed live to the IBSC conference in Melbourne, Australia. The group then traveled by ferry into Mainland China and bused inland to a school for underprivileged students in Rongxian, Guangxi. While in Guangxi, student volunteers worked at the school as maintenance/painting labor, played games with the students, and taught them simple English, while experiencing the simple life of these students.   Later, the boys were broken up into smaller groups and participated in home-stays on farms in the region where they harvested rice in paddies and performed other farming tasks alongside the families of the students who attended the school in Rongxian. Living conditions were extremely poor and unlike anything the visitors had ever experienced.   The two-week immersion proved to be quite powerful for the Bryan, Ben, and Nathan. Some of their reflections are shared below. China was an experience I will hold with me for the rest of my life. When we arrived at the school, I already knew that the people living there were very poor. The facilities are sometimes unbearable due the uncleanliness. The kids there, however, were remarkable. They, too, were shy at first – even shyer than us. After a couple hours, they began to become more social. They seemed very eager to make new friends. I really liked renovating the school. I was the leader of my group and the experience helped my leadership skills and gave me more confidence. The whole trip also helped with my public speaking. I noticed the change when I actually wanted to speak to everyone about my feelings or ideas that would make a plan better. The eagerness of the children and how well they can learn in such a short amount of time is incredible. The most emotional part for me was when the kids in my group got us presents. They were already poor, but they still used their own money to buy us gifts. I will treasure these gifts because they are more than souvenirs, but symbols of friendship that they gave us from their hearts. – Ben Quan, IV Form

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AROUND THE QUAD

Service Learning: IBSC China 2012 In just three days we became a family. Everyone knew everyone and everyone got along. To see the smiles on those children’s faces meant the world to me. By us being there, it showed that we truly cared, and for these children who had a lack of parental support due to their parents living far away and only seeing them on rare occasions, a small amount of affection and support can go a long way. In the days that I spent in China, I did not see a single person upset or unsatisfied. Despite their conditions, they all appreciated their lives and made the most of it. Whether it be only having a single pot, pan, and knife, or walking three hours home and then back to school, not a single person complained. Everyone was content with his role in society, whether it was something as small as a vegetable vender or the manager of a hotel. This overall satisfaction taught me to cherish everything I have. In the end, I was able to conquer a distinct language barrier, bond with people from across the world, and make a difference in people’s lives. Simultaneously, they made a difference in ours. – Bryan Rodriguez, V Form At the Chinese school, we had some icebreakers in which we learned the children’s names and the things that they liked. This was a powerful experience as we got to know the kids that would let us stay in their houses that night and work so hard on their farms. We went to the market and bought food to cook for dinner. We then walked 40 minutes to the kid’s house. There we cooked the chicken, peeled the carrots and potatoes, and cut them. Along with this, we bunched up rice that was lying on the floor. This was very fun and rewarding because the dinner was delicious. I thought the home-stay was a great experience because we experienced another lifestyle and were able to help them in their daily life. One night we slept in the dormitories with the Mainland Chinese kids. In the morning, we serviced the school dormitories by cleaning the bathrooms, painting the window bars, and sweeping the floors. After two hours of work, the dormitories looked much better. This was a rewarding experience because we were able to clean the rooms that the kids stay in and make their lives better. After that, we went to an unsafe school. There we saw how unfortunate a school can be, as it did not have many rooms and desks. There we wrote notes to important people to reflect on what we had just seen. This experience reinforced the fact that we are very lucky to go to a school like Haverford. – Nathan Kidambi, IV Form A co-founding member of the International Boys’ School Coalition (IBSC), Haverford continues to play a key role in the collective goal of sharing, learning, and promoting best practices in boys’ education. Haverford faculty travel in the U.S., Canada, and abroad to engage in professional development opportunities, attending lectures, sharing presentations, conducting research, and participating and leading workshops. Learn more about the Coalition at www.theibsc.org. 10

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AROUND THE QUAD

Meet the new faculty ... Twitter style!

(in 140 characters or less)

Susan Laird LS Reading Specialist Happy and energetic mom, wife, daughter, teacher, friend, reader, athlete, musician, camper who is honored to teach at Haverford.

Jon Stephanik Associate Director of Marketing and Head Crew Coach Passionate about family, friends, sports, coaching. Enjoys outdoors, music, movies. Believes in John Lennon quote, “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.”

Carmen Epstein US Spanish Intern Choreographer, aunt, chef, soccer and poker player moonlighting as a Spanish teacher

Rachael Jennings English Intern Kale, coffee, & semicolon enthusiast. Packing up stories from VT, NH, England, NYC, & now – enjoying the Haverford stories we shape, revise, & revise again.

Tashia Conrad Lab Manager and US Science I love cats and anything medical related. I’m excited I get to teach young people to love science as much as I do.

Marion Jacob MS Science Lax/hockey mom, marathoner, quilter, ice tea and pretzels, road trips, endless summer, pink, Avalon, Disney geek, #2440, just believe, be the change!

Marie Sweeney 2nd Grade Teacher Wife, mother, teacher – seven brothers, five sons, and many foster sons helped shape my love of teaching boys! It is great to be part of a team where boys flourish!

Mario Masso MS Science Science teacher for 15 years. New to THS. Teaching Form I science. Moved to Marlton, N.J. from D.C. this summer. Enjoy spending time reading on the beach.

Mary Ellen Mannix Haverford Center Teacher I spend most of my time working with, advocating for, & supporting children (including my five & those with whom I am blessed to cross paths). Expert laminator, published author, new yogi.

Mark Hightower US Music and The Notables I love to sing, conduct, play guitar and bass, but love teaching these skills even more. I’m excited to be a Ford!

Heather Stinson College Counselor Mom to kid & Labrador, wife, recovering admission officer. Traveler, cook, gardener, hates running. Grew up in KC so Ohio is the East Coast.

Dr. John Rutter US Science, Debate team, Science Olympiad team Returned to area of origin, looking forward to new assignment and enjoying what Philly has to offer.

Peter Arthmire Jr. US Science I enjoy teaching science and participating in outdoor activities. I look forward to a great school year and preparing boys for life!

Amy May Haverford Center Assistant Teacher Enjoys spending time at the beach with her family, running, and teaching at The Haverford School!

Hannah Turlish US History Chair Mainer married to a Texan; son Oliver. Swam for GA and UNC; now runs long distances. Not a Marxist, but will delight in discussing the manifesto all day if you’d like to.

Rosalee Murray Haverford Center Assistant Teacher I speak Spanish. I was raised in Philadelphia but moved to Lansdowne. I love arts and crafts and spend my free time crocheting. I enjoy trying new activities and traveling.

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FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

Antonio Fink

By Dawn Blake

LOWER SCHOOL ART TEACHER

Drawing and soccer have been a part of Antonio Fink’s life for as long as he can remember: “When my brother and I were very young, we would draw as an after-school activity. We used to draw soccer scenes – like a goalie jumping, trying to save the ball that was going into the upper 90 and the whole net was behind him.” Fink grew up in Mexico City, Mexico, and since sixth-grade, he wanted to play tennis for a university in the United States. His family hosted a tennis player from Monterrey, Mexico, who was competing at nationals, who was also attending Pan-American University in Texas. “I remember seeing all the T-shirts and racquet covers that said Pan-American University, and he ended up winning the nationals, so I thought it must be a great school.” Fink applied and received a tennis scholarship. After a year-and-a-half studying graphic design, his path changed. “I often passed the Fine Arts Department and the clay room on my way to the tennis courts. Every time I walked by, I saw people working with clay and I was just fascinated.” While earning his Bachelor of Fine Arts, then taught workshops to children and exhibited his work in museums an art centers along the border of Mexico and the U.S. He considered studying for his master’s degree in Barcelona, but after returning to Mexico City, he became involved in the art scene there, opened a studio, and taught lessons. “Teaching was not something I was consciously thinking about. You want to create and live off your art, but it’s a long process to find your style, to mature and to find your target market, even though you’re not really looking for one. I’ve never been inspired to do anything for the sake of selling it.” Fink stayed in Mexico for six years and during that time, met his wife. They decided to take advantage of his dual citizenship (his mother is from the U.S.) and move to Philadelphia in 1995 as a resident artist at the Clay Studio. Fink drove the Claymobile – a mobile classroom – to underprivileged areas around the city and taught children how to work with clay; kids who would never 12

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otherwise have had a chance to do so. “What I discovered later when I arrived at Haverford was that kids have the same innate ability to do artwork up until a certain age. Before your surroundings – nature and nurture – really kick in, kids all over the world are pretty much the same. And then the environment that surrounds you, that’s what starts molding you, and that’s how you start building priorities. It was great to see these kids perform at the same level as kids who have advantages and privileges. When I won the Sykes Award a few years ago, I went to Buenos Aires, Argentina, and I made my way into a private school for boys (whose colors, coincidentally, were maroon and gold). I taught these boys the same things I teach my boys here. It was the same age group and you could not tell the results apart. If I showed you a drawing from an Argentinean boy and a drawing from an American boy, from any socioeconomic class it’s the same exact level of ability, intensity, freedom, creativity. It’s unbelievable.”

“Art wakes boys up to their creative side and to their independent side. I tell the kids that art is all about making your own decisions.”

Fink completed a master’s degree in ceramics at Tyler School of Art and was awarded a fellowship to go to Rome during summer 2001, before coming to The Haverford School, where he’s been teaching Lower School art for 10 years.

“I have taught coed classes, but there’s something about the energy of boys that is contagious, and they feed off each other. So, if the teacher can match that intensity and channel it properly, it’s a win-win situation. The results are incredible because boys are competitive and, if channeled right, can bring out the best in each other. “I also believe in teaching by example – it’s the most important ingredient. Everything the boys do, they see me do it first so they understand how it’s done. They see it’s possible. It can be done if you do it right, if you follow the method, and if you have a little confidence. What I’m trying to give them is that confidence, that if you try, if you apply yourself, you’re going to do very good things. “Art wakes boys up to their creative side and to their independent side. I tell the kids that art is all about making your own decisions, and it teaches them independence. It teaches them how to solve problems.” Outside the classroom, Fink coaches varsity tennis and Middle School soccer – a perfect fit since he was a two-sport athlete in college. He played four years of Division I tennis and then, a byproduct of changing his major, was a fifth-year student and a walk-on for the soccer team. “I played soccer all my life. In fact, during my junior year in high school I went to a semi-professional team to try out. When I came back to enroll, the university coach asked me, ‘Are you going to come play soccer for me? The tryouts are tomorrow.’ I had to go buy cleats and shin guards for the tryouts, but I did make the team. I even got a half of a soccer scholarship, and I played the entire season. I scored goals for the university – it was a great experience.” Whether in the classroom, on the courts, or the soccer pitch, one thing is certain – Fink is a dynamic and seasoned educator who inspires boys to love art and self-expression. “I think it’s very important to be proud of something that you made out of nothing; to be able to express yourself the way no one else can.”


Go Fords

A tradition of excellence:

125 years of football at The Haverford School By Michael Bradley ’79

For 13 long years, the drought had endured. There was a tie. But there was little more. Hill School had used Haverford as its personal tackling dummy, and there hadn’t been anything the Maroon and Gold could do in response. From 1902-14, the marauders from Pottstown had roughed up Haverford by a combined score of 218-18. Included were two losses in 1905. When a 0-0 tie (“accomplished” in ’02) is high-water mark for success, there isn’t so much a rivalry between two teams as there is a harassment. But in 1915, things were different. A close loss – 14-9 – to Hill the previous season had provided hope that victory was at last nigh. And, indeed, on the final day of the season – a clear, 57-degree Tuesday in November – Haverford broke through, roughing up the visitors, 17-6, to complete a perfect, 6-0 season. The triumph was commemorated with speeches and a dinner that celebrated the mighty team and its exploits. Haverford had outscored its half-dozen victims 132-9, pitched four shutouts and walloped Episcopal, 27-3. Students rejoiced, and the team basked in the adulation. Nearly 100 years later, big gridiron wins remain occasions for festive observance at Haverford. Each time Episcopal is laid low, there is much rejoicing. A triumph over Malvern is greeted with a ferocious emotional catharsis. And beating the rest of the Inter-Ac community isn’t so bad, either. As Haverford begins its 125th season

of football, it is an occasion to look back on the great moments, heroic competitors and legendary coaches that form a rich tapestry of the sport at the School. There have been championship seasons, all-league standouts, and tremendous runs of prosperity. Of course, there have been some dark times, too, when evil forces conspired to rob the program of the resources and support necessary for success. But like any great institution, Haverford football has endured, thrived, and overcome. Its history is rich. Its successes are many. And though big wins, like the Fords’ 1918 triumph over Hill, are no longer celebrated with bonfires and snake dances through campus, they deserve to be recognized today. — The record shows that Haverford’s first official football game was played in 1887 and resulted either in a 70-0 or a 90-0 loss to Hill. That record should be burned. Or, at least, the page should be turned quickly, because one year later, Haverford joined the two-year-old Inter-Ac League, which had been started in ’86 by Penn Charter and Germantown Academy and also included Episcopal, Cheltenham Military, Delancey School (which was absorbed into EA in 1915), and Rugby, and moved quickly toward prosperity. In fact, with wins over Rugby, Delancey (forfeit), and EA (forfeit) Haverford entered its season-ending games with powerhouses GA and Charter atop the Inter-Ac standings. Game day with the Patriots dawned rainy but cleared for kickoff, and the fast track helped Haverford to a 40-12 rout in a decision that was easier than expected and was keyed by

four touchdowns by Alden Arthur Knipe. A week later, the elements did play a large role, as a sloppy track hurt Haverford’s ground game, and PC earned a 24-0 triumph. Somehow, GA skunked Penn Charter, and Haverford ended up tied for the League crown with the two schools. Not a bad debut at all. Haverford needed only three years to capture its second Inter-Ac title. The Walter Thayer-captained squad won the league outright, one year after only a 22-0 loss to Penn Charter prevented the Fords from winning it. It was hard to imagine the 1890 team won any games at all (it finished 4-2, with its other loss to the University of Pennsylvania freshmen and a 54-0 skunking of EA in a “practice game” included with the wins), much less found itself in position to capture a League crown. The average age of the team was 15.7 years, and the median player weight was a bantam-sized 143 pounds. Even for the late 19th century, that was small. There was not much prosperity for Haverford in the last decade of the 19th century, and the School did not find itself on top of the Inter-Ac again until 1902, when a mighty aggregation rolled to an 8-0-2 record, outscoring opponents by a remarkable 210-0. Only 0-0 ties with Hill and GA provided smudges on the otherwise pristine record. The scoreless deadlock with Hill came in the season’s second game on a field made virtually unplayable by rain and mud. Against GA, Haverford had the ball on the Patriots’ 1-yard line at the close of the first half but couldn’t score and advanced into Germantown territory on several occasions after intermission but couldn’t close the deal. Still, the 1902 team remains the only

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Go Fords unscored-upon unit in school history and is certainly worthy of its inclusion in the Athletic Hall of Fame. The 1903 and ’04 squads posted combined 15-5 records, and the ’04 team won the championship, but there was some trouble brewing. Eligibility rules were quite lax at both the collegiate and prep levels during the early days of the 20th century. In fact, some college teams included players who were in their sixth years of undergraduate “study.” Haverford was not immune from this, as the historical report written by James Zug ’87 reveals. Headmaster Charles Crosman was upset by “a scandal about overage football players” and after the 1906 season, Haverford left the Inter-Ac. An aside, also provided by Zug: Part of Crosman’s consternation regarding football could have arisen from the damage to the roof of “The Oaks,” an on-campus building that was consumed in flames when Crosman himself launched a “fire balloon” to celebrate the 1904 championship. Perhaps it was all too much for the venerable headmaster, who was battling heavy financial burdens and struggling to handle a school that had grown exponentially from its humble beginnings as the Haverford College Grammar School in 1884. The time between 1905-20 was not a particularly robust one for Haverford, largely because of its self-imposed Inter-Ac exile. There were some undeniable highlights, like the 1913 season, which opened with six

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straight shutouts, followed by a 67-6 drubbing of Delancey. But a 13-0 loss to Hill stopped the fun. Of course, 1915 was highlighted by the big win over Hill. And Episcopal was largely powerless against the Fords, losing seven games from 1913-20 (the schools didn’t play in 1918 due to the flu pandemic) by a combined score of 114-6. Haverford returned to the Inter-Ac in 1921 and finished second, behind Penn Charter. Its 7-2 victory over Episcopal (what other result were you expecting?) was its first league contest since 1904. Led by Sam Ewing, a 2012 Athletic Hall of Fame inductee who accumulated 13 letters in six sports during his time at Haverford, the Fords dumped EA, St. Luke’s (which was in the Inter-Ac from 1921-26), GA, and Hill to finish the year 4-2. It was a strong emergence from the shadows and would serve as a harbinger of a period of sustained success that would last into the early 1950s. Although Bill Crowell’s tenure was a scant four seasons – 1925-28 – it was certainly prosperous. Haverford won a pair of Inter-Ac titles during his time, including the outright championship in ’25. It was the School’s first since ’04 and was accomplished with a 14-man team that averaged 157.7 pounds per man. But that didn’t stop the Fords from allowing a mere six points in its five league wins. Highlights included a 43-6 pasting of Episcopal and a win over Germantown Academy in two inches of snow. Haverford

outscored its rivals that year, 202-18 and returned to a seat of power in the League in a resounding way. Fans of irony will appreciate that Haverford shared the ’26 crown with St. Luke’s, which was coached by Doc Wallace. Three years later, Wallace would take over at Haverford and win or share 11 Inter-Ac crowns during a legendary 28-year career. The 1926 squad opened the League campaign with a 26-0 whitewashing of EA and then rallied in the final three minutes to subdue Penn Charter, 20-13. But a narrow, 16-13 loss to GA spoiled the chance for a repeat of Inter-Ac perfection, and after a season-ending rout of CHA, the Fords settled for a tie atop the six-team configuration with St. Luke’s. Crowell’s last two seasons at Haverford (combined record 4-8-1) weren’t as prosperous as his first two (10-3-2), and Wallace took over in 1929. Born in 1893 in Church Hill, Md., Frederick Renshaw Wallace was a slight (5’6”, 135 pounds) man but a fine athlete who actually played two games at shortstop for the Phillies in 1919 (one hit in four tries – a single; three putouts, four assists, one error), after spending three years at Washington College in Chestertown, Md. He coached at St. Luke’s from 192126, compiling a 27-17-5 record and tying Haverford for the championship in ’26. His impact on the football program was immediate. After winning just two Inter-Ac games total in 1927-28, Haverford was 3-3 in the League in ’29. Two years later, led by bruising Fred Babcock and team captain Sumner “Ippy” Rulon-Miller, Haverford finished 5-1 in the League and captured the crown. Haverford squeezed past Penn Charter and GA by 7-0 scores, with RulonMiller scoring the deciding TD in each, and blanked Friends’ Central (which was in the Inter-Ac on and off from 1910-48), 6-0 – again on a Rulon-Miller touchdown. Rulon-Miller’s TD pass was the decider in Haverford’s 13-7 triumph over Episcopal, and only a season-ending, 16-7 loss to Chestnut Hill spoiled a perfect, 8-0 campaign. Still, Haverford took advantage of a CHA tie with Germantown Academy to secure the crown for ’31 and define the decade ahead. The Fords won four more championships under Wallace in the ‘30s, securing outright titles in 1935, ’36 and ’37 and tying for the top spot in ’38. The 1935 team was led by Joe “Crisco” Potts and posted a 6-1-1 overall mark in sharp new uniforms provided by the


Go Fords Alumni Association. The squad dropped its opener to Frankford, 7-0, and did not allow another point for the remainder of the season. Alas, a scoreless tie with Friends’ Central prevented a pristine league performance but didn’t prevent Haverford from finishing on top. The 1936 aggregation wasn’t as stingy, but it posted a 4-0 Inter-Ac mark. (CHA had left the League.) Potts threw a pair of touchdown passes in each of the wins over EA (14-7) and GA (20-6) and caught a scoring strike against the Patriots. The Wallace reign of terror continued the next season, when Haverford shrugged off an 0-1-1 start to win the League. Bill McCoy was the standout, accounting for both scores (TD pass, run) in a 13-7 win over GA and rushing for two touchdowns in the 26-0 triumph over Penn Charter on a sloppy track. A surprising 6-6 tie with a mediocre Friends’ Central outfit left the Inter-Ac record at 3-0-1. The 1938 title required some mathematical gymnastics. Haverford finished League play with a 2-0-2 mark, tying Friends’ Central and PC, while GA was 3-1. Somehow, the League fathers decided those marks were congruent, and a tie was declared atop the standings. There was no need for advanced ciphering in 1940. Haverford lost to Episcopal, despite outgaining the Churchmen by a large margin, but beat GA. When the Patriots knocked off EA, there was a three-way deadlock atop the standings and a split championship. Despite the prosperity of the 1930s, it all seemed to be something of a warm-up for 1944, when the team Wallace deemed his “best ever” rolled to the first undefeated, untied season since 1915. Led by Victor Mauck, who unfurled one of the finest performances in School history, Haverford outscored its opponents 196-21, with a unit that averaged 162 pounds per man. Mauck was the scourge of the local gridiron scene, rushing for 11 scores, throwing for nine others, and returning a kick for six points to account for 126 points. He scored in every game but one and earned notice from Philadelphia’s Maxwell Club for his exploits. The undeniable nonleague highlight was Haverford’s 7-6 upset over Philadelphia Public League powerhouse Northeast, which was accomplished when Carl Mann stole the ball from a Viking player and dashed 79 yards for a touchdown. Fritz Thornton’s point-

1961 Haverford School football vs. Frankford (Courtesy Coach Ed Baker)

after provided the margin of victory. Mauck and Harry Yarrow scored in the Fords’ 14-0 whipping of EA, Haverford’s first triumph over its rival in six years. Mauck threw five TD passes and ran for another score in the 45-9 rout of Penn Charter and then rushed for a TD and returned a kick 80 yards for six points to lead Haverford to a 14-6 triumph over Friends’ Central, capping the perfect campaign. Haverford backed up its outstanding 1944 with titles the next two seasons. The ’45 team posted a 3-0-1 league record, with only a season-ending tie against Friends’ Central preventing perfection. The hero of that contest was Yarrow, who despite a 100-degree fever, scored two touchdowns to help Haverford overcome a 13-0 deficit. Another three-way tie concluded the ’46 campaign. Haverford finished 7-1, but dropped a 13-6 decision to EA and settled for a shared crown with the Churchmen and Friends’ Central. The 1950s dawned with a new rival joining the Inter-Ac confederation, Malvern Prep. And in 1951, it took a late first-half TD pass from Bill Burns to John Freney and Buster Dillon’s point-after to secure a 7-6 triumph over the Friars. That and a 14-12 season-ending thriller over EA secured the outright Inter-Ac crown for the Fords. Against Episcopal, a 73-yard kickoff return for a score by Dillon over came a second-half deficit and gave Haverford the title. Wallace celebrated his 25th year as head coach by grabbing a share of the 1953 championship. Only a heartbreaking 7-6 loss to Episcopal in the finale prevented the Fords from making the season perfect. It was Wallace’s final title. After the 1956

season, the 63-year old mentor stepped away from the sport. His final mark of 131-66-19 remains the gold standard for Haverford coaches. How successful was he? Well, if you add up the wins at the School by the second (Ed Baker, 49), third (Mike Mayock, 49), and fourth (Mike Murphy, 34) winningest mentors at Haverford, they surpass Wallace by one triumph. Not bad at all. One season after Wallace retired, Baker arrived on campus to serve as football coach and AD. During his nine seasons at Haverford, Baker compiled a winning percentage of .681 and won three outright championships. His first came in 1961, when he led the Fords to their first perfect campaign in 17 years. Haverford began the season with a stunning, 6-0 win at Frankford. That was quite an accomplishment, considering the Fords had finished 1960 1-6-1 and winless in the Inter-Ac, and mighty Frankford was coming off a 9-2 campaign that included the Public League title. That set the tone for the season. Haverford whipped through its nonconference schedule and made its Inter-Ac debut with a 13-6 triumph over Penn Charter, its first win over the Quakers in seven years. After dumping Malvern, 23-7, and GA, 53-7, the Fords closed out their perfect year with a 13-6 triumph over Episcopal. Haverford outscored its rivals 160-25 and outgained them 2,246-992 yards. Bill Reeves (689 yards, 7 scores) and Bill Smith (540, 7) keyed the ground attack, while Ed Stringer led the team with 37 tackles and earned the Crowell Award as the city’s top player. It was a remarkable team effort, and it would be repeated four years later. haverford.org

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Go Fords Not that the ’64 outfit was anything to look past. The Fords finished 5-0 in the Inter-Ac (Chestnut Hill had returned) and 7-1 overall, losing only to eventual Public League champ Frankford, 8-0, in the season’s curtain raiser. From there, it was perfection. Led by Scott MacBean, the School’s first-ever, three-time, First-Team All-Inter-Ac choice, and rugged lineman Bob Crozer, Haverford whipped Penn Charter, 7-0, to start the League campaign. MacBean and Don Wilkins scored in the 14-12 nail-biting win over GA, and the season closed with a 28-3 drubbing of EA to give Baker his second crown. As good as that season was, ’65 was better. Haverford finished 8-0 and ended the season on a 15-game winning streak. Three of those triumphs came over Public League powers. The Fords opened the year with a 19-0 win over defending Pub champ Frankford, whipped Central, which would tie for the ’65 title, 20-14, and dumped Lincoln, 14-6. Inter-Ac play featured only one frightening moment, and that came against Malvern. But MacBean scored on a 70-yard TD run with 2:00 to play to secure a 13-6 triumph. Haverford blanked GA, 19-0, and overcame CHA, 27-18, before closing the season with a 48-0 frolic over Episcopal in which eight players scored TDs. MacBean won the Crowell Award as Philadelphia’s best

A victorious Coach Mayock after EA game, 1971.

prep player, and Buzzy Potts rushed for 410 yards and scored six TDs. Baker left after the 1966 season to take the head coaching job at Kalamazoo College, a job he held uninterrupted until 1983. (He returned to coach the ’88 and ’89 seasons). He is second all-time in wins at the College – 62 – but was never able to replicate the success he had at Haverford and did not win a league title. 16

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He was succeeded by Jim Auch, who had spent the 1964 and ’65 seasons at Malvern. Auch remained at Haverford for three campaigns and lifted the Fords to a share of the title in 1968. The season dawned with wins over Frankford, Archbishop Carroll, and Central, which was the defending Public League champ. After dropping a 20-18 decision to Penn Charter, Haverford dumped Malvern (20-14), GA (21-14), and CHA (42-13) to set up a season-ending showdown with then-undefeated Episcopal. It wasn’t a contest. Haverford stomped EA, 35-9, to spoil the Churchmen’s dreams of perfection and jump into a tie with them for the Inter-Ac title. It was a great ending to a season that featured a 1,016-yard rushing performance by John Gallagher and 512 yards from John Stoviak, along with 60 tackles from linebacker Steve Del Viscio. Auch’s departure after the 1969 season (to become an assistant at West Chester; he later took over the EA program and won three titles) led to the hiring of Mike Mayock, who had coached at Malvern from 1956-62 – and directed the Friars to their first Inter-Ac title, in ’62 (a tie with PC) – and then oversaw Penn’s offensive line. He arrived to find a team that didn’t have great depth but was filled with talent. And when QB Bill Osborne, a grade-school standout from Downingtown, decided to attend Haverford, Mayock had the final piece of a team that would embark on a two-year run that was the finest in School history. The ’70 season began with a 14-12 win over Central High on a sweltering day that mandated the shortening of quarters from 12 to 10 minutes, the better to preserve the players’ health. Osborne’s 5-yard TD run brought the Fords back from a five-point deficit and set the tone for the season. Haverford rampaged through its next three opponents by a combined score of 140-20 but trailed Malvern, 6-0, in the fourth quarter when defensive end Jim Nesbitt picked off a Friar pass and returned it to the Malvern 20. Two plays later, Osborne hit Nesbitt with a scoring pass and offensive tackle Art Garwood nailed the PAT to give Haverford a 7-6 triumph. From there, it was easy work. Haverford throttled the rest of the League to cap its perfect, 8-0 season. Eight Fords were named First-Team All-Inter-Ac, and John Haldeman was named the League’s MVP. That made sense, since Haldeman gained 1,076 yards, scored 21

TDs, and averaged 9.1 yards per carry. The 1970 season was great, but the ’71 outfit was completely dominant. To get an idea of how good Haverford was that season, consider that the Fords scored at least four TDs in the first half of every game. Had Mayock not substituted liberally during the final two quarters of each contest, his squad would have hung half a hundred on every team. The only drama came before the opener with Cardinal O’Hara. Thought to be the best team in the area and favored by some by as many as three touchdowns, the Lions had great advance praise. On the field, however, not so much. Haverford scored on the first play of the game, intercepted eight O’Hara aerials and coasted to a 34-20 triumph. No other team came within three TDs of the Fords. Haverford, which switched from the I formation to the Delaware Wing-T before the season, amassed 2,949 yards in eight games and averaged 9.0 yards per play. Each run averaged 8.4 yards, and every Osborne completion accounted for 21.7. Haverford forced 33 turnovers and surrendered a touchdown or less to six rivals. It was a remarkable season that culminated in the naming of nine players to the All-Inter-Ac First Team. Haldeman was again the League MVP and became just the second Ford to achieve First-Team honors three times and the School’s first and only Inter-Ac Player of the Decade. Running back/linebacker Peter Lindquist, whom Mayock said “had all kinds of talent, was tough as nails, could fly, and was as cool as a cucumber,” completed his trifecta in 1972. Haverford slid from the top the next few years but finished second in 1975 and narrowly missed the League title when a late comeback in the rain and mire at Malvern fell short. The star of that team was Mike Mayock Jr., a three-time All-Inter-Ac FirstTeamer and future NFL performer. One season later, Mayock Sr. retired from coaching, and the end of his tenure signaled the beginning of a dark time for Haverford football that would last for three decades. A school that had enjoyed 19 championships over a period of 46 years (1925-1971) did not wear another Inter-Ac crown until 2009. Although there were some worthy coaches and talented players throughout the program during that period, a lack of institutional support curtailed efforts to build a winning enterprise. That changed


Go Fords

A victorious Coach Murphy and team at EA, 2011.

when Dr. Joe Cox decided to become actively involved in the selection of Haverford’s new coach, following the 2004 season. His influence and commitment signaled a new era for the Fords. After working through three formative years, coach Mike Murphy began to build momentum. His 2008 team finished 7-3 and tied for second in the League. In ’09, Haverford broke through. It defeated Malvern on a last-second field goal by Aron Morgan, giving the Fords their first triumph over the Friars since 1983. On the season’s last day, Haverford whipped Episcopal, while Malvern dumped Chestnut Hill, creating a three-way tie atop the standings and giving the Fords their first Inter-Ac title of any kind since the pristine ’71 campaign. Murphy’s men backed that up with a truly remarkable 2010 campaign. Haverford struggled with a fierce collection of nonconference opponents and was unable to prevail against any of them. But the difficult early stretch prepared the Fords well for Inter-Ac rigors. Haverford dispatched Penn Charter and Germantown Academy easily, and then dumped Chestnut Hill to avenge the previous season’s bitter overtime loss. After overcoming Malvern for the secondstraight year, Haverford closed the season with a victory over Episcopal to complete a perfect 5-0 League campaign and become the first Inter-Ac team to win the championship after posting a losing record in nonleague play since Penn Charter did it in 1919. With a continued emphasis on excelling on the gridiron, Haverford moves into its future poised for success. The program’s current incarnation is a worthy successor to the champions that came before it and is proof of what can happen when a school uses its vast resources in pursuit of great things.

COME CHEER ON YOUR FORDS! Join us for the traditional rivalry, including a celebration of

Haverford vs. Episcopal Saturday, Nov. 10, 2012 11 a.m. ■ Cross-Country

The cross-country course begins and ends on The Haverford School track

11:30 a.m. ■ Water Polo

McQuillen Pool @ The Haverford School

12:30 p.m. ■ Soccer

Memorial Field @ The Haverford School

2:30 p.m. ■ Football

Sabol Field @ The Haverford School For directions, spirit gear, campus maps, and the most up-to-date information, please visit: www.haverford.org/EAday This is a family event. There will be no alcohol permitted on School property. Due to the high volume of visitors expected, we encourage Haverford School sports fans to utilize SEPTA and carpools.

GO FORDS!! BEAT EA!! GO FORDS!!! BEAT EA! GO FORDS!!

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Feature: Extraordinary Educators (in progress)

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Extraordinary Educators In our long history, one thing has remained constant at The Haverford School: we have always aimed for extraordinary.

Above: While reading and analyzing poetry, English Department Chair Tom Stambaugh ’90 shares a lighter moment with his Upper School English class. Opposite: Upper School engineering teacher Gerry Rooney explains launching procedures for his rocket plane challenge project.

We aim to be educators who have the vision, ability, compassion, and commitment to inspire and deliver a challenging educational program. Educators who possess the flexibility to respond to the needs of boys and support them as they prepare to live and work in an increasingly interconnected, complex world. Educators who employ best practices in boys’ education based on research, experience, and evaluation that effectively informs not only what we teach, but also how we teach. We aim to ignite a passion for learning during the most formative years of our boys’ lives. We aim for extraordinary – not just good or great. But what does extraordinary look like, and how do we get there? Our road map, the Strategic Vision, reminds us that a major institutional goal is to recruit, develop, and retain faculty and staff who are extraordinary. We strive as a community to be guided by new discoveries about the human brain and learning, to be prepared to adjust and develop our instructional strategies, to model a growth mind-set through the use of research, experience, and evaluation, and to seek out and employ best practices in order to effectively further our mission of preparing boys for life. In this quest, we must all play a part – faculty, staff, coaches, parents, alumni, friends – as a community, we strive for “extraordinary” together.

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EXTRAORDINARY ACHIEVEMENT

Megan Connolly:

2012 VEX Robotics Teacher of the Year In the Spring 2012 issue of HST magazine, Megan Connolly shared a reflection with the community about her involvement and experiences spearheading the robotics program at Haverford. Just months later, in April, Connolly was honored by VEX Robotics as the 2012 Teacher of the Year at the World Championship in Anaheim, Calif. It is an extraordinary distinction, considering that there are thousands of participating teams from more than 20 countries at the middle and high school levels. Connolly has been working after school with kids building robots for more than eight years. For the past three, Haverford has participated in the internationally-spanning VEX Robotics competition. In this program, students form small teams and design, build, and program their robot, and then compete in six or seven local competitions. If a team wins a competition that has more than 24 robots, they can qualify to compete in the World Championship. At the 2012 “Worlds,” the best teams and their robots came from 23 different countries around the world for three days of competition. Haverford had nine teams – three in Middle School and six in Upper School – and four of them qualified to go the World Championship. About the experience, Connolly says “We did very well there, bringing home four trophies, as well as the Teamwork Award at the Upper School level and the Excellence Award at the Middle School level. The work is rewarding, fun, interesting, challenging, and is certainly helping kids prepare for the future. What could be better?” We agree. Congratulations, Megan!

The inclusive Strategic Vision process conducted in 2009-10 incorporated meaningful contributions from all constituent groups in the School community. “Extraordinary Educators” is one of the five major pillars identified as a strategic priority in the decade from 20102020, with emphasis on maintaining and building upon the high quality faculty. The School has gained ground in this area since that time, engaging in the important strategic work we set out to achieve: • Design and manage a professional development program that focuses on effective uses of technology, differentiated teaching strategies, and curriculum and instructional development • Administer an evaluation system that promotes professional growth and reflects the research-based performance standards of an extraordinary faculty • Offer a highly competitive salary and benefits package to recruit and support an extraordinary faculty • Develop a school-year calendar and ethos that encourages continuous reflection, professional growth, and faculty renewal Building an Extraordinary Faculty The foundation for a critical culture shift and practice began well before 2009-10. Independent School magazine, the foremost trade publication for independent schools (produced by the National Association of Independent Schools or NAIS), featured an article authored by Haverford’s own Joseph Cox, Thomas Lengel, and Dan Slack in 2003 on the topic. Entitled “Attracting & Retaining the Best: Compensation, Evaluation, and Promotion at The Haverford School,” the article details Haverford’s approach to building an extraordinary faculty that emphasizes the importance of faculty accountability, satisfaction, and growth. “Watching the evolution of Haverford’s compensation, evaluation, and promotion programs over the past few years, we are convinced that paying professional salaries and making growth and accountability a priority are the best ways to benefit our students and to preserve the health of our school. The real measure of any educational institution is the character and quality of those who work inside the gym, on the stage, and in the classroom. While sensible compensation practices help us to attract excellent teachers, effective systems that promote professional growth enable us to develop and retain them. Through an open discussion of sound compensation that is connected to evaluation and promotion, we are discovering what it means to become a professional community of learners: a community that focuses on the growth of its teachers as well as its students is an exciting place to work.” (Independent School magazine, Fall 2003, p. 24) To oversee curriculum alignment across divisions and facilitate the faculty evaluation and professional development programs, Dr. Cox formed the Teaching and Learning Team several years ago. The “TLT” includes Assistant Headmaster Mark Thorburn, Dean of Faculty and Upper School English teacher Becca Davis, and Faculty Leader and Upper School English teacher Dan Slack. Together, they have helped build a teaching and learning environment focused on fostering growth and best practices in boys’ education that has

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Our framework and mind-set for evaluations is in a spirit of learning and growing, not criticism. Mutual respect and honesty open the door for genuine interaction, reflection, and growth. The collective attitude is best described as excited, positive, and grateful, and in the end, our teaching and learning environment encourages faculty to engage in the learning community to build on their strengths and ask for help when needed. Every year, teachers report how much they appreciate the time and attention given to their professional growth. As teachers explore new models of learning, they improve their craft and share best practices. Middle School Learning Specialist Karen Suter agrees. “I have seen a variety of classroom management methods, teaching styles, and instructional strategies, all of which have helped me to grow as a teacher. During my own evaluation process, having peers in my classroom has given me ideas and insights. Often, my peer observer will say, ‘Hey, have you tried this?’ And it opens up a whole new avenue of thinking about a situation.”

Luqman Kolade, US English

become a model for peer schools. “A lot of people have been a part of developing this process, and are invested in its success. Faculty members at all teaching levels are placed on evaluation teams, and often times, the evaluators learn just as much in the process as they do in their own evaluations. It’s about learning what others are doing, seeing techniques that you haven’t tried, seeing unique student-teacher relational dynamics, and sharing your own experiences as well.” says Slack. Other programs have evolved and supported this seminal one: curriculum mapping, decision education, SEED diversity training, boys’ education, and leadership training. All of these, along with funding for graduate study and other professional development opportunities, are used to measure and improve the curriculum, instructional strategies, and classroom environments. We foster a community of learning that engenders a culture of improvement. Faculty Evaluation Faculty and administrators collaborated to develop and implement Haverford’s progressive evaluation process. The four key factors of the evaluation are support, professional development, communication, and expectations. Gone is the old standard checklist evaluation; faculty now engage in an open evaluation dialogue with supervisors and peers, at the heart of which is meaningful conversation about teaching and learning.

Professional Development Another essential ingredient in the strategic effort to recruit, develop, and retain extraordinary educators, Haverford continues to support deep faculty engagement in external professional development opportunities, including graduate study, conferences, workshops, and research. This year, 22 faculty and staff are pursuing advanced degrees, and several staff are taking certificate courses in specialty areas. Upper School English teacher Luqman Kolade is enrolled in the Master’s Writing Program at Saint Joseph’s University. “This is has been the best professional development that I have been part of; it has helped me personally with my writing, and has had a great impact on my teaching,” he says. Many faculty also tout the “embedded” professional development experience of being a peer evaluator. Middle School music teacher John Stroud comments, “The most meaningful professional

“I’ve been most proud of the teamwork inherent in our teacher evaluation process. There is mutual respect and cooperation on all levels – division heads, department chairs, faculty leaders, and the faculty in evaluation. We all have different roles in the exercise, and no one is more important than the others. We help each other learn and grow.”

– Mark Thorburn, Assistant Headmaster

Right: The Teaching and Learning Team – Assistant Headmaster Mark Thorburn, Dean of Faculty and Upper School English teacher Becca Davis, and Faculty Leader and Upper School English teacher Dan Slack.

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development I have engaged in at Haverford has been observing my colleagues both on campus and in other schools. Sometimes we become comfortable in our environment and set in our ways. Leaving my classroom to watch other educators teach reenergizes my own pursuit of excellence. It gives me new perspective and fresh ideas that I am eager to implement in my own classes.” Instructional Rounds As a community, we are always striving for improvement. Last year, academic work by Board member John DeFlaminis, Adjunct Professor of Education at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, helped lead the TLT to explore Distributive Leadership practices. Toward the end of ensuring a consistent and challenging learning experience for our students, the TLT decided to pursue a professional development model that relies on observation and conversation called instructional rounds. Instructional rounds refers to a practice similar to the teaching hospital’s physicians’ rounds, where experienced faculty (Haverford’s Faculty Leaders) observe and interpret the classroom experience from the perspective of the student, thus offering an opportunity for targeted faculty development that will directly result in enhanced student learning. We believe that our faculty understands the importance of developing an environment that is conducive to student learning, and we have made great strides in creating that environment for our boys. Our curriculum mapping efforts have offered faculty the opportunity to develop a clear picture of what we can expect students to know and be able to do at all stages of their careers at Haverford. Instructional rounds will provide a deeper understanding of how we teach in the same way curriculum maps offer a comprehensive description of what we teach. But at the heart of this initiative is the opportunity to build a common understanding and language for improving teaching and learning. Ever Extraordinary Striving to be extraordinary educators is a continuous process, and one that requires respect, honesty, courage, support, and

Maryanne Quinn, MS Latin

teamwork. Highly competitive salary and benefits packages are an important part of the equation, and a dynamic evaluation and professional development process is central to our growth. And it is not always easy. “It’s a human process,” says Davis. “Accepting change and taking risks are always difficult, and changing old views to relate to new opportunities can be challenging. But our evaluations have become effective at holding up a mirror, encouraging reflection and conversation, and providing individualized professional development. We care about our boys and each other; we celebrate what is going on in the classroom and support it.” The language we use reflects the essential question and value at the core of our mission: ‘What is best for the boys?’ The answer? To be nothing less than extraordinary.

REFLECTIONS FROM A FEW EXTRAORDINARY EDUCATORS

Bill Palmer

Lower School science teacher I came to Haverford in 1982 with the intent of the School being a steppingstone, getting my master’s degree and moving onward and upward. By the time I finished my master’s degree, I began to appreciate the situation I was in – teaching highly motivated, energetic boys from supportive families, who couldn’t wait to ask questions about their world. On top of that, they cooperate with me in their pursuit of the answers. During this journey, trust is shared and relationships are forged. Mutual respect is a by-product that lasts for years, if not a lifetime. Teaching science to young boys is an amazing adventure for two reasons. First, young boys are curious, active, creative, enthusiastic, risk takers, and immature … just like me! Second, science is a perfect subject for young boys. Every boy has questions and the more he asks, the more he knows. I tell them if there were no questions, there would be no need for science. Science is about finding out the answers, learning about the world, and it covers all aspects of life: health, physical, biological, chemical, environmental, earth, space sciences. There is something every boy can relate to.

John Stroud, MS music

Bill Palmer, LS science

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I think the key to my success is keeping them engaged. Teaching boys for 30 years, I know what they are thinking and when they are starting to lose focus. As soon as that happens, I change modalities, venues, or even take time out to tell a pertinent joke. Humor is a great attention grabber, and it is really appreciated by the boys. I try to make science authentic. I believe that if it is not authentic and applicable to them, they won’t commit it to memory. For example, when the Jr. Kindergarten class learns about snow, I schedule a lesson where we make snow and the boys can observe how that happens. I purchase dry ice and put it in my water cycle model, which allows the boys to observe the entire process, act it out, and catch the snowflakes on their eyelashes and tongues, and experience it with their senses so they know it’s wet, cold, soft, etc. I strongly believe the more senses they use, the more sense it makes. This concept could be taught in 10 minutes, but I like to take the entire period to play with the concept, and use it in a game or activity. We will play survival (hide-and-seek), launch rockets in the gym, crawl in the planetarium to learn about navigation at sea, make rocks, build a town – live in it (pollute it) and learn how to clean it up, build boats and talk about buoyancy, displacement, and ballast and sail them across the School pool. I don’t want the boys to think science only happens in my room. I teach lessons in my room, the greenhouse, the Multipurpose Room, the gym, pool, athletic fields, Haverford College streams and pond, our empty lot on Panmure Road, the Learning Garden, and any other location that will support my curriculum. Over the years, I have come to be more responsive to the boys to the point where I now consider myself a teacher of boys more than a teacher of science. I’m less concerned with covering mass amounts of content than engaging every boy and trying to instill a love of science, learning, and collaboration. I’ve taken a page from Taylor Mali’s poem “What Teachers Make,” with the realization that they all don’t need to be scientists, but they all do need to be good citizens (productive members in a community). At the end of the year, I hope they understand the importance of learning and have the confidence to investigate a problem, creatively find a solution, and collaborate with others respectfully to solve the problem, and that it’s FUN! Then I know I’ve done my job.

Karen Suter, MS Learning Specialist

Maryanne Quinn

Middle School Latin teacher There is just no place like a classroom in September as names on class rosters take on personality, and the conversation begins that I hope will encourage the learner to expand his expectations of himself and his world. In fact, it is probably conversation that best characterizes my teaching. As I teach, so many, many people take a part in the conversation in my own mind. The wise words, the modeled behaviors, the frowns or smiles in reaction to my efforts, the shared hints and advice of a teacher, a colleague, a parent, an actor, an athlete, my child or grandchild, but most often, a student: all are there in the background as the classroom conversation unfolds. When the stars aligned in 1990 and I found myself stepping into the territory owned by Haverford’s so young and so loved Latin teacher, Ross Fitzgerald, I brought my past with me: JrK-8 classroom and special programs teaching in varied and diverse circumstances. While delighting in the creativity that is so basic to teaching, I had focused on a broad spectrum of thinking, motor, and skills development. Middle School Latin seemed the perfect place to bring all of this together. The bonus was that all my students would be boys, a circumstance that adds significantly to the dynamic between teacher and students in the classroom. As a Haverford parent, I had already observed Mike Cunningham’s unconditional respect for his fortunate Haverford Middle Schoolers. I saw first-hand how storied math teacher and coach Mike Mayock used his subject as his discipline and encouraged his students to own their successes and shortcomings in the process of becoming independent and motivated learners. Over time, the conversation in my head and heart has come to include the advice of these and so any other mentors. I hear Mr. Fred Rogers advising teachers to “remember your childhood” when teaching; Maria Montessori begging adults not to rob the child of his ownership and delight in his “work”; Andy Pausch’s urgings in his inspiring last lectures to approach life with urgency and grace. This advice brings excitement to this conversation, and the many voices of boys who sat in the desks before me through the years keep it fresh and relevant. As each school year unfolds, the conversation plays out with new

Chris Fox, Art Department Chair, US Art

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classes and students. While there is a place for a declarative sentence from time to time, most of my contributions are interrogatives. Some questions have right answers, but most are the kind that encourage the conversation along to the next question. Sometimes a single voice offers an answer, but more often the responses come from here and there in an atmosphere of productive enthusiasm and interaction. Important to a good conversation is reflection, and this, too, is an intentional part of any class. Over the years, I have delighted in having the boys in class for both their Form I and Form II foreign language experiences. As they prepare to leave for Upper School, we know one another very well and our conversations reflect this. Our last lessons center around Aeneas’ visit with the Sibyl of Cumae when he is about to visit the Underworld. They draw heavily not only on the vocabulary, grammar, and translation skills that have been learned, but also on the mythological hero’s journey of Theseus and the complexities that make Daedelus’ relationship with his son Icarus such a compelling tale. As the subject of paintings and poems by Breughel, Matisse, William Carlos Williams and others over time, now so accessible with current technology, links are easily made that encourage familiarity and comfort in the young boy’s cultural world going forward. Most of all, these closing lessons afford a time and place to ponder, reflect, incorporate and appreciate some of the mysteries and challenges that boys know all too well as they grow through this wonderful time of life. There is just no place like a classroom, perhaps at any time, especially when filled with middle school boys. boys.

Chris Fox

Art Department Chair, Upper School art teacher Although I’ve been teaching now for 31 years, I’m not ever sure I’ve been asked to help define an extraordinary educator. I’m pretty sure most teachers are as idealistic and optimistic as I am. I think you need to be, in this profession. So, I think the extraordinary educator that comes to mind for me is the idealized one I have pictured in my mind as the teacher I aspire to be. To begin to describe that ideal, I’d start with two quotes I’ve had on my classroom or office walls for many years now. The first is from Jean Piaget, the noted Swiss psychologist and pioneer in

the study of child intelligence, who said, “The principle goal of education is to create men who are capable of doing new things, not simply of repeating what other generations have done – men who are creative, inventive, and discoverers.” The other quote is from Maria Montessori, the Italian physician, educator, philosopher, and humanitarian who said, “The greatest sign of success for a teacher … is to be able to say, ‘The children are now working as if I did not exist.’ ” I believe an extraordinary educator works with a serious sense of purpose and the optimism expressed by Piaget. I believe an extraordinary educator would approach their work as if it is one of the most important endeavors to be undertaken. Although our work helping students to discover and develop skills and knowledge will allow them to shape the future, I think to do so also requires a degree of optimism to believe that we are capable of achieving such an outcome. I don’t think an extraordinary educator sees his or her work as much a process of “teaching,” as in imparting knowledge or delivering content, as it is creating an environment and activities that allow, encourage, and stimulate students to develop the confidence to explore and take the risks that result in learning. An extraordinary educator also understands that, in the end, the learning only takes place because of what the students do. Although teachers teach, students must choose to learn, and the student’s experience is what actually teaches them. Despite the serious sense of purpose of the teacher, the ultimate goal is that the teacher makes themself, not indispensible, but superfluous. As Maria Montessori implied, the most powerful and lasting learning takes place when students feel that they’ve done it by themselves. That sense of personal accomplishment is what allows us all to continue to take the reasonable risks that are at the heart of real learning. In fact, extraordinary educators see themselves as learners, too – less instructors, and more of “lead-learners,” modeling the practices that they hope to support in their students. One of the beauties of the school calendar is that, just like their students, teachers, too, begin anew each September, making use of the experiences of the past years to improve the next and face the challenges of doing new things. Schools themselves are learning communities, children and adults working together, in concert, to learn and grow. An extraordinary educator sees himself or herself as, and takes joy in being a part of, this greater community of learners.

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Profiles in Service

Dr. Richard B. Roberts ’51:

A remarkable life in medicine by Edwin “Arnie” Forrest ’51

“Profiles in Service” is dedicated to Haverford alumni who have served the United States of America in uniform and then went on to be good citizens and a credit to the School. Dr. Richard B. Roberts ’51 fits this description to the letter and, in addition, the term “extraordinary educator” undoubtedly applies. Please read on for his inspiring story. In 1950-51, Dick Roberts spent a postgraduate year with us at “The Prep” after graduating from Lower Merion High School. He quickly became a star in the classroom, achieving honor roll status, and on the athletic fields, starting at fullback on the Inter-Ac Champion soccer team, starting guard on the co-Champion basketball team, and then pairing with Wade Close ’51 in doubles on the tennis squad. In the meantime, Dick made loads of friends with his ebullient and fun-loving personality. His Haligoluk profile was deadon; he would matriculate to Dartmouth, study premed, and go on to become a research doctor. Following graduation from Dartmouth in 1955 where he was a three-year varsity soccer letterman, Dick entered the Temple University School of Medicine, receiving his M.D. in 1959. He received his internal medicine training from 1959-64 and was appointed Clinical Instructor at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, concurrently serving as Chief Resident in Medicine at Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital in 1964. Dick took part in the U.S. Armed Forces Physicians’ Appointment and Residency Consideration Program (nicknamed the “Berry Plan”), which allowed physicians to be deferred from military service while they acquired training in civilian institutions in specialties in which they would fulfill their two-year military obligation. Following his residency in Ohio, Dick served on active duty from 1964-66, and was assigned to the Division of Communicable Diseases and Immunology at Walter Reed Research Institute at the Walter Reed Medical

Center in Bethesda, Md. One of the most pressing challenges Dick and his colleagues faced at the time was the battle against meningococcal disease, a frequent companion of armies, particularly in recruit camps during large-scale mobilizations. At that time, new outbreaks of the disease were being caused by sulfadiazineresistant strains of Neisseria meningitides, resulting in a number of casualties. Dick subsequently investigated the immune response to the polysaccharide vaccine. Upon completing his military service, Dick was invited to further his medical research and training at the Rockefeller University in New York City from 1966-68. Subsequently, he was named Assistant Professor in the Laboratory of Cellular Physiology and Immunology at the Rockefeller University, and served as a resident physician in 1968-69. In late 1969, Dr. Roberts joined the faculty of Cornell University Medical College in New York City. For more than 40 years, he held various academic positions there, most notably as Chief of Infectious Diseases Division, Vice Chairman of Medicine, Acting Chairman of Medicine, and Associate Dean for Affiliations at its Medical Center. In all, he would hold 16 academic appointments at Cornell, SloanKettering Institute/Memorial Hospital, and the Rockefeller University. In recognition of his many annual teaching awards at Cornell, he received an Honorary Fellowship in the Cornell University Weill Medical College

New Program Developments This fall Dr. Roberts will establish a National Program for the Control and Prevention of Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease in the country of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, West Indies. This disease is a very significant problem throughout the world’s resource-limited countries in the tropics, especially among children ages 5-15 years. Among the many components of the National Program is the educational component that includes multimedia elements (billboards, posters, newspapers, TV, radio, mobile devices, etc) to reach out to the 115,000 people that inhabit seven of its 32 islands, a school-based program for the 96 primary and secondary schools with more than 24,000 students (ages 5-16 years), and seminars and other educational modalities for physicians and other medical personnel that man the 40 health district clinics throughout the islands.

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Profiles in Service

Dr. Richard Roberts ‘51 (center) accepts the Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art, First Class from the Austrian Ambassador at Carnegie Hall in New York City in the fall of 2010.

Alumni Association in 2008. He continues at the Rockefeller University as an Adjunct Professor. At 79 years of age, he happily soldiers on. Recently, Dick served as Dean of Trinity School of Medicine on St. Vincent Island in the West Indies. As of May 2011, he is a Visiting Professor. All the while, Dick continues his activities both at the Rockefeller and Cornell. Dick has authored more than 140 articles on infectious diseases, written some 30 book chapters, edited two textbooks, and served on the editorial board of several journals. Perhaps the crowning achievement of Dick’s career, bringing him international acclaim, has been his 14-year leadership of the Salzburg/Weill Cornell Medical College annual infectious diseases seminars. Designed for young doctors from Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, Central Asia, and other countries, the seminars have been held in Salzburg, Austria. In 1999, Doctors Jim Yong Kim (former President of Dartmouth College and current President of the World Bank) and Paul Farmer of Partners in Health were on his faculty. More than 550 young physicians from 29 countries and 37 faculty members have traveled to attend these seminars, where a broad range of infectious disease topics have been addressed in more than 300 lectures. Effective? Read what several young doctors have said in letters to Dick about their seminar experience. One from Bucharest, Romania, wrote: “It has been 26

Fall 2012

Dr. Roberts receives the Dartmouth 1955 Class Award from the Chair of the awards committee in 2011.

a life changing experience for me!” A grateful Slovakian doctor told Dick, “You are unique in your love to share what you love most and that is your knowledge. I will never forget what you said to us!” Perhaps, the most significant, from the Head of Pediatrics in the country of Georgia: “People from different fighting countries did not [previously] talk to each other, and they changed! They were walking under one umbrella, laughing, and talking peacefully, they became friends. You bring peace to people!” (Author’s note: America needs more goodwill ambassadors like Dick Roberts!) A testament to the great impact he has made in his field, Dick has received many prestigious honors. In fall 2010, the Austrian government honored him with the Austrian Cross of Honour for Science and Art, First Class, ceremoniously presented to him at Carnegie Hall in New York City by the Austrian Ambassador to the United States. Created in 1955, the award honors Austrians and foreign

leading figures who have “distinguished themselves and earned general acclaim through especially superior creative and commendable services in the areas of the sciences or the arts.” Dick was also the first American inducted into Honorary Membership in the Society of Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases in Poland, from whence many of the young seminar doctors had come. In 2011, he was the Honorary President of the First National Conference on the European Experiences in Surveillance and Control of Nosocomial Infections that was held in Brasov, Romania. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and has been presented with more than 18 other awards and recognitions, including receiving his 1955 Class Award from Dartmouth College in 2011. Dick continues to extol The Haverford School for the powerful boost it gave him on his amazing medical journey. Blessed with focused intelligence, vigor, a cheerful countenance, and a loving regard for his fellow man, Dr. Dick Roberts has made a significant difference. We are all very proud of him. Dick and his wife, Debbie, reside in Tenafly, N.J., and boast of three grown children – Bryan, Gwyneth, and Hannah – and four grandchildren.


Alumni Events

Events, News, and Notes from Palmer House and Beyond

Haverford in Paris: Global Readiness and a reception to remember By Keren White, Senior Associate Director of Development It was a blazing hot day in Paris on June 28 when we touched down in advance of our Haverford reunion in the “City of Light” that weekend. Those of us fortunate enough to be staffing the events, including Headmaster Joe Cox and his wife, Kathy, and Board Chair John Stoviak ’69 and his wife, Holly, were privileged to be invited by our hosts, Janie and Jacques Deveze ’65 for dinner that evening in their rooftop garden in the 5th district. This was the very best immersion into French living (or dining, at least) to kick off our international visit, with every item on the menu being sourced from the nearby Rue Mouffetard street markets and specialty vendors. The next evening, 30 of us gathered at the historic restaurant, Le Procope, for a traditional “kir” aperitif, followed by a seated dinner in the Lafayette Dining Room. Le Procope is reputedly the oldest

restaurant in Paris, and famous for having accepted Napoleon’s hat in exchange for a meal when he could not pay his bill. Appropriately enough, we were in the Lafayette dining room, bringing us full circle, not only because of Gen. Lafayette’s role in making America, but also because Dr. Cox is a graduate of and longstanding Board member at Lafayette College. Even as we stepped over the threshold, a wealth of history, culture, and individual distinction collided under the decorative ceilings. Dr. Cox took the opportunity to welcome our guests, and invited all present to stand and introduce themselves. The resulting list of names, diversity of countries, and, at Cox’s request, “things you are famous for,” was impressive from any perspective. A leader of the CIOR, NATO’s Chief of Procurement, former Secretary General of NATO, multiple government

officials, business leaders, and academic figures, revealed themselves quietly in our ranks. And while it would be too forward of Haverford to claim responsibility for such achievements (particularly the achievements of the alumni spouses present!), we can nonetheless be proud of, and learn much through, our association with this phenomenal group of internationally located and globally minded individuals. The following morning, many of us met again, this time in the mayor’s conference room in the Town Hall of the 5th District. Alumni, spouses, and parents of alumni from seven different countries came together to discuss global educational trends, and the future needs of young people. Participants shared stories of their own experiences and accomplishments at Haverford and in the world beyond.

Alumni, parents, spouses, and friends of The Haverford School who attended the Paris reception include: Oivind Baekken ’63 and Ina Rodriguez, Evan Chandlee ’58 and Francoise Chandlee, Gordon Converse ’65 and Sue Cheston, Lt. Col. Jacques Deveze ’65 and Janie Deveze, Hans-Martin Spilker ’58 and Monique Spilker, Klaus Peter Klaiber ’58 and Karleen Klaiber, Jorg Oser ’59 and Rita Oser, Per Hallerby ’65 and Karin Hallerby, Peter Clough ’66, Jacques LeBlanc ’70 and Gail LeBlanc, Rich Margolies ’70 and Nancy Margolies, Mike Petrakis ’09, Wilbert and Gwendoline Roget, Board Chair John Stoviak ’69 and Holly Stoviak, Headmaster Joe Cox and Kathy Stevenson, Senior Associate Director of Development Keren White, and Associate Director of Communications Meghan Vaughan.

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We reflected on the Haverford of today – and tomorrow. What should Haverford be doing to prepare our boys optimally for cultural competency? Some of the suggestions arising from this meeting that the School intends to pursue include: • Alumni abroad should be polled to ask if they can assist with arranging internships abroad or would be willing to host students wishing to travel abroad. • Alumni with experience overseas should be invited to mentor/be a resource for advice to students. • The visiting foreign exchange student program should continue; and we should continue vigorously pursuing our goal to strengthen our host family network. • The school should continue to develop new ways to use technology to connect boys with individuals and groups overseas, to provide relevance to support language instruction and social studies units on foreign cultures. Thank you to all alumni, supportive spouses, and parents of alumni who traveled to Paris for Haverford, and gave us your feedback on our global readiness programs. We hope we will see you all again in the not-too-distant future!

Fords Photos HOSTED BY SMUGMUG.COM

To see more photos from the Paris trip, visit:

www.haverfordschool.smugmug.com (password: fordsphotos)

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Global Readiness Update Global Readiness was identified as one of five leading goals in the 2010-2020 Strategic Vision. In the vision we stated: “To prepare boys to be global citizens in this new world will require development of collaborative problemsolving and learning skills, a sense of shared responsibility to uphold the human rights of all global citizens, the advancement of cross-cultural literacy skills through respecting and valuing human differences, and the ability to analyze and understand the interconnectedness of world events and global issues both past and present.” Two years on, what steps have we taken to advance these lofty goals? In November 2010, shortly after the publication of the Strategic Vision, The Haverford Leadership Council (a group of around 50 alumni, parents and friends, hand-picked to advise the Board of Trustees) met to discuss Global Readiness in detail. The members reviewed the strategies laid out in print, and brainstormed around those items. The ideas coming out of that meeting were shared with the Board of Trustees, who followed up by designating Trustee and HLC Chair Jen Pechet P’15, ’17 to lead a Board focus group for Global Readiness. A staff task force was also

assembled to review the HLC ideas and work to translate them into feasible short term and long term action items, in line with the other core efforts underway at the School at this time. The results are too many to detail here, but the following are highlights: The task force identified five Competencies: • Investigate the world beyond one’s immediate environment, acquiring deep content knowledge and understanding beyond one’s community, region, nation, culture. • Collaborate through a variety of models and media with peers, neighbors, and global partners to develop practical solutions to realworld problems. • Communicate one’s ideas effectively with diverse audiences. • Recognize one’s own and others’ perspectives and understand the role these perspectives can play in issues of global concern. • Translate one’s ideas and findings into appropriate actions to improve conditions.


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... and four Decision Making Principles: • Is it curricular-driven? Cocurricular programming such as student and faculty exchange, school sponsored travel, and school partnerships should align with curriculum. • Is it sustainable? All current and new global programming should have longterm plans that include but are not limited to financial sustainability • Is it accessible? Every effort should be made to ensure that curricular and cocurricular initiatives identified as valuable to developing global readiness are accessible to all students. • Is it authentic? The best global programming initiatives place students in authentic learning situations that provide active and purposeful interaction with people from across the globe. Based on these factors, we identified the following Curriculum based action steps for implementation for the School Year 2012-13: Schoolwide The school will adopt annually a schoolwide theme to be pursued in every division. Each department will offer at least one unit in a particular class through which they will explore the theme and purposefully target the Core Competencies. The 2012-13 theme is hunger.

Lower School • Our signature program will continue to be the social studies curriculum, wherein social studies, and corresponding language fundamentals, are delivered regionally. • Additionally, the Lower School will partner with the Service Learning Director to engage our youngest students in global service projects. Middle School • Eighth-grade students will continue to travel to Puerto Rico to immerse themselves in the language and culture of that island and engage in meaningful Service Learning. • We will research and consider offering a second-grade level excursion to a Spanishspeaking country, possibly Costa Rica. • We are working with the administration of partner school The Western International School of Shanghai to build a student exchange program. • Junior Model United Nations will expand to include a full grade level of students. Upper School • We will build a resource bank for students and their families of established study, service, and travel abroad organizations, to be accesible online via Haverford.org. • We have launched three new student organizations: the Micro-financing Club, the Global Politics Club, and NAIS Challenge 20/20 Club.

• We will seek to endow the existing Global Speaker Series, currently funded annually by Dr. Anil Rustgi P’14. • We are participating in the Student Global Leadership Institute at the Punahou School in Honolulu. Along with students from partner school Ordrup Gymanasium in Copenhagen, selected Haverford students will travel to Punahou for an intensive two-week on-site summer study of an issue of global significance and return with implementation-ready school projects. • Having successfully piloted student exchange with Christ Church Grammar School in Perth, we will expand partnerships and exchange programs with International Boys’ Schools Coalition member schools. Signature Global Studies Options in the Upper School • The Social Studies and Modern-Classical Language Departments will collaborate on the construction of signature programming in global studies, including a senior thesis component. This is a preliminary overview of some progress around the Global Readiness pillar of the Strategic Vision. If you have further questions or ideas to share about the development of global readiness at Haverford, please contact Matt Green at mgreen@haverford.org.

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Josh Levine ’94: Never too young to be a fan Josh Levine ’94 went to The Haverford School and Gettysburg College. His wife, Alice, went to The Academy of Notre Dame in Villanova and Smith College. They have two daughters—Emma and Zoe. So, why did Josh and Alice include Haverford School in their estate plans? To put it simply, because they are HUGE FANS. Says Alice, “Haverford made Josh who he is today. It wasn’t just a school for him, it was like a family and now our girls and I are proud to be a part of the Haverford family too.” So, when it came time to write their wills, there was not a moment’s hesitation. Josh and Alice included a bequest to Haverford in their plans. “I owe a lot to Haverford,” says Josh. “The School made a big difference in my life and I will always be grateful. This is a way I can give something back. The whole family feels that way.” Josh and Alice are the youngest members of The Heritage Society, Haverford’s distinguished legacy circle. It just goes to show you – you’re never too young to be a fan. “My daughters taught me that,” says Josh with a smile. If Haverford has made a difference in your life, or the life of a loved one, please consider following Josh and Alice’s lead. There are many ways to leave a legacy, including gifts that cost nothing now, gifts that provide retirement income now or later, or gifts of special assets such as real estate. Call us or email us today. Let us help you find the best way for you and your family to build on your Haverford legacy. Top, right: Josh, Emma, and Zoe Levine in their Haverford School fan gear. Middle, right: Alice and Josh Levine ’94

For more information, please contact the Office of Gift Planning in Palmer House:

Sam Caldwell, Senior Director of Gift Planning  scaldwell@haverford.org  484-417-2774 Joe Scornavacchi, Associate Director of Development  jscornavacchi@haverford.org  484-417-2792 30

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Heritage Society Visit us on the Web: haverford.org/plannedgiving


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Regional Receptions: Maine

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Aug. 2 Reception – Mount Desert Island, Maine 1 Headmaster Joe Cox and his wife, Kathy, accompanied by alumni, current parents, and friends at the home of Alison and Rob Hastings ’86 on Mount Desert Island, Maine; 2 Haverford parents Jennifer Higgins and son Ross ’15 with Jackie Weiss and son Ethan ’17;

3 Julie and Bob Spahr ’56 and nephew Wes ’87; 4 John Newhall

’51 with sons Dan ’87 and Tom ’84. Thank you to Alison and Rob Hastings ’86 for your wonderful hospitality!

2012-13 Board of Trustees The Haverford School Board of Trustees for 2012-13 includes (front row, from left) Vincent A. Rossi, Sharon Merhige, Leslie Muhlfelder Freemann, Chairman John F. Stoviak ’69, Headmaster Joe Cox, Caroline Rogers, Elizabeth M. Anderson, Kim Keszeli, (middle row) Vice Chairman Richard W. Graham II ’52, Amy Petersen, George C. McFarland Jr. ’77, John J. Lynch, Randall T. Drain Jr. ’01, Robert T. Hastings ’86, Kenneth L. Brier ’68, Carter D. Williams ’86, (back row) Richard. J. Green ’69, Mark D. Turner, Vice Chairman William C. Yoh ’89, Jennifer N. Pechet, John C. Wilkins ’95, Secretary Robert C. Clothier III ’79, Albert C. Oehrle ’58, and John A. DeFlaminis. Not pictured: Peter Rohr, Treasurer David B. Ford Jr. ’93, Michael S. Lewis ’99, David J. Martinelli ’79, Dr. Richard Melvoin, Kenneth W. Schwenke, and Thomas L. Williams.

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The true loves of my life By Eileen Buckwalter, Junior Kindergarten Teacher It is late August, and the purposeful sounds of busy teachers and staff readying for the new school year fill The Haverford School. I walk into the Jr. K classroom, which is filled with crisp reams of paper, shiny new equipment, intriguing books, and brightly colored manipulatives, and I feel the anticipation building. I am holding “welcome to school” information papers, cubby tags, and a list of names. All that is missing is the boys – my brand-new junior kindergarten class. The months since commencement have gone by so quickly. I remember the feeling of pride and a bit of amazement as my former students passed by, young men now who still recall special moments in JrK. “You gave me my start!” “Remember when I blasted off into space with you?” “We went on safari to the rain forest! It was great!” They shared their memories as my eyes filled with tears. I remember the boy who was afraid to cut with scissors and used his hands, instead. I see again the boy with tears rolling down his face who stood by the window, hoping his mom would come back and pick him up. (He is now going to Colgate.) The memories come flooding back, and I hear again a quiet, “Thank you, Mrs. Buckwalter.” It is I who am truly thankful for the 32

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opportunity to be a part of The Haverford School. During Open House each year, I tell parents that I am so lucky to have been adopted by them as an “aunt,” and that together, we are a team. The true loves of my life are my own family, my friends, and my Haverford boys and their families. I want boys to catch the love of learning. I believe that school should be a fun, stimulating, and safe place where boys can grow socially, academically, and emotionally. I know that even the brightest student cannot be truly successful in life if he has not learned to get along with and respect others. I work each day to

“I believe that school should be a fun, stimulating, and safe place where boys can grow socially, academically, and emotionally. I know that even the brightest student cannot be truly successful in life if he has not learned to get along with and respect others.“

nurture an environment of support, encouragement, and cooperation among the boys of Jr. K. I encourage boys to explore their world – in and outside of school – and hope they will find that the journey of discovery is more exciting when shared with a friend. I want them to “dream big,” and stand on a firm foundation as they reach for the stars. Personally, I want to continue to grow as a professional, and I appreciate the opportunities that Haverford has provided for me through educational conferences, special programs, and support and mentoring from some of the finest educators in the field. I am so grateful each day to work with the incredible faculty and staff of The Haverford School. All of us are individuals who pool our unique talents as we focus on the task of helping each boy to learn and to grow. Each milestone along a boy’s road to adulthood is significant in its own way. I am both humbled and grateful to have shared so many with all of “my” Jr. K boys, and hope to continue to do so for a long time to come. Mrs. Buckwalter is joined by her current and past “Super Lifer” students (above). She a 2011 recipient of The Preparing Boys for Life Teaching Excellence Award.


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rfor Repo Sch e Ha he H 12 - T e H ool - 011-12 ol - A ave 1-12 - 20 2011 e H ool 011-1 ol - A Have 11-12 - 20 - 20 12 - T erfo nnu - 20 Hav ool - t - 20 aver ol - A port he H ol - rt - 2 he H cho Rep he H hool Rep - Th rd S Rep The d S H 01 rt h ch - 2 ho e h h o r S al c l l rd h - T 11T o T h rt rt 2 po ve l 0 11- av - A rt e H ho e - T ho 12 fo or Re e Ha nnua verfo 12 - T 1-12 - 20 12 - T d Sc ort - Sch - The rt - 2 epo port -12 - T rd S ort Sc - Th rt - 2 epo epo - 20 he H ool epo - Th d Sc Repo The Sc al R 1-12 d Sc l Rep 1-12 - ford nnu 1-12 - ord S nnua 2011- aver nnua 11-12 verf l - A e 11 1 r 1 a p A R f a t o rd nu 01 rd 2 p l o h a o 1o er ch l R 2 or A rd l R R rt T A 20 11- or A 01 - T ol - e H - 201 t - 2 epor - 20 verf l Re erfo 011-12 Rep nual ual R - 20 verf al Re erfo 011-1 Rep nua nual epo -12 - rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 erfo - An t - 2 verfo nnu t - 20 Hav ool - t - 20 aver ol - port he H ol - rt - he H cho Re a u S al a ua av a An 0 n -2 n n l R 11 a H ho e n rt R rt n 2 al e av ol av - 2 al - T ho po T -A r ho Th t fo or or ch or Sc -12 - epor Rep nual epo he H Ann e H ort - nnu ol - A l - An epo he H- Ann e H ort nnu ol - A ol - A nua - 20 aver ol - A port he H ol - rt - 2 he H cho Rep he H ool Repo - Th rd S Rep The d Sc al R 11-12 d Sc l Re 1-12 - rford nnu 11-12 h a r 1 r nu 0 p h l l o e o R -T l o T T R T ho n e -A 0 S l o p A A o 11 o T R o n rt H ch l 12 20 ual nnua l - A nual 1-12 - hool 12 - T l Re ool - Sch cho nual 1-12 hoo -12 - T al Re ool - Sch Sch ol - A epo he Sch al R 1-12 - Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnua -12 - rd S nua 011- verf nua 11-12 verfo - An rt - 2 verfo nnu t - 20 Hav ool t - 2 ave nn l - A hoo - An 201 Sc 011- nua Sch ford rd S - An 201 d Sc 011 nnu Sch ford ord cho al R 2 - T ford nnu 201 ford ua 011 ver l - A 2011 erfo - An rt - 2 Ha - An - 20 Ha ool epo Ha ol - A por The Sch por e H S A e r f n l l c a 1 2 d e 2 h - oo S ol n r r u o r t h e rt rfor t - 2 - A ord ver erf ool ort rfo rt - l - A ord ave ver rd S nn 011- ave l - A rt ave - An rt - e H hoo rt - Hav hoo epo - Th hoo or The Sc al R The cho l R 12 - ord l R - T ord d o h Sc erfor Sch Repo ave epor hool verf e Ha Hav Sch Rep ave epo hoo verf e H e Ha erfo ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Repo he H ool epo - Th d Sc epo he Sc al R 1-12 d Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnu -12 - rd S nua 2011- verf nnua 11-12 verf - A a A 20 a ol v ord al e H l R Sc Ha Th he ord ual e H al R Sc Ha - Th Th av ho po - Th d S al - T Sch al R 1-12 for al R 2 - T ford nnu 201 for ua 011 ver l - A 011 erfo - An t H a H r r n u a l c u 2 2 v 2 e e r r u -1 l 1 r a ho e e H erf nn Th nu ord he 12 - - T erf nn - Th nu ford he -12 12 - e H S u o t o e h rd al R 11-12 rfo Ann 11-1 ord nn - 20 av nn 011 ave l - A ort ave - An rt - e H ho rt - Ha hoo ep - Th hoo por Th Sc al R v T 11 v A n T 1r A n 12 1rf Ha ol - 11-12 l - A ave 1-12 - - 201 2011- e Ha ool - 011-12 ol - A ave 1-12 - - 20 - 201 12 - T erfo nnu - 20 Have ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 he H choo Rep he H ool epo - Th d Sc epo The d Sc al R 1-12 d Sc l Re 1-12 - rford nnu 1-12 1 r a H 01 rt a 01 r h o ep T ho o h o 2 t e - A 01 S al t ch l R 12 lR o nu 0 T ho 20 oo H 01 T ho rt H or 11- av - A rt e Sc rt - Sch The t - 2 epor port 12 - T d Sc ort - Sch - The t - 2 epo epor - 20 e H ool epo - Th d Sc epo he Sch al R 1-12 - Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnu -12 - rd S nua 011- verf nua 11-12 verfo - An rt - 2 verf nnu t - 2 Hav ool t - 2 ave a An 20 - or h ch l R 2 a e 11e ch or 11 rd a 11 er a p H - A or A R fo An - 2 o or rd 2 po rd l R - T rd nu 01 ol or l R R rt or Re erfo 011-12 Rep nual ual R - 20 verf al Re erfo 011-1 Rep nua nual epo -12 - T rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 erfo - An t - 2 verfo nnu t - 20 Hav ool - t - 20 aver ol - port he H ol - rt - he H cho Rep he H hool Rep - Th rd S Rep The rd S a u o T n 0 S al r l l l l a T n -2 h l v n n r R 11 2 t c o o a H ho e 12 n n o 2 e av av - T ho -A r Ha rt - nnua l - A - An epor he H Ann e H ort - nnua ol - A l - A nual - 20 verf ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Repo he H ool epo - Th d Sc epo The Sc al R 1-12 Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnu 1-12 - rd S nnua 2011- verf nnua 11-12 verf - Th a A 20 a o ep T ho h S a 12 h rd a 11 rd nu 01 p l o fo A R -T lo er A 01 or l R po A A oo ol T oo n rt ch l R 2 Re ool - Sch cho nual 1-12 hoo 12 - T al Re ool - Sch Sch ol - A epo he H Sch al R 1-12 - Sc Rep -12 - T ford nnua -12 - rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 verfo - An rt - 2 verfo nnu t - 20 Hav ool - t - 2 aver ool - port he H ool - rt - he H 011- rd S a n n -2 c 11S n r A 0 1 u T -2 o h or l R - T rd e - T h po o e 11 rd al 11 a a d H h -A r u h d h o o rd 01 Sc erfor ford l - A t - 2 ord S - 20 Ann d Sc erfo rfor Sch nual 1-12 erfo - Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 he H choo Rep he H ool epo - Th d Sc Rep The d Sc al R 1-12 d Sc l Re 1-12 - ort verf - A a ol o T a 01 r l v n l ve rd S al ch l R 12 or er oo or rf rt av - A rt e 01 av ep T ho rt Ha ho ep - T ho l - or av or nu 01 or Ha Hav Sch Rep ave epo hoo verf e H e Ha erfo ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Repo e H ool epo - Th d Sc epo he Sc al R 1-12 Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnu -12 - rd S nua 2011- verf nnua 11-12 verf - An rt - 2 verf nnu t - 2 al R he H cho l Re h h a A n c S a u H R a r h S 0 h h a ol r a l u 01 T R 2 v 11 rd a 11 e d - A or l o A fo o o l R - T rd Th erfor nnua The nual ord S he H 12 - T 2 - T e Ha Sch Rep 12 - T ford nua -12 - T rd Sc nual 011-1 verfo nua 11-12 erfo - Ann t - 2 erfo nnu - 20 Have ool - - 20 aver ol - A port he H ol - rt - 2 he H cho Rep he H ool Rep - Ann 1-12 - rford nnu 1-12 o n 0 S al l r An 11 a h rd al 11T T n -2 h v T 11rt H ho e - T ho n e ch l o av l rf A - A 01 or av - A rt e 1-1 01 Ha ool - 011-12 ol - A ave 1-12 - - 20 - 201 12 - T erfo nnu - 20 Have ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Rep he H ool epo - Th d Sc epo The Sc al R 1-12 d Sc l Rep 1-12 - ford nnu 1-12 - rd S nnua choo t - 2 Hav ool t - 2 ave h - 2 ho e H 201 ort rt 011- av l - A ort he cho ort Ha ho Rep - T cho po - Th d S ual - T Sch al R 1-12 rfor al R 2 - ford nnu 201 for ua 201 ver l - A 201 erfo - A d S por he Sch por e H c r o n l c a 1 h c S e T H h S rt S r e r p u u 1 r e - T rt - Rep Rep t - 2 he hoo Rep 2 - T rd S l Re - Th rd S ual 11-12 rd S al R 11-12 rfo Ann 11-12 ford nn - 20 ave nn 011- ave ol - A ort ave - An rt - e H hoo ort - Hav hoo rfo l Re 12 - ford l R - T ord po rd Re erfo 011-12 Repo nual ual epor 12 - T d Sc nual 011-1 verfo nua 1-12 erfo - Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ool - - 20 aver ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 he H cho Rep he H ool Repo - Th d Sc Rep The d Sc Have nnua 2011- aver nnua 11-12 verf - An r 1 r 0 h l v n R r p a o l o o v o T v n 0 T 2 S r l l l A rt a T 1n h l n rt H 2 c o o A A 2 a 12 Ha rt - nua l - A l - An ual - 201 verf l - A ort - e H ol - A t - 2 e Ha hoo epo e H ool - epo - The d Sc epo he Sch al Re 1-12 - Sch l Rep -12 - ford nnua -12 - rd S nua 011- verf nua 11-12 verfo - The ol - port he H ol - rt - he H cho Re a An 0 a oo p Th o o nn t S al 11 fo An - 2 h Sc l R h h l R 2 a 2 u 01 rd a 11 po An oo ho e - T ho po T or er A or l R - T rd Re ol - Sch Scho l - A epor he H Sch al Re -12 - Sch Rep 12 - T ord nua -12 - T rd Sc nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 erfo - Ann t - 2 erfo nnu - 20 Hav ool - t - 20 aver ol - port he H ol - rt - 2 he H 011-1 d Sc al R 11-12 d Sc l Re 1-12 - rford nnu 1-12 a o n n -2 r rf An 11 0 11 u T - 2 or nu 0 or ua 01 h e o rd al 11av l H ho e - T ho ho rd - A 01 d oo R - T rd or av - A rt e Sc erfo rfor Sch nual 1-12 erfo - Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Rep he H ool epo - Th d Sc Repo The d Sc al R 1-12 d Sc l Rep 1-12 - ort verf - An rt - 2 verf Ann t - 2 Hav ool t - 2 ave h S a o rt r 1 r nu 01 p a a ol l H o o v v o o T t a e r l n l ve d ch l R 2 or ch or av A 01 ep T or Ha Ha rfor l - A t - 2 e Ha hoo epo e H ool - epor - The Sch epo he H Sch al Re 1-12 - Sch Rep -12 - T ford nnua -12 - rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 verfo - An t - 2 verfo nnu t - 20 al R he H cho Rep he H hool Rep - Th rd S Rep The d S 1 a An 0 n -2 S al u c l l a r h Sc l R h h a ol rd l R - T rd u T T R 2 11 rd al 11 -A r he ve oo or A 12 fo fo or or - T e Ha Sch Rep 12 - T ord nua 12 - T d Sc nual 011-1 verfo nua 1-12 erfo - Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ool - - 20 aver ol - A ort he H ol - rt - 2 he H cho Rep he H ool Repo - Ann 1-12 - ford nnu 1-12 - ord S nnua 2011- aver nnua 11-12 verf l - A n 11- or n 1 r av - A rt 1 a l l o ep T ho A f o n 01 av l 2 S l d o rf a h T T h 1rt H er ch l A A 20 - T erfor nnua - 201 ave ol - A - 20 verf l - A ort - e H ol - A t - 2 e H hoo Repo e H ool epo - The d Sc epo he Sch al R 1-12 - Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnua -12 - rd S nua choo t - 20 Hav ool - t - 20 aver ol - port he H ol - rt - he H cho Re S al H o rt h ch l R 2 h Sc l a oo p Th o r 11 fo An S rd a 11 er A H ho e v t e - T ho po T A or or l R - T rd nu 01 ch or Ha ool - epor - The Sch epo he H Sch al Re -12 - Sch Rep -12 - T ord nnua -12 - T rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 erfo - An t - 2 verfo nnu t - 20 Hav ool - t - 20 aver ol - ford Repo - Th rd S Rep The d Sc al R 11-12 d Sc l Re 1-12 - rford nnu 11-12 a r r 1 r nu 0 l a n n l R T r 2 e -A 0 o l o l a rf A 0 d 11 rd u h h R e 11 rd 11 av H ho r -A r 12 Sc ual 011-12 erfo nual 1-12 - erfor Ann - 20 erfo nnua - 20 ave ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort - he H ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Repo he H ool epo - Th d Sc epo he Sc ave nua 011- verf nua 11-12 verfo - An rt - 2 verfo nnu t - 20 Hav ool t - 2 Ha a o a An 20 H An - 2 H ho rt h S e ch or he p a a ol l o - A or v o o T rt av A rt l R - T rd av n 01 T lnn 2 ch l R 2 or - A ort - e H ol - A t - 2 e Ha hoo epo e H ool - epo - The d Sc epo he H Sch al Re 1-12 - Sch Rep -12 - T ford nnua -12 - rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 verfo - The ol - port he H ol - rt - he H cho Rep he H hool Rep - Th rd S Rep 2 - T av h o n 0 H o T n -2 c lR h h r l r A 1 r a R - T rd R S al o c o l 11 h a p u T 12 -1 rd al 11 ho e - T ho Re 12 - T Sch Repo 2 - T ord S nua 12 - T d Sc nual 011-12 verfo nual 1-12 erfo Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 he H 011-12 Sc al R 1-12 Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnu -12 - rd S nua 2011- verf nnua 2011 The - Th a A t- 2- 2 11- ord ual 011-1 erf - An 011- rfor An - 2 Ha An 201 av ol - por av l - A ort he cho ort Ha cho Rep - T cho epo - T t - 2 ford nnu 201 ford nua 2011 ver l - A 2011 erfo - An rt H 1 1 0 r l H H v e p e r a o o 2 erf nn - 2 p v ol o o 112 ve ol l o 11 T d S Re Th d S al 1-12 d S l R 1-12 or ver - A rt - ve An t e 11 rt o e l h Ha oo t 1 r a u l v A r p r 1 r po Th oo ort he ch l R he ho Re 2 a a o o t a e H ho rt Ha ho ep - T ho ep 20 20 20 l Ha ol - epor The Sch epor he H Sch l Re -12 - Sch Rep 12 - T ord S nua 12 - T rd Sc nual 011-1 verfo nua 11-12 erfo - Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 al Re he H choo Rep he H ool epo - Th d Sc epo The d Sc al R 1-12 d Sc ual R ort - ort - ort - ual 1 r u R h a R v o v t n 1 n 0 r r p n 1 a n p n -2 l R T rd p S al o u c l o l a rf A a rd 0 n u T h T R or 11rd al 11-A r 12 Sc ual 011-12 erfo nual 1-12 - erfo Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 ave ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Repo he H ool epo Ann -12 - ford nnu -12 - rd S nua 011- verf nua 11-12 verfo - An rt - 2 verf l - An al Re al Re al Re l - An ver a o ep T ho a An 20 a H ho rt a 11 r av 11 er a l o A rt A o fo An - 2 u o o u u ol av n 01 av l T Th S nn 2 ch l R l - A ort - e H ol - A t - 2 e H hoo Repo e H ool - epo - The d Sc epo he H Sch al R 1-12 - Sc Rep -12 - ford nnua -12 - rd S nua hoo t - 20 Hav ool - t - 20 aver ol - port he H ol - rt - he H cho Rep he H Scho Ann Ann Ann Scho he H Ann c r h o o T n c l r S al h r A h 1 r u T R - T rd h R h r o 11 rd al 11 p H ho e le ll- T ho -T lRe 12 - T Sch Repo 12 - T ord S nua 12 - T d Sc nual 011-12 verfo nual 1-12 erfo - Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ol - - 20 verf ol - A ord S epo - Th d Sc epo The Sc al R 1-12 Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnu 1-12 - rford hoo hoo hoo rford 1-12 hoo 11-1 n 11c Sc Sc rd a r 11 e rd nu 01 l a n l 2 er A 01 ve or n or l R av - A rt e rf 01 av 11- rd 01 Sc 20 ho rt Ha ho rf l R 2 1120 erfo nnua - 20 ave ol - A - 20 verf ol - A ort - he H ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Repo e H ool epo - Th d Sc epo he Sc ave nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 verfo - An rt - 2 verfo nnu t - 20 Hav ool - t - 2 Ha ord S ord ord Hav rt - 2 ord ort - Ha h h lR 2 a o a n H n -2 o e rf H e o h S e r 0 h or l v A t t e p a a l o -A r rf rf p o o rf T l R - T rd Ha ol - epor The Sch epor he H Sch l Re -12 - Sch Rep 12 - T ford nua -12 - T rd Sc nua 011-1 verfo nua 11-12 erfo The ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 he H choo Rep he H ool epo - Th d Sc Rep - Th ave ave ave - Th Rep ave l Re - Th av - ho ep - T ho H H -12 al H H ua -12 n 0 H o T n -2 l r An 11 rd R - T rd a S al o ch l R 12 or av ua 11 rd al 11T ho R -12 Sc nual 011-12 verfo nual 1-12 erfo Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 e H 011-12 Sc al R 1-12 Sc l Rep -12 - ford nnu -12 - rd S nua 2011- verf nnua 2011 The The - The 2011 nnu The Ann 2011 - The Th h 2 a a A n o rt p T r u 01 o o v v t 11 rd a r 11 rd A A A a fo o n n 2 01 - A rt - e H l - A t - 2 e Ha hool epo e Ha ool - epor - The Sch epo he H Sch al Re -12 - Sch Rep -12 - T ort - erfo - Ann t - 2 erfo nnu - 20 Have ool - - 20 aver ol - A port he H ol - port 11-12 11-12 011-12 port ool - 11-12 hool port 011-12 11-12 11-1 c lR h e e h 11 rd l R - T rd u h R 2 h h rt H ho e - T ho e 20 20 2 2 p rd al 11 po Th oo or av l 20 c 20 20 or av - A rt e Re -12 - Sch Rep 12 - T ord S nua 12 - T d Sc nual 011-1 verfo nua 1-12 erfo - Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 al Re e H choo Rep he H ool epo - Th d Sc epo The Sc al R 1-12 d Sc ual R ort - ort - ort - ual R d Sc ort - ord S ual R ort - ort - ort - ual h S n 1r l l n 01 av l f 2 r rd nu 01 p d p n 11 a n p p n 1n p p or n ch l R 2 or l R or p av A rt u rf T 20 erfor nnua - 201 ave ol - A - 201 verf l - A ort - e H ol - A t - 2 e H hoo epo e H ool - epo Ann -12 - T ford nnua -12 - rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 erfo - An t - 2 verfo - An l Re l Re l Re - An verf l Re aver - An l Re l Re l Re - An ver v - A rt e H cho rt Ha hoo ep - Th ho por - Th Sc al R - Th ch al R ol - 011 ver - A 011 rfo - An - 2 Ha - An 20 Hav ool por Ha ool nua nua nua ool Ha nua e H ool nua nua nua ool Ha n a o t o c d l l S e R 2 av ol H oo ep Th S ep he Sc al r he ol rt he ch Re he ch An An An ch he An Th ch An An An ch he An u ho - 2 Ha oo 2 d S l Re -12 for nnu -12 rd 1 o n d t 1 t S S T p S c S l o o o T n T T T S r d 1 r u T R h R h r r o 11 r 11 H Sc ual 11-12 erfo ual 1-12 - erfor Ann - 20 erfo nnua - 20 ave ol - A - 20 verf ol - A ord S epo - The d Sc epo he Sch al Re 1-12 - Sch l Rep -12 - ford nnua -12 - ford hool hool hool ford 1-12 - hool 11-12 ford hool hool hool ford 1-12 - hool 11-12 H o rt a c 0 c c c 11 c 20 er c c u 01 c o rf l R 2 v er rd a rt av A rt 11 er 01 er 01 lnn 20 av nn 01 er A or l R - T rd - A rt - e H l - A t - 2 e Ha hoo epo e H ool - epo - The Sch epo he H Sch ave nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 erfo - Ann t - 2 erfo nnu - 20 Hav ool - t - 20 Hav ord S ord S ord S Hav t - 2 ord S rt - Hav ord S ord S ord S Hav t - 2 rd S rt - 2 Ha o a n H n -2 r e rf e or rf h Sc l R h h l R 2 rd l R - T rd 0 e h or rfo po e p rf rf av l rf rf po e rf or av - A rt e Th oo or Re -12 - Sch Rep 12 - T ord nua 12 - T d Sc nua 011-1 verfo nua 1-12 erfo - The ol - A ort he H ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Rep he H ool epo - Th d Sc Repo - Th ave ave ave - Th Rep ave l Re - Th ave ave ave - Th Rep ave l Re - Th ave h S n 11- or H H a 12 p H a 12 H 12 l l l o o H H 12 al H n 01 av l H o n H T 2 l d rf 11 a 12 1ch l R 2 or T 20 erfor nnua - 201 ave ol - A - 20 verf ol - A ort - e H ol - A t - 2 e H hoo Sch al Re 1-12 - Sch Rep -12 - T ford nnua -12 - rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 2011- The The The 2011- nnua The nnu 2011- The The The 2011- nnu The nnu 011- The Th H o rt h Sc rd a 1 a An n -2 p Th o r u o v -A A -A - 2 t 11 rd al 11 A A A fo or Ha ool - epor - The Sch epo he H Sch al Re -12 - Sch Rep -12 - T ord erfo - Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ool - - 20 aver ol - A ort he H ol - port 11-12 11-12 011-12 port ool - 11-12 hool port 011-12 11-12 11-12 port ool - 11-12 hool port 011-12 011-12 11-1 0 c r av - A rt l o ep T ho e 20 20 2 R T rd h e e rf av l e 11 rd u h R h h rt H 2 2 2 rd 11 20 c 20 20 e 20 Sc ual 011-12 erfo nual 1-12 - erfo Ann - 20 erfo nnua - 20 ave e H hoo Repo e H ool epo - The d Sc epo he Sch al R 1-12 - Sc al R rt - rt - rt - al R d Sc rt - rd S al R ort - rt - rt - al R d Sc rt - 2 rd S al R rt - ort - rt - al R H h Sc l h ch l R 2 rd nu po po po nu or po fo nu p rt av A rt av n 01 av l nn 2 po po nu or po fo nu po p po nu or l R - T rd nu 01 - A ort - e H ol - A t - 2 e H hoo epo e H ool - epo - The -12 - T ford nnua -12 - T rd S nua 011-1 verf nua 11-12 erfo - An t - 2 verfo - An l Re l Re l Re - An verf l Re aver - An l Re l Re l Re - An verf l Re aver - An l Re l Re l Re - An ver h o c lR h h a ua a ol a l r a a l r a a H l a a a l a H h a a n R n l 2 o p a r 0 11 11 av ua ol A Re 12 - T Sch Repo 12 - T ord S nua 12 - T d Sc nual 011-12 - 20 ave ol - - 20 verf ol - A ort - he H ol - A rt - 2 e H choo Repo he H cho nnu nnu Annu cho he H nnu The choo Ann nnu nnu choo he H nnu The choo Annu Ann nnu choo he H Ann a o H ho rt h S n 11- or S -A -A S T T p S l T l o S -A o n -A -A S -A S T -A 2 rf 11- rd T rt 1120 erfo nnua - 20 ave ol - A - 20 verf ol - A ort - epo - The d Sc epo he H Sch al Re 1-12 - Sch Rep -12 - T ford nnua -12 - ford hool hool hool ford 1-12 - hool 11-12 ford hool hool hool ford 1-12 - hool 11-12 ford hool hool hool ford 1-12 - hool 11-12 1 1 H o r A a 1 1 r 0 er R - T rd c c R 0 er v A c c 0 c t t c c 11 p c c c c u c o er rd al 11 er er er Ha ol - epor The Sch epor he H Sch l Re nual 011-12 verfo nual 1-12 erfo Ann t - 20 erfo nnu - 20 Have ol - - 20 Hav rd S rd S rd S Hav t - 20 rd S rt - 2 Hav rd S rd S rd S Hav t - 20 rd S rt - 2 Hav rd S rd S rd S Hav t - 20 rd S rt - 2 Hav ho al R -12 - ford al R - T ord nua An - 2 Ha - An 201 Hav ol - por Hav l - A ort he cho ort he erfo erfo erfo he por erfo epo he erfo erfo erfo he por erfo epo he erfo erfo erfo he por erfo epo he e c p f t o v v T S nu 011 er nu 1-12 er An ol p v T e v T v T e v T o v v T v e T v v v v T d S Re e r e R l R 1 r v 2 - Ha Ha Ha 2 - l R Ha al 2 - Ha Ha Ha 2 - l R Ha al 2 - Ha Ha Ha 2 - l R Ha al R 2 - Ha po Th oo ort he ch l R he ho Re 2 o n 2 l av n - A rt - e H l - A t - 20 e Ha hool Sch l Re -12 - Sch Rep 12 - T ord S nua 12 - T rd Sc nual 011-1 verfo nua 011-1 The The The 011-1 nua The nnu 011-1 The The The 011-1 nnua The nnu 011-1 The The The 011-1 nua The nnu 011-1 The The po - Th hoo por Th Sc ord nua 011 ord ual 011- erf - An 011- rfo An t - 2 Ha - 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20 rd S rt - 2 Have rd S rd S rd S Have t - 20 rd S rt - 2 Hav o rt e r o v r v r o e t o e r r fo fo fo e fo o A fo fo fo fo a fo fo fo n n fo 2 fo fo fo e fo 01 - A rt - e H l - A t - 2 e Ha hool epo e Ha ool - epor - The Sch epo - Th aver aver aver - Th epo aver Rep - Th aver aver aver - Th Repo aver Rep - Th aver aver aver - The epo aver Rep - The aver aver aver - The epo aver l Rep - The ave c lR h h rd l R 2 h R 2 l a l R H al 2 H H H H H 2 al 2 lR H po Th oo or H 2 H al 2 H lR H H 2 H H H 2 H H 2 Re -12 - Sch Rep 12 - T ord S nua 12 - T d Sc nual 011-1 verfo nua 011-1 The The The 011-1 nua The nnu 011-1 The The The 011-1 nua The nnu 011-1 The The The 011-1 nua The nnu 011-1 The The The 011-1 nua The nnu 011-1 The The n n n n 1n 2 2 2 2 l 2 A 2 2 n -2 A 2 A d 11 a 1or n rf -A 2 20 erfor nnua - 201 ave ol - A - 201 verf l - A ort - e H ol - A ort 11-12 11-12 11-12 ort - ol - A 11-12 ool - ort - 11-12 11-12 11-12 ort - ol - A 11-12 ool - ort - 11-12 11-12 11-12 ort - ol - A 11-12 ool - ort - 11-12 11-12 11-12 ort - ol - A 11-12 ool ort - 11-12 11-12 11-12 a oo p Th o ep 0 o o p 0 0 0 p ho 0 H h p 0 0 0 0 ep 0 ch 0 0 0 0 ep ho 0 ch ep 0 ch ep 0 0 0 ep ho v t t A Ha ool - epor The Sch epor he H Sch al Re -12 - Sch al R rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al R Sch rt - 2 rd S al R rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al R d Sc rt - 2 rd S al R rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al R d Sc rt - 2 rd Sc al Re rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al Re Sc rt - 2 rd S al Re rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al R o o o o o o o u o u o fo u o o T u r o o u o o u r o o o u o u rd o u u d o 11 rd R rd u o h R rd Sc ual 11-12 erfo ual 1-12 - erfor Ann - 20 erfo - Ann Rep Rep l Rep - Ann erfo Rep verf Ann l Rep Rep Rep Ann verfo Rep verf Ann l Rep l Rep Rep Ann erfo l Rep verf Ann l Rep l Rep l Rep Ann erfo l Rep aver Ann Rep l Rep l Rep - Ann erf nn - 20 Hav Ann 201 av ol - ort Hav ool ual ual ua ool Hav ual Ha ool - nua ual ual ol - Ha ual Ha ol - ua nua ual ol - Hav nua Ha ol - ua ua nua ol - Hav ua e H ol - ual ua ua ool Hav o A H ho ep h n p n rt e e e nn h lho e he ho nn nn n nn he h ho nn nn nn h nn nn nn h nn nn ho e nn ho e nn he ho nn n po Th oo ort he Sc l R he Sc - A - A - A Sc Th - A - T Sc - A - A - A Sc Th - A - T Sc - A - A - A Sc Th - A - T Sc - A - A - A Sc Th - A - T Sc - A - A - A Sc Th Re Re -12 - Sch Rep 12 - T ord nua 12 - T ford ool ool ool ford -12 - ool 11-12 ford hool ool ool ford -12 - ool 11-12 ford ool hool ool ford -12 - ool 11-12 ford ool ool hool ford -12 - ool 11-12 ford ool ool ool ford -12 - ual The 11 ord ual 011- erf - An 011- ver Sch Sch Sch ver 011 Sch 20 ver Sc Sch Sch ver 011 Sch 20 ver Sch Sc Sch ver 011 Sch 20 ver Sch Sch Sc ver 011 Sch 20 ver Sch Sch Sch ver 011 Ann 2 - S 0 v l 2 2 2 2 erf nn - 2 2 2 a a 2 a -1 Ha oo rt - e H ford ford ford e H rt - ford ort e Ha ford ford ford e Ha rt - ford ort Ha ford ford ford Ha rt - ford ort Ha ford ford ford Ha rt - ford ort Ha ford ford ford e H rt - ool - 011 ford v t A Ha ool - epor - The Sch epo - Th aver aver aver - Th epo aver Rep - Th aver aver aver - Th epo aver Rep - The aver aver aver - The epo aver Rep - The aver aver aver - The epo aver Rep - The aver aver aver - Th epo Sch rt - 2 aver Sch l 2 R H R H al 12 l 12 R l R R H o h l R -12 ford al R -12 l a l H H H a l H 2 H 2 H H d a H H l l H 2 H H H 2 d H 2 H H H 2 p 1 1 1 1 r c 1 S ua 011 er nu 011 he he he 011- nua he nnu 011- he he he 011- nua he nnu 011- he he he 011- nua he nnu 011- he he he 011-1 nua he The nu 11-1 he he TheSchool 11- ua rfo Re he for ho n -T A n -T A n - T - An - 20Haverford 2 -T -T -T 2 n -T A 2 2 2 -T -T -T 2 -T -T -T 2 -T -T -T 2 - T 2 - T 2 - t - 20 - Ann ave ual 2 - T aver d Sc d av n nn 2 2 t 1 n 1 r 1 r 1 - A ort - e H ol - A ort - 11-12 11-12 11-12 ort - ol - A 11-12 ool - ort - 11-12 11-12 11-12 ort - ol - A 11-12 ool - ort - 11-12 11-12 11-12 ort - ol - A 11-12 ool - ort - 11-12 11-12 11-12 ort - ol - A 11-12 ool A r l H r H 1 1 n 1 h o e o 0 p 0 o po 2011-12 p h p o rfo rfo p h p oo he - A 01 o p h p 0 0 0 p 0 h po nn 0 0 01 0 0 p 0 01 Report 0 0 0 011ual 0 0 Re 12 - T Sch al Re rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al Re Sch rt - 2 d Sc al Re rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al Re Sch t - 2 d Sc al Re rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al Re Sch rt - 2 d Sc al Re rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 l Re Sch rt - 2 rd Sc l Re rt - 2 rt - 2 rt - 2 al Re Sch - T ool rt - 2 - Th ave Have 2 - T r 2 H a - rd r a r 2 r d d d h 1 d d 1 1 1 o o o o o o o o u o u o u o o u r o o u o o o u r o o o u o u r o u u r o 1 r o c e e 1 20 erfo - Ann Rep Rep l Rep Ann erfo Rep verf Ann l Rep Rep Rep Ann erfo Rep verf Ann l Rep l Rep Rep Ann erfo l Rep verf Ann Rep l Rep l Rep Ann erfo l Rep verf Ann Rep Rep l Rep - Ann erfo 2011 rd S l Rep 2011 - Th - Th 201 An a a ll a lv v al a v o a a a a l a a a l la lav al al al al lav a al 2 al al al lav a

The Haverford School

Annual Report

2011-2012

Please note that the Annual Report is available only to the School community in print and via a secure online link. The Annual Report is not included in this publicly available PDF.

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Thanksgiving Events

Upcoming Alumni Events » OCT

Washington, DC

25 Regional Reception

6-9 p.m. @ Old Ebbitt Grill

NOV

Young Alumni EA Day

9 Pre-Game Bash

7-9 p.m. @ Yangming

NOV

10

If you’re in town for the holiday weekend, join fellow alumni, friends, and family for these annual Haverford School Thanksgiving events:

Wednesday, Nov. 21

NOV

15

Notables Reunion Concert Centennial Hall | 7 p.m.

Young Alumni Can Drive with The Agnes Irwin School Merion Cricket Club Ballroom | 9-11:30 p.m.

NOV

5-7 p.m. @ Buckley Pavilion Please contact Jamie Griffin for details: jgriffin@haverford.org. Visit www.haverford.org/alumni for more information about the event.

Notables Reunion Concert

Young Alumni Can Drive with The Agnes Irwin School 9–11:30 p.m. @ Merion Cricket Club Ballroom NOV

Thanksgiving breakfast with

22 soccer and football

9 a.m. @ The Dining Hall DEC

Questions? Contact Andrew Bailey ’02 at 484-417-2791 or email abailey@haverford.org.

Wrestling Banquest

7 p.m. @ Centennial Hall

Athletic ability is not required, but be sure to wear your maroon and gold! Haverford Dining Hall | 9 a.m. Sports | 10 a.m.

7:30-10:30 a.m. – Pancake Breakfast 9 a.m. – Golf 10 a.m. – Cross-country 11 a.m. – Water Polo Noon – Soccer 1:30 p.m. – Football Visit www.haverford.org/eaday for more information about the event.

21 and Michael Stairs Tribute

Thursday, Nov. 22 Thanksgiving Breakfast with Soccer and Football

EA Day at Haverford

2

DEC

Chicago Regional Reception 11 a.m. @ Shaw’s Crab House

Annual Alumni Ice Hockey

23 game vs. EA Alumni

6 p.m. @ Skatium in Havertown

JAN

1

See you there!

Alumni Varsity Squash Match

Time TBA @ The Haverford School Field House, Squash Courts

Stay tuned for more events and further details in the monthly eNews!


sport some new

maroon & gold! Support the HSPA Spirit Gear Sale or visit the FORDS Store to view the latest Maroon & Gold apparel! GO FORDS!

Online at:

www.haverford.org/fordsstore

FORDSStore


HAVERFORD S C H O O L To d a y

Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage

450 Lancaster Ave., Haverford, PA 19041

Wayne, PA Permit No. 1080

Change service requested

PAID


Haverford School Today Fall 2012