Page 1

THE HAVEN

FAC I L I T I E S MASTERPLAN FULL REPORT


PREPARED FOR THE HAVEN BY ARCHITRAVE ARCHITECTURE + TOPOGRAPHICS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE NOVEMBER 2014


t a bl e o f c o n t e n t s PART 3

APPENDICES

PART 1

FOUNDATIONS

FOREWORD

5

A

SCENARIOS

20

INTRODUCTION

6

B

SITE INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

21

GUIDING PRINCIPLES

7

C

DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

32

D

BUILDING FRAMEWORK

35

E

OPEN SPACE FRAMEWORK

42

F

INFRASTRUCTURE FRAMEWORK

44

G

MASTERPLAN DIAGRAMS

48

H

PHASING (tourist accommodation units)

51

I

MASTERPLAN STATISTICS

53

J

FIRE RISK MANAGEMENT

55

K

CLIMATE CHANGE RESILIENCY

58

L

IMPLEMENTATION + COST ESTIMATES

60

M

EXISTING BUILDING ANALYSIS

67

O

COST REVIEW

96

P

FLOOD CONSTRUCTION LEVEL REVIEW

102

Q

REFERENCES

104

PART 2

FACILITIES MASTERPLAN VISION PLAN

10

PHASING PLANS

12


Part 1

Foundations


FOREWORD The Haven Facilities Masterplan is the most comprehensive planning project ever undertaken in our 30-year history. The intention of the Masterplan is simple: to have the facilities at The Haven match the high quality of the programs and faculty who lead them. The Haven’s founders, Bennet Wong and Jock McKeen, created an organizational structure which ensured that The Haven and its important work would continue after they had retired. The Masterplan ensures that the buildings that house and contain this work, as well as the beautiful open space which surrounds them, also have a plan for the future. Underpinning the Masterplan are the Guiding Principles, which can be found on page 7 of this report. The Guiding Principles capture the broad intentions for the ongoing development of The Haven and were developed from input received during the planning process. There exists a strong connection between the Masterplan Guiding Principles and the decision making process that our founders used as The Haven was growing. Ben and Jock chose locations for buildings which required as little tree removal as possible: the Guiding Principles include the objective “design to minimize the removal of healthy trees”. Even during the 10 year period when the majority of the new buildings at The Haven were constructed, programs continued to be offered: one of the Guiding Principles is that the Masterplan should be ‘Phase-able’ and “undertake development projects in a manner that minimizes disruption and builds momentum”.

The Masterplan has required us to learn everything we need to know about the property and its infrastructure. The Haven grew organically, with buildings constructed when there were sufficient funds available. In order to continue to be sustainable, a needs-based, facilities Masterplan is now required to provide a larger context by which to better guide strategic investments in site infrastructure and selected existing buildings, as well as identifying needs best accomplished through new construction. The Masterplan represents the best collective wisdom and vision for the institution and will serve as a road map for site development, infrastructure, landscape, building renovation and new construction. Any plan of this kind needs to be supported and delivered by an exemplary team. I have been very fortunate to be joined by Bryan Croeni (M.Arch, MA) as Project Manager for the Masterplan. During his tenure as a Director of the Haven Foundation Board and beyond, Bryan has generously offered his many years of experience and his deep understanding of The Haven in service of this most important project. Whenever possible at The Haven, we try to work with Gabriola businesses, as part of our support for the local economy. Architrave and Topographics are two Gabriola companies with expertise and skill far beyond what might be expected to be found on a small Gulf Island. Bryan and I interviewed them separately and were delighted to discover that their preference was to work together as a team. In true Haven fashion,Vince Iameo, Cameron

Murray and Megan Walker have used open communication as a way to navigate through a complicated project. The result, which can been seen in this report, is outstanding and far exceeds my initial expectations. I also appreciate the generous donors who have combined their vision for the future of The Haven with ours and, through their financial support, enabled us to move faster on the Masterplan than originally anticipated. Thank you to David Beckwermert, Chriss Corbett, Mark and Sandy Gunderson, Shana Johnston and Dave Goossen, Laurie Kelley and Scott Poole, Al Schultz and Leona Kolla, and Anna Weiers. A final thanks to the staff, board and faculty of The Haven, as well as the many people who stepped forward and contributed to during the consultation phases of the Masterplan. You have provided input and enthusiastic support for what is required for The Haven to continue in perpetuity. Here’s to the future of The Haven!

Rachel Davey, Executive Director

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INTRODUCTION

STRATEGIC MASTER PLAN This Facilities Masterplan was first proposed in The Haven’s 2010-15 Strategic Plan. The Strategic Plan laid the groundwork by including the following assumptions for The Haven’s Gabriola Island property: to operate indefinitely, and in the current location; to be financially and environmentally sustainable; to increase capacity as well as operational efficiency; and to better support participants, staff, and faculty through facility improvements. The Strategic Plan further recognized that a comprehensive Facilities Masterplan was needed to ensure that site improvements were considered holistically and strategically. SITE PLANNING HISTORY The Haven’s Gabriola Island property currently reflects its historically incremental approach to site planning. When the property was purchased by Bennett Wong and Jock McKeen in 1983, it came with a number of buildings that had been built during its time as the Taylor Bay Lodge, a fishing and vacation resort. As The Haven’s programs evolved and expanded, the founders rapidly constructed additions, new buildings and infrastructure to meet growing needs. Decisions were generally made one building or one problem-solving effort at a time. While many forward-thinking decisions (such as an investment in foundation cisterns) have served The Haven well, other decisions have proven problematic. Additionally, some 30 years later, the existing facilities are aging and in need of upgrades and improvements. For the past decade, 6

The Haven was unable to implement any major improvement work due to a lack of clarity with zoning bylaws, which was finally resolved in 2012. The Haven now wishes to move forward with site improvements using a new approach - comprehensive, strategic, reflective of lessons learned, and aspirational for the future. PURPOSE OF THE FACILITIES MASTER PLAN The Facilities Masterplan represents the best collective wisdom and vision for The Haven. It serves as a road map for site development, infrastructure, landscape, building renovation and new construction. It is grounded in a deep understanding of the beautiful property, and energized by a commitment to best support The Haven’s mission. It captures the intentions for managing and developing the physical site in a manner congruent with The Haven’s vision, mission, values, philosophy, purpose and teaching principles. It considers all aspects of sustainability - environmental stewardship, financial stability, and social vibrancy. It is a vision for the very best physical expression of Haven values, and of an environment that supports its work in the world. This planning effort was begun with a 25 year horizon mandate. It is likely that the Plan’s full vision may take longer than that to realize. It is also expected that assumptions and realities will change over this long a timeline, and the Plan will need to flex and evolve. This document captures the best thinking at this time, and, as importantly, the

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Participants at the Dream Big Workshop

Presentation of 3 alternative scenarios at The Haven’s 30th Birthday Party Celebrations

Dream Big summary diagrams

knowledge, assumptions and values behind these decisions, laying the groundwork for adaptability.

The process began with a series of “Dream Big” workshops, where the answer to every idea was Yes! The collective positivity and creativity was inspiring. Many common themes and values emerged and have been integrated into the Plan and its Guiding Principles. The full account of this effort can be found in the Dream Big Report, which can be downloaded at www.haven.ca/about-us/ facilities-masterplan.html. Three scenarios were then developed to study ideas, and presented for feedback. The scenarios can be found in Appendix A of the Facilities Masterplan Full Report. The final Facilities

THE PLANNING PROCESS The Haven also approached the planning process through their values and teachings. The Planning Team strives to engage, listen and integrate the collective wisdom of the broad Haven community - staff, faculty, past and potential participants, the Board of Directors, and the Gabriola Island community.

Masterplan reflects all that was learned through the feedback, study, and research process. With the assistance of the Masterplan team, an extensive effort was launched into a site and building inventory and analysis process. More is known now than ever before, which makes the plan more grounded in reality, as well as easier to adapt as needed. The inventory and analysis materials can be found in the Appendices of the full report.


GUIDING PRINCIPLES GUIDING PRINCIPLES The Guiding Principles for the Facilities Masterplan were developed from input received throughout the planning process. They capture the broad intentions for management and development of the Gabriola Island property. They are a foundation for every site decision, and can provide guidance for any future evolution of the Plan.

Sustainability

Phase-able

Environmental Sustainability Objectives: • Act as stewards of the site and island ecosystems, minimizing disturbance, monitoring health, and celebrating the natural setting. • Design to minimize the removal of healthy trees, particularly those designated as “Significant” by the Vegetation Management Plan. • Acknowledge the planet’s changing climate, and that adaptive management strategies are needed. • Strive for Net Zero Water. Design, renovate, and operate to minimize water usage. Maximize opportunities to collect and store rainwater as the most promising source of reliable, low-cost, lowecological impact water. • Incorporate on-site food production, while adopting a Gabriola Island scale approach to increasing local food self-sufficiency. • Design to minimize energy usage, and increase on-site renewable energy production.

Objectives:

Economic Sustainability Objectives: • Use a life-cycle cost-benefit approach to guide expenditure decisions. • Support the wider Gabriola Island economy by hiring and sourcing locally when possible, minimizing competition with other local businesses, and encouraging local tourism. • Implement facility improvements that attract participants while improving operational efficiencies.

Objectives: • Use local materials and design vernacular. • Establish a strong connection to the natural environment, creating building and landscape design that flows from indoor to outdoor spaces, enhancing pathways and destination spaces, connecting to local trails, and considering the weather and seasons. • Maximize opportunities for viewing and enjoying both the forest and ocean views. • Honour elements of history. • Encourage and retain a touch of whimsy, and opportunities for creative expression by individuals or program groups.

Support long-term vitality of The Haven on Gabriola Island, by protecting the environment, ensuring financial self-sufficiency, and strengthening community.

Community Sustainability Objectives: • Create interior and exterior places for connecting as community. • Strengthen connections with the wider Gabriola Island community by considering the broader environmental, economic, and cultural implications of decisions. • Acknowledge the value of loyal staff and faculty by providing healthy and comfortable work environment.

Undertake development projects in a manner that minimizes disruption and builds momentum. • • • • •

Create flexible spaces in early phases that can hold a variety of uses on a temporary basis while new facilities are constructed. Phase projects so ideally replacement facilities are constructed before any are removed. Phase and design projects for minimum construction disruption. Phase and design projects to build excitement, inspire donations, and celebrate transformation. Implement each phase leaving a complete, functioning facility, in case future phases are delayed.

A Sense of Place

Capitalize on the spectacular natural setting, enhanced through beautiful design, in creating a setting for memorable & iconic experiences.

Openness and Accessibility

Ensure maximum accessibility to as many people as possible.

Place Supports Program

Recognize that the programs are the core of The Haven, and create spaces that support and enhance the experiences people come here for. Objectives: • Create transitional spaces / walkways between session rooms and communal gathering areas, supporting that energetic transition. The whole site should support the program experience. • Create both big and small session rooms that allow for visual and auditory privacy, inspire transformation, and accommodate a variety of exercises. • Create spaces for reflection, solitude, and intimate connection, as well as spaces for gathering, celebrating, and energizing as a community. • Enhance opportunities for exercise and physical experience. • Create spaces for all ages and abilities, including children, teens, seniors, and less able-bodied. • Include elements that inspire delight, offer comfort, and uplift the spirit. • Situate guest accommodation and services, and program spaces in the most attractive sites.

Objectives: • Design program spaces, pathways, accommodation, amenities for all age groups & abilities. • Design to create a sense of welcome and openness. • Incorporate openness in the master planning and implementation processes, by clarifying and sharing the criteria by which decisions are made, and allowing for input by those impacted by decisions • Increase connections with the Gabriola community, by inviting shared use of the grounds and amenities, where appropriate. • Include a diversity of guest accommodation price-point options. • As an educational facility, incorporate demonstrative and interpretive elements in building and site design.

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Part 2

Facilities Masterplan


VISION PLAN

a

legend

l eag e nd taylor

VISION PLAN This plan illustrates the long-term vision for The Haven’s site and facilities. At full build-out the site is transformed into a comprehensive campus, a balanced whole composed of a series of well crafted spaces and experiences.

m

10

n

h

ORGANIZING FRAMEWORKS The site reorientates around two central organizing forms - the Circle Meadow and the Sunset Meadow, connected along a central axis that opens the view to the water. Covered pathways, courtyards and dining terraces extend the gathering spaces outside, and allow for year round connection to the spectacular natural setting. Buildings are clustered on the site, increasing operational efficiency and ease of access while retaining larger areas of forest. Drought tolerant gardens, accessible walking paths, green roofs, open meadows, and waterfront restoration further enhance the landscape experience and ecological health of the site. (See Appendix E-Open Space Framework). Oceanview buildings step back and up from the waterfront edge and potential affects of sea-level rise, as well as creating waterfront open spaces that can be shared by all. TWIN LODGES Two new Lodge buildings frame the central axis and water view. These two buildings are envisioned as a part of a consolidated “core” of the development programme. With facilities for most essential uses (accommodation, guest amenities, session rooms) included in these two buildings, most other buildings can be shut-down during times of lower capacity. In effect, they act as

a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w

p i b

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bay b cottages taylor bay cottages c accommodation accommodation d meadow / septic meadow / septic e courtyard courtyard / parking/ parking lodge b f lodge b thunderbird dorms g thunderbird dorms sunset meadow dining terrace meadow h sunset courtyard i dining terrace circle meadow / septic j courtyard labyrinth / septic building faculty k circle meadow / septic meadow / septic l labyrinth / septic lodge a new building mstaff faculty building registration parking n meadow / septic heron o lodge a phoenix guest p parking new staff building storage q parking arrivalregistration circle davis road r heron s phoenix t guest parking u storage v arrival circle

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e l

d g

Facilities Masterplan

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N 6 June 2014

ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS

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the “lungs” of The Haven’s facilities, allowing for expansion and contraction in response to seasonal need, and thereby improving operational efficiency (see Appendix G Masterplan Diagrams). Iconic, sustainable architecture will elevate the facilities to the same level as the programs, and promote the centre as a world-class institution (see Appendix D - Building Framework). Lodge A replaces many of the facilities in the existing lodge, including a waterfront view dining area, food service, kitchen areas, front desk, and gift shop, Upstairs are a mix of accommodation room types, and a well soundproofed and spatially separated medium size session room with accompanying lounge. Lodge B replaces many of the facilities in the existing Orca building. On the ground floor, a Bodywork Centre creates a calm and special environment to support The Haven’s bodywork program. A games room and lounge allow for casual, fun interaction. A gym and indoor swimming pool encourages year-round exercise. Situated on its own elevated view deck, the hot-tub shares changing/shower facilities with the gym. Fully soundproofed, a second Heron sized session room would also be on the ground floor, with its own separate entry from the Circle Meadow and covered colonnade. Upstairs offers a variety of accommodation room types and price-points. The main floor levels of the two lodges are raised to the same level as the circle meadow (the existing central septic field), allowing for open flow to this central gathering space, and improved accessibility. A series of courtyards, accessible ramps, steps, and dining terraces step down to the oceanfront Sunset Meadow.

ARRIVAL The guest arrival experience is transformed. From the Arrival Circle drop-off area, guests are welcomed by the main entry of Lodge A, framed by existing trees and gateway gardens. New parking areas move cars out of the central zone. Guests park in shortterm parking while registering, then move their car in one of two main lots located on the edges of the site. A Welcome Walk leads guests from the Wong and McKeen Phoenix Auditorium parking lot to the a small terrace at the edge of the Circle Meadow, where a guest will first view the Salish Sea, framed by the twin Lodges. SESSION ROOMS The session rooms are the heart and soul of the campus, and the whole site will support those spaces. Existing session rooms in Heron and Phoenix are improved with additional soundproofing, accessibility features, landscaping and entry spaces. New session rooms, fully soundproofed and accessible, and in a variety of sizes, are located in the core buildings of Lodge A, Lodge B, and the Faculty Building. Transitional spaces between the session rooms and the social spaces in the Lodges are carefully considered. ACCOMMODATION Accommodation is upgraded and guest capacity increased within the existing zoning restrictions by optimizing a mix of small scale, affordable, private and shared rooms, as well as premium rooms with ocean views. More beds are also available in shared dorm rooms, located in the renovated Thunderbird building as well as in the core building of Lodge B, which offer a very affordable accommodation option. Additional guest capacity is maximized by replacing the Sandpiper and Seagull buildings with optimally designed cottages with a greater number of smaller bedrooms, and upgrading

View of the Arrival Circle from Davis Road

View of Lodge A from the Arrival Circle T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N

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family and ocean-view accommodation options. The number of rooms accessible for those of low mobility is increased. Ground floor rooms are available in the cottages and accommodation building (“C” on the Vision Plan). An elevator in Lodge A makes the rooms on its second floor accessible. FACULTY + STAFF FACILITIES Swallow is replaced by a two storey staff building (administration above maintenance), universally accessible via a bridge to Lodge A’s elevator. A new Faculty Building provides a centre to support the program leaders, assistants, and interns. Ocean view faculty accommodation, accessible and soundproofed meeting rooms and small session rooms, and a 24 hour quiet room/ library / meditation space overlooking a quiet garden and Taylor Bay will make this a very special core building. INFRASTRUCTURE Necessary infrastructure upgrades and improvements are carefully integrated into the site plan. The primary septic field is retained, and re-purposed as a central feature, the Circle Meadow. Failing septic fields are replaced with an innovative drip dispersal field, which can wind through the trees in the forest, with no new tree removal. Electrical needs are met by upgrading to Phase 3 power. New and expanded sources of potable water are being explored, with roof rainwater harvesting and foundation cistern storage integrated into all buildings. Stormwater falling on the rest of the site will be channeled into vegetated swales and other bio-engineering features, cleansing the water as it percolates towards the ocean.

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The twin lodges frame the ocean view and Centre Courtyard, as seen from the Circle Meadow

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PHASING

Phase 1 - The Front Door + Entrance Circle

PHASE 1 _ Front Door Phase 1 - Development Programme Session and Meeting Rooms Type

1 2 3 4 3

1 1 3 (4) 0 (3) 1 (3)

0 1 0 4 2

Red text = below goal

Accommodation - Tourist Accommodation Units (TAU)

A

B E

Goal (TAU)

Phase Total (TAU)

Phase Total (beds****)

Standard*

18 (60%)

13

35

Dorms**

6 (20%)

7

44

Higher-end ***

6 (20%)

10

26

30

105

5 beds

NA

5

15 (50%)

12

15 (50%)

13

Type

Total Guest Accommodation

D

C

Faculty beds Low-mobility access (no flights of stairs) Family friendly units (connectable rooms, multiple beds, suites)

*Standard rooms. Existing private basic rooms and forestview rooms counted as standard. **Dorms. Existing Heron shared rooms counted as dorms. *** Higher-end. Existing oceanview units counted as higher-end units. ****Includes sofa-beds.

A_ Arrival Circle, Parking, Gateway Gardens

Soundproofing this building improves the proximity of accommodation to session rooms, as well as minimizing the disruptive impacts of future construction phases on programs. Facade improvements make the east facing side of the building an attractive backdrop to the arrival experience.

Additional Needed

* Count of accessible, functional, zoning compliant rooms. (#) includes existing sub-standard rooms.

PHASE 1 The proposed Phase 1 begins at the “front door” of the facility, setting the tone for improvements, laying the stage for future phases, and demonstrating The Haven’s commitment to sustainable operations and facility renewal.

B_ Heron Improvements

Phase Total*

Auditorium Large session (~1200sf) Medium session (~750sf) Small session (~300sf) Meeting room (~250sf)

PHASING PLAN One of the guiding principles of the Plan is that it be “phase-able”, for funding, disruption, and priority reasons. With so many variables to consider, the phasing plan proposed below is only one of many possible build-out sequences. Each project phase will need to consider fundraising, long-term investment versus available funds, interim spaces, infrastructure upgrades, and many other factors in determining project scope.

This series of projects starts the transformation of the site arrival experience. At the terminus of Davis Road, a turnaround circle and drop-off zone welcomes guests. A new parking lot adjacent to the Wong and McKeen Phoenix Auditorium locates vehicles away from the center of the site, and frees up this area for Lodge A. Installation of phase 3 power will also upgrade the electrical system in anticipation of growth and reducing existing risks.

Goal

Cistern Storage

A B C

Arrival circle, parking, gateway gardens Heron improvements Phoenix improvements

C_ The Wong and McKeen Phoenix Auditorium Improvements

An entry addition to Phoenix from the relocated parking lot emphasizes its community importance, as well as adding storage and circulation improvements. D_ Thunderbird improvements

Thunderbird is renovated as shared rooms with bunk bed facilities, increasing the bedcount on the TCI property and increasing

D E

Current Estimated Need* (US Gal)

Thunderbird improvements Sanitary disposal field

Potable Water

300,000

Non-Potable Water

243,750

the accommodation options available at a lower price point Fire suppression improvements will also be required. E_ Sanitary Disposal Field

The failing Sandpiper field is replaced with an innovative drip disposal system winding through existing trees. The Swallow field is also decommissioned and consolidated with the new field, reducing maintenance costs. The new field will be built with enough capacity to serve future build-out in this zone of the site.

Cistern Chapel treatment

5,000

Cistern Chapel

40,000

Thunderbird

50,000

Phoenix

100,000

Tank adjacent to Cistern Chapel

1200

Osprey tanks

2200

Heron tanks

6000

Reps tanks

2600

Raven tanks

2200

Eagleview tank

2000

Kingfisher tank Totals

Phase Storage Capacity (US Gal)

Additional Storage needed (US Gal)

2000 543,750

213,200

330,550

* Current storage needs calculated by Worley Parsons. While the guest capacity on the TCI site will increase over time, Havenhaus and Havenside are assumed to be removed from the TCI system. Therefore, for the purposes of the Masterplan, use needs are assumed constant. However storage needs will change based on use patterns, supply sources, and rates of yield and should be recalculated during project design phases.

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PHASE 2 This exciting phase will dramatically transform the facility.

Phase 2

Phase - Development Programme Session 2 and Meeting Rooms Type

The new lodge is constructed in the existing parking lot, at the same grade as the existing septic fields. Osprey is removed to transition units to the Lodge.

C

B A E D F

B_ Dining Terrace

The old lodge is removed, in a grand reveal of the expanded oceanfront landscape. The first phase of the dining / waterfront terraces is constructed. The design of these elements will need to carefully consider interim grade transitions to Orca and other buildings.

A new parking area is constructed for shortterm parking while registering, as well as The Haven shuttle.

1 2 3 4 3

1 1 3 2 2 (3)

0 1 0 2 1

* Count of accessible, functional, zoning compliant rooms. (#) includes existing sub-standard rooms. Red text = below goal

Accommodation - Tourist Accommodation Units (TAU) Goal (TAU)

Phase Total (TAU)

Standard*

18 (60%)

11

34

Dorms**

6 (20%)

7

44

Higher-end ***

6 (20%)

10

26

28

104

NA

5

Type

Faculty beds Low-mobility access (no flights of stairs) Family friendly units (connectable rooms, multiple beds, suites)

The Plan envisions a new staff building to be located in Swallow’s current location, and connected to Lodge A with a bridge, allowing for universal access to the second floor. While it will likely be most cost effective to construct this building in parallel with Lodge A, the Plan also considers an interim renovation to the upstairs of Swallow for administration use.

E_ Registration / short-term parking

Additional Needed

Total Guest Accommodation

C_ Swallow / Staff Building

The Lodge A portion of the Circle Meadow and Circle Path is constructed, creating attractive seating and walking spaces that flow from indoors to outdoors. A new ramp is constructed for Heron, transforming the existing 24 room to a more gracious session room entry, while enhancing the gateway garden experience.

Phase Total*

Auditorium Large session (~1200sf) Medium session (~750sf) Small session (~300sf) Meeting room (~250sf)

A_ Lodge A

D_ Circle Meadow

Goal

5 15 units (50%) 15 units (50%)

Phase Total (beds****)

13 14

*Standard rooms. Existing private basic rooms and forestview rooms counted as standard. **Dorms. Existing Heron shared rooms counted as dorms. *** Higher-end. Existing oceanview units counted as higher-end units. ****Includes sofa-beds.

Cistern Storage

A B C

Lodge A Dining Terrace Staff Building

D E F

Current Estimated Need* (US Gal)

Circle Meadow Registration / short-term parking

Potable Water

195,000 Lodge A

F_ Gateway Gardens

Preserving existing trees as gateway elements, a native enhanced garden with special entry paving, creates an attractive contemporary west-coast landscape to greet arriving guests. Totals

Additional Storage needed (US Gal)

240,000

Non-Potable Water

Gateway Gardens

Phase Storage Capacity (US Gal)

250,000

Cistern Chapel treatment

5,000

Cistern Chapel

40,000

Thunderbird

50,000

Phoenix

100,000

Tank adjacent to Cistern Chapel

1200

Raven tanks

2200

Eagleview tank

2000

Kingfisher tank

2000 435,000

452,400

-17,400

* Current storage needs calculated by Worley Parsons. While the guest capacity on the TCI site will increase over time, Havenhaus and Havenside are assumed to be removed from the TCI system. Therefore, for the purposes of the Masterplan, use needs are assumed constant. However storage needs will change based on use patterns, supply sources, and rates of yield and should be recalculated during project design phases.

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PHASE 3 The timing of this phase will depend on funding priorities, accommodation needs, and further infrastructure studies. It may occur after the Lodge B phase.

Phase 3

Phase 3 -Meeting Development Programme Session and Rooms Type

Goal

Phase Total*

Additional Needed

1 2 3 4 3

1 1 3 2 2 (3)

0 1 0 2 1

Auditorium Large session (~1200sf) Medium session (~750sf) Small session (~300sf) Meeting room (~250sf)

A_ Hotel Haven

A new accommodation focused building is constructed with 9 Tourist Accommodation Units, with a focus on family housing. Half the units will be on the ground floor, providing access to those with low-mobility.

* Count of accessible, functional, zoning compliant rooms. (#) includes existing sub-standard rooms. Red text = below goal

Accommodation - Tourist Accommodation Units (TAU)

C A

B_ Parking lot

A new parking area, with an allowance for fire-truck access and turn-around, is constructed to serve Hotel Haven, the future cottages, and Lodge B. More parking stalls will likely be required here than currently illustrated in the Plan.

Goal (TAU)

Phase Total (TAU)

Phase Total (beds****)

Standard/Private Rooms*

18 (60%)

10.5

26

Dorms/Shared Rooms**

6 (20%)

11.5

62

Higher-end ***

6 (20%)

6

14

28

102

NA

5

Type

Total Guest Accommodation

B

C

Faculty beds Low-mobility access (no flights of stairs) Family friendly units (connectable rooms, multiple beds, suites)

5 15 units (50%) 15 units (50%)

15 15

*Standard rooms. Existing private basic rooms and forestview rooms counted as standard.

C_ Removal of Kingfisher and Raven

**Dorms. Existing Heron shared rooms counted as dorms.

The Plan proposes Kingfisher and Raven be removed to relocate tourist accommodation units to Hotel Haven.

*** Higher-end. Existing oceanview units counted as higher-end units. ****Includes sofa-beds.

Cistern Storage Current Estimated Need* (US Gal) Potable Water

A B C

Removal of Kingfisher and Raven

195,000 Lodge A

Parking lot Totals

Additional Storage needed (US Gal)

240,000

Non-Potable Water

Hotel Haven

Phase Storage Capacity (US Gal)

250,000

Cistern Chapel treatment

5,000

Cistern Chapel

40,000

Thunderbird

50,000

Phoenix

100,000 435,000

445,000

-10,000

* Current storage needs calculated by Worley Parsons. While the guest capacity on the TCI site will increase over time, Havenhaus and Havenside are assumed to be removed from the TCI system. Therefore, for the purposes of the Masterplan, use needs are assumed constant. However storage needs will change based on use patterns, supply sources, and rates of yield and should be recalculated during project design phases.

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PHASE 4 A_ Lodge B

Phase 4

The focus of this phase is the construction of Lodge B. Lodge B replaces Orca as a centre for guest amenities, as well as providing a variety of accommodation options, including a focus on small private basics and shared rooms. Orca and Eagleview are removed for the new building and to free up tourist accommodation units. The Cistern Chapel could be removed at this time, opening the view to the water.

Phase 4 - Development Programme Session and Meeting Rooms Type

Goal

Phase Total*

Additional Needed

1 2 3 4 3

1 2 3 2 1

0 0 0 2 2

Auditorium Large session (~1200sf) Medium session (~750sf) Small session (~300sf) Meeting room (~250sf)

B

* Count of accessible, functional, zoning compliant rooms. (#) includes existing sub-standard rooms. Red text = below goal

Accommodation - Tourist Accommodation Units (TAU)

A

B_ Waterfront Terraces

The terraces are completed, creating grade transitions to the water, with steps, seating walls, ramps, and landscape gardens.

Goal (TAU)

Phase Total (TAU)

Phase Total (beds****)

Standard/Private room*

18 (60%)

11.5

32

Dorms/Shared rooms**

6 (20%)

14.5

72

Higher-end ***

6 (20%)

4

10

30

114

NA

0

Type

C

Total Guest Accommodation Faculty beds Low-mobility access (no flights of stairs) Family friendly units (connectable rooms, multiple beds, suites)

C_ Labyrinth

A labyrinth is suggested to be integrated into the gravel bed treatment area.

5 15 units (50%)

15 25

*Standard rooms. Existing private basic rooms and forestview rooms counted as standard. **Dorms. Existing Heron shared rooms counted as dorms. *** Higher-end. Existing oceanview units counted as higher-end units. ****Includes sofa-beds.

Cistern Storage

A B C

Current Estimated Need* (US Gal) Lodge B

Potable Water

Labyrinth Totals

Additional Storage needed (US Gal)

240,000

Non-Potable Water

Waterfront terraces

Phase Storage Capacity (US Gal)

195,000 Lodge A

250,000

Lodge B

200,000

Thunderbird

50,000

Phoenix

100,000 435,000

600,000

-165,000

* Current storage needs calculated by Worley Parsons. While the guest capacity on the TCI site will increase over time, Havenhaus and Havenside are assumed to be removed from the TCI system. Therefore, for the purposes of the Masterplan, use needs are assumed constant. However storage needs will change based on use patterns, supply sources, and rates of yield and should be recalculated during project design phases.

16

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N


PHASE 5 This phase could occur incrementally throughout the build-out of the Plan, and not necessarily as the final stages. The timing will depend on available funds, tourist accommodation units, and major repair needs for the older Seagull and Sandpiper cottages.

Phase 5

Phase 5 - Development Programme Session and Meeting Rooms Type

B

A_ Waterfront Cottages

Goal

Phase Total*

Additional Needed

1 2 3 4 3

1 2 3 4 3

0 0 0 0 0

Auditorium Large session (~1200sf) Medium session (~750sf) Small session (~300sf) Meeting room (~250sf)

* Count of accessible, functional, zoning compliant rooms. (#) includes existing sub-standard rooms.

Three or four new cottages are constructed with a focus on higher-end and family orientated accommodation. Sandpiper and Cormorant are removed.

A

B_ Faculty + Building

A new building is constructed for faculty accommodation, small session rooms, intern/meeting rooms, and a 24 hour quiet/ mediation/library room, all with waterfront views. Faculty accommodation does not count towards Tourist Accommodation Units, and therefore this building could happen anytime in the phasing process.

Red text = below goal

Accommodation - Tourist Accommodation Units (TAU) Goal (TAU)

Phase Total (TAU)

Phase Total (beds****)

Standard/Private room*

18 (60%)

11.5

32

Dorms/Shared rooms**

6 (20%)

14.5

72

Higher-end ***

6 (20%)

4

24

30

128

NA

5+

Type

Total Guest Accommodation Faculty beds Low-mobility access (no flights of stairs) Family friendly units (connectable rooms, multiple beds, suites)

5 15 units (50%) 15 units (50%)

15 15

*Standard rooms. Existing private basic rooms and forestview rooms counted as standard. **Dorms. Existing Heron shared rooms counted as dorms. ` ****Includes sofa-beds.

Cistern Storage Current Estimated Need* (US Gal) Potable Water

A B

Faculty + Building Totals

Additional Storage needed (US Gal)

240,000

Non-Potable Water

Waterfront Cottages

Phase Storage Capacity (US Gal)

195,000 Lodge A

250,000

Lodge B

200,000

Thunderbird

50,000

Phoenix

100,000 435,000

600,000

-165,000

* Current storage needs calculated by Worley Parsons. While the guest capacity on the TCI site will increase over time, Havenhaus and Havenside are assumed to be removed from the TCI system. Therefore, for the purposes of the Masterplan, use needs are assumed constant. However storage needs will change based on use patterns, supply sources, and rates of yield and should be recalculated during project design phases.

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N

17


Part 23

FacilitiesAppendices Masterplan


Appendix A | Scenarios SCENARIOS During the Scenario phase, three different directions were developed to explore alternative concepts for the Masterplan. These were presented for feedback at The Haven’s 30th birthday party celebrations, and lessons learned were consolidated into the Vision Plan.

SCENARIO A | The Village The Village concept started with the premise of minimal change, re-using and adapting existing facilities. The central concept for the Lodge was to build a new building in the existing parking area, and also to renovate the existing Lodge, as an open dining and flexible gathering space. New dormitory and session room buildings were added, and other buildings were designated as renovated. In general, this scenario received less support than the others. Elements that were appreciated were a respect for The Haven’s existing facilities and the eclectic, organic layout.

SCENARIO B | The Hub The Hub concept explored the premise of consolidation of the accommodation and amenity program areas into a central “hub”, with the session room buildings as “jewels in the forest”, accessed by a series of pathways, each with its own theme (mind, body, and spirit). The Lodge was envisioned as a two phase construction. Part A would be built where Cormorant currently exists, then the existing Lodge would be removed, and Part B would be constructed. This option also brought the central drop off zone deeper into the site, and with a clear view of the water at the point of arrival. A Living Machine building would treat wastewater and be a demonstrative feature to the site entry.

This concept for the Lodge was not preferred, due to the lack of connection to the water for the new building, and the cost and impracticality of renovating the existing Lodge building.

Positive feedback was received about all of these ideas. Ideas that were questioned included round session room buildings, and lack of vehicular access throughout the site. In the scenario evaluation process, it was determined that this lodge replacement concept would be too challenging in phasing logistics and capacity. The Living Machine waste treatment system was also ruled out due to the capital and maintenance costs, combined with the current regulatory requirement to retain large areas for dispersal.

20

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

SCENARIO C | Water The Water scenario envisioned a rainwater harvesting pond as central feature. The pond also created an attractive internal view, especially at the point of arrival. A meditative pathway circled the pond and provided a transitional space between the session room buildings in the forest and the central lodge buildings. The lodge was conceived as a two building center, Phase A and B, framing a central courtyard, with a waterfront terrace/ amphitheater stepping down to an open waterfront lawn. Phase A would host the same program as the existing Lodge. Lodge B would hold a bodywork center and guest amenities such as the pool, hot-tub, and gym. A Living Machine building would treat waste. Accommodation was clustered in waterfront cottages. Feedback was positive on many of these ideas. People also liked the circle forms, as reflective of The Haven’s process and Chinese medicine. The Masterplan has not carried forward with the rainwater harvesting pond idea due to current regulatory restrictions on its use for potable water, and insufficient need for additional non-potable water supply. The existing central septic fields are also being retained.


e,

ra. e

Snuneymuxw First Nation. These Coast Salish people have lived on Gabriola for over 3,000 years and have left more than 100 archaeological sites including shell middens, petroglyphs and burial sites.

Historic Context First Nations

Gabriola Island part site of the Some say The is Haven was traditional of the once usedterritory for peace-making Snuneymuxw gatherings. First Nation. These Coast Salish people have lived on Gabriola for over 3,000 years and have left more than 100 archaeological sites including shell middens, petroglyphs DISCOVERY PROCESS and burial sites.

The lodge, Raven, and the Seagull and Sandpiper cabins are original to this era. The lodge and Raven have had multiple additions over the years.

First Nations Considerable site inventory, research and Haven by the Sea analysis was done during the planning

Haven by the Sea

A fishing and recreational retreat lodge, built probably in the 1930s and '40s.

worn footpath amongst Haven Lot's significant trees

The lodge, Raven, and the Seagull and Sandpiper cabins are original to this era. The lodge and Raven have had multiple additions over the years.

Ben and Jock purchased the property in 1983, and began a very active Monotropa or the coastal fir forest the first nations "pathfinder perioduniflora, of construction that lasted into plant" , Adenocaulon Indian Pipe, an indicator theofearly species good soil 1990's. health bicolor worn footpath amongst Haven Lot's significant trees

eelgrass grows throughout Taylor Bay Monotropa uniflora, or Indian Pipe, an indicator species of good soil health

many birds feed and nest on the property and shoreline the coastal fir forest

deer and other animals move freely through the property

the first nations "pathfinder plant" , Adenocaulon bicolor

The Cultural & Experiential Landscape Until it was purchased by Ben Wong and Site Planning Considerations Cultural + Experiential Landscape The Cultural & Experiential Landscape Taylor Bay Lodge by the Sea Jock McKeen in 1983, the site was usedHaven for

Gabriola Island isare part of the Benprocess and Jock purchased the property to ensure made with once used for decisions peace-making in 1983, beganterritory a very At active gatherings. traditional ofsame the the bestand information possible. the period of construction that Nation. lasted time, data was not alwaysFirst available or cost-intoThese Snuneymuxw theeffective early 1990's. to obtain, and some assumptions Some say The Haven site was

Coast needed to beSalish made. A people summary ofhave what lived on was learned is captured in this report. Gabriola for over 3,000 years and Supporting documents and additional detail have left more than 100 files are stored securely at The Haven. Some petroglyphs can be found archaeological sites including shell hardcopy information is also available in the throughout Gabriola Administration middens,files. petroglyphs and burial

reducing high buildings.

Appendix B | Site Inventory and Analysis

Taylor Bay Lodge

SITE INVENTORY + ANALYSIS

Historic Context

period of construction that lasted into the early 1990's.

eelgrass grows throughout Taylor Bay

The forest, the shoreline, and open lawn/gardens are decades as a fishing and vacation resort, The A fishing and recreational retreat lodge, Ben and Jock purchased the property the three primary landscapes of the site. Each offers a Taylor Bay Lodge. Seagull, Sandpiper, and and '40s. built probably in the 1930s parts of The Lodge, Swallow and Ravenin are1983, and began a very active distinct experience. original to that era, although most haveperiod been of construction that lastedTheinto impressive ocean views are limited by the expanded and renovated many times over placement of the lodge and cistern chapel. The lodge, Raven, andthethe Seagull and the early 1990's. years. Some may consider memorials, especially those that Sandpiper cabins are original to this era. are "fixed" (such as trees), or locations of ashes, as The 1980’s andmultiple 90’s were a time of The lodge and Raven have had sacred, and requiring preservation in perpetuity. tremendous growth and construction for additions over the years. The Haven. Heron, Kingfisher, The Wong and Other gardens and fixed features are assumed to be

sites.

SITE HISTORY Historic photos from the Taylor Bay Lodge era The Haven’s site is part of the traditional territory of the First Nation. Some saySnuneymuxw The Haven site was There is evidence of human settlement on oncefor used petroglyphs can be foundfor Gabriola thousands of peace-making years. Legend has throughout Gabriola it that The Haven site was once used for gatherings. peace-making gatherings. an early pioneer Taylor Bay is named after

considered with varying degrees of attachment, permanence, significance, and investment.

McKeen Phoenix Auditorium, Thunderbird, Cormorant, Orca, Osprey and Eagleview were all constructed during this time to support the expanding programs.

The central feature of the site is currently the main parking lot. The arrival sequence can be confusing and is blocked from the water view.

Very little major improvement or construction has happened since that period of growth, in part due to a lack of clarity in Ben and Jock, pioneers of zoning compliance, which is nowanother resolved. kind

Art features can be found throughout the site. The assumption is that most pieces could be sensitively relocated if justified by development goals.

many bird the prope

Site Plan

The forest, t the three pr distinct expe

The impress placement o

Some may co are "fixed" (s sacred, and r

Other garde considered w permanence

The central parking lot. T is blocked fr

Art features assumption i relocated if j

THE CULTURAL + EXPERIENTIAL LANDSCAPE This special property offers three primary Site Planning Considerations landscape experiences - the shade and Ben and Jock, pioneers of another kind Theopenness Haven is accessible by the new Gabriola Island enclosure of the forest, the and busand service! tended quality of the lawns gardens,Many and people come to the island without a car, which the dynamic appeal of the water’s edge.helps keep parking needs down.

Island Context an early pioneer Taylor Bay is named after

Island Context

the gnome garden

Walking Galleries a common The and~ openness, tended Peterson memorial the to burnthe area Malaspina Mandarin phase is garden the shoreline ~ open views, forest ~shaded, quiet, shaded, lawnopenness and gardens The open views, tide tide Thethequiet, Athe Chinese garden, The Joann western facing water view makes the gnome garden Joann Peterson burn area and the Mandarin phase thewhimsy, shoreline garden pools, &memorial slippery enclosed, andprotected protected. for, colorful, caredgarden Site Considerations activity. ItPlanning isThe not, however, very clear to get nature of the lawns and ~ open views, tide pools, and slipperyrocks! rocks theenclosed created by participantshow garden pools, & slippery rocks! and gathering areas. Haven one of the best sunset viewing spots gardens environment of the forest there, and sometimes trespassing can occurof the shoreline on the island. Unfortunately, the view is is accessible by the new Gabriola Island The Haven inadvertently. bus service! blocked from many points on the site by Many people come to the island without degrees, may be considered with attachment, a car, which keep parking needs down. The walk along helps the shoreline is extremely slippery in Facilities Masterplan the Lodge and Cistern Chapel buildings, Facilities Many memorials, special gardens,Masterplan and permanence, significance, and investment. winter. especially from those arriving to the site. Walking to the Malaspina Galleries is a common ashes are located throughout the property. Any development that will require relocation SCENARIO EXPLORATION PHASE SCENARIO EXPLORATION PHASE Generally, the guest arrival activity. sequence It is is not, however, very clear how to get Known locations are here. The Plan of the more sacred elements will be are available at mapped the nearby Restaurants and services 4 Augustand 2013the primary ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS there, andis sometimes trespassing can4 occur August 2013 confusing experience of a as well Twin Beach mall, as in the Village. The HavenARCHITRAVE acknowledges that these elements, to varying+ TOPOGRAPHICS addressed sensitively. inadvertently. parking lot. supports the local economy by striving to minimize competition with local business. is extremely slippery in The walk along the shoreline

the en

site analysis

ecology and landscape ecolo

One of Gabriola’s many petroglyphs

The development of The Haven facilities

winter.

petroglyphs can be found throughout Gabriola

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

The Phoenix is frequently used for performance events attendedand by the broader Restaurants services are Gabriola available Island at the nearby

21


ECOLOGY + CLIMATE The Haven is committed to being a good steward of the property, making site improvements with consideration of the natural environment, and managing the site to improve ecological health. A Vegetation Management Plan was completed in 2005 by Pottinger Gaherty Environmental Consultants, and provides more detail on site ecology and management strategies. An update to the Vegetation Management Plan will be completed in 2015.

however, by the year 2100, some of the existing shoreline structures, landscape, and infrastructure may be impacted by rising sea levels and increasing storm surge intensity and frequency.

Ecology + Climate

A peer review of the Plan’s sea level rise research and recommendations was completed by River and Coastal Engineer Daniel Arnold, P. Eng., and can be found in Appendix P.

Ecology and Climate Site Planning Considerations

SITE ECOLOGY The Gulf Island landscapes are both unique and under development pressure. All of the local native plant communities are considered “red-listed” - rare and endangered. There are no legal conservation requirements currently in place to be followed, however, best practice is to minimize impact on the native plant communities. In general, The Haven’s native forest landscape is in good overall health. Most of the hazard trees identified in 2005 have been removed, although an updated assessment is needed.

Significant trees include older specimens or uncommon species, and should ideally be preserved. Sea level rise may change the shoreline boundary and shift setbacks. Existing structures and vegetation may be impacted by increased flooding risk. Adaptive management strategies will be needed. Seasonal change impacts how the site is used - wind and rain in the winter, drought and sun in the summer. The important habitat species, eelgrass (Zostera marina) can be found throughout Taylor Bay, and is easily damaged by boats or shading from marine structures.

CLIMATE CHANGE + SEA LEVEL RISE The sensitive Gulf Island environment is particularly vulnerable to climate change. Considerations for The Haven include increasing summer drought, fire risk, forest pests and disease, winter storm intensity, salt water intrusion, and sea level rise. Climate change science is continually evolving - risks can be estimated and prepared for, however on-going awareness and adaptation will be needed. At this time, the Plan has adopted the sea-level rise estimates outlined by the BC Ministry of Environment for the Nanaimo region (BC Ministry of Environment, 2011). The rocky shoreline found at The Haven is less vulnerable to increasing erosion effects, 22

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

The forest remains in overall good health. Most hazard trees identified in 2005 have been removed. Fire management strategies are important: creating defensible space, fire truck / water access; and reducing highly flammable vegetation/materials around buildings.

worn footpath amongst A worn footpath Haven Lot's significant trees causing compaction of the roots of heritage trees

Monotropa uniflora, uniflora, or Monotropa Pipe, an indicator orIndian Indian Pipe, an species of good soil health indicator species of good soil health

the coastalfirfirforest forest The coastal

the first nations "pathfinder Adenocaulon plant" known , Adenocaulon bicolor, by bicolor First Nations as the “pathfinder plant”

eelgrass grows throughout Eelgrass grows TaylorTaylor Bay Bay throughout

many birds and and nest on Many birdsfeedfeed the on property and shoreline nest the property and shoreline

deer and animals move Deer andother other freely through property animals movethefreely through the property

The Cultural & Experiential Landscape

Site Planning Considerations The forest, the shoreline, and open lawn/gardens are the three primary landscapes of the site. Each offers a


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84 9" 12.12 DF

1 85 12.01 0" CD

1 5"

104 13.14 DF-404

1 163 2"12.50 CD-389

138 12.52 CD-363

1 6"

1 6"

2 0"

814 11.22 DF

4"

896 10.19 CD 1 5"

8"

1 90 11.91 5" CD-478

89 2 12.01 CD-385 2"

2 0"

136 11.80 CD

9" 102 12.91 CD 1 2"

2 6" 808 11.12 ARB

2 3"

1 6"

164 11.96 WELL

101 1 13.11 8" DF 8"

1 7"

827 10.71 DF

2 3"

833 10.91 CD

116 13.08 DF-413

9" 127 13.03 DF-401

132 12.52 CD-364

832 10.73 DF

834 10.84 DF

2 0"

9"

126 12.83 DF-315

179 10.67 BC

2 0"

889 10.47 CD

890 10.42 CD

134 12.16

1 8" 125 12.70 DF-316

181 11.11 DF

828 10.61 DF 1 2"

835 10.63 DF

1 7"

9"

7" 204 11.67 BC

806 10.97 BC

880

1 6"

9"

1 2" 124 12.57 CD-317

9"

184 11.06 DF

CRAWL SPACE

2 817 0" 10.88 DF-345

210.70 4"DF-200

888 10.57 IP

1 8"

133 12.78 DF-365

169 11.46 FSD

838 10.33 DF

884 1 10.49 6" DF-271

910 9.42 IP

121 12.87 DF-122

9" 123 12.65 CD-314

1 9"

1 7"

183 10.51 BC

1 91 11.63 6" CD-477

98 11.78 2 DF 4"

193 11.01 DF-470

1340 10.79 BC

841 10.13 CD

1 83 5"11.85 CD-479

100 11.98 DF-411

119 12.61 DF-391

1 3" 122 12.60 DF-312

1 6"

194 10.82 DF-469

191 190 11.17 CD-472 CD

1 4"

2 8"

343 9.90 DF

1 80 2"11.16 DF

106 11.40 CD-416

105 12.61 CD-412

185 10.48 DF-465

186 10.58 DF-464

2 9"

840 10.20 CD

1 2"

110 11.77 DF-411

1 5"

144 12.01 BC 3 1"

821 10.40 CD-463

886 10.30 DF-277

1 5"

Windmill Palm

111 12.24 DF-415

5"

1 3" 818 10.66 DF-346

911 315 9.38 9.38 CD CD

Western Red Cedar

4" 79 11.04 ARB

99 1 11.28 6" CD-410

1306 10.21 CD-463

1 8"

850 10.19 HUB-2256

2 0"

1 6"

1 2"

Western Yew

107 11.23 CD

2 2"

192 11.11 HUB-2255

2 4" 1 311 9.44 6" CD-248

342 9.49 CD-262

Mountain ash

82 2 12.11 4" DF-450 1 2"

203 11.68 BC

901 9.28 CD-247

345 9.62 DF-261

Red Oak

112 11.50 CD-420

2 0"

RA

1 9"

Douglas Fir

120 12.41 CD

1 8"

1 2"

842 10.25 CD

1 2"

108 11.16 DF-417

195 10.41 DF-454

1 0"

316 9.67 LP

1 4"

1 8"

196 10.14 CD-455

1 878 10.11 8" CD-202

905 9.60 DF-246

Cherry

109 11.04 CD-421

113 12.25 DF-424

199 9.92 CD 1 8"

1 822 8" 10.07 CD-461

STO

335 9.95 CL

350 9.76 CD

1 2"

357 10.02 IPOS

200 10.23 DF-458

188 9.76 CD-460

2 6"

CIS AC TERN CE SS

349 9.50 CD 336 9.69 CL

1 0"

2 8"

75 2 11.22 DF 3"

2 4"

189 9.83 WELL

N

902 9.24 CD-245

904 9.60 DF-249

912 9.51 CD-250

114 11.00 CD-425

1230 10.09 DF

TER

2 8"

347 9.50 CD-253

Apple

74 10.34 CD-483

44 10.82 FSB

338 9.36 CL

1 6"

1 0"

1 1"

903 9.35 CD-244

Gingko

2

1231 10.12 DF

1 0"

1310 10.04 CD-341

1 2"

1 8"

348 9.43 GF-257

Atlas Cedar

115 10.34 DF-426

CIS

848 9.68 FSG

359 8.88 DF

2 2"

1 6"

202 11.86 BC

1 321 0"9.11 CD-243 1 7"

1 8"

1227 9.79 DF

HWT

1 309 1"9.45 CD-240

360 8.84 CD

339 8.94 CL

1 2"

1229 9.74 DF

197 9.85 DF

1 4"

CIS EQ TER UIP N RO MENT OM

851 10.40 BC

846 10.05 CD-289

1 2"852 10.03 CD

914 9.82 CD-271

1228 9.60 DF

7"

1 6"

9"

2 3"

201 10.04 DF-457

1308 1 9.94 0" 1CD-338 8"

1311 9.92 CD-340

2 2"

332 9.27 DF-213

6"

1235 10.06 PP

198 9.64 CD

1316 9.91 BF

1312 9.94 CD

2 0"

CIS AC TERN CE SS

1 9"

847 10.05 CD-291 8"

Arbutus

1" 1 81 11.30 1 2" CD-481 8"

1 6"

1302 9.82 BC

1 4"865 1 10.54 866 DF-307 3" 10.48 DF-306

1 5"862 5" 10.58 DF-305

1 0"

2 4"

1 3"853 9.88 CD-290

7"

1232 1 9.36 CD-446 5"

1295 9.77 DF

8"

8"856 9.99 CD-294 1 1 5" 5"855 9.85 CD

1 3"854 9.84 CD-292

Red Alder

1226 9.16 DF

1320 9.49 CD

861 10.29 CD-304

877 10.19 PP

Japanese Maple

859 10.34 DF-302 9" 860 10.23 DF-303

915 10.16 DF-270

7"

1234 9.26 DF

1323 9.82 DF-308

916 9.95 CD-268

2 0"

7"

1 78 0" 10.75 DF-411

1 41 10.67 3" DF-490

1 73 0"10.72 CD/DF-484

Grand Fir

1299 9.35 DF-448

DF-308

8"

9"

1298 9.07 DF-450

1233 9.53 2 DF-447 2"

1309 9.62 ARB 8"

AL 874 9.63 BC

UP

1 3"

917 10.40 CD-269

924 9.90 CD-234

1 6"322 9.20 DF-242

1 0"

1271 9.64 DF-323b

Tf

1 6"76 10.93 CD-412

65 9.73 DF-427

66 9.68 CD-429

72 9.90 DF-430

Common Name

1214 9.89 BC

1225 9.27 DF-445

1 2"

1297 9.02 DF-449

1 2"

1272 9.59 CD-324

1321 9.27 CD-332

1300 9.74 FSO 1 7"864 9.90

1338 10.52 DF-309

1 1"

IC

1 6"

925 9.94 DF-235

1 8"

1293 9.53 DF 1294 1 9.33 6" DF-451

1296 8.84 DF

T R E E S Botanical Name Abies grandis Acer palmatum Alnus rubra Arbutus menziesii Cedrus deodara Gingko biloba Malus sp. Prunus sp. Pseudotsuga menziesii Quercus rubra Sorbus aucuparia Taxus brevifolia Thuja plicata Trachycarpus fortunei

8" 1315 9.80 CD 1337 10.79 DF

1 2"

9"

1 3"

1 0"

1 0"

1 0"

DN EP

CH

918 10.10 CD-229

3 3"

358 9.47 DF-207

"

6"

1 5"857 9.99 DF-295

1 2"306 9.75 DF-257

333 8.84 CD-218?

340 8.66 CL

6"

1335 10.08 DF-334 8"9

RA 9"

922 10.63 DF-231

923 10.38 DF-232

1 8"

362 8.79 CD-211

2 1"

DF

1 0"

1 7"867 10.85 DF-310

2 0"858 10.13 DF-296

9.10 DF-219

331 8.95 DF-215

1 1"

SIZE

HW

ME

960 875 9.53 9.55 BC BC

1 2" 324 8.88 CD-217

363 8.56 CD-212

1 8" 1317 9.56

HW

SINGLE

1279 9.46 CD

1 0"

1 0" 868 10.03 DF-297

SIZE

DR 10 OO 9 M

MP

BE

1 0"

1324 8.98 CD-329

1325 8.96 CD-330

919 9.79 CD-228

921 10.20 DF-238

2 4"

68 9.69 67 DF-437 9.77 CD-431

2 2" 77 10.87 DF-443

1 40 10.32 3" DF-450

1223 8" 9.81 DF

1 2"

1333 9.96 DF-311

1

E

1 3"

1 5"

4" 1 871 1 9.97 869 2"870 0"DF-300 9.88 9.74 DF-298 CD-299 DOUBL

1 2"

7"

1331 9.60 DF

1 9"

DN

876 959 9.50 9.48 BC

929 1 10.41 2 8" DF-230 3"

1 2"

1 2" 872 9.87 DF-301

RA

932 931 1 9.79 9.76 CD 2" CD-226

938 9.69 DF-221

940 8.56 CD-216

1 4"

38 2 10.85 9" DF-494

58 10.11 DF 42 9" 10.06 DF

64 9.06 CD-428

2 4"

9"

933 10.14 DF-224

1 8"

1 6"

1 3"873 9.82 DF-312

DR 10 OO 8 M

SIZE

364 8.37 CD-205

1 8"

71 9.91 DF

1 0"

57 10.06 CD-485

9"

1 5" 7"

1215 9" 9.64 DF

1275 9.25 1274 6" 9.29 DF DF

1 1"

63 9.08 DF-498

1 2"

1 3"

BE

935 10.27 DF-225

937 9.82 CD-222

325 9.07 DF

2 2"

1 7"

1 6"

1 0"

69 8.95 DF-433

70 9.55 CD-434

1 1222 9.56 0" DF

1276 9.18 DF

7"

37 210.74 4"DF-415

36 8" 10.64 CD

HRV

SIZE

DN

1 8"

946 8.23 CD-197

2 8"

1 0"

1 3" 1 4"

1328 8.92 CD

1330 9.10 CD

30 2 10.64 3" CD

35 9"10.19 DF

59 9.13 PP

62 9.08 DF-499

1277 9.11 DF

7"

1280 9.23 DF-323a

1 0"

1329 8.95 DF-314

SIZE

DR 10 OO 7 M

SINGLE

QUEEN

1 2"

1221 9.28 DF-441 1 1220 9.51 0" DF-440

8" 1 1"

34 9" 9.93 DF

1 32 9.83 3"DF-487

1 1"

QUEEN

BE

1957 1"9.55 DF-178 958 9"9.52 ARB

1 2"

9"

8"

1281 8.87 DF

1326 9.02 DF-315

SIZE

7"

DN

1 33 2"9.74 BF488

56 9.10 DF-496

1 39 10.12 1" DF

1327 8.84 DF-313

2 2" E

DR 10 OO 6 M

LE

956 9"9.06 DF

942 8.55 CD-200 936 9.52 HUB2258

1 7"

BE

SINGLE

926 9.45 FSH

943 8.68 CD-199

8" 55 8.97 DF-497

61 8.97 DF-500

1219 9.19 DF-442

1224 1 9.16 6" DF-444

DOUBL

DF-180

944 8.96 CD-198

D N

1 7"

60 8.66 DF-501

1 3"

1282 8.88 DF

7" 6"

2 4"

2 4"

SIZE

945 8.88 CD-197

1 8"

355 9.06 CD

1284 8.81 DF-322

D N

GE

DN

1270 9.44 ORN

SINGLE

1 8"

1012 8.04 CD-189

1 2" 9"

3 3"

1285 8.76 DF-321

1 1"

9"

1 0"953 8.87 ARB

CD-179

1011 7.87 CD-190

1 6"

361 8.96 DF-206

1290 8.50 DF-318 1 8"

BE E

4"

SIZE

SIZE

DR 10 OO 5 M

DOUBL

8" 954 8.73 DF

965 8.81 CD-149 1 5"

1 4"

Cd

?

? ? SIZE

1286 8.34 DF-320

1287 8.34 ARB

1288 8.30 DF-319

SINGLE

QUEEN

1006 7.79 CD-187

1 4"

8" 1 0"

1289 8.36 DF

8"

QUEEN

7"955 8.68 DF

1 2"

1 1"

1292 8.26 BC

BE 1005 7.76 CD-132b

1009 7.55 DF-185

GE

RA

961 8.44 CD-153

1008 7.51 CD-184

31

RA

1 1218 8.47 0" ARB-443

D N 7"

29.56 0"DF-486

STO

MP N RO UT OM ER

963 8.44 CD-154

EP

1 4"

1 1"

HW

952 8.26 DF-171 1 0"

967 8.37 CD-156

966 9.04 CD-148

D N

1 0"

1 5"

997 9.16 CD-146

EP

978 8.22 PP 1 995 9.01 0" CD-144

1 2"

1 6"

1 29 2"10.01 DF

54 8.64 DF

WC

996 8.53 CD-143

1007 7.79 LAMP

1 4"

1 4"

52 8.39 DF

WC

8"

28 9.91 GF-536

2 8.52 HUB2250

8"

1213 7.87 BC

1001 8.04 CD-139

D N

1 2"

2 26 3" 9.65 CD-534

51 8.14 DF

HAL

L

SES SIO RO OM N

998 8.05 CD-142

1 0"

1 6"

1 4"1 24 9.08 4" CD-537

4 8.38 DF

DN

1000 7.25 CD

8"

6"

1002 7.23 CD-137

1 7"23 9.39 DF-538

1 8"21 9.12 CD-533

1 7"20 9.18 CD-532

1 22 2"8.95 DF

1 2" 1 1248 0" 8.10 DF

1 1 0"

1 6"

1 4"19 8.99 CD

1 1247 0" 8.09 DF

972 7.19 DF-125

1004 7.11 CD-132a 8"

1 2"

Qr

1242 6.95 TRLS

8" 991 7.12 ARB-166

43 7.76 CD-505

1249 6" 7.74 DF

DN 1240 7.42 HZ

P DN

987 9"7.23 CD-83 970 7.32 DF-123

RAM

1 8"

17 8.89 CD-530

2 1250 7.93 7" DF-506

DN

974 7.03 CD-129

Sa

2 7" 18 8.96 DF-529 2 1" 6"

1243 8" 7.79 ARB

2 986 7.14 0" CD-84

8"

5 8.18 DF-525

2 1245 7.72 7" DF-507

1241 7.21 ASH

9"993 6.76 DF

1 16 8.546" CD-528

6 8.31 CD-526

2 1246 4" 7.45 CD

979 6.79 FSI

1018 6.62 CD-113

3 0"

7 8.24 CD-527

1211 7.48 FSN

1 1116 6.19 0" DF-68

1 2"

1 5"

8"

15 8.53 CD

2 1"

1036 6.60 DF-117

1034 6.70 DF-115

Qr

11 7.85 CD-544

8 8.39 DF-541

1 2"

11110 6"6.22 DF

8" 1111 5.86 ARB

1 1114 0" 6.31 DF-65

1019 6.54 CD-111

10 7.96 DF-543

1 1113 0" 6.42 DF

1 1124 7.08 2" DF

1 5"982 6.91 CD-87

1021 6.61 DF-110

1 6"

2 3" 1254 7.43 CD-529

3 1251 0" 7.40 DF

1 1109 6"5.85 CD-70

1 1123 6.24 0"DF

8" 985 6.52 DF-88

1 6"

2 0"

N U

6"

9" 1112 6.43 DF-62?63?

1037 6.46 CD

2 0"

1 7"

1 1118 2" 6.10 CD

1125 8" 6.25 DF-78

1 5"983 6.79 CD-86 8" 984 6.73 CD-85

1 2"

R

IC

1106 7.47 CD-73

1126 6.01 DF

6"

1 1130 6.30 0" DF-79

1038 6.37 DF-118 6"

1020 5.99 CD

W AL

1 2"

1 1127 5.65 2" DF-80

1 1032 2" 1033 6.77 6.72 CD-122 CD-121

1039 6.25 CD

9 8.00 DF-542

1107 5.50 CD-72

2 0"

1105 6" 5.81 CD 1128 6.02 BF-81

1129 6" 6.01 BF

1040 6.14 DF-119 1 0"

1 0"

EC

N

EL

CO

1122 8" 5.50 DF

1 6" 1041 6.00 CD-90

8"

1 8"

2 3"

7"1252 7.08 ARB 1 6"

1024 6.28 DF-104

1022 6.22 CD-108

1 3" 12 7.85 CD-545

M

UP RT PO CAR

T

C

EC 2 0" 1023 5.80 ARB

EP

2 1255 4" 7.56 CD-523

1 1253 1"7.12 ARB-510

1 1104 0"5.53 CD

8"

1 2"

1 1097 2"5.19 DF-46

3 1095 0" 5.19 CD-45

8"1121 5.45 CD

1 0" 1042 5.88 CD-92

6"

21093 0"5.15 CD-44

L

3 12 M O

IT N JA

LO

EP

1101 8" 5.24 CD-77 1 1102 1 1103 0" 5.36 0" 5.39 CD CD

1045 5.57 DF-93

O

UP

C W RO D BE 4 12 M O RO D BE

1 2"

1025 5.56 CD-103

2 1" 11256 7.59 0"CD-522

PO

12 M O RO D BE

C

981 5.42 BC

1031 5.72 ARB

SIZE LE DOUB

HW

6"

7" 1096 4.99 ARB-47

DN

1027 6.11 DF

2 1092 0"5.09 CD-43

1 1091 7"5.13 CD

MP

1 6"

1026 5.70 DF

8"1099 5.43 DF-49

8"1098 5.21 ARB

2 1090 0"5.08 DF-40

RA

8"

9"

1100 4.93 BC

2 1089 0"5.02 DF

1088 4.94 CD-36

1 2"1083 5.11 CD-31

8" 1084 5.36 CD-33

1043 5.13 FSJ

13 8.03 DF

HW

C

1 0"

M

1 7"1078 5.15 CD-32

2 2"

O O DR 0 14

8"1082 5.08 CD-35

1046 4.85 ALD

1050 5.41 DF-95

1049 5.59 DF-94

14 8.26 DF

SIZE LE DOUB

BE

2 4" 1081 5.31 DF-30

1047 4.88 BF 7"

1 0"

1 1257 6"7.66 ARB-549

WC

FP

W

1 8"1085 4.75 CD-37

8"1086 4.82 1 CD-38 1087 4"4.84 CD-39

7"

1 2"

MEETING ROOM

1 9"1076 4.51 CD-28

1 0" 1077 4.44 CD-29

1048 4.65 YEW

2 4"

M O ) O ed DR 1 ss 14 ce ac

1072 4.85 CD-27

1 4" 1079 4.70 CD-21 4"

1 2"1258 7.29 DF-521

1 2"1259 7.82 DF-520

ot (n

W

2 4"

1051 5.08 JM

4"

LE DOUB

LE

1217 5.94 BF

BE

Ap

Ps

SIZE

1 9"1261 7.90 DF-517

1265 7.02 CD

DOUB

8"

NOT MAPPED

DN

??

H

FT

HW

WC

QUEEN

C W

Tf

GI

BAR FRIDGE

M O ) O ed DR 2 ss 14 ce ac

OOM 156

2 2" 1 1080 4.84 2" ALD

1073 4.21 CD-24

ot (n

2 4"

SIZE LE DOUB

1 6"1262 7.30 DF-516

BE

1070 4.60 DF-26

MEETING ROOM

BEDR

9" 1075 4.65 DF

BE

BED

MW

1 8" 1074 4.40 CD-23

O

K

Y

??

EC

DR

??

D

UN

9"

1069 4.49 CD

1071 4.30 CD

1 9"

SOFA

UP

6"

1028 5.57 DF-99

LA

DN

M

3 0"

DN

O O DR 3 14

1030 5.03 ARB

1210 5.88 ORN

Y

G

BE

1 0"

TR

1142 9" 4.78 1 1143 DF-59 4.91 1 1146 0" WL-60 1 2"4.89 1144 1 CD-57 4.99 1 2" 1145 2" DF-58 5.08 2" CD-57

LIVIN

??

2 0"

1029 4.74 DF

EN

1147 4.57 BC

1136 4.42 CH

DN

D

EC

DN

K

9"

MP

Ps

RA

1 2"

Ps

DN

1068 4.30 DF-20

1131 4.06 BC 1061 4.27 DF-11

M

1 2"

O O DR 4 14

1059 3.84 CD 1060 4.23 CD-18

DN

C

N

BE

6"

1 2"

IO

HW

1058 3.92 CD

W

GE

PT

??

1 5" 5"

1056 3.88 CD

C

UN

CE

DN

1055 3.89 8" CD

DN

6"

1052 3.98 CD

BEDRO

??

MP

1053 3.92 CD

OM 1062 3.95 CD

LO

RE

RA

9"

2 8"

1054 3.85 CD

DN

W

1057 3.89 DF

1 6"

SIZE

M

UP

NETTE

SINGL

O O DR 5 14

BEDRO

E

BE

R

OM

DN

1064 3.42 BC

3 0"

NOT MAPPED 6"

Ms

W

1207 6.18 DF

PA

DN

SOFA

TREES Trees considered as significant were mapped during the 2005 Vegetation Management Plan effort, and include large/older trees, wildlife trees, and uncommon species. As part of the Masterplan effort, we undertook a more detailed mapping of the trees on site over 8” (diameter at breast height). Tree preservation was an important value for The Haven’s founders, and remains important to The Haven management and other stakeholders. Underlying the concept of tree preservation are several other values: stewardship and regeneration of the natural environment; preservation of wildlife habitat; guest experience of Gulf Island landscapes; and protection from wind, rain and sun. At the same time, any potential new development of buildings, parking, circulation, infrastructure or even landscapes will likely require removal of some trees. The detailed survey of existing trees allows for site development to be planned to preserve more significant specimens or groupings whenever possible. Trees identified for preservation need protection from disturbance and compaction within the canopy drip-line, and attention to how nearby development will create changes in wind, sun, and hydrology. An arborist assessment is recommended during project design.

1 6"

815 11.92 DF

2 8"

816 11.96 DF 1 156 0" 13.78 CD

812 3 11.88 DF 0"

1811 11.86 8"CD

155 3 13.88 DF 0" 154 2 14.16 5" CD

892 11.27 DF-584

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

23


EXISTING WATER SYSTEM A sustainable water supply is The Haven’s biggest infrastructure issue. Water is a particularly precious resource on the Gulf Islands. With no municipal water system on Gabriola, all water is collected on site, either from wells or from rainwater harvesting. Increasingly, water shortages have led to the need to purchase off-island water during the summer drought months. With the prediction of drier summers due to climate change, water supply issues are only going to increase. WELL WATER SOURCES There are several operating wells on the property. On Gabriola, wells are drilled to (hopefully) intersect fractures in the sandstone bedrock carrying rain run-off, which can occur at any depth; there is no perched aquifer at a typical depth, and wells are often seasonally affected by summer drought. The Haven is located in an area of the island known to have less water available, and, due to the proximity to the ocean, wells are also vulnerable to salt-water intrusion. The Haven’s primary potable water source, Well A, is a seasonal well, going dry when there are no rain events for a week or so. Water is pumped and stored in cisterns during the wet winter months. In the summer months, there is little or no production. Well B has traditionally been The Haven’s primary non-potable water supply (toilets, irrigation, and swimming pool). During the drier summer months, Well B water has also been used as a potable water source by processing the supply through a reverse osmosis system. While this well produces year round, it has high levels of salt water intrusion and sulphur, and these levels are increasing. The Ministry of Environment

24

(Island Health) has required that use of this well be discontinued.

Water System

Well C has not been utilized as a water source for some time. It is reported to be seasonal, and to have a high level of dissolved solids and sulphur, which would require treatment to make the water potable. Additionally, it is marginally within the setback from a septic field (see the Sanitary System Diagram on page 26), although a hydrogeologist has provided a use approval letter to the approving agencies. The Haven is currently reviewing bringing this well back into production. The other wells on the property, including well “D” drilled in 2013, do not produce. RAINWATER HARVESTING Rainwater harvesting is a popular water source on Gabriola due to the challenges with well production. The Haven has a long history of harvesting roof rainwater, which is treated for use. Currently, six buildings’ roofs are harvested, with a combined catchment area of 1,338 m2. With the impending shutdown of Well B, The Haven has applied to the Island Health to expand and update its rainwater harvesting system. The Haven’s permit application is still under review. STORAGE Water storage is a critical component of The Haven’s water system. Water is collected from the wells and rainwater harvesting systems during the wet winter months, treated and stored for use. There are three large concrete foundation cisterns and multiple smaller plastic tank cisterns on the property, with a combined capacity of 213,200 imperial gallons. The current capacity is not sufficient to store the potential production from the wells nor from rainwater harvesting, nor to cover supply needs during drier years.

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

TREATMENT + DISTRIBUTION There is an extensive system in place for treating all sources of water to ensure safety in use. Updates to expand and simplify the system are underway or pending approval of the existing permit application.

CONSERVATION The Haven takes water conservation seriously, and educates all guests on the importance of reducing use. Many measures have been implemented to conserve water, including the installation of low-flow fixtures and appliances.


Auditorium Large session (~1200sf) Medium session (~750sf) Small session (~300sf) Meeting room (~250sf)

1 2 3 4 3

1 1 3 (4) 0 (3) 1 (3)

0 1 0 4 2

* Count of accessible, functional, zoning compliant rooms. (#) includes existing sub-standard rooms. Red text = below goal Water Use** Well A Production* Potable (TAU) Water Use** AccommodationPotable - Tourist Accommodation Units 350

Well A Production / Potable Water Use (m3/month)

Type Standard* Dorms**

Phase Total (TAU) Goal (TAU)

300

250

Higher-end ***

18 (60%)

13

35

6 (20%)

7

44

6 (20%)

10

26

30

105

NA

5

200Accommodation Total Guest 150

Faculty beds Low-mobility access (no flights of 100 stairs) Family friendly units (connectable 50 rooms, multiple beds, suites)

5 15 units (50%)

Drainage

Well A Production*

Phase Total (beds****)

12 25

*Standard rooms. 0 Existing private basic rooms and forestview rooms counted as standard. Feb Mar Apr **Dorms. Existing HeronJan shared rooms counted as dorms.

May

Jun Month

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Dec

*** Higher-end. Existing oceanview units counted as higher-end units.

A****Includes chart illustrating the seasonal cycles of water use vs. Well A production. (chart by Worley Parsons) sofa-beds.

Cistern Storage Current Estimated Need* (US Gal) Potable Water

300,000

Non-Potable Water

243,750

Cistern Chapel treatment

5,000

Cistern Chapel

40,000

Thunderbird

50,000

Phoenix

100,000

Tank adjacent to Cistern Chapel

1200

Osprey tanks

2200

Heron tanks

6000

Reps tanks

2600

Raven tanks

2200

Eagleview tank

2000

Kingfisher tank Totals

Phase Storage Capacity (US Gal)

Additional Storage needed (US Gal)

2000 543,750

213,200

330,550

* Current storage needs calculated by Worley Parsons. While the guest(*calculated capacity on the TCI will increase over Cistern storageexisting and recommended capacity by site Worley Parsons) time, Havenhaus and Havenside are assumed to be removed from the TCI system. Therefore, for the purposes of the Masterplan, use needs are assumed constant. However storage needs will change based on use patterns, supply sources, and rates of yield and should be recalculated during project design phases.

EXISTING STORM DRAINAGE Other than the roof rainwater harvesting system, there are minimal constructed drainage features on site; most stormwater percolates naturally through landscape areas to the sea. There is a remnant trench in the southwest corner of the site that was reportedly built to solve drainage issues in the 1980’s, but does not appear to carry or intersect water today.

The one area of the site that does puddle in the wet winter months is north of the Osprey building. It appears that road drainage coming down Davis Rd. in a swale/ditch on the south side of the road discontinues as it approaches The Haven site. It is possible that it is this drainage that moves through the forested area north of the entry drive, and collects in a low point

north of Osprey. The existing drainage collected in the pipe system is not treated before it daylights in outlets on the shoreline.

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25


SANITARY SERVICING SYSTEM All of The Haven’s wastewater is treated on site. The existing sanitary treatment system consists of seven separate septic fields and associated tanks, each servicing one to three buildings. They vary in age (the oldest thought to be installed in the 1970’s, and the most recent in 1998), treatment capacity, and size. Detailed on-site and documentation reviews of the fields were done in 2010 (Lewkowich Engineering), and 2013 (Van Isle Septic). Most fields were deemed to be in relatively good functioning order, with 5-18 year life spans before repairs and upgrades would be needed. The exceptions are the two Sandpiper fields, which are showing signs of failure, and can not be replaced in situ due to being within the setback from Taylor Bay. The Raven septic field was also not able to be located so its condition is unknown. While not noted in the 2010 and 2013 reports, anecdotally, the Swallow/Cormorant field occasionally has odor issues. Green grass patches, a problem indicator, were also noted by Anita Davey, ROWP, during a site visit in August 2014. The Swallow/ Cormorant field may also be within future ocean front setbacks as sea-level rise occurs.

some pros and cons to each regulatory system, consultants have recommended The Haven strive to ensure the design flow rate stay below the 5,000 gal/day threshold (Worley Parsons, 2014). There are various established methods of calculating flow in absence of actual flow meters. The current flow rate has been variously calculated as 10,816 gal/day (Lewkowich, 2010), 3,800 gal/day (OSI, 2013), and 4,780 gal/day (Davey, 2014). In order to more accurately establish the flow rate and document seasonal fluctuations, The Haven has recently installed flow meters on all buildings; better data will be available after at least one annual cycle. Regardless, it is clear that, at least at peak occupancy periods, The Haven may be already approaching the 5000 gal/day, and almost certain to be over that with the additional capacity called for in the Masterplan.

FLOW RATE AND JURISDICTION OF AUTHORITY Apart from the conditions of the various fields, the primary concern for the sanitary servicing system is the overall flow rate and the resulting Jurisdiction of Authority. There are two governing bodies concerned with disposal of septic effluent in BC. The Ministry of Health (MoH), represented locally by Island Health, regulates systems of up to 4999 imperial gallons per day. Flows of 5000 or greater are regulated by the Ministry of Environment (MoE). Each has a distinct set of regulations, with different disposal options, monitoring requirements, system designs, approval processes, and monetary requirements. While there are 26

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

Sanitary Servicing System


ZONING The Haven’s properties consist of two different zoning types, regulated by Gabriola Island’s Land Use Bylaw. The main property is zoned TC1- Tourist Commercial. The Haven also owns 5 residential lots along Malaspina Drive, zoned as SRR-Small Rural Residential. Each zone relates to a set of bylaws restricting principal and accessory uses, size and type of buildings, lot coverage, and other considerations. The focus of this Plan is the TC1 property. Land with TC1 Zoning is primarily intended for tourist accommodation. A tourist is defined as “traveling” and “non-resident.” The zoning allows for wide range of other non-residential accessory uses to service the principal Tourist Accommodation use and includes restaurant and recreational facilities. The amount of TC1 zoned land on Gabriola Island is limited and largely comprised of three prominent facilities: The Haven, The Surf Lodge, and Silva Bay Resort. These facilities all predate the TC1 zoning adopted in 1999. Significant development has not occurred in a TC1 zone since 1999 adoption. The Haven Facilities Masterplan has not been reviewed with Gabriola Islands Trust. However, it is consistent with requirements set out by the most current Gabriola Island Land Use Bylaw. Note: There are two TC1 bylaw items that require clarification with Islands Trust: 1. The definition of Floor Area includes cisterns if not for “Domestic” or “Fireprotection”. It is not clear what “domestic” refers to in the case of a Tourist Accommodation facility. The Masterplan has not included cistern floor areas in the Floor Area calculation.

2. Faculty accommodation has not been included in tourist accommodation unit total. For convenient reference only, the following excerpts are cited in part or whole from the Gabriola Island Land Use Bylaw No. 177 Adopted: November 22, 1999 & Consolidated: October, 2011. For the ultimate confirmation of current Land Use requirements the reader should contact Local Jurisdiction of Authority directly. D.3.8 Tourist Commercial 1 (TC1) Permitted Principle Uses: • Tourist Accommodation • Restaurant • General Store Permitted Accessory Uses: • Outdoor and indoor recreation facilities accessory to tourist accommodation • Licensed liquor establishment accessory to a principal tourist accommodation use • Campsite Permitted Buildings and Structures • Hotels, motels, lodges, Inns, cabins, and campsites to a maximum of 13 tourist accommodation units or campsites per hectare (5.26 units per acre) and a maximum of 30 tourist accommodation units or campsites per lot area in this zone. • Other non-residential buildings and structures for the permitted uses set out in this zone Regulations • The maximum height of buildings and structures is 9.0 metres (29.5 feet). • The minimum setback for buildings or structures, except for a sign, fence, or pump/utility house is: 6.0 metres (19.7 feet) from any lot line; and 3.0 metres (9.8 feet) from another building sited on the same lot.

• •

• •

The minimum setback for campsites is 6.0 metres (19.7 feet) from any lot line. The maximum combined lot coverage by buildings and structures is 40 percent of the lot area. The maximum floor area ratio is 0.20. The maximum size of a tourist accommodation unit: in a building containing multiple tourist accommodation units is 37.2 square metres (400.4 square feet) in floor area; and in a detached building containing a single tourist accommodation unit is 65.0 square metres (699.7 square feet) in floor area. Cooking facilities are only permitted in tourist accommodation units located in a detached building containing less than three tourist accommodation units. No tourist accommodation unit may be occupied by any person continuously or within a year for more than six months; or by a unit owner for more than 45 days in a calendar year and more than 29 continuous days. Licensed liquor establishments are allowed only in conjunction with a hotel, motel, inn or lodge having a minimum of four tourist accommodation units. Tourist Accommodation: means the use of a tourist accommodation unit on an overnight basis by members of the traveling public who reside elsewhere; Tourist Accommodation Unit: means a room or suite of rooms used by a registered party composed of one or more members of the traveling public who reside elsewhere; Principal: in relation to use, building, or structure means the main or primary use, building or structure; Accessory: in relation to a use, building or structure means ancillary, secondary and exclusively devoted to a principal use, building or structure, expressly permitted by this bylaw on the same lot

Zoning & Buildings Zoning and Buildings

Site P

The Hav Residen zoning b develop site cove

The SRR Haven's resident ideas of uses to current

The TC unit is d common site.

A_The Lodge B_Seagull C_Sandpiper D_Eagleview Construction: probably Construction: 1930s Construction ? and probably Institutional zones are or, where the 1930s accessory useConstruction: is locatedprobably 1930s Commercial Additions/renovations: 1984, 1986, 1987 Additions/renovations: 1986 Units: 1 Beds: 2 Additions / renovations: 19 excluded; on0 common property in a bare Units: Units: land 1 Beds: 2 Units: 1 Beds: ? • Floor Area Ratio: means the figure strata plan, on a strata lot in the same obtained by dividing the floor area of all strata plan; • Floor Area: means the total area of buildings on the lot by the lot area; • Lot Coverage: means the total area all floors for each storey of a building covered by buildings and structures measured to the outer surface of the measured within the outermost walls, exterior walls and if there are no walls, Originally the "Taylor Bay Lodge", with many One of the original cabins, with elements of historic One of the original cabins, with elements of historic Eagleview contains the 1 truely acc additions over the years. to This building has been theedgecharm. It is onedrip of the higher price point units, charm. are It is oneno of thewalls, higher price point units, and to the unit on the site. Mirrored glass giv orandif there measured measured the outer of the center of The Haven since 1983, and the site of has frequent return visitors. However, its age has frequent return visitors. However, its age The meeting rooms are awkward many memories. However, it is energy ineffecient, contributes to frequent maintenance needs. It only contributes to frequent maintenance needs. It only noise conflicts with the residential outer edge of the drip- line. line, and for purposes of calculating floor layout is awkward, spaces are undersized, and there has a wood pier foundation. has a wood pier foundation. view makes it one of the higher pr are safety and accessibility challenges. It also blocks area, the following apply: 1. all areas of a the water view from the rest of the site. It only has a wood pier foundation. building having a floor and ceiling at least one metre apart constitute a storey; 2. F_Reps Library G_Thunderbird H_Heron I_Phoenix the floor area&occupied by any cistern1987, 1990 Construction: Construction: 1984 Construction: 1988-89 Meditation Room Additions/renovations: Additions/renovations: Units: 4 Beds:? used for the collection of rainwater Construction: 1990's? Units: 4 Beds:? Session Rooms: 1 Units: 0 Session Rooms: 3 Units: for0 domestic use or fire protection is excluded; and 3. covered walkways up to 1.8 metres (5.9 feet) in width adjacent to a building’s exterior walls in this bylaw’s

T H E H AV E N FAC I LofIresidential T I E units. S M A S T ETheRHeron P Lbuilding A Nholds-the A P E Nused D I CTheE Phoenix S is the Thunderbird consists It is also mostPcommonly 27largest building

These buildings hold the library and meditation room. They also include a center for The Haven's water distribution system.

sited over one of the properties larger foundation cisterns.

"big group" session room, as well as the Heron's Nest meeting room. Bedrooms are on the second floor, and consist of 2 beds per shared room. This makes it a more affordable option, but limits privacy. There are noise conflicts between the session and

used for community events as wel programs. It is built above the pro cistern. It lacks storage space, and facilities.


TOURIST ACCOMMODATION UNITS In 2010-2011, The Haven went through a process to more clearly define tourist accommodation units with the Islands Trust. Given The Haven’s nature as an educational facility, bedrooms can be smaller, and more facilities can be shared than may be true of a typical vacation resort, and therefore there is the potential for more beds per tourist accommodation unit. The Haven commissioned conceptual floor plans from Delinea Design Consultants, as example diagrams that illustrate multiple bedrooms and shared facilities, within the constraints of the existing planning regulations. These were reviewed by the Islands Trust, who issued a ruling by email that these conceptual plans would be permittable as tourist accommodation units under Gabriola’s land use bylaws. The Facilities Masterplan has continued to explore floor plan typologies that can offer a variety of accommodation choices that would meet the definition of a tourist accommodation unit, and increase the accommodation capacity within the 30 unit maximum.

28

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S


Assessment Summary Diagram

EXISTING BUILDINGS ANALYSIS There are 15 existing buildings on the site. Swallow, Seagull, Sandpiper, Raven and The Lodge all date back to the 1930’s or 40’s, with many additions and renovations over the years. Other buildings were primarily built in the 1980’s and 90’s in The Haven’s founding years. An important effort of the planning process was to map and analyze the existing buildings with the goal of determining whether a building would be best retained as is, retained but renovated for a different use, or removed and replaced. A full set of this analysis and floor plan maps is contained in Appendix M. Example of Existing Building Floor Plans

ASSESSMENT SUMMARY The results of the existing building analysis process are summarized in this diagram. It is important to note that this process considered each building individually. The Facilities Masterplan considers the site as a whole - and in some cases, recommends a different action than noted here.

Example of Existing Building Analysis T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

29


A_The Lodge

Construction: probably 1930s Additions/renovations: 1984, 1986, 1987 Units: 0

Construction: probably 1930s Additions/renovations: 1986 Units: 1 Beds: 2

C_Sandpiper

Construction: probably 1930s Units: 1 Beds: 4

D_Eagleview Construction: 1984 Units: 1 Beds: 7

E_Raven

Construction: probably 1930's or 1940's Additions / renovations: 1985, 1987 Units: 1 Beds: 13

Originally the "Taylor Bay Lodge", with many additions over the years. This building has been the center of The Haven since 1983, and the site of many memories. However, it is energy ineffecient, layout is awkward, spaces are undersized, and there are safety and accessibility challenges. It also blocks the water view from the rest of the site. It only has a wood pier foundation.

One of the original cabins, with elements of historic charm. It is one of the higher price point units, and has frequent return visitors. However, its age contributes to frequent maintenance needs. It only has a wood pier foundation.

One of the original cabins, with elements of historic charm. It is one of the higher price point units, and has frequent return visitors. However, its age contributes to frequent maintenance needs. It only has a wood pier foundation.

Eagleview contains the 1 universally accessible residential unit on the site. It has an ociean view and is a higher price point unit. Mirrored glass gives the unit privacy.The meeting rooms are awkward. Very small rooms on the second floor are used as faculty housing.

The Raven was originally a 4-plex for the Taylor Bay lodge. Several additions over the years have created an eclectic building to maintain. It only has a wood pier foundation. It contains basic and forest view rooms.

F_Reps Library & Meditation Room

G_Thunderbird

Construction: 1987, 1990 Units: 4 Beds: 11

H_Heron

Construction: 1984 Additions/renovations: Units: 4 Beds:14 Session Rooms: 1

I_Phoenix

Construction: 1988-89 Additions/renovations: Units: 0 Session Rooms: 4

J_Cistern Chapel

These buildings hold the library and meditation room. They also include a center for The Haven's water distribution system.

Thunderbird consists of residential units. It is also sited over one of the property's larger foundation cisterns.

The Heron building holds the most commonly used "big group" session room, as well as the Heron's Nest 24 hour room. Bedrooms are on the second floor, and most consist of 2 beds per shared room. This makes it a more affordable option, but limits privacy. There are noise conflicts between the session and residential rooms. The wood decking requires frequent maintenance.

The Phoenix is the largest building on site, and is used for community events as well as Haven programs. It is built above the property's largest cistern. It lacks storage space, and entry/foyer facilities.

The Cistern Chapel is the hot-tub building. The deck is built over the Taylor Bay Lodge's original salt-water swimming pool, which is now a cistern for the Haven's potable water system. The hot-tub and roof structure were built in the 1980's. The deck can be very slippery in winter. The building and deck blocks views to the ocean from elsewhere on the site.

K_Kingfisher

L_Orca

N_Swallow

O_Cormorant

Construction: 1990's? Units: 0

30

B_Seagull

M_Osprey

Construction: 1984-86 Units: 0

Construction: 1983 Units: 5 units Beds: 18

Construction: 1988 Additions/renovations: 1994 Units: 3 units Beds: 8

Construction: 1985 Additions/renovations: 1988 Units: 5 units Beds: 10

Construction: 1988 Units: 0 units Session Rooms: 3

Construction: 1987 Units: 2 units Beds: 4

As an ocean view building, Kingfisher contains higher price point rooms. Noise issues between rooms is problematic.

Orca hosts the pool, gym, recreation rooms and residential / bodywork rooms, as well as three accommodation units.

Osprey holds a mix of private basic and forest view rooms. The materials storage behind the building is a source of complaint.

Swallow hosts the maintenance shop and storage on the ground floor, and 3 smaller session rooms above. There are noise conflicts between these two uses.

Cormorant holds some of the higher price point rooms, with ocean views.

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S


ELECTRICAL ANALYSIS RB Engineering performed a visual site inspection of The Haven electrical power infrastructure on June 18, 2014. The following information is from their report. The purpose of the assessment was to review the current condition of the site electrical infrastructure and how it relates to the 25 year Masterplan. The accompanying site plan shows general routing of existing building services and the single line diagram shows the general flow of power throughout the site. The Haven derives its electrical power from a BC Hydro service from Davis Road. This service enters the site with an overhead single phase primary service (12 kV) to a power pole with a 167 kVA transformer. From this pole there are three secondary BC Hydro services (600 amp, 120/240 volt, single phase) demarking in the Osprey, Heron and Phoenix buildings. These low voltage services then feed the remaining buildings throughout the site and are comprised of a mixture of overhead and underground power feeds. The BC Hydro infrastructure (which includes the overhead primary service, the power pole c/w 167 kVA transformer and overhead secondary power cables)is owned and maintained by BC Hydro. The Haven forwarded the past 2 years of BC Hydro billing. This information was used to determine the power loading of the primary and secondary services. The BC Hydro primary service is limited to 167 kVA and the maximum recorded peak demand on February 2014 was 168 kVA, this transformer is the largest available from BC Hydro and is fully loaded. The three BC Hydro secondary services are limited to 115 kVA per service. One service has a peak load 100 kVA, and the other two services have a peak load between 40 and 47 kVA.

The remaining of the electrical infrastructure from the BC Hydro service to point of utilization is owned and maintained by The Haven. The overhead infrastructure mainly feeds Thunderbird, Raven and Kingfisher buildings. The underground infrastructure mainly feeds Osprey, Swallow and Lodge buildings. The review of the interior electrical infrastructure of the buildings was mainly limited to the electrical room and main power panels. Several deficiencies were identified with recommendations for improvement. It was unclear during the site review how the Sandpiper and Eagle View buildings are being fed. In summary currently The Haven has a typical electrical infrastructure in which a facility has grown over the years and power connections were added as needed. This method of installation creates an unstable infrastructure due to not understanding the entire site when making changes. The BC Hydro primary service is fully loaded with no room for expansion without adding an additional power pole and transformer. However the BC Hydro secondary services are currently adequate with one service 90% loaded and the other two services 50% loaded but these services are limited to the primary service being fully loaded.

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Appendix C | Development Programme PHASE 1 _ Front Door

Session and Meeting Rooms

Type

DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

ACCOMMODATION Currently, The Haven has about 89 beds available for guest and faculty use on the TC1 zoned property. The average number of guests per night is 32 (2012). However, there are distinct seasonal trends - lowest in the winter months, and at capacity in the summer. About 85% of the time, double/ queen beds are single occupancy (important for sizing septic systems, restaurant seating, and other programs). On average, The Haven is booked at 30% capacity; the goal is to increase that to 50%. Meeting that goal is influenced by a complex set of factors including marketing, economy, seasonal draw, and site constraints. For the purposes of the Plan, we are utilizing a goal of an average 50 people (not including staff) on site per day. Zoning bylaws restrict accommodation to 30 “Tourist Accommodation Units” on the TC1 property. Through an extensive effort with the Islands Trust, a definition of Tourist 32

There are a number of goals for the future development of accommodation: • Increase capacity by planning for smaller bedroom/bathroom footprints (more beds per unit). • Increase the number of beds available at lower price points, as dorms, shared rooms and private basic rooms. For planning purposes, the goal is 20% of units as dorms/shared rooms, 40% as standard rooms (private), and 20% as higher-end rooms. • Increase the number of units that can be accessed by those with low-mobility. The goal is 50% of units to be at ground level, or accessible by ramp or elevator (not stairs). Fully universally accessible bedrooms should be increased to between 5-10. • Maintain a number of rooms as “familyfriendly”. This could mean connectable

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

SubTotal Havenside Havenhaus

SINGLE SOFABED

DOUBLE SOFA BED

TOTAL BEDS

6 8 8 3 4 7 1 2 2

6 12 5 4 6 3 0 0 2

7 2 6 3 4 7 1 2 1

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1

0 0 5 1 0 0 1 2 0

13 14 16 8 11 10 2 4 4

1

3

1

4

2

0

1

7

30 0 0

44

1

42 21 4

35 3 4

2 0 0

10 1 1

89 25 9

TOTAL

rooms, multiple beds per room, or suites with lounge space and/or kitchenettes (detached units only). Beds used by faculty or other nonpaying guests do not count towards tourist accommodation units. Faculty accommodation could be in its own building or portion of building, or flexibly hosted in available bedrooms. Tent camping was determined as not preferable.Yurts or other seasonal buildings were considered, but all still count towards maximum tourist accommodation units, and determined better built as bedrooms.

1 1 3 (4) 0 (3) 1 (3)

0 1 0 4 2

Red text = below goal

DOUBLE/ QUEEN BEDS

4 4 5 3 4 5 1 2 1

1 2 3 4 3

* Count of accessible, functional, zoning compliant rooms. (#) includes existing sub-standard rooms.

SINGLE BEDS

Raven Heron Kingfisher Orca Thunderbird Osprey Seagull Cormorant Sandpiper Eagleview (includes 5 faculty beds)

UNITS

Additional Needed

Accommodation Development Programme Accommodation - Tourist Accommodation Units (TAU)

EXISTING ACCOMMODATION

BUILDING

Phase Total*

Auditorium Large session (~1200sf) Medium session (~750sf) Small session (~300sf) Meeting room (~250sf)

Existing Accommodation Rooms ACCESSIBLE ROOMS

Accommodation Units was developed that acknowledges The Haven’s nature as an educational institution with a need for smaller, denser accommodation than a typical tourist resort (see Tourist Accommodation Unit diagrams in Appendix H). The definition allows for a maximum square footage of bedrooms and bathrooms per unit: 37.2 s.m. (400.4 s.f.) for attached units, and 65.0 s.m. (699.7 s.f.) for detached units. Each unit can also include lounges or other spaces that do not count towards the allowable square footage. The existing accommodation facilities were also defined in numbers of units, currently at the maximum 30 units allowed. Any new accommodation construction will need to be offset by decommissioning existing units.

BEDROOMS

DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME This Development Programme provides idealized parameters for various types of uses on the site. It represents the best assumptions at this time as to what The Haven needs to operate sustainably and successfully. The research and consultation has only gone as deep as needed for purposes of the Facilities Masterplan. Additional programming will be done as plans and designs are further developed. This Development Programme should not be considered as fixed, and be adapted as needs, feedback, and ideas change over time.

Goal

123

Type

Phase Total Goal (TAU) (TAU)

Standard*

18 (60%)

Dorms** Higher-end ***

13

35

6 (20%)

7

44

6 (20%)

10

26

30

105

5 beds

NA

5

15 (50%)

12

15 (50%)

13

Total Guest Accommodation Faculty beds Low-mobility access (no flights of stairs) Family friendly units (connectable rooms, multiple beds, suites)

Phase Total (beds****)

*Standard rooms. Existing private basic rooms and forestview rooms counted as standard. **Dorms. Existing Heron shared rooms counted as dorms. *** Higher-end. Existing oceanview units counted as higher-end units. ****Includes sofa-beds.

Cistern Storage

Current Phase Additional Estimated Storage Storage • Increase the number of small session SESSION + MEETING ROOMS Need* Capacity rooms (about 300 s.f.) to 4 and replace needed The existing session room facilities range in (US Gal)rooms. (US Gal) (US Gal) the non-accessible functionality, condition and appeal. Issues Potable Water 300,000 • Make all session and meeting rooms include a lack of accessibility, zoning bylaw 243,750 universally accessible. compliance, poor ventilationNon-Potable or access toWater Cistern Chapel treatment 5,000for leader • Include 3 team meeting rooms natural light, sound issues, privacy from Cistern Chapel 40,000 team use. Ensure session and meeting adjacent walkways, or awkward layout. Thunderbird 50,000 rooms are well soundproofed and have Existing session and meeting rooms Phoenix 100,000 appropriate storage, coat/shoe rooms, determined as needing replacement are: Tank adjacent to Cistern Chapel 1200 and restrooms. Swallow, Swallow’s Nest, Swallow’s View, tanks 2200 • Osprey Allow space for an energetic transition Peterson B, Havenhaus 361, and Whitaker. Heron tanks 6000 between session rooms and the busy Also, additional session and meeting room Reps tanks areas, such as the 2600 communal coffee area space is needed. Raven tanks 2200 in the Lodge. Eagleview tank • Allow for visual connection2000 to the Goals for session room development: Kingfisher tank 2000 outdoors, while maintaining a sense of • Add a second Heron sized room of Totals 543,750 213,200 330,550 privacy. about 1200 s.f. * Current storage needs calculated by Worley Parsons. While the guest capacity on the TCI site will increase over time, Havenhaus and Havenside are assumed to be removed from the TCI system. Therefore, for the purposes of the Masterplan, use needs are assumed constant. However storage needs will change based on use patterns, supply sources, and rates of yield and should be recalculated during project design phases.


Existing Session, Meeting, + Bodywork Rooms

2

9

5

Orca Havenside Raven

2

3

3 1 1 5

ACCESSIBLE

4 1

BODYWORK ROOM

BUILDING

1 2

1 1

ACCESSIBLE ROOMS

1

1

MEETING ROOMS

Sub-Total Total

3

1

BODYWORK

SMALL SESSION (~300SF)

1

MEDIUM SESSION (~700SF)

Phoenix Heron Swallow Lodge Eagleview Havenhaus 361

LARGE SESSION ROOM (~750+)

BUILDING

AUDITORIUM

SESSION+MEETING ROOMS

0

5

Session, Meeting, + Bodywork Rooms Development Programme Session, Meeting Rooms + Bodywork Rooms Goal

Existing Total*

Additional Needed

Auditorium

1

1

0

Large session (~1200sf)

2

1

1

Medium session (~750sf)

3

3 (5)

0

Small session (~300sf)

4

0 (2)

4

Meeting room (~250sf)

3

1 (3)

2

Bodywork room

4

0 (4)

4

Type

* Count of accessible, functional, zoning compliant rooms. (#) includes sub-standard rooms.

Guest Accommodation

Goal BODYWORK (units) Type are five existing rooms used for There Standard* 18 (60%) bodywork. None of them are universally Dorms** 6 (20%) accessible, and the current proximity to Higher-end *** 6 (20%) the pool causes noise issues in the summer. The Haven’s bodywork practitioners have a world-class reputation, and bodywork is Faculty beds flexible an important complement to the programs. Low-mobility access (no flights of 15 units As such. The Plan envisions creating a (50%) stairs) special Bodywork Centre, rooms, planned and Family friendly (connectable multiple beds, suites) Havenside and Havenhaus beds replaced on TC1

• •

? 17 beds

Existing Totalholistically Phase Total designed as a healing, restorative (units) (beds****) environment and iconic Haven experience. 17

46

3

12

Goals for the Bodywork Centre: 10 26 • Universal accessibility 30 84 • 4 bodywork rooms • A waiting area / lounge 5 • Easy access to parking • 12Easy access to the Lodge - assumed where booking and payment will still 25occur. 0

*Standard rooms. Existing private basic rooms and forestview rooms counted as standard. **Dorms. Existing Heron shared rooms counted as dorms. *** Higher-end. Existing oceanview units counted as higher-end units.

Restroom with shower. Quiet - soundproofing or distance from noisier uses. Other ideas include a second hot-tub and/or sauna, and proximity to a multipurpose/session room that could be used for meditation, yoga, or movement classes.

PARKING Zoning bylaws require a minimum of 1 parking spot per sleeping unit, plus 1 per 3 seats in a food or beverage area. With the Plan’s 30 units and new 65 seat restaurant, a minimum of 52 spots would be required. Currently, there are approximately 60 parking spaces on the TC1 site, about 32 in the central lot, and about 28 scattered amongst the forest along Crystal Lane. During busier times, parking spots can be hard to find. The suggested goal for parking is to maintain or slightly increase the available number of spaces to accommodate the increase in bed count and capacity goals. GUEST AMENITIES The Haven currently offers many amenities to their guests as part of creating a complete retreat environment. The Plan envisions improving and expanding these over time. The food/beverage serving and dining areas will always be the social heart of The Haven, where everyone mixes and gathers several times a day. Program, space planning and design goals for these spaces, to also include all the related guest and staff spaces, will be more carefully explored during the design process for the Plan’s Lodge buildings. At this time, the Plan includes an approximately 65 seat dining area (reflecting the goal of average 50+ participants on site per day, plus some contingency). During the summer and other high capacity times, second seatings at meal times can accommodate dining, as well as utilizing outdoor terrace seating options. There is also a continuing need for a small

private dining room (like the current Gomori room) and a staff dining area. Other guest amenities in the existing Lodge include the bar, lounge, gift shop, coffee and tea area, and reception/front-desk. Again, a more detailed programming and design effort will occur during the planning process for the Plan’s Lodge A building. Noted at this time: the bar needs to be separable from children; the current lounge area is too small; and the multi-tasking performed by front desk staff requires proximity (or alternative operational solution) to the front entry, bar, meal payment, shop, and registration staff. Other guest amenities are currently located throughout the site. The gym remains an important program to retain and improve - the existing facility is often too hot in summer and cold in winter. The hot-tub is a very favorite element. The Plan does not envision decommissioning the existing location for some time, however, at some point it may be at risk from sea-level rise. Its location also blocks a broader water view. There is also interest in having two hot-tubs on site. The second location could be located adjacent to the pool facility, and/ or indoors, and/or related to the Bodywork Centre (and potentially clothing-optional). This will need to be further explored during the design of the Plan’s Lodge B. The existing lounge and games rooms in Orca are often underutilized, although certainly well used in the summer months by the kids and teens, and important to have. Concepts for improving the programming and design of these spaces should be explored during the design of Lodge B. Other existing guest amenities include a 24 room, a library, designated smoking area, and guest laundry. The Haven would like to retain all of these programmes on site.

STAFF FACILITIES Optimal sizing and proximity planning of the “back of house” facilities is very important to efficient operations and staff morale. Further planning and design for improvements or replacement facilities will include additional consultation with staff to ensure ideas are incorporated from those who know these needs the best. At this stage of planning, the Plan notes the following points: •

• •

• • •

Total existing square footage of kitchen, food storage, and kitchen office areas is about the right size, although some of the current layout is awkward. Proximity and access of delivery trucks to food storage is required. The existing maintenance shop is about the right size. The addition of an exterior work area would be optimum. Additional covered and screened storage area is needed. Housekeeping needs ease of access to supplies, equipment and areas to be cleaned to work efficiently and safely. Upstairs rooms ideally have a closet for storing heavier items (such as vacuums) on-site. Avoid uncovered exterior wood decks and stairs. Consolidate and increase the central housekeeping storage area. Evaluate out-sourcing laundry to save on-site water. If laundry is to stay on site, a better located facility with safe access and good ventilation is needed. Plan and design new rooms with a furniture and lighting/electrical/cable layout. Ensure rooms are big enough to pass a standard vacuum between the wall and a double bed. The existing administration and registration offices, storage, and meeting space are all generally too small. At this time, the Plan estimates 25-30 percentage larger is needed.

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

33


Functional Relationships Diagram be used, adapted, and evolve. Therefore, the Functional Relationship Diagram abstracts uses from the existing physical site – and captures what functions require certain adjacencies, and which require physical (or auditory) separation. These lessons can be applied to whatever form The Haven evolves. Key Lessons: • Noise conflicts are the primary issue for poorly compatible adjacencies. Noisy uses (maintenance shop, truck deliveries, program sessions, dining room, the pool, etc.) do not work well adjacent or stacked with noise-sensitive uses (accommodation rooms, program sessions, bodywork rooms, etc). Good soundproofing (such as in Eagleview) can make some of these adjacencies acceptable. • The front desk staff serve many roles simultaneously. Unless there are operational changes, they require some level of adjacency to the bar, gift shop, food serving, guest arrival areas, and body-work booking/payment. The front desk also needs to be easily accessed by administration and registration staff. • Housekeeping staff need to service almost every building daily. Closer proximities increase efficiency. (This is also true for maintenance staff, although not on a daily access basis). • When possible, maximize the value of a support space by sharing it between different uses. Parking lots, washrooms, showers/lockers, and service loading areas could all serve multiple operational spaces. Multi-functional spaces are also a more efficient and valuable asset – such as a session room that can also serve as a yoga/movement or meeting room. • Food serving is the hub where all staff, participants, and faculty mix together.

OPERATIONAL EFFICIENCY Operations refers to how The Haven functions on a day-to-day level, serving the needs of participants as efficiently and effectively as possible. Over the years, staff and management have developed many layers of systems that support the operation of The Haven, and this will continue to evolve. The Facilities Masterplan considers how site planning and design considerations can contribute to smooth work flows, comfortable and efficient environments, reduced costs, and improved staff productivity and morale as ways to increase operational efficiency: •

• 34

Consolidate. Program the new lodge buildings so that they contain a complete set of facility uses. During times of lower capacity, close down other buildings to save on energy use and housekeeping time. Improve energy efficiency of all buildings.

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

Consolidate facilities for ease of access by housekeeping. Improve ease of access for housekeeping by minimizing stairs. Reduce maintenance hours needed by investing in durable, reliable, and standardized materials and systems.

Investigate centralized control or generation systems for heating, cooling, and hot water. Document site improvements, keeping maps and as-built documentation up to date.

Plan for emergencies. Reduce fire, flooding and seismic risk through good design. Build in resiliency and adaptability.


Appendix D | Master Plan Building Framework Lodge A Conceptual Program Below Grade Level Main Level

BUILDING FRAMEWORK It is important to note that there will be a consultative design process for each building phased for implementation, when further conceptual study will occur, adaptively building on lessons learned. The floor plan and section diagrams in this section are schematic only. BUILDING FRAMEWORK OVERVIEW Central to the site is The Circle Meadow, an open grassy field that takes the perfect shape of a circle and marks the centre of The Haven facility. The Circle Meadow (septic field) takes the necessity of infrastructure and makes it into a main landscape and community feature. The Lodge A and B buildings encircle and enclose The Circle Meadow. These buildings house the main functions of the facility and create the heart and core of The Haven community. The radial building facades of both Lodge A and Lodge B provide a covered colonnade to rain protected space to move through, a place to stop, sit, and socialize.

The following describes the conceptual program, space planning, massing, and character of each new or renovated building.

Lodge A

LODGE A The Lodge A is the main building central to all facilities. It is similar in function and in location to the original Taylor Bay lodge built as a resort in the 1930’s.

Section Lodge A

existing grade

The courtyard between Lodge A and Lodge B provides a view of The Georgia Strait, Taylor Bay and the mainland mountains. The west coast context is visible from the core of the facility. With approximately one third of The Haven facility program accommodated in Lodge A and Lodge B, the two main buildings are the largest in scale relative to the other buildings on the property.

Upper Level

second floor

existing lodge removed

main floor

existing deck removed

cistern and services

lodge A

dining terraces, ramps and stairs

recommended flood construction level year 2100 (5m)

existing hot-tub and cistern chapel

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

35


24'-0"

Lodge A Siting

Scale Comparison: Existing Lodge + Proposed Lodge A LOUNGE

3 0 "1167 4.12 DF

SESSION 1,388 SQ.FT.

1 1 1166 " 2.94 CD

5 1168 " 3.82 CD

6 "

1150 0.04 WL-950

1 2 1163 " 3.48 DF

1160 2.60 CD

9 1161 " 3.27 DF

2 8 " 1164 3.69 DF-562

5 1162 " 3.74 CD

24'-0

WC 1 71169 "4.06 ARB

1 6 "

1188 4.51 CD

1 2 " 1 8 "

1189 4.71 CD

1187 4.48 CD

1148 4.28 FSL

1158 4.34 DF

1 8 "

LIVING 1159 4.50 DF

DECK BATHR M

SOFA

BED

1 9 "

1170 2 4.61 8 CD-559? "

6 "

KITCHE NETTE

"

1157 13.73 6DF "

1156 2.58 DF

1 3 "

H

1186 4.61 ARB

W

2 0 "

BEDRO OM QUEEN SIZE

1 5 "

1185 4.82 DF-557

1190 4.84 DF

11174 54.91 YEW "

1 4 "

2 0 "

1171 4.19 2 DF-572 2 "

1154 3.93 DF

1 8 "

2 8 "

The main floor Lodge A will house the reception, gift shop, café /bar, restaurant, lounges, kitchen and pantry. An elevator and two stairways provide access to accommodation rooms and session rooms above. A crawlspace for services and utilities access is below with a multithousand gallon cistern for rainwater collection.

2 0 "

1173 1 4.28 8 YEW-574 "

1 0 1194 " 5.67 DF 6 "

1195

5.637 DF "

1196 5.69 ARB

1 1199 2 6 5.68 " " DF

1175 4.86 2CD-575 7

9 1200 " 5.63 DF

8 1197 " 5.80 DF

"

1 5

1 5 "

1"1198 2 5.76 " DF-554

Massage 3

7 1201 " 5.72 DF

1182 5.56 FSM

M

BEDR

SOFA

BED

LIVING

W

QUEEN SIZE

153 OOM

WC

1209 7.20 BC

WC

SOFA

BED

LIVING

DN

DN

1178 1 4.69 1 DF "

1179 1 4.72 7 DF-579 "

FIREPLACE

EP

BEDR DN

152 OOM

QUEEN SIZE

Ms Ps 3 "

K

OF

DN 1140 2.90 BC

SER VIC DN

1137 3.04 DF

DIN

DIN ING

OF

RAM P DN

ING

OF

FIC

OF

E

DN

E

OF CH

E

SOFA BED

E

FRI

L TE

CK

UP

DE

DR 15 OO 5 M

GE

BE

UN

CK

C

DE

W

S

ST OR UP

W

C

CH AN ICA W C L

ME GA G

DN RAMP 1 9 " 821 10.40 CD-463

3 1 " 2 3 "

1 6 "

194 10.82 DF-469

2 0 "

1 8 "

839 10.18 CD

1 6 " 1 2 "

1 3 "

911 315 9.38 9.38 CD CD

1 6 "

899 9.46 CD-163

887 1 10.40 6 DF-276 "

898 9.63 DF-164

2 0 "

346 9.71 DF

1 0 "

1 2 "

344 9.66 DF

1 0 " 1 4 "

908 9.48 CD 1 4 "

1 0 "

909 9.57 CD-162

2 2 "

894 9.80 CD-165

2 8 "

1 2 "

844 10.69 DF-203

1 879 1 10.76 CD "

837 10.64 CD

1 2 "

1 3 "

836 10.46 CD

1 8 "

835 10.63 DF

SIZE SINGLE

SIZE

EP

1 0 "

180 11.19 CD

138 12.52 CD-363

2 0 "

141 11.99 DF-358

142 12.29 DF-359

1 5 "

1161 412.45 "DF-390

95 1 12.47 1 CD "

139 12.03 DF-360

2 0 "

1 8 "

93 13.95 2 DF 4 "

143 12.71 DF-366

8 "

175 11.40 DF-353

176 11.37 CD-352

174 1 11.55 0 DF "

173 11.67 2 DF 3 "

1 6 "

172 11.73 IP

2 2 "

1 8 "

149 2 14.36 4 CD-373 "

160 9 12.94 " DF

167 12.92 DF-369

1157 14.05 4 CD-371 "

2 8 "

816 11.96 DF

178 11.23 DF-349

1153 114.30 " CD

811 111.86 8CD "

158 113.19 6CD "

152 114.36 7CD "

1 151 0 14.50 CD "

3 14.74 IP

se at

at

1 6 "

154 2 14.16 CD 5 "

se

892 11.27 DF-584

at

se

OFFICE KITCHEN 210 sf

Prep

FRIDGE 85 sf

RECEIVING 120 sf

OFFICE RECEPTION 230 sf

PANTRY 110 sf

D

ground floor lodge

6,140 sq.ft.

ER V CO ED

LODGE Kitchen + Dining + Registration + Administration + Laundry EXISTING BUILDING ANALYSIS + RENEWAL PLANNING MATRIX PARAMETERS Regulatory

ECONOMIC

KEY QUESTIONS

NOTES

Is it built to current code?

NO

Islands Trust Bylaw Compliance

Does it meet current land use bylaws?

NO APPARENT ISSUES / WILLIAMSON SURVEY

Housekeeping

2011 BUILDING INSPECTIONS REPORT ISSUES NOTED / CRAWL SPACE TERRIBLE. ROOF LEAKS. EVERYTHING IN POOR CONDITION. DOORS TOO SMALL TO MOVE APPLIANCES/DELIVERIES. HEATING ISSUES

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

Functionality

GOOD PROXIMITIES FOR STAFF INTERACTION. SPACES ARE CRAMPED. NOISE ISSUES FOR OFFICES. ISSUES WITH BAR + MINORS. LAUNDRY POOR LOCATION. LACK OF STORAGE. LEVEL CHANGES AWKWARD.

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

Energy Costs

is it an energy efficient building? Can it be cost-effectively renovated for increased effeciency?

NO. IT CANNOT BE COST-EFFECTIVELY RENOVATED

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

Sanitary

Does the septic system need replacement?

POTENTIAL ISSUES WITH OVERALL FLOWRATE

Water System

Will replacing the building have a high-cost impact on the existing water system?

NO FOUNDATION CISTERN / THIS IS A LARGE BLDG AND IF REPLACED COULD INCLUDE A LARGE CISTERN.

Is it maximizing contributions to rainwater harvesting?

LARGE ROOF / NO ROOFWATER COLLECTION. IN PLANNING STAGES SOME.

Embodied Investment

Building Age and Condition

Where is the building in its lifecycle?

END OF LIFECYCLE

Business

Donor Appeal

Grandfathered Elements

Would a repair or renovation trigger other major upgrades or replacements? Would a major renovation or replacement be likely to appeal to donors? Are the rooms regularly booked or used?

ENVIRONMENTAL

east

Climate Change Adaptability Air Quality

Water Usage

YES, SEPTIC.

YES. KEYSTONE BUILDING

REPLACEMENT

5-10 Years

NA YES. OLDER BUILDING

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

LAUNDRY COULD BE RELOCATED OFF SITE/ISLAND.

EVALUATE RELOCATING LAUNDRY.

INCREASING FIRE RISKS.

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

Are materials low emmittance? Good ventilation? Mold?

NO COMPLAINTS NOTED.

Life-safety issues?

REQUIRES FURTHER ANALYSIS. FREQUENT SMALL LEVEL CHANGES ARE A HAZARD. FIRE RISKS WITH LAUNDRY AND KITCHEN

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

BC Firesmart rating? Electrical analysis?

POOR FIRESMART RATING. SERIOUS RISK DUE TO CRITICAL NATURE OF BUILDING FUNCTIONS. ELECTRICAL OVERLOADED.

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

Facilities Masterplan

Siesmic rating? Proximity to waterfront?

The fireplace will be next to the restaurant and café /bar facing the view. The fire will make a cozy conversion area. SOCIAL

Noise

Proximity of noisy uses to noise sensitive uses?

Comfort

Experience

Proximity to other uses

Low mobility accessibility

Significance

1988 NOT TO CURRENT SEISMIC

sitting season can extend to late October and commence in late March. ECLECTIC CHARM, GREAT OCEAN VIEWS. POOR GUEST ARRIVAL VIEWS.

10-25 Years

ADMINISTRATION PROXIMITY TO RECEPTION & FOOD SERVICE

Is the space comfortable? Temperature? Size for use? Quality for price point? Access to daylight?

LACK OF DAYLIGHT. CRAMPED SPACES. AWKWARD LEVEL CHANGES. SUNROOM TEMPERATURE WITH WEATHER.

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

How well does the space meet programmatic needs? Is the space close enough to commonly required adjacencies?

FUNCTIONAL FOR GUESTS. CRAMPED FOR STAFF. POOR ARRIVAL EXPERIENCE.

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

CENTRAL. LACK OF STORAGE.

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

Are there stairs or other mobility barriers?

Historic

Should it be preserved for historic reasons?

Cultural attachment

Level of attachment and resistance to change?

INTERIOR STEPS/RAMPS TO ACCOMMODATE TRANSITONS BETWEEN RENOVATIONS/ADDITIONS IN RANDOM LOCATIONS A HAZARD

Facilities Masterplan

ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

ORIGINAL TAYLOR BAY LODGE AT CORE OF CURRENT BUILDING, BUT FEW HISTORIC ELEMENTS REMAIN.

ELEMENTS COULD BE REUSED

HIGH.

ELEMENTS COULD BE REUSED. REQUIRES CHANGE MANAGEMENT

DRAFT MASTERPLAN 01 MAY 2014

REPLACE. INVESTMENT BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

Hazards

Attractive appearance? Attractive views?

0-5 Years

BEST ADDRESSED BY REPLACEMENT.

Fire Risk (Wildfire + Internal) Aesthetic

SUMMARY RECOMMENDATION

ALL ROOMS IN CONSTANT USE

Is the energy usage higher than necessary? (heating, lighting, windows, insulation) Is water usage higher than necessary? (fixtures, appliances, bathtub, laundry) Is it in danger of sea-level rise, water shortages or increased wildfire fire danger risks?

Carbon Footprint

Earthquake and Tsunami Risk

THE HAVEN FACILITIES MASTER PLAN

DRAFT MASTERPLAN

The outside fireplace will be roofed to retain warmth and provide protection from the steady, light west coast rain. The outdoor 24 January 2014

RECOMMENDED ACTION

OK. GLASS/SUNROOM IS HIGH MAINTENANCE. CHANGING LEVELS AND CRAMPED SPACES ARE ISSUES.

How easy is it to clean?

Is there back-up power during outages?

Experience

Un-milled timber columns a full 18” in diameter will define the colonnade. They will be reminiscent of the Douglas fir forest nearby and provide a totemic quality to the building. The large, double flue, masonry fireplace in Lodge A will be the social hub of the facility.

Replace

How much regular maintenance is required? Are there major capitol repairs required?

Power

Accessibility

Renovate, Re-program

How well does the space meet programmatic needs? Is it the right size? Does it have the right adjacencies?

Infrastructure

Health and Safety

ANALYSIS Preserve, Maintain

Maintenance

Do the units maximize the number of beds permitted?

west

" Should the building be maintained, reprogrammed/renovated, or replaced ? "

Building Code Compliance

Revenue

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

FREEZER 120 sf

Male

WC 110 sf

12' x 9'

Female

12' x 9'

OUT 2500 DOOR COV sf ERE

R

36

WC 110 sf

at

O O D T f U s O 500 2

base map - PROPOSED LODGE 1"=30'

Lodge A + Lodge B

the waterproof barrier from UV degradation and provide insulation against heat loss and solar gain. The roof will provide garden views from the upper floor rooms and ground the building with the natural surroundings. The upper floor roof will be sloped and clad in metal for efficient and maximal rainwater collection.

UP

155

0perational

The green, lower level roof will be planted with xeriscape plants native to the region. Gravel from the root base will filter rainwater. The dense plant base roof assembly that includes drainage will protect

H WAL L

13.88 3 DF 0 "

ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS

The rammed earth wall will be behind the glass wall and will rise the full two storey height. As it faces south it will retain the heat of every minute of sunshine. The thermal mass will radiate the warmth into the evening hours. The wall will be central to the functioning of the building.

28'-0"

SERVICE 330 sf

6

fir e fir e

1 156 13.78 0 CD "

"

812 11.88 3 DF 0 "

se

150 14.38 DF-375

open to above

RAMM ED EA RT

1 8 " 166 13.08 IP

'-0

815 11.92 DF

1 5 "

1146 314.49 " DF-376

1 148 4 14.47 " CD-374

159 2 12.95 1 CD-370 "

168 12.49 DF-367/8

15' x 10'

KITCHEN 510 sf

booth seats 4-6

booth seats 4-6

6

EART MED RAM

117 12.46 FSC

1 9 "

177 11.66 DF-351

1810 11.35 8 BF-350 "

881 11.11 883 2DF 11.20 4 " DF 882 1 11.32 4 DF "

booth seats 4-6

140 12.43 CD-361

"

1 3 "

2 5 "

849 11.06 BSF

3 6 "

6

94 7 12.49 " CD 1 3 "

171 211.39 DF-356 4

813 11.09 DF

4 "

843 11.13 YEW

893 10.52 DF-581

1 5 "

92 12.79 FC

814 11.22 DF

829 10.94 DF

830 11.15 CD

891 10.55 DF

3 6 "

booth seats 4-6

1 2 " 1 5162 12.52 "CD-388

2 6 " 808 11.12 ARB

2 3 "

1 2 "

86 8 12.05 " CD

96 12.24 CD

137 12.68 DF-362 1 6 131 " 13.11 DF-40?

1 6 "

205 10.58 E 831 10.80 CD

87 1 12.10 4 DF-383 "

1 4165 "12.36 CD-387

1 0 130 " 13.06 CD-399

1 6 "

827 10.71 DF

2 3 "

1 6 "

895 10.17 CD 2 1 "

88 11.99 CD-381

103 1 13.22 DF 8 "

BUILDING AREA MAIN FLOOR 8,226 sq.ft. UPPER FLOOR 4,330 sq.ft. TOTAL 12,556 sq.ft.

ALL HW

84 9 12.12 " DF

85 1 12.01 0 CD "

1 5 "

104 13.14 DF-404

1 2163 12.50 " CD-389

832 10.73 DF

833 10.91 CD

90 1 11.91 5 CD-478 "

102 12.91 CD

89 12.01 2 CD-385 2 "

2 0 "

828 10.61 DF 1 2 "

2 1 "

2 0 "

9 " 8 "

9 127 " 13.03 DF-401

2 1 " 128 13.28 DF-402

179 10.67 BC

834 10.84 DF

2 0 "

889 10.47 CD

890 10.42 CD

896 10.19 CD 1 5 "

2 2 "

CRAWL LIBRARY SPACE

24

9 "

164 11.96 WELL

101 1 13.11 DF 8 "

1 8 126 " 12.83 DF-315

DECK

2 817 0 10.88 " DF-345

1 7 " 888 10.57 IP

1 8 "

1 6 " 897 10.14 CD

125 12.70 DF-316

132 12.52 CD-364

135 12.20 CD

169 11.46 FSD

838 10.33 DF

880 210.70 4DF-200 "

910 9.42 IP

9 "

182 10.95 DF-473

806 10.97 BC

343 9.90 DF

8 "

1 2 124 " 12.57 CD-317

9 "

134 12.16

136 11.80 CD

1 7 129 " 12.98 DF-398

1 4 "

884 1 10.49 6 DF-271 "

133 12.78 DF-365

1 0 " 9 " 7 " 204 11.67 BC

181 11.11 DF

LOUNGE

886 10.30 DF-277

1 5 "

116 13.08 DF-413

123 12.65 CD-314

1 2 " 1 9 "

184 11.06 DF

1 7 "

3 3 "

1 3 818 " 10.66 DF-346

345 9.62 DF-261

9 "

122 12.60 DF-312

9 "

144 12.01 BC

191 190 11.17 CD-472 CD

2 5 "

183 10.51 BC

MECH. ROOM

819 10.80 DF-344

316 9.67 LP 2 0 "

1 4 "

91 1 11.63 6 CD-477 "

98 11.78 DF

193 11.01 DF-470

185 10.48 DF-465

186 10.58 DF-464

1340 10.79 BC

2 9 "

840 10.20 CD

2 4 "

GIFT SHOP 365 sf

820 10.54 CD-462

AGE

850 10.19 HUB-2256

841 10.13 CD

2 4 "

1311 9.44 6 CD-248 "

342 9.49 CD-262

5 "

105 12.61 CD-412

RECEPTION 630 sf

1 8 "

DN

EP 7 7" "

885 1 10.13 5 CD-281 "

335 9.95 CL

1 0 "

1 5 "

DN

336 9.69 CL

100 11.98 2 DF-411 2 "

203 11.68 BC

842 10.25 CD

1

350 9.76 CD

1 2 "

357 10.02 IPOS

9 "

1306 10.21 CD-463

STOR

192 11.11 HUB-2255

2 8 " 901 9.28 CD-247

183 11.85 5 CD-479 "

99 1 11.28 6 CD-410 "

111 12.24 DF-415

1 5 121 " 12.87 DF-122

4'-0" 1'-6"

SIZE

1 2 "

MECH . 1878 810.11 "CD-202

1 9 "

82 2 12.11 4 DF-450 "

106 11.40 CD-416

120 12.41 CD

119 12.61 DF-391

1 3 "

1 2 "

QUEEN

ROO 137 M

902 9.24 CD-245

903 9.35 CD-244

905 9.60 DF-246

27'-3"

8'-0"

1 0 "

2 8 "

1 2 "

4'-0"

1 8 "

904 9.60 DF-249

1 8 " 912 9.51 CD-250

1 2 "

110 11.77 DF-411

5' x 7'

1 334 4 9.33 CD-251 "

112 11.50 CD-420

2 0 "

1 0 "

1 1 "

DN BED

CIST WC ACC ERN ESS WC

301 9.22 Q

347 9.50 CD-253

1 80 2 11.16 " DF 79 4 11.04 " ARB

107 11.23 CD

202 11.86 BC

1 2 "

848 9.68 FSG

1 8 "

348 9.43 GF-257

349 9.50 CD

1 0 "

1 2 "

195 10.41 DF-454

1 8 "

338 9.36 CL

351 9.86 CD-251

108 11.16 DF-417

8'-0"

2 6 "

189 9.83 WELL

1 822 8 10.07 CD-461 "

HW

SIZE

359 8.88 DF

2 2 "

1 6 "

SIZE

196 10.14 CD-455

1310 10.04 CD-341

NT

SIZE

SINGLE

1 321 0 9.11 " CD-243 1 7 "

1 7 "

353 9.64 DF

14'-0"

EP

DN

1 8 "

2 0 "

1 8 "

109 11.04 CD-421

113 12.25 DF-424

2 4 "

18' x 28'

360 8.84 CD

339 8.94 CL

352 10.01 CD

1 6 "

1 0 "

SINGLE

1236 10.63 CD

1 0 "

HWT

199 9.92 CD

DISPLAY

1 0 "

355 9.06 CD

1 2 "

354 9.49 DF

2

181 " 1 11.30 1 2 CD-481 8 " "

75 11.22 2 DF 3 " 44 10.82 FSB

QUEEN

1 309 1 9.45 " CD-240

1 2 "

1 2 "

CD-483

115 10.34 DF-426

114 11.00 CD-425

M

M

ERN

1 8 74 " 10.34

1 6 "

1 6 "

Bar /Coffee

1 852 210.03 " CD

BEDR 136OOM

1227 9.79 DF

1230 10.09 DF

BAR 400 sf

CIST

SIZE

2 0 "

1 0 "

6'-0"

BED SIZE

SINGLE

200 10.23 DF-458

188 9.76 CD-460

CIST EQU ERN IPME ROO

MW SINGLE

851 10.40 BC

846 10.05 CD-289

1229 9.74 DF

Elevator

2 2 " 1 9 "

1 0 "

SIZE

847 10.05 CD-291 8 "

SIZE SINGLE

"

BEDR 138OOM

BF

SINGLE

2 4 "

1 853 3 9.88 " CD-290

1228 9.60 DF

7 "

197 9.85 DF

1 4 "

SOFA

1 5 1 5 855 " 9.85 " CD

2 0 " 914 9.82 CD-271

6 "

1231 10.12 DF

6

1 2 "

SIZE

2 3 "

201 10.04 DF-457

DN 358 9.47 DF-207

SIZE DOUBLE

9 "

1308 1 9.94 0 1CD-338 " 8

1311 9.92 CD-340

WC

BEDR 135OOM

QUEEN SIZE

877 10.19 PP

913 10.15 DF-257

1232 9.36 CD-446

6

RAM P DN

8 856 " 9.99 CD-294 915 10.16 DF-270

1 3 854 " 9.84 CD-292

1 9 "

7 "

1 5 "

1235 10.06 PP

198 9.64 CD

DN

2 0 "

924 9.90 CD-234

1 6 "

925 9.94 DF-235

1233 9.53 DF-447

1295 9.77 DF

MP

1 3 "

2 4 "

1 308 2 9.28 " CD-237

1234 9.26 DF

1 78 0 10.75 " DF-411

41 1 10.67 3 DF-490 "

1 73 0 10.72 " CD/DF-484

1299 9.35 DF-448

2 2 "

1303 10.11 BC SIZE SINGLE

1 322 6 9.20 " DF-242

7 " 1 3 "

QUEEN

1 676 "10.93 CD-412

72 9.90 DF-430

DN

8 "

2 0 "

SIZE

916 9.95 CD-268

332 9.27 DF-213

1298 9.07 DF-450

2 2 77 " 10.87 DF-443

40 1 10.32 3 DF-450 "

65 9.73 DF-427

1226 9.16 DF

1316 9.91 BF

SINGLE

2 4 "

Restaurant seats 90

CIST ACC ERN ESS WC

333 8.84 CD-218? 3 3 "

3 3 "

38 10.85 2 DF-494 9

58 10.11 DF 42 9 10.06 " DF

64 9.06 CD-428

2 4 "

1 6 "

WC 1 4 865 " 10.54 1 866 DF-307 310.48 "DF-306

1 58625 "10.58 " DF-305

917 10.40 CD-269

1 306 2 9.75 " DF-257

2 1 "

9 "

1309 9.62 ARB

1312 9.94 CD

1 0 "

14'-0"

66 9.68 CD-429

UP

7 "

1214 9.89 BC

1225 9.27 DF-445

1 2 "

1297 9.02 DF-449

1315 9.80 CD

1 1314 8 9.96 " CD

1 1313 9.98 7 DF "

AGE

1 0 "

1223 9.81 DF

1296 8.84 DF

1 2 "

1271 9.64 DF-323b

8 "

9 860 " 10.23 DF-303

1 2 " 1294 9.33 DF-451

1320 9.49 CD

8 "

1 5 857 " 9.99 DF-295

9 "

1 8 "

3 "

1 0 "

1 6 "

1272 9.59 CD-324

1 0 "

1321 9.27 CD-332

1300 9.74 FSO

9 859 " 10.34 DF-302

874 9.63 BC

918 10.10 CD-229

57 10.06 CD-485

9 "

1 2 "

1 5 "

DINING 1525 sf

9 " 922 10.63 DF-231

923 10.38 DF-232

1 8 "

362 8.79 CD-211

340 8.66 CL

1 0 "

1323 9.82 DF-308

1 7864 "9.90 DF-308

1293 9.53 DF

1302 9.82 BC

STOR 861 10.29 CD-304

DN

331 8.95 DF-215

1 1 "

361 8.96 DF-206

1 8 "

2 0 323 " 9.10 DF-219

2 8 "

2 863 2 9.20 " DF-331

1334 9.83 DF-332

1 0 "

1338 10.52 DF-309

1 1 "

8 "

37

2 10.74 4 DF-415 "

36 8 10.64 " CD

1 1 "

63 9.08 DF-498

68 9.69 67 DF-437 9.77 CD-431

6

2 4 " 1 305 2 9.89 " DF-233

363 8.56 CD-212

1 8 1317 " 9.56 DF

8 " 9 "

1319 9.37 DF

6 "

1335 10.08 DF-334

1337 10.79 DF

6 "

35 9 10.19 " DF

39 1 10.12 1 DF "

59 9.13 PP

62 9.08 DF-499

1 0 "

1 8 "

71 9.91 DF

1215 9 9.64 " DF

1279 9.46 CD

1333 9.96 DF-311

1 0 "

1 7867 "10.85 DF-310

2 0 858 " 10.13 DF-296

EP

CAL

30 2 10.64 3 CD "

LOUNGE 590 sf

1 2 324 " 8.88 CD-217

1 3 "

SIZE

ANI

34 9 9.93 " DF

61 8.97 DF-500

69 8.95 DF-433

70 9.55 CD-434

7 "

8 "

HW

SINGLE

HW

CH

33 1 9.74 2 BF488 "

56 9.10 DF-496

Fireplace Lounge

1 9 "

1

ME

8 " 55 8.97 DF-497

32 1 9.83 3 DF-487 "

1 1 "

1 4 "

1275 9.25 1274 9.29 6 DF DF "

1 0 "

919 9.79 CD-228

960 875 9.53 9.55 BC BC

1 3 "

1 3 "

1220 9.51 DF-440

1222 1 9.56 0 DF "

1324 8.98 CD-329

1 0 868 " 10.03 DF-297

SIZE

RO 109 OM

2 4 "

60 8.66 DF-501

1219 9 9.19 " DF-442

1221 9.28 DF-441 1 0 "

1 0 "

14'-0"

UP

31 29.56 0DF-486 "

2 4 "

DN

1270 9.44 ORN

1276 9.18 DF

7 "

1 5 "

14'-0"

HW

SIZE

8 "

1325 8.96 CD-330

14'-0"

HW

ROO M 117 STOR AGE

SINGLE

1328 8.92 CD

1330 9.10 CD

4 871 "1 9.97 1 869 0 DF-300 2 870 " 9.88 " 9.74 CD-299 DF-298 DOUBLE

BED

876 959 9.50 9.48 BC

1 2 "

7 "

1 2 872 " 9.87 DF-301

RAM P DN

930 1 9.69 6 CD-227 "1 0 920 9.70 " CD-227

929 1 10.41 8 DF-230 2 3 " "

921 10.20 DF-238

32'-2"

6

932 8 9.79 931 1 " CD 9.76 2 CD-226 "

934 10.04 CD-223

"DF

54 8.64 DF

6

RO 108 OM

SIZE

933 10.14 DF-224

1 8 "

1 6 "

M 116

AGE

1 3 "

9 "

DN

935 10.27 DF-225

937 9.82 CD-222

938 9.69 DF-221

SIZE

STOR

1 0 "

6

2 2 "

1 29 210.01

1 4 "

52 8.39 DF

53 8.55 DF

12 '-0 "

1 2 "

939 9.60 DF-220

940 1 8.56 CD-216 7 "

1 4 " 364 8.37 CD-205

ROO SINGLE

1224 1 9.16 DF-444 6 "

8 "

129'-5"

28 9.91 GF-536

2 8.52 HUB2250

8 "

8 "

1277 9.11 DF

7 "

1280 9.23 DF-323a

1329 8.95 DF-314

1331 9.60 DF

1 2 "

2 26 3 9.65 CD-534 "

51 8.14 DF

M 110

WC

CHAIRS

2 0 " 325 9.07 DF

941 8.67 CD-201

1 3 873 " 9.82 DF-312

ROO

SIZE

1281 8.87 DF

CIST ACCEERN SS

1 6 "

2 8 "

7 "

1 0 "

BED

SIZE

SIZE

111

"

2 25 0 9.94 DF-535 "

1 8.39 A 8 "

DN

ENTR Y HALL

SINGLE

M

WC

SINGLE

1282 8.88 DF

7 "

1283 8.80 DF

6 "

"

1 8 "

946 8.23 CD-197

SIZE

RO 107 OM

SINGLE

QUEEN

1 7 "

1 1 "

QUEEN

BED

1957 19.55 " DF-178

1284 8.81 DF-322

'-0

SIZE

"

9 "

1326 9.02 DF-315

7 "

DN 936 9.52 HUB2258

958 9 9.52 " ARB

1 6 "

4 "

1285 8.76 DF-321

1 1 "

1 8 "

50 8.08 DF

49 8.14 DF-503

48 8.04 DF-502

SINGLE

MECH

SIZE SINGLE

D N

9 956 9.06 " DF

942 8.55 CD-200

1 8 "

BED

943 8.68 CD-199

SIZE

9 "

SINGLE TRUNDLE

1 2 "

SIZE

RO 106 OM

1 0 "

SIZE

M 115

1218 1 8.47 0 ARB-443 "

Cd

1286 8.34 DF-320

1290 8.50 DF-318

2 2 "

DOUBLE

BED

926 9.45 FSH

SIZE

1327 8.84 DF-313

'-0

2 4 "

944 8.96 CD-198

1287 8.34 ARB

8 " 1288 8.30 DF-319

1 0 "

D

SINGLE

RO 104 OM

SIZE

DF-180

1 7 "

1289 8.36 DF

N

SIZE

SIZE

BED

D N

CD-179

1 9947 "9.25

945 8.88 CD-197

1 8 "

1012 8.04 CD-189

44

HC

1 0 953 8.87 " ARB

1 9948 "8.67

949 8.93 CD-181

964 9.44 CD

SINGLE

1 6 "

ROO SINGLE

FWC

1 5 "

8 "

1292 8.26 BC

8 "

RO 105 OM

SIZE

8 954 " 8.73 DF

965 8.81 CD-149

1010 8.00 DF-188

1 0 "

1 0 "

46 7.99 DF-504

SINGLE

SESS ROO ION M

M 114

DRESSING

SIZE

QUEEN

QUEEN

DOUBLE

1 2 "

1011 7.87 CD-190

24

7 955 " 8.68 DF

1006 7.79 CD-187

1 4 "

1 4 "

TIC

SIZE

MWC

961 8.44 CD-153

1005 7.76 CD-132b

SIZE

M 112

ROO ROO DOUBLE

HRV

? 7 "

?

997 9.16 CD-146

BED

1 6 "

1 4 24 " 1 9.08 4 CD-537 "

4 8.38 DF

booth seats 4-6

D

1 1 "

N 1 2 "

1 2 "

1 4 "

1009 7.55 DF-185

UIP

GY

R

963 8.44 CD-154

1008 7.51 CD-184

8 "

EQ

M

CA

D

MP N RO UTE OM

8 " 1 0 "

PAY PHO NE

DN

SINGLE

GE

1213 7.87 BC

SINGLE

CO

1 0 "

1 7 " 950 8.07 CD-173 1 4 951 " 8.26 CD-172

962 8.19 CD-155

DN

COV ERED DECK

M 113

ROO

LOUN

?

1 1 "

RAMP

ROO

DECK

SE P

ROOM

1 4 "

1 6 "

COV ERED DECK

RO N

D

952 8.26 DF-171

9 "

967 8.37 CD-156

966 9.04 CD-148

D

1 0 "

1 5 "

N

995 9.01 CD-144

1 23 7 9.39 "DF-538

1 821 "9.12 CD-533

1 720 "9.18 CD-532

1 22 2 8.95 " DF

1 2 " 1 1248 0 8.10 DF "

P3

N 978 8.22 PP 1 0 "

17 8.89 CD-530

1 4 19 " 8.99 CD

1 1247 0 8.09 " DF

DN

996 8.53 CD-143

1007 7.79 LAMP

43 7.76 CD-505

4'0"

R BUI LDI NG

OL

PO

HE

968 7.65 CD-158

998 8.05 CD-142

1239 7.52 OAK

1001 8.04 CD-139

1 0 "

STO

IN LIV

PO

C

OL

ME

BU

W

DN

C W CK DE

BO

C CH ME

977 8.92 DF-165

Qr

1240 7.42 HZ 1242 6.95 TRLS

RECEPTION

2 7 18 " 8.96 DF-529 2 1 "

2 9 "

SESSION

1 2 "

1 0 "

1 16 8.54 6 CD-528 "

6 8.31 CD-526

5 8.18 DF-525

1250 2 7.93 7 DF-506 "

1249 6 7.74 " DF

DN

STAGE

999 7.36 DF-140

1 2 "

1244 6 7.71 " DF

1243 8 7.79 " ARB

AUDITORIU

1 0 "

8 1003 7.43 " CD-135

1 4 "

DN

DN SIZE

BED

QUEEN

DE CK D CO VE

RE 8 "

971 7.16 CD-124

972 7.19 DF-125 1 2 976 1 " 8.02 0 975 DF-164 " 7.91 DF-163

1000 7.25 CD

8 "

1 8 "

1246 2 7.45 4 CD "

DN

1 2 "

1 4 "

8 "

6 "

DN

DY BE W DR OR OO 13 K 3 M

UP 8 "

973 7.10 CD-126

1004 7.11 CD-132a

1002 7.23 CD-137

W

C

8 991 7.12 " ARB-166

969 7.28 CD-157

Massage 1

3 0 "

1245 2 7.72 7 DF-507 "

1241 7.21 ASH

DECK

1 2 "

1017 6.73 CD-114

1 6 "

OVE

K

8 992 " 7.00 ARB

987 9 7.23 " CD-83 970 7.32 DF-123

990 7 7.67 " ARB-162 1989 27.72 "DF-161

1 2 "

O R

D 1 8 "

1 2 "

1 0 "

RE W OR BE K DR 13 OO 4 M BO DY

UP 974 7.03 CD-129

15 8.53 CD

7 8.24 CD-527

1211 7.48 FSN

Sa

OU LO TD UN OO GE R

8 "

1018 6.62 CD-113

10 7.96 DF-543

8 8.39 DF-541

1 2 "

2 1 "

DY

986 2 7.14 0 CD-84 "

1019 6.54 CD-111

2 0 "

9 8.00 DF-542

1 7 11 " 7.85 CD-544 2 3 "

1254 7.43 CD-529

3 1251 0 7.40 DF"

BO

DN 1 994 6 0 7.00 " " ARB

2 3 "

7 1252 7.08 " ARB

EX IS T IN G

1 988 0 7.04 " DF-82

979 6.79 FSI

9 993 " 6.76 DF

8 "

SOFA

LO

IT JAN

UP

NC DECA CK RPO RT

DN

1 1115 6.60 0 DF-66 " 1 1117 6.60 0 DF "

1035 6.91 DF-116

1034 6.70 DF-115

WC

1 3 12 " 7.85 CD-545 2 1255 4 7.56 " CD-523

1 1253 1 7.12 " ARB-510

SOFA

RA

The Lodge A is a building that is both extroverted and introverted in character. It will be a very public building with the reception, restaurant, lounge and café /bar. A glass wall on the main level will face the colonnade opening the interior to views, weather, seasons and activities outside.

W

1 1114 0 6.31 DF-65 " 1 1116 0 6.19 DF-68 "

1 5983 "86.79 CD-86 984 " 6.73 CD-85

1 2 "

CO VE

1 1113 0 6.42 " DF

1 1123 6.24 0 DF "

1124 1 7.08 2 DF "

1 5982 " 6.91 CD-87

1037 6.46 CD

W OR

1125 8 6.25 " DF-78

1130 1 6.30 0 DF-79 "

8 985 " 6.52 DF-88 6 "

1020 5.99 CD

11110 66.22 DF "

1112 9 6.43 " DF-62?63?

1036 6.60 DF-117

1 5 "

IL D IN G

UP

UP M EN123 DR KIT OO CH

BE

RM BED

WC CK DE

CT

CO

ELE

SIZE

CK

DN

DE UP CK

DN

DE

BEBEDR DR OO OO MM 121 125

DE DE CK CK

WC

HWDN T

LIV 120 ING 126 M

M LIV DR 127ING OO BE

DR OO

ING WC WC

BE

DIN DN WC attic access

CK

UP

RA GE

DE

CK

124

STO

DE

M

WC

DN DN

DR OO BE

BE DR BED OO RM M

QUEEN

1111 8 5.86 " ARB

"

DN

1 1118 2 6.10 CD "

EP EP

2 1 1256 " 17.59 0CD-522

P RAM

11109 65.85 CD-70 "

HW

1108 6 5.72 " CD

SIZE DOUBLE

HW

1106 7.47 CD-73

1126 6 6.01 " DF

1129 6.01 BF

1039 6.25 CD

1 6 "

SIZE

2 2 " 13 8.03 DF

M OO DR140

1 2 "

1127 1 5.65 2 DF-80 "

1 1032 2 6.77 1033" CD-122 6.72 CD-121

1038 6.37 DF-118

QUEEN

SIZE DOUBLE

BED

2 0 "

1105 6 5.81 " CD 1128 6.02 BF-81

6 "

1 0 " 6 "

1 6 "

DN

1122 8 5.50 " DF

1 6 1041 " 6.00 CD-90

1021 6.61 DF-110

1 6 "

1 0 "

1 1097 2 5.19 " DF-46

1095 3 5.19 0 CD-45 "

1107 5.50 CD-72

1 1257 6 7.66 "ARB-549

BE

2 1093 05.15 CD-44 "

1 6 "

8 "

1022 6.22 CD-108

2 0 "

7 1096 " 4.99 ARB-47

2 1092 05.09 " CD-43

11091 75.13 "CD

1 1104 0 5.53 " CD

1024 6.28 DF-104

1040 6.14 DF-119

8 1098 " 5.21 ARB

2 1090 05.08 " DF-40

8 1101 5.24 " CD-77 1 1102 1 1103 0 5.36 0 5.39 " CD " CD

1121 8 5.45 " CD

WC BODYWORKS 1,200 SQ.FT.

2 4 " 14 8.26 DF

M OO ed) DR141 ess t acc

2 1089 05.02 " DF

1088 4.94 CD-36

1 1083 2 5.11 " CD-31

8 1084 " 5.36 CD-33

1043 5.13 FSJ 1045 5.57 DF-93

SIZE DOUBLE

1 1259 2 7.82 " DF-520

(no

1 0 "

8 1099 " 5.43 DF-49

1 1258 2 7.29 " DF-521

BE

1 71078 " 5.15 CD-32

1049 5.59 DF-94

1100 4.93 BC

DOUBLE

2 1 1260 6.95 " DF-518

??

WC

SIZE

1 91261 "7.90 DF-517

4 1265 " 7.02 CD

??

8 1082 " 5.08 CD-35

1046 4.85 ALD

1050 5.41 DF-95

1 2 "

8 "

2 0 " 1023 5.80 ARB

SIZE

SIZE DOUBLE

1 6 1262 " 7.30 DF-516

1 6 1263 " 7.39 BF-515

1 1 1264 7.02 " DF-514

O NE SED W LO LO CA DG TI E ON

1217 5.94 BF

M OO ed) DR142 ess t acc

1047 4.88 BF

7 "

1 0 "

1 0 1042 " 5.88 CD-92

6 "

SIZE

SINGLE

8 "

(no

7 "

1 2 "

981 5.42 BC

0"

BE

1031 5.72 ARB

SINGLE

1216 5.57 PALM

??

6 "

SIZE

8 1086 " 4.82 1CD-38 1087 4 4.84 " CD-39

1025 5.56 CD-103

Tf

M OO DR143

1027 6.11 DF

SINGLE

2 4 1081 5.31 " DF-30

PRPs OP

RY

SHO

NOT MAPPED

FP

1 6 "

1026 5.70 DF

SIZE

T

P

DN

8 "

9 "

SINGLE

1 81085 "4.75 CD-37

1048 4.65 YEW

ND

9 "

GIF

BEDROO M 132 BEDROO MEETING 131 M ROOM

1 4 1079 " 4.70 CD-21 4 "

DN

1210 5.88 ORN

LAU

DN

1 " 5.08 CD-57 2 "

HW

BE

Ap

WC

GE

1 1146 2 4.89 1144 CD-57 4.991 " 2 DF-581145

BAR FRIDGE

DN DN

WC

1 9 1076 " 4.51 CD-28

1 0 1077 " 4.44 CD-29

WC UN

ION

TRY DN

1142 9 4.78 1143 " DF-59 1 0 4.91 WL-60 " 1 2 "

MW

MEETING ROOM

??

RA GE

2 4 " 1072 4.85 CD-27

1051 5.08 JM

4 "

LO EPT

EN

BEDROO M 130 LIVING

WC

DN

TTE

1080 1 4.84 2 ALD "

SINGLE

SIZE SIZE

P RAM

STO

2 2 "

2 4 " 1073 4.21 CD-24

HENE

SIZE

UP

M OO DR144

1 9 " 1070 4.60 DF-26

KITC

DN

OP

SIZE BED E

RA GE

REC

DECK

1147 4.57 BC

1136 4.42 CH

BEDROO M 156

9 1075 " 4.65 DF

SH

8'-

Massage 2

WC RK

CK

higher

SINGLE TRUNDL

STO

1028 5.57 DF-99

1 8 1074 " 4.40 CD-23

1071 4.30 CD

9 "

0"

3 0 "

2 0 " 1069 4.49 CD 6 "

DE

36"

BE

Ps

1061 4.27 DF-11

WO

1207 6.18 DF

SIZE

1068 4.30 DF-20

1131 4.06 BC

1 2 "

2 0 "

??

1059 3.84 CD 1060 4.23 CD-18

P

SINGLE

6 "

E

TRY

DN

E

E

HW

1058 3.92 CD

PAN

"

DN

5 "

DG

EN

1202 26.74 4DF

2 2 1266 " 6.65 CD

RA GE

DR Y

up

BEDROOM

1 5 "

1056 3.88 CD

STO UN

??

SIZE SINGLE

1062 3.95 CD

1055

3.89 8 CD "

E

STO DN RA GE

R

up

6 "

1052 3.98 CD

1 2 "

1030 5.03 ARB

EZE

DN

2 8 "

1054 3.85 CD

1053 3.92 CD

1 6 "

1 0 "

3 1 1267 " 6.30 DF-352

OW OF FIC

QUEEN QUEEN

P DN RAM

SINGLE

6 "

9 "

1029 4.74 DF

NE

rm

- SW ALL

M OO DR145

RAG

RECEPTION

SW ALL

ST confi

N

BE

24'-

1057 3.89 DF SIZE

NOT MAPPED

1 2 "

FIC

PRE

STO

SIZE QUEEN

-

'S

SIO

LA

FRE

RAM P DN

OF

K

BAR BEDROOM

TTE KITCHENE

N

OW

SES

E

WC

WC

FIC

SIO

GE

UP

FIC

DN

DEC

1133 4.05 K

1064 3.42 BC

RA GE

E

WC

PORCH

NOT MAPPED

3 0 "

SES

STO

gene RA ral

BED

SW SESSIO STO AL hous RAN VIE LO ekee W WS pingGE

WC FIC

KIT

FIC

UP

OM

DN

1 4 "

FOLD

MEE OFFIC TIN E G RO

DN

ING

DN

confi RA rm GE DN

STO

ING

1205 5.37 GKO

E

RA GE

DN

DIN

DN

FIC

UIP

DIN

DEC

1141 3.92 BC

1 0 1 " 1138 3.76 5 ARB "

2 0 "

ING

3 "

OF

EQ

DN

DIN

STO

DN

UP

RN CISTE SS ACCE

1066 3.22 DF

1065 2.74 DF

1 8 "

1203 5.56 CH

ING

BBQ

1153 4.99 BC

RAMP

1 2 "

GE CHAN ROOM

1067 3.21 DF

STO

DIN

WC

WC

1 2 "

1204 5.46 AP

1 6 "

DN

Y ENTR

CK

UNDER ROOF

1152 4.26 G

DN

1 2 1139 " 3.35 DF

DE

1180 5.19 2 DF-581 2 "

1181 1 5.05 8 DF "

HOT TUB

1 8 "

1 8 "

WC

?

R

DN

DECK

CISTE

OVER DECK

shop

RN

1 2 "

24 January 2014

1193 5.69 CD

1177 1 4.42 7 CD-577 "

1 8 "

The masonry, rammed earth wall will parallel the curved, glass exterior wall bisecting Facilities Masterplan Lodge A longitudinally down the middle. This DRAFT MASTERPLAN massive wall will provide a barrier between the outer, community workings of The Haven facing the Circle Meadow and the private accommodation rooms and session rooms and inner workings of the facility.

ENTRY

1191 5.00 DF

1192 5.09 DF

1172 4.46 2 DF 5 "

1155 3.64 DF

1 1 "

1151 3.26 G

1184 5.51 DF-556

6

The siting of Lodge A allows for it to be constructed while the existing lodge is still in use. Once Lodge A is operational, the existing lodge will be removed, creating a grand reveal of its waterfront views.

WC

ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS

ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS

October 22 2013 DRAFT


Lodge B

Lodge B Conceptual Program Main Level

Upper Level ORCA LODGE

24'" 24'-0

ďŹ re

LOU

'-0

SHARED DORM 1 12'X16'

"

CH

RO O

Pool 20' x 48'

16'-0

M

STANDARD PRIVATE 1 12'X16'

SHARED DORM 2 12'X16'

IN ENTR Y

BATH 5

GYM / POOL

STANDARD PRIVATE 2 12'X16'

PRIVATE BASIC 1 7'X11'

PRIVATE BASIC 2 7'X11'

PRIVATE BASIC 3 7'X11'

BATH 7 BATH 2

SHARED DORM 3 12'X16'

WC

PRIVATE BASIC 4 7'X11'

PRIVATE BASIC 5 7'X11'

STANDARD PRIVATE 3 12'X16'

LOUNGE

BATH 9

BATH 10

BATH 4

SHARED DORM 4 12'X16'

Massage 3

STANDARD PRIVATE 4 12'X16'

BATH 11

24'-

RECEPTION

8'-

0"

PRIVATE BASIC 8 7'X11'

LOUNGE

BATH 12

0"

Massage 2

PRIVATE BASIC 6 7'X11'

PRIVATE BASIC 7 7'X11'

"

KS

BATH 3

24'-0

B

OR YW OD

ENTRY

BODYWORKS 1,200 SQ.FT.

BATH 8

ION

WC

"

OFFICE

BATH 6

OFFICE

SESSION 1,388 SQ.FT.

"

84'-0

ROO

ODATIO N MA

SESS

18'-0

"

LOUNGE

BATH 1

CHANGE ROOM

TR OO

F

6'-0"

BATH

24'-0"

ACCOMM

CHANGE ROOM

MEN

"

"

ENTRY

0"

SHARED DORM 4 12'X16'

WC

WC

HOUSE KEEPING

Massage 1 RECEPTION

24 '-0

44

" '-0

"

24 '-0 " 24 '-0 "

BUILDING AREA 8,226 sq.ft. MAIN FLOOR UPPER FLOOR 4,330 sq.ft. TOTAL 12,556 sq.ft.

BUILDING AREA MAIN FLOOR 8,226 sq.ft. UPPER FLOOR 4,330 sq.ft. TOTAL 12,556 sq.ft.

24 '-0 "

metal roofing, cedar and metal siding will be durable, low maintenance and will connect the buildings with the natural surroundings.

E /G A

GYM 790 SQ.FT.

24'-

ition of retreat facilities that are located in spectacular, Thesettings use of natural building is The ote and natural that include Seamaterials Ranch and Douglas and fir timbers, porcelain en Institute infundamental. northern California Holly Hock on floor tile, timber slab stair treads, green and tes Island.

96

NG

MES

INDOOR POOL 1,265 SQ.FT.

CAT

38'-0

24'-0"

po 8'-8 ol ta " x ble 4'-1 0"

"

16'-0

"

accessed separately from individual doors opening onto the colonnade. Hallway minimal building form, open layout, glass wall connection circulation space is minimal. Privacy and he outside and use of locally sourced, natural materials is maintained. ne a modern,soundproofing west coast aesthetic. The Haven will lead a

N

COVERED ENTRY

24'-0"

40'-0

24'-0

od decks will be replaced by on grade concrete patios The diverse facilities on the main level are ease of access, extended lifespan and low maintenance.

"

LOUNGE /GAMES ROOM 1,200 SQ.FT.

Accommodation units with configurations

road overhang will surround both The Haven and Orca ranging from large to small, both private and ges. The overhang will shade the building interior in by shared, are on the upper floor, traversed mer when the suncorridors is high inand thebookended sky. Whenby thespacious sun is low wide winter light willlounges. come in under the overhang.

'-0

WA TER

24'-0"

The pool, change rooms, a recreational use of natural building materials is fundamental. Douglas mbers, porcelain floor timber treads, green lounge withtile, pool table slab and stair fireplace, metal roofing, cedar and metaland siding will rooms be durable, low bodywork centre session ntenance andare willon connect thefloor. buildings with the natural the main Service access oundings. and cistern rainwater storage are below.

EE

F

38

24'-0"

LODGE B multitudinous and diverse facilities on the main level are Thefrom schematic concept calls for a continuing essed separately individual doors opening onto the colonnade connecting Lodge A to Lodge onnade. Hallway circulation space is minimal. Privacy B, is enclosing The Circle Meadow. ntained.

GR

24'-0"

pool, change rooms, a recreational lounge with pool e and fireplace, The Bodyworks and session rooms are the main floor. Service access and cistern rainwater age are below. Accommodation units with figurations ranging from large to small both private and ed are on the upper floor. Traversed by wide corridors bookended by spacious lounges.

ORCA LODGE

0"

continuing colonnade connects The Orca Lodge with Haven Lodge enclosing The Circle Meadow.

A broad overhang will surround both Lodge A and Lodge B. The overhang will shade the west building interior in summer when the sun is high in the sky. When the sun is low in winter light will come in under the overhang.

Wood decks will be replaced by on grade concrete patios for ease of access, extended east lifespan and low maintenance. The minimal building form, open layout, glass wall connection to the outside and use of locally sourced, natural materials define a modern, west coast aesthetic. The Haven ORCA LODGE - MASTER PLAN PLACE SETTER ONLY -FOR CALCULATION OF ROOM SIZES -SITE COVERAGE & BUILDING MASSING

will lead a tradition of centres that are located in spectacular, remote and natural settings that include Sea Ranch and The Esalen Institute in northern California and Hollyhock on Cortes Island.

ORCA LODGE - MASTER PLAN PLACE SETTER ONLY -FOR CALCULATION OF ROOM SIZES -SITE COVERAGE & BUILDING MASSING

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

37


Hotel Haven Conceptual Program queen-size bed 66"x80"

With flexible layout and a variety of units it will accommodate shared singles, couples and families. Main & upper floor lounges allows for communal congregation. Shared bathrooms are in keeping with the modest living spaces typified by The Haven philosophy.

STAFF BUILDING The vision plan includes a new 2 storey staff building, with administration and registration on the upper floor, housekeeping and maintenance headquarters on the ground floor. It will be connected to Lodge A by a bridge element between the upper floors, making the upper floor wheelchair accessible via Lodge A’s elevator. Depending on funding availability, this building would be most costefficiently constructed at the same time as Lodge A. If funds do not allow construction at that time, the upper floor of the existing Swallow building could be renovated for administration use, until funds can be raised for the staff building.

tub/shower 30x60

tub/shower 30x60

15'-0"

24'-0"

tub/shower 30x60

4'-6"

tub/shower 30x60

queen-size bed 66"x80"

39'-9"

12'-0"

15'-0"

12'-0"

queen-size bed 66"x80"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

10'-0"

12'-0"

109'-0"

MAIN FLOOR

2'-6"

HOTEL HAVEN

GREEN ROOF PATIO

ROOMS

24'-0"

BATHRM

BATHRM

LOUNGE

GREEN ROOF PATIO

ROOMS

BUILDING AREA MAIN FLOOR 3,400 sq.ft. UPPER FLOOR 2,200 sq.ft. TOTAL 5,600 sq.ft.

80'-0"

Tucked away and private on the water’s edge, with a view of the Georgia Strait, the Faculty Building is to be located in a special spot on the property. This location will provide faculty with a place of retreat. The library reading / meditation / 24 hour room will be a quiet, sanctuary like space suitable for contemplation.

UPPER FLOOR

34'-0" 2'-6"

29'-0"

2'-6"

4'-6"

15'-0"

1

Nestled in the forest, it replaces the Raven building, an original accommodation building built as part of the Taylor Bay Resort in the 1930’s. Each main floor unit has access to the outside. Upper floor units get access to a roof top patio with ocean views.

2

3

4

5

6

34'-0"

17'-0"

7

8

9

10

4'-6"

11

12

13

14

15

16

24'-0"

10'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

This building replaces the Seagull cabin that was built in the 1930’s as a part of the original Taylor Bay Resort.

24'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

10'-0"

12'-0"

109'-0"

12'-0"

10'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0" 109'-0"

38

FACULTY+ BUILDING The Faculty Building will house faculty and intern accommodation, two small session rooms, two wheelchair accessible meeting rooms and a library reading / meditation room.

ENTRY

queen-size bed 66"x80"

29'-0"

led in the forest it replaces The Raven Lodge the original mmodation building built as part of the resort in the HOTEL HAVEN 0's. Each main floor unit has access to the outside. Upper Haven an ocean allocation units get accessThe to aHotel roof top patiohas with views.of 9 Tourist Accommodation units, the highest count for a single Haven building. Depending on developed configuration it will have a guest capacity ranging from 36 and up to 72 guests.

LOUNGE tub/shower 30x60

2'-6"

h flexible layout and a variety of units it will accommodate ed singles, couples and families. A main & upper floor ges allows for communal congregation. Shared bathrooms n keeping with the modest living spaces typified by The en philosophy.

Staff Building/Swallow

queen-size bed 66"x80"

8'-0"

Hotel Haven has an allocation of 9 Tourist ommodation units. The highest count for a single Haven ing. Depending on developed configuration it will have a t capacity ranging from 36 and up to 72 guests.

Faculty+ Building

4'-6"

7'-9"

Hotel Haven

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

12'-0"

12'-0"

10'-0"

17'-0"


bridge allows wheelchair access to 2nd floor

existing grade

administration offices

4.59'

second floor

main floor

maintenance shop cistern and services

covered walk

lodge A

staff building

Thunderbird Dorms Conceptual Floor Plan SINGLE SIZE

SINGLE SIZE

SINGLE SIZE

2 lockers

2 lockers

2 lockers

12 DN

6 lockers

CISTERN ACCESS

WC

SINGLE SIZE

SINGLE SIZE

6 lockers

SINGLE SIZE

SINGLE SIZE

HW

SINGLE SIZE

SINGLE SIZE

SINGLE SIZE

SINGLE SIZE

6

6

6 lockers

WC

DN

SINGLE SIZE

The Thunderbird Dorm building is designed to accommodate approximately 30 - 45 guests. It will be most useful during the peak summer season when the kids and youth programs are running. Built-in bunk beds, (potentially single over double with built-in storage units) and 5 shared bathrooms make for efficient accommodation.

6 SINGLE SIZE

SINGLE SIZE

2 lockers

5ft

diameter

THUNDERBIRD DORMS

This project is a renovation to the existing Thunderbird building that currently accommodates up to 14 guests. There is value in doing a retrofit to the existing building. The increased capacity and suitability for group housing can be achieved at modest cost. The existing cistern is already a part the facility water system. The existing building currently is in good repair. Alterations would be fairly minor.

new bathrm

SINGLE SIZE

le path

Thunderbird Dorms

Section Through Lodge A and Staff Building

4 lockers

WC

Bunk bed concepts T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

39


12'-0"

8'-0"

9'-0"

40'-0"

10'-0"

14'-0"

12'-0"

WATERFRONT COTTAGE

3'-0"

8'-0"

12'-0"

8'-0"

tub/shower 30x60

8'-0"

20'-0" 3'-0"

king-size bed

tub/shower 30x60

40'-0" 10'-0"

king-size bed

Cottage Floor Plan Conceptual Program

416 sq.ft.

8'-0"

Cottages

12'-0"

12'-0"

14'-0"

14'-0"

12'-0" 24'-0"

288 sq.ft. 12'-0"

king-size bed

king-size bed

8'-0"

tub/shower 30x60

tub/shower 30x60

8'-0"

12'-0"

12'-0"

tub/shower 30x60

8'-0"

9'-4"

40'-0"

DRAFT MASTERPLAN

20'-0"

288 sq.ft.

tub/shower 30x60

5'-4" 24'-0"

+ 16'6" recommended flood construction level year 2100 12 MAY 2014

9'-4"

ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS

estimated future setback, year 2100

estimated future natural boundary at year 2100 (14'6")

12'-0"

existing builiding setback

DRAFT MASTERPLAN

Facilities Masterplan

2'-0"

WATERFRONT COTTAGE - MASTER PLAN PLACE SETTER ONLY -FOR CALCULATION OF ROOM SIZES -SITE COVERAGE & BUILDING MASSING

ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS

7.5m (24.6')

24'-0"

1.7 m (5'6")

Facilities Masterplan

WATERFRONT COTTAGE - MASTER PLAN PLACE SETTER ONLY -FOR CALCULATION OF ROOM SIZES -SITE COVERAGE & BUILDING MASSING

12 MAY 2014

12'-0" 1.5m

existing project natural boundary

7.5m (24.6')

ARCHITRAVE + TOPOGRAPHICS

DRAFT MASTERPLAN

9'-4"

3.2 m

9'-4"

Facilities Masterplan

Section Through Hotel Haven + Cottage

evel Yr 2013

5'-4" 24'-0"

WATERFRONT COTTAGE

2'-0"

4.4m (14'5")

2'-0"

WATERFRONT COTTAGE

416 sq.ft.

12 MAY 2014

5m (16'6")

20'-0"

UF

4'-0"

COTTAGES Four detached Waterfront Cottages each comprised of one Tourist Accommodation Unit. Flexible in layout, shared singles, couples or families can be accommodated. With kitchenettes and living space these units are also suitable for groups or longer term living quarters. Ground floor living space opens onto the waterfront.

2'-0"

12'-0"

38'-0"

Main Floor 850 sq.ft. Upper Floor 528 sq.ft. Total 1,378 sq.ft.

llowance for evel Yr 2100, surge, wave d freeboard. l Boundary", ane Yr 2100

tion Yr 2013 e Allowance, ent, Yr 2100 evel Yr 2013 etic Datum )

UF

4'-0"

38'-0"

Upper Floor 528 sq.ft. Total 1,378 sq.ft.

+27

room

room

accessible room

accessible room

cistern

+17'

WATERFRONT COTTAGE - MASTER PLAN PLACE SETTER ONLY -FOR CALCULATION OF ROOM SIZES -SITE COVERAGE & BUILDING MASSING

shoreline protection mitigation zone

0.83 m (2'8") 0m

40

sandpiper removed

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

new cottage 1 detached unit

hotel haven 9 attached units

par


Heron Improvements

Phoenix Improvements

RESIDENTIAL ZONED PROPERTIES

Residential Properties

In addition to the main TCI zoned property, The Haven also owns 5 lots along Malaspina Avenue, zoned as SRR - small rural residential. While these properties are not part of the formal scope of this plan, they must be considered as part of the bigger picture. Zoning bylaws constrain what uses are allowable on these sites.

HERON IMPROVEMENTS A sturdy, large, and culturally important building, with many recent upgrades, Heron remains as a long-term fixture of the Plan. The Plan envisions upgrades to this building as part of the initial “Front Door” phase. The east facing facade becomes a visual backdrop to the new arrival sequence, and will require upgrades and/or screening. The building entry sequence is proposed to be relocated to enter through the current Heron’s nest room, creating a more gracious vestibule for the main session room. The relocated accessible ramp will double as a directional feature for the Gateway Gardens. Soundproofing will improve the adjacencies of accommodation and session rooms space, while also help protect the session room from the noise of future construction phases.

THE WONG AND MCKEEN PHOENIX AUDITORIUM IMPROVEMENTS The Wong and McKeen Phoenix Auditorium is historically significant to The Haven, as well as an important resource for the greater Gabriola community, as a venue for hosting public events. The building also contains the largest existing foundation cistern for water storage. All Dream Big visions for the site retained this iconic building. The Plan recognizes the important community nature of this building with an improved entry sequence, with new adjacent parking, entry gardens, entry vestibule, and covered passageway to the Welcome Walk, leading to the refreshment centre of the Lodge A building. Badly needed storage space is also planned.

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

41


Appendix E | Master Plan Open Space Framework OPEN SPACE FRAMEWORK OPEN SPACE CONCEPTS The Haven site provides design inspiration with a sublime natural form of seashore, meadow and forest ecosystems. The north view is exceptional with an arrangement of islands and sunsets. A series of open air rooms are shaped between existing trees and by the placement of new structures as gathering places for the Haven community.

The Welcome Walk

Sunset Meadow + Waterfront Terraces

The Arrival Circle THE WELCOME WALK The Welcome Walk between Heron and The Wong and McKeen Phoenix Auditorium guides guests from the new parking area towards the Circle Meadow and Lodge. It also offers the first view of the sea, framed by the Lodge buildings.

SUNSET MEADOW + WATERFRONT TERRACES A sequence of garden terraces, with landings, alcoves, ramps and stairways provide various gathering opportunities between the new lodge and the seashore. This place invites summer sunset viewing, dinner theatre, and musical performances.

View of Lodge A from the Arrival Circle

Section Through The Sunset Meadow and Waterfront Terraces

the bennet wong lodge 42

existing grade

THE ARRIVAL CIRCLE A forest gateway opens from Davis Road upon an Arrival Circle, surrounded by floor second existing trees and new plantings. A garden courtyard invites visitors westward along a flagstone walkway to the new Lodge A. main floor Southward, vehicles continue to the new Wong and McKeen Phoenix Auditorium and services cisternarea. parking

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

existing lodge removed

existing deck removed

dining terraces, ramps and stairs

recommended flood construction level year 2100 (5m)

existing hot-tub and cistern chapel


The Circle Meadow

CENTRE COURTYARD The Centre Courtyard is a special gathering place, at the point of connection between the Circle and Sunset Meadows, and the twin Lodge buildings. Special paving and art elements create a symbolic centre for The Haven site.

THE CIRCLE MEADOW The Circle Meadow creates a landscape centre for the internal site. Covered walkways and the Lodge buildings circle the meadow at the same grade as the existing septic field, creating easy flow and making a feature out of this currently underutilized space. New deciduous tree plantings add spatial definition, soften the buildings, and provide summer shading.

The twin lodges frame the ocean view and Centre Courtyard, as seen from the Circle Meadow bridge allows wheelchair access to 2nd floor

Centre Courtyard

existing grade

existing retaining wall

existing retaining wall

Section Through The Circle Meadow

main floor

administration offices

4.59'

second floor

maintenance shop cistern and services

the circle meadow and septic fields

the circle path

covered walk

lodge A

staff building T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

43


Appendix F | Master Plan Infrastructure Framework INFRASTRUCTURE FRAMEWORK WATER Extensive work has been done, and is continuing, on studying the potable and non-potable water supply situation at The Haven, and how to improve its year-round sustainabiity, both now and into the climate uncertain future. Bob Burgess, of Rainwater Connection, produced a series of reports for The Haven in 2013, focused on rainwater harvesting. The reports note how rainwater harvesting, in conjunction with on site well water, can improve the balance between water supply and demand. The reports also outline how to improve the quality of roof harvested water. They illustrate a plan of adding additional catchment areas from existing buildings, increasing the rooftop catchment area by 9,028 SF (830m2), or a 62% increase. The reports also encourage the application to continue to use Well B water via reverse osmosis to supplement potable water supply. There are additional recommendations for increasing water conservation, adding additional storage, improving water management, improving harvesting efficiency, and improving water quality. John R. McQuaid, cofounder of Wizards 4 Environmental Technologies Inc, has been assisting The Haven with their rainwater harvesting permit application to the local Jurisdiction of Authority, and developing schematics and construction drawings to improve the health and safety of the system. Lewkowich Engineering Associates Ltd. carried out a hydrogeological assessment for the property in late 2014. The report 44

emphasized the challenges the local groundwater conditions create for wells in this area of the island. Several options were outlined for consideration, and several were ruled out. Among those still on the table are: expanding water storage; drilling a new angled well; regularly trucking water from Nanaimo; placing C Well into production with treatment; expanding rainwater harvesting; desalination; hydrofracturing, starting with an already drilled but dry well; and reclaimed water reuse. It is likely to be a combination of some of these options that will solve The Haven’s water supply issues. WATER IN THE MASTERPLAN While there are factors currently in active study that keep water supply concepts general for now, there are principles embedded in the Plan. Regardless of water source, increasing water storage capability is a clear priority. Certainly the new buildings envisioned for early phases - such as Lodge A and B - schematically allow for foundation cisterns under both buildings. Design elements are also envisioned to both facilitate rainwater harvesting (metal roofs, green roofs to pre-filter harvested water), and highlight the preciousness of water (perhaps window views into the cisterns, downspout features, demonstrable measurements of the cistern levels, etc.). A new, state of the art water treatment centre, to replace the Reps building, and/ or potentially the treatment centre at the Cistern Chapel, could be incorporated into Lodge A or Lodge B. The existing piping and treatment system, developed incrementally over time, could be replaced with a carefully designed system, fully to code and approved by Island Health.

T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

Roof Rainwater Harvesting Master Plan Lodge A 2 Lodge B 3 Phoenix 4 Heron 5 Thunderbird 6 Accommodation 7 Cottages 8 Faculty Building 9 Staff Building

8

Total Roof Area

9 7

1 3

6

2 4

5

3

6200 sf 8200 sf 4800 sf 1900 sf 1700 sf 3400 sf 850 sf each 1700 sf 3900 sf ~ 35,200 sf


SANITARY TREATMENT MASTER PLAN As introduced in Appendix B, Site Inventory and Analysis, an important consideration for the Masterplan is the likely increase in sanitary flow rates to over 5000 gal/day due to the increase in bed capacity, and the corresponding change in Jurisdiction of Authority from the Ministry of Health (MoH) to the Ministry of Environment (MoE). Once the flow monitors have been installed for one annual cycle, more accurate calculations can be made. The flow will be calculated by taking the average daily flow over an entire year and doubling it; an average daily flow of 2500 gallons would trigger the transition to the MoE regulations. While there are some advantages to transitioning to the MoE system (namely the ability to re-use treated reclaimed/ greywater, and reduced disposal field size), there could be significant capital and operational costs associated with the application, system design, and on-going monitoring requirements. Further evaluation will be needed once metered flow rates are established or during the design phase of any projects that will increase bed capacity on the TC1 site, permits for which may trigger the transition process. One strategy that may avoid or delay the increase in flow rate over the 5000 Ig/day is the use of commercial composting toilet

systems for new buildings. There are systems on the market based on foam flush fixtures, that use almost no water. Treatment occurs in sealed tanks situated in service areas of the buildings, so the “toilet experience� for guests is familiar and odorless. It also could be an educational and high-profile green technology for The Haven to promote. An example product can be found at: http:// www.clivusmultrum.com/green-buildingbronx.php. More research is needed to determine if such a strategy would indeed result in less operational and capital costs over the long term than more traditional technologies under the MoE regulations, as well as providing a significant reduction in water needs. TREATMENT + DISPOSAL Allowable treatment and disposal options differ under the MoH or the MoE. The following criteria were also clarified to aid in screening the options: minimal harm to the natural environment; treatment and disposal to occur on site and not piped into the ocean; minimal tree removal; respectful of neighbors (odor, setbacks); adaptable to be allowable under either jurisdiction; demonstrably sustainable, with a potential educational component; reasonable capital, operational and maintenance costs; potential for reclaimed water reuse; and compatibility with ultra low-flow fixtures.

CRITERIA Flow Rate Application Process and Cost

MINISTRY OF HEALTH Up to 4999 Imperial gallons/day Simple. 4 page application form with a scale drawing of proposed system. Approximately hours-week to complete. A day to over one week, depending on time of application and amount of backlog in Health Authority office. Immediately upon acceptance by Regional Health Authority Office

MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT 5000 Imperial gallons/day or greater More involved and costly process. Environmental impact report, maps, and drawings can take days to months to complete. Minimum 90 days from submission of EIS report. Possible for application process to take 6-12 months.

BC Regulation 326/2004. Sewerage System Regulation (SSR).

BC Regulation 87/2012. Municipal Wastewater Regulations (MWR)

Disposal Options (simplified to those being considered by The Haven) Disposal Field Size (for Proposed Flow in Table 1) - varies dependent on flow rate and treatment level Setbacks from wells

Only disposal to ground methods

Disposal to ground methods. A reserve field and standby field are also required.

Financial Requirements

Time between Application and Acceptance/ Approval Time between Application and Commencement of Construction Regulations

Monitoring Requirements

30 days after emplacement of Construction Bond and development of a Replacement Fund, after approval by MoE Pollution Prevention Officer

Septic tank quality = 10,000 sf

Reuse as reclaimed water is possible. Septic tank quality, Class D = 4,400 sf

Secondary, Type 2 standard = 5,000 sf

Secondary, Type B or C = 1500 sf

Type 3 = 3335 sf 30m

A reserve field and standby field are also required. Dependent on level of treatment, minimum of 60m. Treatment must be to High Secondary Level (Level B) to be within 300M of a potable water source. NOTE: even at treatment levels allowing the minimum 60m requirement, A, B, and C wells could all be within the setbacks from either the Heron field or the new proposed sub-surface drip field.

$200 filing fee

Variable fee calculated by Pollution Prevention Officer + Base fee of $100 + $1400/m3 effluent, in cash or security bonds ($42,000 using the full build-out flow rate from Table 1) + replacement fund + land for reserve and standby field (cannot be built on) Annual monitoring program and reports required (likely ~ $2000/year)

APPENDIX F TABLE 2 Comparison between Ministry of Health and Ministry of Environment Regulatory Requirements

APPENDIX F TABLE 1 Current and Masterplan build-out flow rates, calculated by Anita Davey, ROWP T H E H AV E N FAC I L I T I E S M A S T E R P L A N - A P P E N D I C E S

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During the early phases of the Masterplan there was significant interest in “living machine” / wetland treatment systems, similar to those at the Esalen Institute in California or the Omega Institute in New York. Both institutions actively promote their systems as demonstrable elements of their commitment to sustainability. These types of systems require up-front pre-treatment, before undergoing polishing treatment in constructed wetland beds. For The Haven, under the MoH’s Sewerage System Regulation (SSR), the treated effluent would still have to be disposed of under ground. Under the MoE’s Municipal Wastewater Regulation (MWR), the highly treated effluent could be reused as nonpotable water, disposed of under ground or above ground, or discharged into Taylor Bay. During the Masterplan process, it was determined that if the overall goal was to remain under the MoH’s SSR, the wetland polishing step, while with educational and promotional value, was not worth the additional capital and operational costs when the treated effluent would still need to be disposed under ground. If The Haven does transition to the MoE’s MWR, and the treated effluent can be reused, then there is value in considering constructed wetlands as part of the treatment system. More study and discussion is needed to determine if the extra capital and operational costs can be justified by the educational and marketing opportunity, or if packaged treatment plants would be sufficient. The current recommendation for disposal is to develop a drip disposal field within the forested southwest region of the property. These fields are acceptable disposal systems by both the MoH and MoE. They are relatively simple to install, and require only minimal groundcover vegetation removal. The flexible pipes can be wound around existing trees, which provides the forest with 46

some irrigation (mitigating fire risk and the increasing impacts of summer drought due to climate change), while evapotranspiration actually assists in the uptake and distribution of the effluent. Initially, the drip disposal field will replace the Sandpiper fields, the “missing” Raven field, as well as the Swallow/ Cormorant field, opening up that valuable waterfront view land for building sites. The new drip field could also be constructed, initially or in stages, to eventually uptake effluent from all facilities; consolidation into a common field is recommended for ease of maintenance. The existing fields can remain as back-up / reserve / standby fields, as required by the MWR, or phased out.

Sanitary Treatment Master Plan Concept

The current recommendation for treatment is to install an aerobic treatment plant to treat the effluent to a quality recognized by both the MWR and SSR to allow a reduced field size. Modular elements can be added at later phases to accommodate increased flow when connecting new facilities, as well as to increase the level of treatment to reclaimed water standards, when/if under the MWR. Alternatively, existing treatment facilities can be incorporated, while still diverting flows to the new drip disposal field. The treatment and disposal design must consider the likelihood of transition to MWR, and the resulting change in setback requirements from well sources (see the Sanitary Servicing Diagram in Appendix B). At a minimum, all effort should be made to ensure treatment levels and field locations do not impact the ability to use Well A. The Heron field may need to be phased out in that case. GREYWATER REUSE In parts of the world with increasing water shortages, greywater reuse is becoming a more common tool for potable water conservation. Greywater is commonly

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considered the untreated water from bathroom sinks, washing machines, and showers/baths. Usually, kitchen water, (and obviously toilet flushing) is considered blackwater, due to higher amounts of contaminants. Greywater can be a water source for non-potable uses such as toilet

flushing, irrigation, or fire suppression - the most likely potential uses at The Haven. Treatment requirements and standards for reuse vary by jurisdiction. In Canada, the greywater regulatory environment is complex and evolving. Health Canada has issued the Canadian Guidelines for

Domestic Reclaimed Water for Use in Toilet and Urinal Flushing (Health Canada, 2010), and the Standards Council of Canada has issued standards for packaged residential and light commercial non-potable water treatment and reuse systems. BC is also the first province to begin addressing “reclaimed


water” regulation under the Municipal Wastewater Regulation (MWR) (BC Ministry of Environment,2013). The MWR makes no distinction between a greywater or blackwater source; regulations instead refer to the level of quality a treatment system must produce for certain uses. For toilet flushing, reclaimed water must be clear, odorless, and sufficiently disinfected - a high level of Type B treatment. Up to 50% of wastewater, sufficiently treated, may be recycled. Special coloured piping, signage, and backflow prevention devices are required. Treatment and use measures must be developed in consultation with the MoE regional director and local health officer.

ELECTRICAL The 25 year master plan will need a new BC Hydro three phase primary service with one three phase secondary service demarking in a single electrical room and all new power feeders to the buildings. This will provide for a significantly increased power supply. Upgraded service will be brought in along Davis Road from Taylor Bay Road, and connect to a new stand-alone electrical building located in the northeast corner of the property. The current three separate meter services will be consolidated into one. This will allow for direct distribution from a new central system to each building. Initially, it will be directly connected to Heron, Phoenix and Osprey.

In practice, there are very few permitted greywater systems in BC to date (Balke, 2014). The treatment system and dual piping required can create high up-front costs, and the regulatory approval process can be challenging. It is also possible the additional plumbing complexity and hence potential of cross-contamination may complicate the rainwater harvesting regulatory environment. As the most promising source supply, supporting the approval of the rainwater harvesting system is recommended as the priority. That said, paradigms and regulations are changing, and more pioneer projects are likely. Additionally, The Haven has been dual plumbed for potable and non-potable water use and is accustomed to treating water for use. However, adding dual “out” plumbing to separate grey and black water would still be recommended, and potentially the nonpotable “in” line may need to be replaced with special marked pipes. Greywater / reclaimed water reuse is worth examining more closely in future project planning and design as part of a holistic, sustainable approach to site water management.

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Appendix G | Master Plan Diagrams FUNCTIONAL AND GUEST EXPERIENCE DIAGRAMS Arrival Experience

Guest Amenities

Circulation

Low Capacity Operation “The Core”

PLANNING A COMPLETE PLACE The Masterplan considers all aspects of operations and guest experience holistically. Each space responds to its context, and many layer together multiple functions. Together each space and project moves towards an improved whole. ARRIVAL EXPERIENCE The arrival experience of guests to The Haven is choreographed as an easily comprehended sequences of arrival moments. All guests are met by an opening and inviting glimpse of Lodge A at the terminus of Davis Road. Guests arriving by taxi or shuttle are dropped off at the arrival circle, and move through the Gateway Gardens to the Front Desk in Lodge A. Guests arriving by car use the short-term registration parking lot while registering, then move their vehicles to the parking lots. Those parking in The Wong and McKeen Phoenix Auditorium parking lot will follow the Welcome Walk between Phoenix and Heron, and will complete their arrival experience with their first view of the ocean, framed by the two iconic lodge buildings. CIRCULATION Cars are kept to the periphery of the site. Wheelchair accessible pathways connect all buildings and facilities on the site. Delivery trucks back into the “back of house” zone between the staff building and Lodge A. GUEST AMENITIES Guest amenities are concentrated in the Lodge A and B buildings, as part of the consolidated core.

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LOW CAPACITY OPERATION Currently, the average annual occupancy rate is about 30%, but often all buildings are partially occupied. This adds to the housekeeping and energy resource operating costs. By concentrating all essential facilities and a variety of accommodation types in a few key buildings, other buildings can be seasonally closed, saving valuable operating funds.

Session Rooms

Transitional Spaces

Gathering Areas

Intimate Spaces

SESSION ROOMS + TRANSITIONAL SPACES Most session rooms surround the inner Circle Meadow, with two additional small session rooms in the Faculty+ Building. Covered walkways allow for rain-protected circulation to and from the Lodges, and support the transition in experience from the intimacy and transformational nature of sessions to the busy activity of the Lodges. GATHERING AREAS Spaces intended for social gathering in larger groups are concentrated in the core area of the site, creating a vibrant centre. Both indoor areas (dining, lounge spaces, etc.) and outdoor areas are planned. INTIMATE SPACES Spaces for intimate conversation or private reflection are also envisioned throughout the site. These can be as simple as a bench, a pair of armchairs, or special garden nooks. Indoor areas include the 24 hour room/ meditation room / library.

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STAFF Staff areas are concentrated to allow for ease of communication and access. A bridge from Lodge A’s elevator to the new staff building will allow for wheelchair access to administration offices. Including housekeeping storage areas in the new buildings will reduce the effort and frequency of transporting supplies.

Staff

Faculty, Assistants, + Interns

Kids, Youth, + Families

Fire Truck Access

KIDS, YOUTH, + FAMILIES Kids, youth and families are welcomed throughout the site. Family suitable accommodation is provided at all pricepoints, including bunk-beds, connected standard rooms, and cottage suites. The centre and sunset meadows double as playfields, and a kids play area is viewable from the outdoor dining terraces. FACULTY, ASSISTANCE + INTERNS The Plan provides spaces for program leaders and interns to meet, prepare for sessions, and take respite. Faculty accommodation does not count towards the Tourist Accommodation Units, and are clustered together with meeting rooms and session rooms in the Faculty+ Building. Soundproof meeting rooms adjacent to the library create a learning centre for fostering intern training. FIRE TRUCK ACCESS Initial input from the Gabriola Fire Department indicates the need for 20’ (6m) wide fire-truck access, as well as turnarounds (or hammerheads), and staging areas at the 2 areas indicated.

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Appendix H | Tourist Accommodation Unit Phasing PHASING_TOURIST ACCOMMODATION UNITS TOURIST ACCOMMODATION UNITS A factor that needs to be considered in the phasing of buildings is the finite cap on Tourist Accommodation Units, set to 30 by local zoning bylaws. Since the existing facility has been deemed to be at the 30 unit limit, any new accommodation construction will require decommissioning of existing units. The following is one possible scenario of how this exchange could unfold. The goal is to increase the price diversity and number of beds that can be accommodated within the 30 units. By maximizing the space design within the allowable square footage of each unit, the Plan increases the number of guests that can be accommodated on the TCI site by about 50%, by expanding the number of beds from 84 to 128.

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Appendix I | Master Plan Statistics MASTERPLAN STATISTICS

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Appendix J | Fire Risk Management FIRE RISK MANAGEMENT Most of the existing resort was designed and built with tree preservation as a priority, not fire risk management. Designing to minimize the consequences of wildfire is much more promoted today. Wildfire is a definite concern on Gabriola Island. Indeed, the Gulf Islands’ forests historically burned every 100300 years (Ministry of Environment, 2013). The longer, drier summers predicted due to climate change are also increasing the risks (Ministry of Environment, 2013).

In the drought of summer, however, even less combustible vegetation can allow a fire to progress.

The risks to be mitigated include the impacts of a wide-spread wildfire to the property and structures, and the risk of a fire starting on the property and spreading through the forest and to nearby properties.

Ground fires are usually less intense and dangerous than a crown fire. Once a fire has spread to the tree crowns it is very difficult to control. Therefore, a key aspect of risk management involves removal or reduction of “ladder fuels” that will spread a fire to tree crowns. Ladder fuels include shrubs, downed branches, and lower branches.

There are existing design and materials factors on site that contribute to fire risk: BUILDINGS For buildings, risk elements include wood siding, single-pane windows, open eaves, combustible roofs, a lack of sprinkler systems, and open decks (BC Forest Service, 2013). These are common elements of the existing buildings. Electrical hazards are also being noted for upgrades. LANDSCAPE Research indicates that some vegetation is more combustible than others. In addition to seasonal factors, characteristics that contribute to combustibility include fine leaves and branches, accumulated dry dead material, resin content, dense branching structure, or flaking thin bark. In general, coniferous and evergreen vegetation is more combustible, and deciduous vegetation is less.

Highly combustible tree species found on site include cedar, cypress, Douglas fir, yew, arbutus, spruce, and balsam fir. Some of the higher combustibility understory/ groundcover includes juniper, bamboo, boxwood, rosemary, dry grasses, broom (Scotch and Spanish), and blackberry.

INFRASTRUCTURE Access to water during a fire is critical. On Gabriola, the fire trucks carry their own water supply. There is also a hydrant between Heron and Phoenix that gives access to all of the water in the Phoenix cistern in the event of a fire. The fire crews could also tap into The Haven’s pool, in the event of a fire. Water is also accessible for a reload nearby: at the ferry terminal fire hydrant, and at Camp Miriam. If the other on-site cisterns can be accessed by a 6” hose, those would also be back-up water sources. Currently, while many power lines are underground, some are distributed overhead. Particularly for the high voltage line near the Davis St. entrance, this can be a major

ignition hazard, due to the potential for breakage from falling trees, as well as arcing to adjacent vegetation (Pottinger Gaherty, 2005). Underground power lines are typically more fire safe.

Fire Risk Management Zones

Propane tanks are also potential hazards. They should be kept a minimum of 10m from any building, and their surroundings kept clear of vegetation for at least 3m. Relief valves should be regularly maintained, and always point away from buildings. FIRESMART GUIDELINES The Gabriola Island Fire Department, as well as the 2005 The Haven Vegetation Management Plan, recommend adherence to the BC Forest Service’s FireSmart Guidelines. These guidelines focus on creating a “defensible space” around a structure, as well as recommending materials and construction details for the structure itself. Defensible space is recommended as a series of zones, radiating from a structure, each with vegetation management strategies.

• Priority 1 Zone (10 meters from

a structure) removal of all shrubs, trees, and combustible materials. Recommended groundcover is irrigated lawn. • Priority 2 Zone (10-30 meters from a structure) remove smaller trees, shrubs and debris. Space trees so crowns are 3-6 metres apart. Remove or reduce coniferous trees. • Priority 3 Zone (130-100 meters from a structure) Thin the shrubs and smaller trees, and evergreen trees. Thin crowns to 3-6 metres.

BALANCING ECOLOGICAL VALUES WITH SAFETY AND PROPERTY PROTECTION If the current BC Firesmart Guidelines are directly implemented, the property will look very different than it does today. Given the potential safety, economic, and aesthetic consequences of fire on the property, fire risk management indeed must be carefully considered. However, a blanket adoption of the BC Firesmart Guidelines will conflict with other values, such as tree preservation,

water conservation, landscape experience, and environmental stewardship. The Priority Zone guidelines outlined below offer an alternative balanced approach. Fire Risk Management Priority Zone 3 (30 -100 m from structures) 1. Reduce fuel load, especially “ladder fuels” which spread fire to tree crowns: 2. Remove non-native highly combustible understory vegetation (i.e.: scotch broom).

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Fire Risk Management Priority Zone 2 (10 -30 m from structures) 1. As Zone 3, and; 2. Particularly before high fire risk season, remove deadfall and dead material, especially finer needles and twigs. Chip and return this material as a moisture conserving and organic amendment mulch on the forest floor. Leave larger snags and coarse woody debris (greater than 7cm diameter) as important wildlife habitat. 3. Thin high combustibility trees less than 8” diameter at breast height (DBH). Where possible, space trees to 3-6 metres between crowns. Treat adjacent Significant Trees as groupings, focusing on thinning surrounding trees. 4. Prioritize retention of deciduous trees, and choose deciduous species for new plantings. 5. Remove all high-combustible understory vegetation. Fire Risk Management Priority Zone 1 (0-10m from structures) 1. As Zone 2, and remove fuel load, especially “ladder fuels” which spread fire to tree crowns: 2. Remove high combustibility trees less than 8” diameter at breast height (DBH). Aim to space trees to 3-6 metres between crowns. 3. Prune all branches overhanging buildings and decks 4. Raise the canopy of all trees to three times the height of the understory (minimum 2-3 metres), OR remove the understory vegetation. 5. Relocate firewood, propane tanks, and other stored combustible materials.

OTHER FIRE RISK MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES Fire Detection & Suppression Properly engineered automatic fire suppression systems will detect, locate, and extinguish fires through a network of sensors. These systems will extinguish fires that start inside a building, minimizing damage and maximizing life safety. These systems must be certified by all applicable North American standards, the B.C. Building Code, and compliant with requirements of the local Fire Authority. All new, and existing buildings that form part of the final Master Plan including: Thunderbird, Phoenix, and Heron, should be retrofitted with automatic fire suppression. Consideration must also be given to the network of open-space pathways that form parts of the required exits to safety in the event of fire. Fire Fighting Plan A Fire Fighting Plan includes a physical plan for both facility occupants and fire fighting authorities displayed and accessible in prominent locations on the property. This plan identifies key components that include location of fire exits, extinguishers, and other pertinent information. It is intended to prevent confusion and facilitate orderly execution of fire fighting / life safety mission, and is to be reviewed on a practice basis prior to an actual fire event.

for a specified duration of department hose stream use as outlined in BC Building Code and related documents.

the substructure, which in combination with finished surfaces, acts to prevent a fire from creating a life-threatening situation.

Dedicated water storage in sufficient quantities, and a dry standpipe network with appropriate fire hose connections in locations identified by Fire Plan is recommended.

For both new and retrofit buildings, noncombustible components to consider include roofing, exterior cladding, windows and open decks, such as:

Annunciator Panel & Communication Network Timely notification is integral to both the Automatic Fire Suppression System and the Fire Fighting Plan. A communication system notifies the local Fire Authority and facility occupants through a system of audible sounds, lighting, and signage. At appropriate entry locations, a graphical interface displaying the entire system will advise on fire location and other information pertinent to fire fighting authorities. In addition to ample water, a reliable electrical power supply is important. The Fire Fighting Plan will need to address the possibility of a facility power outage coinciding with a fire emergency. Type of Construction The current facility is comprised of combustible construction, with buildings that are set in close proximity to large tracts of woodland areas.

The Fire Fighting Plan is to be reviewed with local Fire Authority, Registered Professionals, and appropriate authorities of jurisdiction.

The degree of combustibility for all new construction will be specified by the BC Building Code. It is likely that for the majority of construction combustible construction will be permitted.

The local fire fighting authorities must also review access routes to the various extremities of the property, confirm staging areas, and be provided with sufficient quantities of water to meet requirements

It is advisable to employ the use of noncombustible exterior components as much as possible, to reduce the hazards associated with fire spread. In addition, where applicable, consideration must be given to

• Metal Roofing Assembly (typically rely • • • •

on substructure to achieve fire ratings) Green Roofs Non Combustible Cladding (metal, masonry, concrete panels) Fire Rated Doors Tempered Glass

the tank are pointed away from buildings and populated areas. Clear all branches that could fall on the high-voltage power lines within The Haven property. Monitor vegetation encroaching on high-voltage power lines along Davis Street, and request tree trimming by BC Hydro if necessary. Particularly during any new development, underground the power lines.

Structural components integral to the support of floors, roofs, and walls are to be fire rated as per the building classifications outlined in BC Building Code. Maintenance of Building Components The performance of a building’s exterior in minimizing flame propagation during a fire emergency can be improved by a maintenance regime that includes:

• Keeping the roof clean & free of needles, leaves, and combustible debris

• Cleaning gutters and removing extensive leaf litter

• Roof venting screened and protected from combustible surfaces

• Combustible extensions, protrusions into wooden areas minimized or protected

INFRASTRUCTURE Ensure all propane tanks are located a minimum of 10m from buildings; surroundings are cleared of vegetation for a minimum of 3m; relief valves are functioning and both relief values and longitudinal axis of

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Appendix K | Climate Change Resiliency CLIMATE CHANGE RESILIENCY

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5m (16'6") 4.4m (14'5") 3.2 m

Flood Construction Level Yr 2013

Project Natural Boundary, typical elevation Yr 2013 1 meter Global Sea Level Rise Allowance, with -0.17m regional adjustment, Yr 2100 Mean Sea Level Yr 2013 (Canadian Geodetic Datum )

1.7 m (5'6")

+ 16'6" recommended flood construction level year 2100

+17'

shoreline protection mitigation zone

0.83 m (2'8") 0m

the 14’6” contour, based on the BC Ministry of Environment’s recommendation for the Flood Construction Reference Plane (FCRP) for the year 2100, which includes allowances for sea-level rise, maximum high tide, storm surge and wave effects. The recommended further allowance for freeboard, 0.6m or 2’, sets a Flood Construction Level, or minimum Finish Floor Elevation of 16’6”.

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existing builiding setback

Recommended allowance for Flood Construction Level Yr 2100, Allowing for high tide, tidal surge, wave run-up, and freeboard. Estimated "Natural Boundary", or Flood Construction Reference Plane Yr 2100

estimated future setback, year 2100

estimated future natural boundary at year 2100 (14'6")

7.5m (24.6')

7.5m (24.6') existing project natural boundary

SEA LEVEL RISE + NEW BUILDINGS At this time, the Plan has adopted the sea-level rise estimates outlined by the BC Ministry of Environment for the East Vancouver Island region for the year 2100 (BC Ministry of Environment, 2011). The rocky shoreline found at The Haven is resilient to increasing erosion effects, however, by the year 2100, some of the existing shoreline structures, landscape, and infrastructure may be impacted by rising sea levels and increasing storm surge intensity and frequency. The Plan responds by incrementally decommissioning or replacing elements at risk, at increased elevation and/ or setbacks. Current (2014) regulatory setbacks for buildings are a minimum of 7.5 metres (24.6’) from and a Finish Floor Elevation / Flood Construction Level of 1.5 meters (4.9’) above the Natural Boundary. The Natural Boundary is a position defined by a legal survey along the waterfront, but with a loose technical basis. It does not necessarily directly correspond to a consistent elevation. It is therefore not possible to determine the Natural Boundary for a future higher water level (BC Ministry of Environment, 2011). The Plan sets an estimate for the future Natural Boundary at

Sea Level Rise + New Buildings

1.5m

The sensitive Gulf Island environment is particularly vulnerable to climate change. Considerations for The Haven include increasing summer drought, fire risk, forest pests and disease, winter storm intensity, salt water intrusion, and sea level rise. Climate change science is continually evolving - risks can be estimated and prepared for, however on-going awareness and adaptation will be needed.

sandpiper removed It is important to reiterate that sea-level rise planning is not an exact science, and is continually evolving. Sea-level rise will happen incrementally over time, and there is no way to really know how far it might advance and when. Setting back (and up) waterfront buildings so they are less likely to be affected by predicted sea level rise is a wise protection of investment, however it also limits the opportunity to maximize the very valuable and enjoyable

waterfront buildings. An alternative approach is to protect and preserve the land from advancing sea levels with shoreline protection measures such as sea-walls or energy reducing landscape elements such as constructed berms. While such strategies can be problematic on softer shorelines (seawalls can increase erosion), the rocky shoreline of The Haven site should accommodate such elements well. The Plan has chosen to adopt the sea-level prediction for the year 2100

new cottage 1 detached unit as where to “hold the line”. This assumes a constructed lifespan for the new buildings to at least that time. Sea-level rise beyond that chosen elevation would be responded to either with increased shoreline protection, or replacement/renovation of buildings at increased setback and/or elevation. Current science and regulatory guidelines should be consulted during the detailed planning and design phase of any shoreline


buildings and infrastructure. Additionally, the desired building lifespan, an allowance for future shoreline environmental setbacks, risk tolerance, and future adaptation strategies should be discussed and addressed during the design phases of the waterfront buildings.

Projected Natural Boundary and Flood Level in 2100

FRESH WATER SUPPLY Climate change predictions for the Gabriola Island region also indicate increasing summer drought, paired with stronger winter storms. Sea-level rise may increase the risk of salt water intrusion into well water supply. While current regulations are problematic for The Haven harvesting rain-water for potable water, the trend is indicating changes on the horizon. Rainwater harvesting, with increasing volumes of storage to capture water in the winter months, remains the most promising source of sustainable potable water supply. Therefore the Plan has allowed for foundation cistern storage that surpasses even current need, to build in adaptability and resiliency for the future. SEPTIC FIELDS Septic fields are also at risk from sea-level rise. The Sandpiper septic field (which serve Sandpiper, Kingfisher, Cistern Chapel, and Eagleview) is already beyond the current shoreline setback, and is failing. The Plan calls for replacing this field in the near-term, with a system much higher in elevation and farther in setback. The Swallow/Cormorant field (which serves Swallow, Cormorant, Osprey, and Seagull), may also eventually be within a shoreline setback, in the more distant future. The Plan recommends further evaluation before any major repair or investment in that field location. It may be worth going with a more expensive system that reduces the field size requirements, or “holding the line� with shoreline protection elements, or relocating the field.

SITE ECOLOGY The climate change indicators and predictions for the Gulf Islands include longer, drier, and warmer summers, and wetter winters. Over time, this will impact the ecology of the site. Species that are at the southern limit of their range, or are less drought tolerant, are increasingly likely to show signs of stress. This can also increase their vulnerability to disease, insects, and windthrow. Along the coastal edge, sea-level rise and increasing intensity of storms, may

increase salt content in the soil as well as shoreline erosion, and lead to localized stress or death. The western red cedar is most likely to become stressed, due to drought. Longer term (post 2050), Douglas-fir trees may become stressed due to insufficient winter chilling. A forest that is diverse in species and age is the most resilient. (Swift and Ran, 2012). The forest should be monitored for increasing signs of stress, with regular arborist assessments for hazard trees. When

making decisions about forest thinning or planting, factor in a species climate resiliency. The increasing risk of fire has already been discussed, and indicates favouring deciduous species in site management. A peer review of the Plan’s sea level rise research and recommendations was completed by River and Coastal Engineer Daniel Arnold, P. Eng., and can be found in Appendix P.

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Appendix L | Implementation and Cost Estimates IMPLEMENTATION PHASING + ADAPTABILITY The intention of the Masterplan is to offer a comprehensive vision for renewing the facility with long-term sustainability in mind, while also capturing what we now know as key considerations for site planning and design. There are many variables to consider, and many are likely to continue to evolve and change. As such, the Plan should not be regarded as fixed, but as a guiding vision for future decision making, and allowed to adapt. FINANCING STRATEGIES One of the fundamental guiding principles of the Plan is to support the financial sustainability of The Haven. The Plan recommendations ensure wise capital investments. Rather than on-going costly repair of failing individual buildings and infrastructure, each phasing milestone will holistically solve multiple problems at once, and make forward thinking investments. Guest capacity and hence revenue potential is increased. The Plan also consolidates the core site programme into larger buildings that are more cost-effective to construct and operate. Expensive elements such as elevators are optimized. The “bundling” of many programme elements into a single building or phase also broadens the appeal to each potential donor’s interests.

Financing the implementation of the Plan will require a creative, collaborative, and multi-faceted approach. The Haven intends to self-fund projects through capital budgets when possible. Fundraising for contributions from The Haven’s generous and supportive philanthropic community will also be key to realizing the Plan’s vision in a shorter time frame. Grants are another avenue to explore, particularly for innovative sustainability measures, or community shared spaces such as The Wong and McKeen Phoenix Auditorium. The potential of costsharing for community shared spaces could also be explored. The following cost estimate was peer reviewed and an alternative costing was completed by the BTY Group. Their report can be found in Appendix O.

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Appendix M | Existing Building Analysis

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THE LODGE

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SEAGULL

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SWALLOW

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OSPREY

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HERON

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THE WONG AND MCKEEN PHOENIX AUDITORIUM

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REPS

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THUNDERBIRD

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KINGFISHER

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RAVEN

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SANDPIPER

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ORCA

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CORMORANT

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CISTERN CHAPEL

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Appendix O | Cost Review COSTING REVIEW An independent review of the Facilities Masterplan cost estimate (See Appendix L), and alternative costing, was completed by the BTY Group in late 2014. The two efforts produced cost estimates with a 1% variation. BTY’s conclusion was that the cost estimate of Appendix L was within an acceptable cost range. The complete BTY report is included here as Appendix O.

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Appendix P | Flood Construction Level Review FLOOD CONSTRUCTION LEVEL REVIEW An independent peer review of the Facilities Masterplan’s recommended flood construction level and sea level rise resiliency recommendations (See Appendix K), was completed by River and Coastal Engineer Daniel Arnold, P. Eng. His report is included here as Appendix P.

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Appendix Q | References REFERENCES Ausenco Sandwell, (2011). Climate Change Adaption Guidelines for Sea Dikes and Coastal Flood Hazard Land Use. BC Ministry of Environment. Balke, J. (2014). Wastewater Management Systems, A Review of Sewage Systems for Denman Island, Including an Analysis of Greywater Reuse and Rainwater Collection.. [online] Available at: http:// www.denmanaffordablehousing.org/ DCLTA/Greywater_files/Feb%2013-14%20 DCLTA%20Wastewater%20Management%20 Systems%20Final%20Report.pdf [Accessed 11 Nov. 2014]. Environmetal Stewardship Division, M. (2014). Natural History of the Study Area - East Vancouver Island & Gulf Islands Technical Report - Appendix 10. [online] Env. gov.bc.ca. Available at: http://www.env.gov. bc.ca/sei/van_gulf/technical/appendix10.html [Accessed 11 Nov. 2014]. Firesmart Guide to Landscaping. (2014). 1st ed. Canadian Forest Service.

Reclaimed Water Guideline A Companion Document to the Municipal Wastewater Regulation Made Under the Environmental Management Act. (2013). [online] Available at: http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/DownloadAsset?a ssetId=514F9C184A6C432188E204218468F 70F&filename=reclaimedwater.pdf [Accessed 11 Nov. 2014]. Swift, K. and Ran, S. (2014). Successional Responses to Natural Disturbance, Forest Management, and Climate Change in British Columbia’s Forests.. [online] Jem.forrex.org. Available at: http://jem.forrex.org/index.php/ jem/article/viewFile/171/113 [Accessed 11 Nov. 2014]. The Home Owners FireSmart Manual, B.C. Edition. (2011). 1st ed. BC Ministry of Environment. Www2.gov.bc.ca, (2014). Climate Change Impacts - Reports & Data. [online] Available at: http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/topic.page?id= BE3D1E436EE14ADE8255FA0AD060659C [Accessed 11 Nov. 2014]

Hc-sc.gc.ca, (2010). Canadian Guidelines for Domestic Reclaimed Water for Use in Toilet and Urinal Flushing [Health Canada, 2010]. [online] Available at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/ ewh-semt/pubs/water-eau/reclaimed_watereaux_recyclees/index-eng.php#executive. [Accessed 11 Nov. 2014]. Pottinger Gaherty Environmental Consultants, (2005).Vegetation Management Plan for The Haven Foundation.

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Facilities Master Plan for The Haven  
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