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Sales Launch Sep 2019 PUNGGOL POINT CROWN

Customized report for Mdm. JiaYun


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How this report is being organized This report has been organized into segments as follow:

Email correspondence This segment is to record all OR important email correspondence between 'hausanalyst' and users for future record and prevent future dispute.

GOOD HOUSING attributes This segment is to share attributes to look out for when buying a non-landed property from technical aspect which will form the basis of this analysis report.

Written analysis (with 10am and 3pm sun diagram) This segment will record all analysis in written analysis (numbers of stacks based on package) on a stack basis. Each stack analysis will be accompanied by sun diagram for 10am and 3pm to detail the month in which there's a known sun exposure based on recorded data from our 3D model with the geo referencing capability. There will be a pictorial reference of sun diagram at the end of the written analysis segment for easy understanding.

Sun and shading analysis This segment will record potential stack/ stacks 3pm sun exposure (from our 3D model) for 12 months running (21st of each month) for detail reference. The building details in our model will reflect an almost accurate representation of fact (at the moment of analysis) of the building exposure.

Scoring chart (with scoring parameters and definition) This segment has been designed to allow users to cherry pick better stack/ stacks via our scoring system which consists of at least 6 attributes. This chart will form the basis of eventually selecting a better unit based on availability.

Pricing analysis (For Absolute package only) In this segment, we will make comparison between sample stack of the analyzed development with immediate surrounding previous BTO launches to compare the price of each level based on same localities and same attributes in terms of building heights, proximity to MRT or LRT, etc. The analyzed pricing will give a better picture of the intended investment opportunity or possible setbacks.

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How to use this report Option 1 - read through all the written analysis first User can choose to read through all the written analysis and understand the options available before deciding on which stack/unit to go for. Option 2 - go straight to score chart to identify higher score stack/ stacks User with time constraint can choose to go straight to our scoring chart to identify and choose the higher score stack/ stacks (based on availability), then return to the written analysis segment for these chosen stack/ stacks to have in-depth understanding. Please note that user can choose to omit any attribute/ attributes which do not affect user’s comfort level. After identifying preferred stack/ stacks, we will communicate with users via email or Whatsapp on unit availability and comment in depth on this unit/ units. We will then monitor the unit availability and advise on unit/ units to be shortlisted based on 'Queue number' and date of selection.

Icons Following icons have been introduced in the written analysis to simplify the understanding of the written analysis as well as assist in the comparison between stacks.

west sun exposure

wind exposure

building distance

viewing angle

noise disturbance

Lift ratio

distance to lift

others (if any)

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Common glossary use in this report

gable end wall

gable end wall

gable end wall

block

stack

gable end wall

structural wall/ column

hood

fin main facade

unit

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Location

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Site plan

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Email Correspondence

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On 10 Dec 2019, at 7:18 PM, JiaYun <archice@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi, I chanced upon the website and review while I was browsing for more details for the tengah Nov 2019 bto. I am interested to engage the service as I strongly believe that a good home starts with a good house. May I know how to go about it? Thank you Jiayun

On 11 Dec 2019, at 14:31 PM, haus analyst <hausanalyst@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi JiaYun, 1. Thanks for writing in. Appreciate it. 2. i. May we know when is your selection? ii. What is the room type which you have booked for? 3-room, 4-room, 5-room or 3-gen? iii. There are 3 developments in Tengah available for selection, do you have any preference? 3. We will advise in details once we get the information for item 2 above. Thx and regards, CHUA 蔡 soon ching 纯进

On Mon, Dec 12, 2019 at 6:38 PM JiaYun <archice@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi soon ching, The selection only starts in Jan. So I have yet to receive the invitation package from HDB. I'm looking for a 5 room at tengah plantation Village only, as I thought the site plan looks acceptable to me. I might be wrong, haha. My que no. Is 67, so I want to do research for my new home then anyhow take one unit base on what I like. I bought current house base on "feelings" then actual facts which I am now extremely regret about it. Thank you. Jiayun

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On 13 Dec 2019, at 8:29 AM, haus analyst <hausanalyst@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi JiaYun, 1. Thx again for writing back. i. For Tengah, there will be 3 developments with 5 rooms offered for selection. We can help to analyse base on overall attributes for these 3 developments before you decide on which to go for detail analysis. ii. On not having informed decision before making your previous home selection, many homeowners who engaged us share the same sentiment. We analyse base on scientific evidence, so no worries. iii. Since you have earlier Q number, we recommend you to take on our 'Most Popular' package which will be sufficient. iv. Information for Plantation Grange and Garden Vines@Tengah are available for model building works while we are still waiting for Plantation Village. 2. Sample report (previous format) is available here for review (this is a sample for 'Most Popular' package) https://issuu.com/hausanalyst/docs/standard_sample 3. Payment will be in 3 stages (via e-payment to SG bank acc OR PAYNOW). Following is our payment structure for our 'Most Popular' package priced at S$350 (We will issue invoice for all payment and follow up with payment receipt for future record): Stage 1: S$100.00 upon receiving Stage 1 information. (this will also serve as down payment for continuation of work for stage 2) Stage 2: S$200.00 upon receiving Stage 2a information. Stage 3: S$50.00 After selection and upon receiving final report for future reference after your selection. Following chart illustrate items to be included in the 'Most Popular' package. Stage 1 materials consist of ‘Basic Information’ (item 1-3) which mainly to give you an idea of URA future development around the site (base on URA Draft Masterplan 2019), HDB resale pricing from 2007 till current and attributes for GOOD HOUSING (this will form the basis of the report). Stage 2a will cover ‘Analysis Components’ (item 4-9). We will only analyse in written format of up to 50% of the available stacks in the specific development while you can still get the score for all stacks in our scoring chart which will be provided. After you have received Stage 2a report, we will follow up with Stage 2b. Based on your Q, we will be able to monitor the take up, unit’s availability and shortlist until the day before your selection. 4. Propose delivery timeline will be as follow: Stage 1: By 21 Dec 2019 (Saturday) this is allow yourself more time to understand our analysis parameters which we have recently updated and refined. Stage 2a: to be confirmed when information for Plantation Village have been released. Stage 2b: to be confirmed when information for Plantation Village have been released. 5. There will be Q&A, explanation and simulation to help you understand your choices based on your needs and you can ask as many questions as possible to make sure you understand. 6. Please note that this is a staggered/ staged payment and NOT partial payment for stage work. Meaning you will still need to pay the full amount even if you choose to give up the selection. Should you decided to give up on this selection, you will only have to top up additional S$200.00 for each of future selection. Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


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7. All communication via email will be recorded in the customized report to prevent future dispute. 8. If you are ok with the above, please revert to this email and we will proceed as schedule. For faster communication, please Whatsapp at 9168 9321. Feel free to communicate your concern at any point and should you want to understand in person before signing up, do let us know. Here's some review from new homeowners who have engaged us : "Not that we didn't trust your free review but being kiasu we decided that we should get the paid review as well since we are deciding to buy something that costs few hundred thousand. Thankfully we did, ..." “Totally agree with you that housing is one of the most expensive investment, we need to know what we are buying. Even buying a $300 thing some of us research for weeks on which is the best brand etc what more a $300k house?” Mrs. Lim | Tampines GreenWeave 4-rm 2015 "Just to share, my father quite impressed with your (hausanalyst.com) professionalism... He said keep up the good work, and wishes you (hausanalyst.com) success... " Mr Lim | stat board MTI | Tampines GreenVerge 5-rm 2016 "When I got the number I was very upset... felt v ironic... xxx out of 800+? Lucky number but so far ... So I thought I needed help to choose a better unit that I don't think I'm capable to find... So I'm really relieve you came along... help to decide and aid decision making... and I can confidently tell HDB which unit I want and know it's available... Sooo really glad and thankful!" Ms Ann Y | accountant, offshore taxation | Tampines GreenVerge 5-rm 2016 "It's quite overwhelming at first with all the data partly due to the project size. But thankfully there is ranking page which really helps with the decision... Happy that it helps us make an informed decision" Mr. Chiang | data analyst, banking | Tampines Green Court 5-rm 2017 "Thanks for the additional info. Never would knew this if you (hausanalyst) didn't say. I'm definitely glad to know all the 'hidden' info that we buyers would not know if we ain't in this industry" Ms. Joanna | banking | Tampines Green Court 4-rm 2017 "Very detailed report and analysis and good service, never regret for my green court BTO" Mr. Tan | sales and marketing | Tampines Green Court 4-rm 2017 "I am on HWZ and also bto forums.. googled and saw your (hausanalyst) 3d illustrations so we tot it was nice to have a report" Mdm. Liew | homemaker, former teacher | Tampines Green Court 3-rm 2017 "Thank u (hausanalyst) for yr detailed (analysis), it was helpful in knowing what I'm getting instead of blind guessing or just knowing the very basic details" Mr. Goh | recruitment | Tampines Green Court 5-rm 2017 "Was a very good experience... Helped me understand and made good informed choice Mr. Teo | banking | Tampines Green Court 5-rm 2017 "Your (hausanalyst) report is very helpful in our flat selection. Especially the afternoon sun exposure analysis. Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Mr. Seah | retiree, former IBM | Tampines Green Court 5-rm 2017 "Engaged Haus analyst a few days before our appt date as we were still undecided on which unit to pick. Best decision made since it is a huge purchase + time wasn't on our end. Initially we already had in mind of our dream flat + unit however we were uncertain of the pros and cons. Read reviews and chanced upon Hausanalyst. Turns out, on our first meeting, we realised what we had visualized in our minds all along were in actual fact not what it is. Backed by scientific data, we were given a thorough and detailed report, a model of the entire project and nitty gritty details down to the direction and exposure of the sun throughout the year at different timings, noise pollution from which areas and wind directions, just to name a few. Even the rubbish chute / water piping and how it functions were explained to us. There and then we knew the money spent weren't in vain. We were shown many aspects of the project which opened up our selections for the unit. On top, having the model enables us to be situated in the desired flat itself with the use of VR, being able to see the view and floor plan of the unit. End up, based on professional advice given, we selected our desired flat. Please do not hesitate to render this service. An amount of money would open up your mind + you ought to know what you're paying for with the huge sum spent. Thank you for your patience and rushing out the report for us! Highly recommended!!" Mr. Tan Kok Rui | commercial banking | Tampines GreenVines 5-rm 2018 Thx and regards, CHUA 蔡 soon ching 纯进

On Mon, Dec 12, 2019 at 23:44 PM JiaYun <archice@gmail.com> wrote:

Ok. Sounds good to me. I will take that.

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GOOD HOUSING attributes

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WHAT is west sun exposure? Ever wonder why is it so important to get a residential unit with minimal or no west sun exposure? Let us take a step backward to understand what is west sun exposure. As we all know, Singapore is located along the Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equator. Therefore, we are closest to the Sun from any point on Earth. This also implies that we will get the most direct sunlight from the Sun which consist of components like UV (ultra violet), IR (infra-red) and visible light. As the Sun rises from the East and gradually set in the West (due to Earth rotation along its axis), we will get the most sunlight with high level of UV of up to 5 hours from 12pm to 4pm (based on NEA recorded data on a little cloud cover day). The heat we feel from sunlight is mainly from IR rather than UV but UV will cause more harm to human and material than IR which is why we are trying to avoid the afternoon sun (west sun).

WHY is it important to avoid choosing a hot house? Does

it occur to you that every time you reach home, you will reach out for the air-con controller to activate the ceiling fan to cool down the internal space. A hot house happens when the residential unit is exposed to direct sunlight, which carries UV and IR. UV and IR transmit through materials like window and wall, though the former will allow higher transmission. More building surfaces expose to direct sunlight during the peak period (12pm to 4pm) will allow more UV and IR to transmit through.

Prolong UV exposure will degrade building materials externally and internally. A simple scenario can be traced to the discolouration of your curtain when you compare both sides of the fabric, cracked floor tiles, cracked leather sofa, broken plastic materials, discolouration of floor tiles, etc. All these will lead to higher maintenance cost in the long run due to higher wear and tear.

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Higher indoor air temperature will also translate to higher energy consumption to disperse the additional heat trapped indoors. Air conditioning will need to work extra hard; ceiling fan need to turn faster and with it more energy being consumed and more cost involved which includes maintaining and replacing the airconditioning units. Attached chart showing the quarterly household electricity tariff from 2017 till 2019 with data from SP Service Singapore shows a visible yearly increment in terms of energy prices and this trend will continue with fluctuated raw material cost (natural gas) to generate electricity as well as accompanied sales tax.

Warm weather will persist in the long run. Attached is a graphical presentation by Straits Times with data from MSS (Meteorological Service Singapore) clearly reflect a warmer last 10 years (2009-2018) compare to all previous year on record. If the weather pattern persists or getting worse, all the above mentioned will increase exponentially. To mitigate or reduce the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect which cause warmer weather in Singapore, a crossinstitutional initiative named ‘Cooling Singapore’ have been set up to develop a roadmap to achieve this (www.coolingsingapore.sg).

Difficulty to sell the property in the future. The current method of selling property will change drastically when the Singapore government decided to release work done under ‘Virtual Singapore’ in the near future. Virtual Singapore (https://www.nrf.gov.sg/programmes/virtual-singapore) is a $73m initiative by NRF (National Research Foundation) to develop a dynamic 3D model of Singapore with collaborative data. Data such as how many hours of daylight exposure for every single Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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unit will be made available for completed housing units, this will allow informed decision making by potential buyers. In short, if you buy a hot house now, you will find it hard to sell in later date as buyers will know how bad the situation will be.

HOW to avoid the west sun exposure? Avoid west facing. To avoid west sun exposure, home buyer should avoid buying into units with main façade (the surface where the living room and most bedroom windows align) facing North West (NW), West (W) as well as South West (SW). Buying a housing unit with these facing will have to live with at least 7 to 12 months of direct west sun exposure. Vertical and horizontal sun shading devices will have limited impact in reducing the direct sunlight exposure as the location, material and design of sun shade varies and may render it useless.

Avoid highest floor unit.

The highest floor unit will come with additional surface expose to direct sunlight which is the roof. Most of the flat roof is made of reinforced concrete (older HDB and private condominiums) top up with additional layer of pitch roof (with slope for rain water run off) to supposedly reduce heat intake. The reason why solar cell being install on the roof top should provide a direct answer on why you should avoid it. The roof surface being perpendicular to sun angle, will absorb the most sunlight and of course, heat. The secondary pitch roof with slope at 1:50 gradient (which was introduced in all new HDB blocks) may reduce heat intake but not totally omitting it, thus the heat issue is still very much exist. The direct link can be traced to the pricing of the top 2 highest level units in almost all new HDB BTO developments which usually being priced the same to allow discount to the top most level.

Avoid higher floor unit for mid to super high-rise residential development. A high-rise building being defined as building with at least 23m high (8 storeys high in HDB BTO context) while a super high-rise residential development being defined by SCDF (Singapore Civil Defence Force) as a residential building of more than 40 storeys high. As building goes up higher, direct heat intake from sunlight will increase exponentially. Therefore, air conditioning units have been widely used to reduced indoor heat. While the indoor units work by cooling down the indoor space, the outdoor units will dispel the hot air. When all units install air conditioning units and hot air being dispel constantly (and hot air rises and suck in by the higher unit’s outdoor unit), the upper units will get the most additional heat impact from this recurrent action.

Conventional wisdom pointed to choosing either North or South facing units. All developments come in a mixture of units with different facing, while avoiding the west facing will be crucial, not all homeowners will have that luxury as the selection system may not allow them to avoid one. Then the 2nd best option would be choosing the either North or South facing units. Many would think or have been made to believe that North or South facing units will not get any west sun exposure. Elementary science will tell you that the Earth rotate on its axis at a tilted angle of 23.5 degrees while orbiting the Sun 365 days a year. The Earth rotation at an angle will translate to at least 5 months of exposure to west sun for either North or South facing units. Yes, you can only minimise the exposure, but not avoiding it.

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Temperatures in Singapore could hit 40°C as early as 2045: Scientists TODAY online PUBLISHED JUL 04, 2019 UPDATED 05 JULY, 2019 Low You Jin

Raymond Limantara/TODAYSingaporeans could be faced with searing temperatures of up to 40°C as early as 2045, according to scientific analysis conducted here.

SINGAPORE - By 2045, Singaporeans could face some days of the year when temperatures soar as high as a scorching 40°C. At best, this sweltering scenario could be delayed to as late as 2065 onwards, based on simulations conducted by a team of scientists at the Centre for Climate Research Singapore, which is part of the Meteorological Service Singapore. Dr Muhammad Eeqmal Hassim, a senior research scientist at the centre, told TODAY on Thursday (July 4) that this is the worst case scenario if the world continues to emit greenhouse gases at a rate that is “business as usual”. “It (days of 40°C) won’t be a one-off event. There'll be some days starting from as early as 2045. And that's what we saw in the results. Some models are later. And so that's why we tend to give a range (that is) as early as 2045, possibly, or as late as 2065 onwards,’’ he said. Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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The scientist’s dire warnings come on the back of a recent four-day heatwave across western Europe that killed at least seven people. Reuters reported that the French region of Gard was the worst-hit, suffering a maximum of 45.9°C on June 28 — France’s hottest day on record. Scores of fires burned some 550 hectares (5.5km²) in the country’s southern region and destroyed several houses and vehicles. Closer to home, Malaysia was gripped by its own heatwave in the middle of March. "Level 1" alerts were issued by the Malaysian Meteorological Department to as many as 10 areas when the mercury hit maximum temperatures of between 35 and 37°C for three consecutive days. Only Level 2 and Level 3 alerts are more serious, with Level 3 applying when temperatures top 40°C for three straight days. The dry spell also saw water levels at several dams hovering at critically low levels.

IT’S ‘WARMING EVERYWHERE’ Singapore may have escaped heatwaves of this magnitude in recent times, but Dr Eeqmal stressed that the island is just getting warmer. He said that in the last 10 years, January has been “as warm, or warmer” than what May was in the 1970s. “Our coolest month now is as warm as what our hottest month was then.” He added: “If you talk to elderly people, they would have a recollection of how much cooler Singapore was (when they were younger).” Underscoring Dr Eeqmal’s point, a British climate professor has created a project titled Show Your Stripes. The colourful graphic by Reading University’s Professor Ed Hawkins shows to the layperson how much their country has warmed over the last century. This chart, compiled by Professor Ed Hawkins of Reading University's Department of Meteorology, shows average temperatures in Singapore from 1901, on the far left, to 2018 on the far right. Blue signifies cooler temperatures, and red warmer temperatures. Illustration: https://showyourstripes.info/

In his chart for Singapore, which starts from 1901 and ends in 2018, about two-thirds of it comprises various hues of blue – an indicator of cooler years.

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It is only in the last one-third that more red bars start appearing, with the darkest shade of red towards the far right of the chart, which is roughly now. Dr Hawkins told TODAY in an email interview that he created the graphic to show that “our planet is warming everywhere”. “Everyone can look at these visualisations and instantly understand how temperatures in their own location have changed,” he said. To put it in numbers, Dr Eeqmal said that Singapore’s temperature has increased by 0.29°C, on average, over the past four decades.

‘NEW TEMPERATURE REGIME’ The numbers may seem minuscule, but the effects on the environment manifest in a huge way through changing weather patterns and more extreme weather. For instance, Dr Eeqmal said Singapore is experiencing “heavy rain events that are not only more intense, but more frequent”. Minimum temperatures are also on the rise. “One of the signs of global warming is that night time temperatures are increasing as well. So people are getting less relief.” The last decade has also been the hottest decade on record, he said. “We are getting into a new temperature regime.” Aside from the weather, Nanyang Technological University’s (NTU) Associate Professor Adam Switzer weighed in on how else an increase in the thermometer will affect Singapore. As it is, climate change is causing faraway glaciers to melt and the ramifications are being seen here. Dr Switzer, who is a principal investigator at NTU’s Asian School of the Environment, said the Republic’s tide gauge network has shown a “general trend” that sea levels are rising. Warmer oceans also cause coral reefs to bleach and die, which in turn affects the food supply. TODAY previously reported that warming temperatures can lead to more dengue mosquitoes being bred as well. Dr Switzer said some people continue to deny that climate change exists. “Unfortunately, even with overwhelming evidence of climate change, there are certainly people who, for a variety of reasons, will continue to ignore the facts placed in front of them,” he said. Still, he acknowledged that there are those who want to face the challenge and address climate issues. The challenge, he said, was to provide them with clear science-based guidelines.

WE NEED TO ACT NOW

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Yet, even in a hypothetical situation where leaders of the world collectively put a stop to carbon emissions today, Dr Switzer said it would “take decades” to see the changes in the atmosphere. “Some impacts like sea-level rise would take centuries to equilibrate, but that is not a reason to not act now. The longer we wait, the more urgent the problem will become.” While the future might look bleak, there is a growing awareness among Singaporeans about the need to tackle climate change, according to a non-profit organisation made up of lay people with an interest in the environment. Earth Society’s vice president Low Chip Khoon also found that in their various outreach programmes to educate the public on the effects of climate change, they realised that young people seem to care more about climate change than others. “Perhaps, they know that if we don’t do anything about climate change, they would not have a liveable planet to live in.”

CREATING A SNOWBALL EFFECT Climate change might seem like an abstract idea that is beyond most people’s means to tackle, but there are practical everyday solutions that can be adopted that can eventually lead to a snowball effect, said Dr Eeqmal. For example, he said something as simple as converting to LED lights is not only more cost effective, but energy efficient. “Turning your air-conditioners thermostat up to 25°C or 26°C, instead of 22°C, reduces the amount of electricity required for cooling as well.” While it might be hard for Singaporeans who love to travel, the fact is that aircraft generate a lot of greenhouse gases. Scientists agree that people should reduce their flying as much as possible in order to reduce emissions. If that is not possible, an adjustment in people's diet would also help, said Mr Low. “One major action we can do is to reduce meat consumption by half to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” he said. A 2018 report by The Guardian stated that food production causes great damage to the environment, via greenhouse gases from livestock, deforestation and water shortages from farming, and “vast ocean dead zones from agricultural pollution”. If people do their part to mitigate the effects of climate change, Dr Eeqmal said the projections for Singapore would be a lot less extreme. “Under this mitigation scenario, our daily average temperature would only reach up to 29 or 30°C by the end of the century, which is what we are currently experiencing, and something we can tolerate.”

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WHAT is prevailing wind exposure? How

do we know when to expect the prevailing wind? The Earth is being divided into Northern hemisphere (China, Russia, Europe, etc.) and Southern hemisphere (Australia, New Zealand) with Equatorial countries in between. Both Northern and Southern hemisphere experience distinctive 4 seasons while Singapore being located at the equator experience tropical climate which is either sunny or rainy day with constant changes of cloud coverage. When the Northern hemisphere going through Winter (China usually around December), the Southern hemisphere will go through Summer (Australia around the same time) and vice versa. When the Northern hemisphere experience Winter, the air pressure is higher and it will move towards Southern hemisphere where the air pressure is lower (Australia is entering Summer and hot air rises) and vice versa. Being located along the equator, Singapore will experience this major air movement which is what we refer to as prevailing wind. During the Northeast Monsoon Season, the prevailing wind is from North/ Northeast while during the Southwest monsoon season, the wind is mainly from South/ Southeast. In between monsoon season, there will be wind movement from other directions like Northwest or Southwest but less frequent.

WHY is it important to understand prevailing wind pattern? We enjoy breezy days, but it may bring along pollutants if the source of pollution is along the prevailing wind path. Let us explore the pull and push factors of having prevailing wind, so homeowners will better understand how to balance the pro and cons when choosing a residential unit.

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Pull factor

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Push factor

Prevailing wind as the main source Assist in the surrounding pollutant of passive ventilation. Wouldn’t it be nice movement. As described earlier on, should if every time you open your windows or standing at the balcony, a stream of gushing wind flows through and cool down your unit? Best of all, it’s free! The challenge would be to know how to benefit from the prevailing wind by knowing where and when does the prevailing wind happen. Singapore receives mostly South Eastern wind, therefore the next question would be how to make sure that the surrounding environment (i.e. building, future development, etc.) won’t block this prevailing wind potential.

there be a construction activity going on just across your unit and prevailing wind happens to move along the same direction towards your unit, then you will be experiencing massive dust pollution. If you think of the pollutants as a gas, then maybe the most recent (July 2019) pollution at Pasir Gudang in Johore Bahru will give you a better idea of what to expect. The challenge will be to know in advance what sort of surrounding your future home will be surrounded by before you decide. We will discuss on this in the later part of this article.

Promote indoor air exchange. Designing a unit which allows cross Aggravate rain water splashing ventilation is a tough act as issue. wind with heavy rainfall always translates designers need to balance privacy Gushing to water leakage through the window or sliding needs vs allocating more openings door edges if the design is not water tight or it’s (i.e. windows) for cross ventilation. not being done properly. This situation was Current housing unit generally separate public area (Living and Dining room) from private area (Bedrooms) and a common corridor connecting these two areas. The corridor in between the rooms at the front and bath at back will reduce air movement potential. To promote cross ventilation, all doors (Main door, bedroom, kitchen door) and windows should be left open. This ideal situation may not happen most of the time, thus there’s a high concentration of stagnant air within the interior spaces. This stagnant air consists of particles as well as microbes which may cause sickness. If a unit is facing a prevailing wind path, once the doors and windows are open, air exchange will happen at a quicker pace compare to a unit not facing the prevailing wind path as it will need to be induced by air pressure differences between outdoor and indoor spaces.

recorded in the Internationally acclaim residential project, Waterway Terraces 1 at Punggol back in the year 2015. The reply from the developer is as follow (as published by straits times dated 2015 July 16): … "Preliminary checks indicate that because of the intense rainfall and direction of the wind, rainwater had accumulated at the balcony area and, in some cases, had also seeped into the living rooms or bedrooms connected to the balcony….

Based on the location of the affected units as well as the direction of wind during that exact period, we deduced that the shape of the building could also play a part in inducing excessive wind flow, which accelerate the water seepage issue apart from than the size of the balcony as well as poor workmanship and construction detailing.

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HOW to make the right decision to benefit from prevailing wind potential. Basic understanding of where and when the prevailing wind happens.

As described earlier, if we know that China is entering winter, then we should expect wind from North East to happen as air movement flow from Northern part of Earth towards Southern part of Earth. To maximise the prevailing wind intake, the wall with the most opening (i.e. windows) should be perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction.

Understand the location of the project as well as the surrounding present and future situation. (i.e. building heights, plot ratio, building shapes, distance between buildings, etc.). We know that the city core (in the city state like Singapore) tends to have taller buildings while city fridge with lower building heights. Singapore skyline is mainly guided by the URA masterplan which will be reviewed every 5 years to plan for future 10 to 15 years land use. A neighbourhood with mostly taller building will create wind tunnel effect whereby wind being channelled between the gap of 2 neighbouring buildings and thus increase the wind speed after it moved through the building’s gap. This wind load (from wind tunnel effect) may not be what you as a residential occupant will enjoy, due to its higher intensity. Note: A high-rise building being defined by SCDF as any building taller than 24m (8 storeys of a typical HDB). So, how do you know if you will get a tall building next to your chosen development? As explained earlier, Singapore land use is guided by URA Masterplan (latest review in 2019). The masterplan will reflect the intended land use in the near future with plot ratio, which determine how much floor area can be developed within the particular land. On top of this, height control will be imposed on certain area due to flight zone restriction, etc. A higher plot ratio usually can be traced to mature area due to higher land cost and readily availability of amenities. While a layman or even industry expert may guess the future surrounding development based on given plot ratio, only a trained professional can make the closest assumption of what the future layout will be in terms of building block placement, density, etc. Knowing the future surrounding development will give you the edge over others who don’t. Back in 2015, the international acclaimed public housing, Waterway Terraces I made headlines for the wrong reason when mini flash flood hits a number of units. While the report pointed to intense wind with heavy rainfall as well as leaky balcony as the main culprits, we noticed that the incident only happens in a selected area of the development (A spokesman said: "Most of these units face an open field, making them more prone to impact by heavy downpours."). At this particular facing, the shape of the building is an inward form of a partial hexagon, almost similar to an armchair shape. Theoretically, when wind moves diagonally towards this surface, the intensity will increase similar to tunnel effect as wind being ‘directed’ to a single point of the surface.

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Punggol 'Waterway' flats get wetter than expected THE STRAITS TIMES PUBLISHED JUL 16, 2015, 5:00 AM SGT Yeo Sam Jo

HDB says owners of 24 units have sent in feedback on water seepage after downpour

Rainwater seeped into some flats, including Mr Eric Loh's (above), at Waterway Terraces I during a heavy downpour on Monday morning. PHOTO: ERIC LOH

When engineer Eric Loh woke up just past 2am on Tuesday in the middle of a thunderstorm, he was confronted by a nightmarish sight. Rainwater was seeping into his brand new four-room flat in Punggol even though the windows were shut. "It was raining very heavily and water was coming in from my balcony door and the windows in two of the rooms. I had to put pieces of cloth on the ledges to soak up the water," he recalled. Mr Loh was among many residents of Waterway Terraces I, a Housing Board Build-To-Order project, who have been complaining on Facebook about water seeping into their flats during Tuesday morning's cloudburst. Some said their units were "flooded", with their furniture soaked and parquet floors damaged. Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Financial consultant Zeoane Goh, 30, who moved in last month and had ponding in her living room on Tuesday, said: "Even if there's a big storm, our flats should be dry. We're not living in the 60s."

Rainwater seeped into some flats, including Mr Eric Loh's (above), at Waterway Terraces I during a heavy downpour on Monday morning. PHOTO: ERIC LOH

The HDB said it received feedback about water seeping into flats from the owners of 24 units there. A spokesman said: "Most of these units face an open field, making them more prone to impact by heavy downpours." She added that this is the first time the HDB has received such feedback, and that inspections were carried out on the same day. "Preliminary checks indicate that because of the intense rainfall and direction of the wind, rainwater had accumulated at the balcony area and, in some cases, had also seeped into the living rooms or bedrooms connected to the balcony. "To resolve the issue, we will carry out improvement works that will improve the flow of water in the balcony," she said. Residents there also complained about fire alarms going off on at least three occasions in the wee hours of the morning.

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"We keep getting woken up," said finance assistant Fabian Lau, 28, who moved in two months ago with his wife. "We've mentioned this to the Building Services Centre but it is still happening. If there's really a fire in future, nobody will care." The HDB said it received two cases of feedback on false fire alarms and is investigating the cause.

Resident Terrence Tan's 10th floor flat (above) was one of the units at Waterway Terraces I in Punggol that was soaked by rain during a heavy downpour. PHOTO: ERIC LOH

Dr Janil Puthucheary, MP for Pasir Ris-Punggol GRC, visited 17 of the affected units on Tuesday. He said in a Facebook post: "Without any engineering expertise, it looks to me that this is not one specific fault or defect, but rather different problems in different units resulting in the rain coming in... Nevertheless, it all needs to be dealt with." Dr Puthucheary said the project's contractors assured him that they will fix the water seepage problem by this week.

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WHAT is viewing angle? When

you are buying a new home (most critical for non-landed/ high-rise), one of the attributes that industry players will advise you to look out for unit with good view. Best if you can get waterbody view or park view, else you should look for at least internal garden view (or pool view for private properties). While these advises are no brainer, one thing they can’t tell you is the exact view you are going to get from your balcony or window if you are buying an off-plan property (yet to be built property like new BTO launch). Are you going to get a full, unblocked view? Or are you going to get an odd angle of the supposedly perfect view? What about the view from high level? What about the present and future surrounding development which may affect your supposedly unobstructed view?

Before we explain further, we should first understand what is the limitation of human eyes. Unlike birds, reptiles or most of the animals, human have both eyes located in front and positioned side by side, thus limiting our field of view. While we can reach up to 210 degrees forward facing horizontal arc in our visual field, our binocular vision can only cover up to 120 degrees horizontally when we are looking with both eyes. Vertically we can cover up to 130 degrees as shown in diagram. Knowing the science behind it may give us an advantage over those who don’t, but seeing the eventual view (through VR and 3D modelling) would be the game changer.

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WHY do we pay for a premium view? Emotional needs.

Isn’t it nice if we can have a view as if we are living in the Mandai Natural Reserve? Or lying on the bed facing the open sea at Maldives resorts? We tend to be calmer, relax when we are looking at nature’s wonder. We can’t get these luxuries in urban settings where we need more space to house people. Therefore, architects and planners created man made green spaces like courtyards, urban park, green link, etc. as well as blue spaces like waterway, lake, pond, etc. to replicate the nature and allow residents to enjoy a replacement nature’s setting.

Awareness of surrounding. Does it ever occur to you that when you hear a loud bang or siren wailing, the first instance is to look for the source? You either try to look out from the window, go to the highest ground possible (if there’s roof garden) to find out what’s going on. This instant reaction will allow you to know what’s going on, a lot faster than waiting for updates on social media and allow more time to react to the situation. Many are willing to spend millions just to enjoy the fire work at Marina Bay during national day event.

Pride and future monetary incentives.

You want to own something which others can’t afford or you simply just want to let others know that you are capable of getting what you wanted. Of course, this action may represent a minority group of home owners but we can’t deny that they exist. Having access to ‘premium’ view also ‘artificially guaranteed’ a higher return on investment. Why we said it’s ‘artificially guaranteed’? Based on current (even today) scenario, majority of home buyers will equate highest level to having the best view and best investment (till they live in, regretted it).

Lack of information/ understanding.

Blue and green colour always catch our wandering eyes when we look at an off-plan (yet to be built) property. Somehow the impression of this colour tends to be mismatched with the reality. A man-made lake nicely coloured in turquoise blue may give you the impression that you will get a Maldives’s standard of the waterbody, but in reality, you will get a murky natural coloured lake (i.e. brown). Reason for this being, there’s a fine print which said, the lake also served as a retention pond. Retention pond means when there’s heavy rain, the excess rain water, which overflow the normal drainage system will temporarily divert into this lake to make sure that flash flood doesn’t happen. A nice olive (green) coloured spaces in the site plan will somehow give you an impression that you will get a Hyde Park equivalent, but your expectation may not match the reality (usually landscape plan won’t be available during new launches).

HOW does viewing angle related to buying for a view? The placement of window/ windows.

For example, there are BTOs with Living area’s window recess inwards compare to the bedroom next to it, thus, the viewing angle will be limited as the extend surface of the bedroom next door will block the view out of the window from the Living Room. While you can detect this scenario on the floor plan, you will never know how the specific unit relates to the surrounding space or landscape.

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The details on or around the window. Vertical fins or vertical elements which are designed to shade direct sun impact will limit the viewing angle from inside out if the depth and location didn’t take into consideration of the viewing aspect. Our Bidadari homeowner was sharing on lake view unit owners have been complaining on their facebook page of why the vertical fin being placed in the middle of their window which affect their view towards the lake (also served as retention pond). The homeowners only have themselves to blame for ignoring the details and ill-informed about their purchase.

The height of the unit. In a major residential township like Sengkang or Punggol, the building height is generally controlled by the flight path. When the building height being controlled, the only way to maximised the numbers of housing unit would be to build more blocks within the same plot of land while maximising the building height. This will create a flat skyline whereby all buildings look about the same height and buying high floor unit will not give you additional advantage in terms of view as you are merely looking at someone else’s rooftop or water tanks. A mid floor homeowners would end up feeling claustrophobic due space constrain whereby it’s too far from the ground to see what’s going on and yet too low to see what’s beyond.

View within Waterway Ridges and beyond Punggol Waterway

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What you get for S$1m: A HDB flat with view of Sentosa fireworks, Singapore Flyer and city skyline TODAY online PUBLISHED MAY 20, 2019 UPDATED 20 MAY, 2019 Wong Pei Ting

View from the living room window of a City Vue @ Henderson HDB flat. SINGAPORE — Skyscraper flats, towering above the ground at 40 storeys and higher, have been available on the resale market for over a decade, but in recent years it has become increasingly common for buyers to fork out seven-figure sums for them. Call it the Pinnacle effect – this trend began in 2015, when the first ever million-dollar resale transactions for standard Housing & Development Board (HDB) flats were recorded. Before 2015, million-dollar HDB resale transactions involved maisonettes, executive flats or rare HDB terrace homes. But that year, nine five-room units at the Pinnacle @ Duxton made the record books for being the first ever public homes that were not maisonette, executive or landed units to be sold at S$1 million or more. All nine units were located on higher floors, between the 19th and 48th storeys. Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Since then, HDB data shows that increasing numbers of buyers are following suit, handing over S$1 million or more – once an unimaginable sum in the public housing market – for a standard flat, as long as it commands panoramic views of the city. The trend was underscored last month when a buyer paid a record S$1.2 million for a five-room flat at Boon Tiong Road, located between the 34th and 36th storeys. In fact, a spectacular view is so valuable that buyers are willing to pay seven-figure sums even for fourroom flats now. In June last year, for the first time ever, a four-room flat, located somewhere between the 46th and 48th floor of the Pinnacle @ Duxton, was resold for S$1.028 million. By March this year – just nine months later – there had been eight more four-room flats that were sold for S$1 million or more. These units were located at two estates across Singapore – four at Pinnacle @ Duxton, and the remainder at Boon Tiong Road in Bukit Merah. And the one factor that united them all was their height — all were situated on the 28th floor or higher.

SKY-HIGH PRICES FOR SKY-HIGH UNITS HDB began building flats taller than 40 storeys high only in the mid-2000s, with the first of these entering the resale market in 2008. As more of such stratospheric flats have been built over the years, more have also changed hands, at correspondingly astronomical prices. A look at the data shows that since 2015, 116 standard five-room flats have been resold for at least S$1 million. It is common knowledge that units located on higher floors tend to fetch higher prices on the resale market. When seven-figure sums are involved, the numbers bear this out quite dramatically: 

73 per cent (30 of 41 units) of standard five-room flats on the 40th floor or above that have been resold since 2015 fetched S$1 million or more.

Just 10 floors lower, between the 31st and 39th storeys, only 37 per cent of standard five-room flats resold since 2015 (50 of 136 units) changed hands for S$1 million and above.

The proportion of million-dollar price tags plummets below the 31st floor. Among standard fiveroom flats located between the 19th and 30th floors that have been resold since 2015, a mere 2.7 per cent (36 of 1332 units) fetched S$1 million and above.

Not surprisingly, these million-dollar skyscraper units also tend to be in central locations.

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They include those at the Pinnacle @ Duxton, City View at Boon Keng Road, Natura Loft at Bishan Street 24, The Peak at Toa Payoh, and flats at Boon Tiong Road, Clementi Ave 3, Commonwealth Drive, Ghim Moh Link, Holland Drive, Holland Close and Strathmore Avenue.

View from the living room window of a City Vue @ Henderson HDB flat.

A MILLION-DOLLAR VIEW LIKE WINNING THE LOTTERY Units at City Vue at Henderson Road are not yet eligible for resale – the first dwellers of the new estate moved into their homes only in the later part of last year. But the estate’s corridors and lift landings are already dotted with the flyers of property agents seeking prospective sellers. Homeowners with units on the highest floors there already expect that if and when they put their flats on the resale market, they will be able to command prices of at least S$1.2 million. It’s down to the views, they say. From these flats, one can get an unobstructed view all the way to the Southern Waterfront. From the comfort of their homes, these owners get to enjoy the regular display of fireworks from Universal Studios Singapore. They can also see the Singapore Flyer and the Central Business District skyline in the distance. Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Ms Carrie Ng, 41, a logistics professional who co-owns a five-room flat on the 47th floor, said that if she were to sell the unit in future, she would only be willing to part with the great view if she receives an offer of at least S$1.2 million – using the record Boon Tiong Road sale as a benchmark. Her 46th floor neighbour, service engineer Rim Yong, 58, also said that he would “think twice” about selling his four-room flat even if somebody were to offer him S$1 million for it. To him, his view is a “different kind of wealth”. “I own a high-floor unit with such a good view, which allows me to see fireworks on New Year’s Eve and Chinese New Year,” he said. “You would never dream that one day, you would become so ‘rich’. It is almost the same as striking the lottery.”

The view from Ms Carrie Ng's flat at City Vue. Both Ms Ng and Mr Yong were among those who received priority for flat selection at City Vue, since they were displaced by the Government’s Selective En bloc Redevelopment Scheme (SERS), which affected their former homes at Redhill Close estate. Boon Tiong Road’s high-floor occupants were similarly displaced by SERS. Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Most of these owners used to live in Bukit Merah View and, like 52-year-old Esther Tan, consider themselves “super lucky” to have landed a unit on a high floor. “Of course, it is like winning 4D,” said the housewife who now lives on the 36th floor. As a testament to how desirable her flat is, she pointed out that every time a flat from her three-year-old estate fetches over a million dollars – which has already happened thrice – at least five property agents would come knocking on her door in the month after.

BETWEEN CONDO AND HDB, THE VIEW WINS OUT Several homeowners of high-rise HDB units told TODAY they had the option of purchasing a private home but bought a HDB flat instead as they were swayed by the views that the same amount of money could buy in the public housing market. One of them is a senior manager living at the top floor of the 40-storey Natura Loft in Bishan.

The view from Mr Harry Tan's 40th-storey flat at Bishan Street 24’s Natura Loft.

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“The view is the reason we paid about S$750,000 for this. It was a decision between a condominium and this,” said the 42-year-old who declined to be named. She added that she would “not be so foolish” as to sell her flat, even though she is constantly being approached by property agents who come to her flat to tell her that she can sell it for over S$1 million if she so desired. In an adjacent block at the same estate is a former taxi driver who splurged S$1.18 million for his topfloor unit. That makes 62-year-old Harry Tan, now a retiree, the buyer who has paid the third-highest price ever for a standard HDB flat in Singapore. But he told TODAY he didn’t think it was an unreasonable amount.

The view from Mr Harry Tan's 40th-storey flat at Bishan Street 24’s Natura Loft. As he was house-hunting, he came across condominium units with inferior views and lower ceilings but which still cost quite a bit more than this Bishan flat he eventually viewed. “One look” was all it took, he said, for him to decide that the Natura Loft unit was his dream home. Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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He says if he were to resell the flat, he would not let it go for less than S$1.4 million.

THE SELLERS AND AGENTS WHO MADE BANK Mr Jonathan Poh, 44, sold his 39th-floor five-room flat at Boon Keng’s City View estate for S$1.12 million last June. He told TODAY he was “not really surprised” by the price that the unit fetched, as by that time it had already become “the norm in the market anyway”.

View of Boon Tiong Road’s 40-storey flats from the living room window of a HDB flat at Havelock Road. His agent, Mr Louis Tay from property platform Ohmyhome, said the unit attracted four bids beyond the reserve price of S$1 million. From the flat, one can see unobstructed views of the sea, the city skyline and the Singapore Sports Hub, among other attractions, he said. “The view sells itself. I don’t even need to explain or present any case about the flat’s existing renovation,” he said, noting that “comparable alternative products” in the market are currently rare.

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A 45-year-old ERA Realty property agent who only wanted to be known as Joe, said the closest he has come to facilitating a million-dollar HDB resale transaction was a 28th floor unit at The Peak in Toa Payoh, which changed hands for S$940,000 in 2017. Based on his observations, he said, a good view can fetch a premium of as much as S$400,000. Propnex Realty agent Aaron Lin, however, sounded a note of caution, saying that buyers must be aware that after paying such hefty prices, they might not be able to make a profit down the road if they choose to resell their flats. “If you look at the overall prices of resale HDB flats in the past few years, prices have dropped quite a bit,” he said.

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WHAT defines a good building spacing? Different point of view will yield different understandings of the importance of building spacing. The regulators (town planners, architects, URA, HDB) are more interested in the macro aspect of how the individual development connected to the greater surrounding area. Currently, there’s no specific guideline on building spacing to control the development in Singapore. However, back in Mar 2010, URA (Urban Redevelopment Authority), SIP (Singapore Institute of Planners), REDAS (Real Estate Developer’s Association of Singapore), SIA (Singapore Institute of Architects) jointly released ‘An Industry Guide of Good Practices to Minimise Wall-Like Developments’ to better control the building spacing. On the macro level, the concern is more about not having wall-like building blocks, thus the regulation is to break the blocks vertically and horizontally to allow more openings in between. From end user/ homeowner’s point of view, building spacing is being defined as the distance between your unit’s window to the opposite block of buildings (be it the front of the building or the side/ gable end of the building). Common sense will tell us that the wider the spacing between 2 blocks facing each other will be better, but most of the time we can’t get this as the homeowners don’t get to decide how the development being designed or building being distributed/ arranged. For ready to move in units, homeowner will get to assess if that’s what he/ she can live with. While for yet to be built units, homeowners are always at the mercy of the developer or their agents due to lack of real time information or the intention to minimise the real time information to increase sales.

WHY having ample building distance / spacing is important? Homeowner’s privacy. Most of us will not be comfortable when neighbours from the opposite blocks get to look directly into our unit and intrude our privacy. While curtain/ drapery can be the last resort, the reason of having windows or balcony at the Living Room and Bedrooms is to allow homeowners more interaction between the indoor and outdoor spaces. Having a curtain would be like creating a wall to segregate the indoor and outdoor spaces, therefore defeat the purpose of investing in the surrounding landscape.

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Prevent claustrophobic spaces. Imagine living in a confined space which is very high and the small area footprint. Most of us will not like the feeling of living in such condition. The same can be translated to a group of tall or super tall buildings being cluttered in a situation which create a small space in between these blocks. Imagine Hong Kong! Building need to be spread out to allow openings in between to give breather as well as allow better wind flow and ventilation.

Claustrophobic spaces created by blocks of buildings in Hong Kong

Allow morning sun exposure to as many blocks as possible. In tropical country, we try to avoid the hot afternoon sun (also known as west sun) as much as we can but we welcome morning sun, which provide us with free vitamin D. In a context of group housing like BTO developments (where usually there will be more than few blocks of building in the same development), the architects/ planners will first try to achieve the amount of units allow within the development, then placing blocks to minimise west sun exposure, often the previous action may have affected surrounding blocks by blocking off the much needed morning sun instead. Homeowners who ended up choosing these units may regret their decision as the unit will be mostly dim.

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HOW to determine a good building distance/ spacing? Allow meaningful distance between building blocks facing each other. During the nation building period, rolls and rolls of public housing blocks were constructed up to 6 storeys high (comfortable height without needs for lift) with distance between blocks of not less than 20m in between. This configuration can be traced to planning in China, where the requirement for sun exposure during the winter solstices required this (building distance) as a minimum standard. For the older building blocks, the corridor (the front) also serves as a buffer from the opposite block residents prying eyes. While the new building blocks are usually double load (having units on both sides of the same corridor), therefore the common sight would be having Living Room facing the opposite blockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Living Room. In this regard, the 20m distance is not enough to allow privacy and we recommend at least 40m in between or building blocks not more than 16 storeys high and wider distances for taller buildings, although thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no regulation to control this (due to the creative nature of the industry, most of the regulation can be worked around, thus rendered a standard regulation useless).

The distance to the nearest windows is at 25m

Understanding the dynamic correlation between density and building height. In Singapore, there are low, medium and high-density housing developments. Under URA residential handbook guideline as of May 2019, HDB BTO is being classified as high-density housing. In short, high density means that more people are staying within the same area of land.

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In terms of building height, while thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a control in terms of plot ratio, homeowners need to refer to the draft 2019 masterplan to know the latest update on height control for a specific plot of land due to possible air space control by CAAS (Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore). This constraint can be observed in areas around Yishun, Punggol, etc. The direct correlation between density and building heights are: a. High density with standard building height control as of May 2019 (i.e. plot ratio 2.8, height control not more than 36 storeys). If the building block can go up higher, the same number of units can be stacked in lesser building blocks and therefore allow more space in between. For example, if a developer needs to provide 576 units at maximum height of 36 storeys, the developer needs to plan for 4 blocks of 4 units per floor building block (4 units x 36 levels x 4 blocks). b. High density with height control restriction (usually at 160m AMSL, 100m being the mean sea level and 60m means allowable height above mean sea level). Assuming we use the same amount of unit needed in the same development as above (576 units) but with height control of up to 60m. For a 60m control, we can build up to not more than 16 storeys high after we minus the existing road level which is usually 4 levels above mean sea level. In this scenario, the developer will need to build 6 blocks of 6 units per floor building block (6 units x 16 levels x 6 blocks). Therefore, the spacing between building will be reduced to accommodate more building blocks.

Understanding the impact of choosing a lower level, mid-level and highlevel units. Based on the above scenarios, choosing a different segment of the building block will give homeowners a different perspective on how to perceive distance. With reference to scenarios in item 2. a. If the building block goes up higher, the distance between buildings will need to be wider as thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more space in between buildings. Based on our records of BTO launches since 2010, most of the highrise blocks have managed to avoid facing each other within the same development and when they do, the worst case was at 20m to 40m apart. Most of the cases which we observed, managed to have at least 75m and beyond which is our recommendation for high-rise blocks. For distance less than 75m apart, the lower levels will suffer the most as it creates a claustrophobic scenario for the homeowners. For the middle segment of the building blocks, anything between 40m-75m would be just enough. b. For building heights not more than 18 storeys high, a distance between buildings of 20m-40m is a common sight in BTO developments. For level 2 to 8, distance between 30m-35m would be sufficient to allow some breather. Mid-level of level 9 and above should have at least 40m distance apart to allow better breathing space and privacy from prying eyes.

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WHAT cause noise disturbance? To understand noise pollution, we should have a clear understanding of 3 fundamentals which is the source, intensity and duration of the pollution. NEA (National Environmental Agency) of Singapore has classified noise pollution into 3 main sources which includes construction noise, Industrial noise and vehicular noise. A set of guidelines has been drawn up by NEA to control the intensity of the noise source (measured in dB, decibel) and time/ duration of these noise source allowed on daily and weekly basis. The following are guidelines for the 3 main noise pollutants. Construction Noise: https://www.nea.gov.sg/our-services/pollution-control/noisepollution/construction-noise-control Industrial Noise: https://www.nea.gov.sg/our-services/pollution-control/noise-pollution/industrialnoise-control Vehicular Noise: https://www.nea.gov.sg/our-services/pollution-control/noise-pollution/vehicularnoise-control Noise control has become so important that as recent as 25 Mar 2019, NEA have issued a circular to all developers, architects, engineers, contractors and builders notifying that from 1st Apr 2019 onwards, there will be a new introduction for Registered Noise Consultants Scheme whereby these consultants (approved by NEA) will prepare and endorse noise impact assessment for new projects to get clearance from NEA based on technical noise guidelines. All the above are official noise disturbance sources, we (hausanalyst.com) have also identified noise disturbance at micro level, which we will include in our scoring and written analysis.

WHY homebuyers should avoid noise disturbance? Emotional stress due to prolong exposure.

Imagine you are having a nice afternoon nap. All of the sudden, a roaring noise of a jet plane wakes you up from your slumber and affect your resting time! Multiply this event by twice a week and 104 times a year, you will start to think of moving out of the unit instead! The same can be said about noise from moving vehicles along the highway, main roads as well as the moving MRT coaches above the street level. If you are exposed to such pollution on a daily basis, this will affect your emotions as mentally and physically you are deprived of quality rest time.

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Affect daily communication.

Many residents have made known about their frustration of having to shout at each other in the same residential unit to talk to each other due to constant noise pollution from the surrounding environment. This noise pollutions are mainly from construction activities as well as vehicular movement which includes MRT. Based on a report by NUS researcher, areas in the city tends to have higher noise pollution compare to heartland areas.

May cause hearing loss due to prolong exposure.

While we may not experience complete hearing loss due to daily moving MRT coaches or moving vehicles (depends on location), somehow it will reduce our hearing capability over a prolong period of time. Based on WHO guidelines, 70dB is the sound level which, if someone exposed to it consistently for a full day, will lead to hearing impairment. Currently Serangoon is at 73.1dB, Orchard at 72.8 dB, Outram at 72.8 dB, Bukit Timah at 72.6dB. (please find the list in the following news article)

A moving MRT coach emit noise recorded as up to 64.1dB with noise barrier.

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How to avoid noise disturbance? Knowing the major source of noise disturbance and avoid facing it directly. Apart from the known official source of noise pollution above, each of us does have a tolerance on certain noise as well. There were complaints about noise from school activities nearby, noise from religious activities, noise from the nearby commercial hub, etc. The main façade of the unit (where most of the windows are located) is vulnerable to noise pollution as the window itself (usually at 5mm thick glass) will not be able to totally segregate the noise impact from external surroundings. A double layer glass window with air gap in between may do the trick, but it will be costly.

Allowing buffer/ distance between openings and the noise source.

Allowing buffer by having some form of structure or tall vegetations in between or increasing the distance away from the noise pollution will help greatly in reducing noise pollution if the direct option of avoiding it, is limited or not available. Back in 2017, LTA has started to install noise barriers along the elevated MRT lines to reduce noise pollution from the moving coach. It was reported that the noise barrier has managed to reduce the noise pollution by 5dB from a moving train. Phase 2 of barrier work will be completed by Q3 2020 and Phase 3 expected to be completed by 2023.

Understanding the impact of noise on lower level, mid-level as well as higher level units. Understanding which segment of building to go for is related to understanding how noise/ sound wave move. For units at lower level, usually there will be plenty of objects for the sound wave to bounce off from, therefore reducing the intensity of the sound wave. As building goes up higher, there will be lesser objects for sound wave to bounce off, therefore the sound become louder.

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Living with noise pollution: Serangoon, Bukit Timah and Clementi among the noisiest neighbourhoods in Singapore THE STRAITS TIMES PUBLISHED APR 23, 2017, 5:00 AM SGT Ng Jun Sen

Serangoon, Clementi and Bukit Timah are among the noisiest neighbourhoods in Singapore, one study has found. What does it mean to be living with noise pollution? The Sunday Times finds out.

Mr Spencer Tan of noise monitoring firm Dropnoise measuring the noise level at Block 537, Choa Chu Kang Street 51, last Wednesday.ST PHOTO: KEVIN LIM For the past three decades, Mr K.C. Tang, 72, and his wife have been communicating by shouting at each other. Even then, the couple can barely make out what each other is saying, due to the unceasing cacophony of horns, sirens and revving engines from the Central Expressway (CTE) around 40m away from their three-room flat at Block 115, Potong Pasir Avenue 1. Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Said Mr Tang, a retiree, with a sigh: "We have grown used to this." Over in Yew Tee and Choa Chu Kang, where MRT tracks are within spitting distance from some Housing Board blocks, residents say that they, too, have become accustomed to living with noise. Choa Chu Kang resident Nadia Begum, 29, whose home is some 30m away from a stretch of MRT track where a train rattles past every few minutes, said: "Closing all the windows is not sufficient. We have to use pillows over our heads to muffle the noises at night." Mr Tang and Ms Begum are among the tens of thousands living next to busy roads, MRT tracks, construction sites and shopping malls around Singapore, who are coping with din just outside their homes. A new study from the National University of Singapore (NUS) found that Singapore's average outdoor sound level throughout the day is 69.4 decibels, which is equivalent to the noise made by a vacuum cleaner. This exceeds the National Environmental Agency's recommendation of no more than 67 decibels averaged over an hour, and is a whisker shy of the World Health Organisation threshold of 70 decibels a day. Consistent exposure to that level can cause hearing impairment. The study - led by NUS graduate student Diong Huey Ting and Professor William Hal Martin, who heads the university's masters in audiology programme - took 18,768 outdoor sound measurements between last December and February to determine how noisy Singapore is. Worryingly, around 27 per cent of the gathered data exceeded 70 decibels, said Ms Diong. The study also identified the noisiest places in Singapore. Serangoon tops the list of planning zones, with an average of 73.1 decibels from more than 100 noise readings. Said Ms Diong, 27: "In densely populated Singapore, common amenities like shopping malls, hawker centres and playgrounds all contribute to community noise, on top of that created by traffic." Noise pollution is inevitable in big bustling cities around the world and Singapore is experiencing it too. While there are no comparative studies, anecdotally, the city has become noisier over the years as it continues to develop - with more expressways, longer MRT lines and the cycle of construction and demolition playing out over and over again. This is on top of new trends like the growing popularity of integrated mixed-use developments, with retail spaces, offices, transport hubs and homes in the same complex. This worries Mr Spencer Tan, 30, of noise monitoring firm Dropnoise. "Even those who live on the higher floors will not be spared since sound travels upwards." To try to mitigate against noise pollution, the Government has put in place several measures, including tighter enforcement of construction sites and urban planning regulations. Several solutions are still undergoing trials and may be rolled out in the coming years. Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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But some are concerned that these measures may not be able to keep pace with a growing nation. Mr Tang's home became noisier when the CTE was widened from a three-lane to a four-lane dual carriageway in 2012 to accommodate more traffic. Said Mr Tang in Mandarin: "We complained then, but nothing much can be done about it since it is impossible to fight progress." Dropnoise, which produces noise reports for residents and condominium managements, has seen business boom since it started the monitoring service last year. Mr Tan gets more than three inquiries from frustrated residents to attend to every week. Its reports can be used in court action against noisy neighbours, or submitted to regulatory bodies as proof of noise pollution. Within Mr Tang's home, for example, Dropnoise, using a sensitive sound meter, recorded an average of 66.6 decibels over a five- minute period. "This means that the resident is hearing a constant background noise equivalent to a loud conversation. He will have to speak louder if he wants to be heard," said Mr Tan. Since the problem of noise pollution is here to stay, doctors said residents should be more aware of ways to protect their hearing. These include the use of hearing protection, such as ear plugs and ear muffs, as a temporary solution, said the head of Singapore General Hospital's (SGH's) otolaryngology department, Dr Barrie Tan. Dr Low Wong Kein, senior ear specialist at Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital, said besides hearing impairment, constant exposure to loud noises can cause health problems such as hypertension and heart disease. Psychologist Nishta Geetha Thevaraja from the SGH department of psychiatry said personal and work relationships can be affected by irritability and anger issues brought about by noise pollution. Those who have become accustomed to loud noises are "usually unaware of these implicit effects noise pollution has on their lives", she added.

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Serangoon is noisiest part of Singapore A total of 18,768 sound measurements were recorded over a 21/2-month period in a new study on noise by NUS audiologist William Hal Martin and graduate student Diong Huey Ting. According to the data, the noisiest parts of Singapore (based on planning zones) are: Serangoon (73.1 decibels) Orchard (72.8 decibels) Outram (72.8 decibels) Bukit Timah (72.6 decibels) Clementi (71.8 decibels) Kallang (71.5 decibels) Marina South (71.0 decibels) Downtown Core (71.0 decibels) Yishun (70.8 decibels) Rochor (70.3 decibels) The noisiest regions are:

Separately, The Sunday Times took average noise readings over a five-minute duration at two sites. The measurements were recorded by noise monitoring firm Dropnoise. MR K.C. TANG'S HOME Location: Block 115, Potong Pasir Avenue 1 Main source of noise pollution: Central Expressway Indoor average noise level: 66.6 decibels Outdoor average noise level: 74.2 decibels MS NADIA BEGUM'S HOME Location: Block 537, Choa Chu Kang Street 51 Main source of noise pollution: MRT tracks Indoor average noise level: 60.5 decibels When a train goes past: 73.2 decibels

Central region (70.0 decibels) North-east region (69.9 decibels) East region (69.8 decibels) West region (67.8 decibels) North region (66.3 decibels)

NO SOUND OF SILENCE World Health Organisation guidelines say 70 decibels is the sound level which - if someone is exposed to it consistently for a full day - can lead to hearing impairment. Here's how Singapore and other cities stack up. SINGAPORE The mean noise level is 69.4 decibels, according to an NUS study. It is averaged from more than 18,000 sound readings taken over a 2½-month period. NEW YORK CITY Noise generally hovers around 70 decibels on the streets of Manhattan, according to measurements taken by magazine NYMag. TAINAN A 2009 traffic noise study conducted in Taiwan's Tainan city in 2009 found that 90 per cent of the population was exposed to more than an average of 62 decibels during peak hours.

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HONG KONG In one of Asia's busiest financial hubs, 13.6 per cent of the population is exposed to a noise level of above 70 decibels, according to the government's Environmental Protection Department. CAIRO The average noise level in Egypt's capital is 90 deci- bels. It hardly falls below 70 decibels, according to a 2007 study by the Egyptian National Research Centre. SHANGHAI Road noise on Shanghai's streets hits an average of 71.9 decibels during the day and drops to 65.9 decibels at night, according to newspaper Shanghai Daily.

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Written Analysis

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Block 435B Off North towards North West facing stack: 1535 1. This stack is facing off North towards North West. This stack will have up to 5 months of 3pm west sun exposure. Gable end wall (with or without corner window) will be exposed to west sun at least 3 months in a year. This will induce additional heat into Master Bedroom. Notes: a. Please refer to following page 3pm sun diagram. b. Avoid top most level unit as roof above will allow additional heat intake. c. Details from NEA on uv exposure can be found here: https://www.nea.gov.sg/weather/ultraviolet-index/uv-radiation-uv-index 2. Based on weather data collected by NEA from 2014 to 2017, this stack will have exposure to prevailing wind potential from North (N). Notes: a. Prevailing wind exposure for each stack and condition for its exposure will be summarized in scoring chart and scoring parameters and definition. b. Prevailing wind exposure is being estimated based on exposure to the main façade and the back of unit (yard, kitchen, etc.) c. Please take note that prevailing wind from N, NE occur between November to April while prevailing wind from S, SSW occur between May to October. 3. This stack will enjoy a building distance of up to >100m (distance being measured perpendicularly from the main façade to the nearest opposite block). Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance and please take note of the condition for the distance. 4. This stack will have a viewing angle of 50/120 (viewing distance of up to 50m with viewing coverage of 120 degree) measured from main facade. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for the scoring condition. b. Based on reasonable line of sight and cumulative distance between buildings, 50m (for building less than 18 storey) and 100m (for building higher than 19 storey) will be used as a maximum guideline and viewing angle at 120-degree.

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5. Lift ratio for this block is at 1:69. This ratio is beyond the comfort level of recommended 1:40-60. Notes: a. Having higher lift ratio will translate to estimated higher usage, longer waiting time and potential higher maintenance issue in the future (i.e. breakdown). 6. This stack will have up to 40m from the nearest lift. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance. b. US regulation allow for maximum 30m travelling distance for disable while UK allow for maximum 50m travelling distance without rest for mobility impaired using stick individual. c. Homeowner may choose to omit this attribute should there be no consideration for elderly mobility.

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Off North towards North West facing stack: 1537 1. This stack is facing off North towards North West. This stack will have up to 5 months of 3pm west sun exposure. Notes: a. Please refer to following page 3pm sun diagram. b. Avoid top most level unit as roof above will allow additional heat intake. c. Details from NEA on uv exposure can be found here: https://www.nea.gov.sg/weather/ultraviolet-index/uv-radiation-uv-index 2. Based on weather data collected by NEA from 2014 to 2017, this stack will have exposure to prevailing wind potential from North (N). Notes: a. Prevailing wind exposure for each stack and condition for its exposure will be summarized in scoring chart and scoring parameters and definition. b. Prevailing wind exposure is being estimated based on exposure to the main façade and the back of unit (yard, kitchen, etc.) c. Please take note that prevailing wind from N, NE occur between November to April while prevailing wind from S, SSW occur between May to October. 3. This stack will enjoy a building distance of up to >100m (distance being measured perpendicularly from the main façade to the nearest opposite block). Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance and please take note of the condition for the distance. 4. This stack will have a viewing angle of 50/120 (viewing distance of up to 50m with viewing coverage of 120 degree) measured from main facade. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for the scoring condition. b. Based on reasonable line of sight and cumulative distance between buildings, 50m (for building less than 18 storey) and 100m (for building higher than 19 storey) will be used as a maximum guideline and viewing angle at 120-degree.

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5. Lift ratio for this block is at 1:69. This ratio is beyond the comfort level of recommended 1:40-60. Notes: a. Having higher lift ratio will translate to estimated higher usage, longer waiting time and potential higher maintenance issue in the future (i.e. breakdown). 6. This stack will have up to 35m from the nearest lift. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance. b. US regulation allow for maximum 30m travelling distance for disable while UK allow for maximum 50m travelling distance without rest for mobility impaired using stick individual. c. Homeowner may choose to omit this attribute should there be no consideration for elderly mobility.

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435B 1537 1535

438A 1607 1605

438B 1645 1643

JAN FEB MAC APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC

>50% shielded by sun shade/ other block exposed to direct sun fully shaded due to sun angle

10 am sun diagram 435B 1537 1535

438A 1607 1605

438B 1645 1643

JAN FEB MAC APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC

>50% shielded by sun shade/ other block exposed to direct sun fully shaded due to sun angle

3 pm sun diagram

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Block 438A North East facing stack: 1605 1. This stack is facing North East. This stack will not have 3pm west sun exposure all year round. Notes: a. Please refer to following page 3pm sun diagram. b. Avoid top most level unit as roof above will allow additional heat intake. c. Details from NEA on uv exposure can be found here: https://www.nea.gov.sg/weather/ultraviolet-index/uv-radiation-uv-index 2. Based on weather data collected by NEA from 2014 to 2017, this stack will have exposure to prevailing wind potential from North East (NE). Notes: a. Prevailing wind exposure for each stack and condition for its exposure will be summarized in scoring chart and scoring parameters and definition. b. Prevailing wind exposure is being estimated based on exposure to the main façade and the back of unit (yard, kitchen, etc.) c. Please take note that prevailing wind from N, NE occur between November to April while prevailing wind from S, SSW occur between May to October. 3. This stack will enjoy a building distance of up to 90m (distance being measured perpendicularly from the main façade to the nearest opposite block). This stack will be looking towards Block 442A of Punggol Point Cove across Punggol Road. View towards Johore Straits will be partly restricted by Block 442A. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance and please take note of the condition for the distance. 4. This stack will have a viewing angle of 50/120 (viewing distance of up to 50m with viewing coverage of 120 degree) measured from main facade. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for the scoring condition. b. Based on reasonable line of sight and cumulative distance between buildings, 50m (for building less than 18 storey) and 100m (for building higher than 19 storey) will be used as a maximum guideline and viewing angle at 120-degree. 5. This stack is directly facing/ within close proximity (75m radius for Major source and 38m radius for Minor source) to vehicular source (primary road/ highway/ elevated MRT) and minor vehicular source (MSCP/ internal service road/ etc.) Notes: a. Absolute data from noise pollution in dB varies greatly, thus we measure based on number of sound disturbance source. Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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6. Lift ratio for this block is at 1:80. This ratio is beyond the comfort level of recommended 1:40-60. Notes: a. Having higher lift ratio will translate to estimated higher usage, longer waiting time and potential higher maintenance issue in the future (i.e. breakdown). 7. This stack will have up to 30m from the nearest lift. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance. b. US regulation allow for maximum 30m travelling distance for disable while UK allow for maximum 50m travelling distance without rest for mobility impaired using stick individual. c. Homeowner may choose to omit this attribute should there be no consideration for elderly mobility.

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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North East facing stack: 1607 1. This stack is facing North East. This stack will not have 3pm west sun exposure all year round. Notes: a. Please refer to following page 3pm sun diagram. b. Avoid top most level unit as roof above will allow additional heat intake. c. Details from NEA on uv exposure can be found here: https://www.nea.gov.sg/weather/ultraviolet-index/uv-radiation-uv-index 2. Based on weather data collected by NEA from 2014 to 2017, this stack will have exposure to prevailing wind potential from North East (NE) Notes: a. Prevailing wind exposure for each stack and condition for its exposure will be summarized in scoring chart and scoring parameters and definition. b. Prevailing wind exposure is being estimated based on exposure to the main façade and the back of unit (yard, kitchen, etc.) c. Please take note that prevailing wind from N, NE occur between November to April while prevailing wind from S, SSW occur between May to October. 3. This stack will enjoy a building distance of up to 80m (distance being measured perpendicularly from the main façade to the nearest opposite block). This stack will be looking towards Block 442A of Punggol Point Cove across Punggol Road. View towards Johore Straits will be partly restricted by Block 442A. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance and please take note of the condition for the distance. 4. This stack will have a viewing angle of 50/120 (viewing distance of up to 50m with viewing coverage of 120 degree) measured from main facade. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for the scoring condition. b. Based on reasonable line of sight and cumulative distance between buildings, 50m (for building less than 18 storey) and 100m (for building higher than 19 storey) will be used as a maximum guideline and viewing angle at 120-degree. 5. This stack is directly facing/ within close proximity (75m radius for Major source and 38m radius for Minor source) to vehicular source (primary road/ highway/ elevated MRT) and minor vehicular source (MSCP/ internal service road/ etc.) Notes: a. Absolute data from noise pollution in dB varies greatly, thus we measure based on number of sound disturbance source.

Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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6. Lift ratio for this block is at 1:80. This ratio is beyond the comfort level of recommended 1:40-60. Notes: a. Having higher lift ratio will translate to estimated higher usage, longer waiting time and potential higher maintenance issue in the future (i.e. breakdown). 7. This stack will have up to 35m from the nearest lift. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance. b. US regulation allow for maximum 30m travelling distance for disable while UK allow for maximum 50m travelling distance without rest for mobility impaired using stick individual. c. Homeowner may choose to omit this attribute should there be no consideration for elderly mobility.

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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435B 1537 1535

438A 1607 1605

438B 1645 1643

JAN FEB MAC APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC

>50% shielded by sun shade/ other block exposed to direct sun fully shaded due to sun angle

10 am sun diagram 435B 1537 1535

438A 1607 1605

438B 1645 1643

JAN FEB MAC APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC

>50% shielded by sun shade/ other block exposed to direct sun fully shaded due to sun angle

3 pm sun diagram

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Block 438B Off South towards South West facing stack: 1643 1. This stack is facing off South towards South West. This stack will have up to 5 months of 3pm west sun exposure. Notes: a. Please refer to following page 3pm sun diagram. b. Avoid top most level unit as roof above will allow additional heat intake. c. Details from NEA on uv exposure can be found here: https://www.nea.gov.sg/weather/ultraviolet-index/uv-radiation-uv-index 2. Based on weather data collected by NEA from 2014 to 2017, this stack will not have exposure to prevailing wind potential. Notes: a. Prevailing wind exposure for each stack and condition for its exposure will be summarized in scoring chart and scoring parameters and definition. b. Prevailing wind exposure is being estimated based on exposure to the main façade and the back of unit (yard, kitchen, etc.) c. Please take note that prevailing wind from N, NE occur between November to April while prevailing wind from S, SSW occur between May to October. 3. This stack will enjoy a building distance of up to 30m (distance being measured perpendicularly from the main façade to the nearest opposite block). This stack will be looking towards Block 438C to the South. View will be greatly restricted by Block 438C. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance and please take note of the condition for the distance. 4. This stack will have a viewing angle of 25/120 (viewing distance of up to 25m with viewing coverage of 120 degree) measured from main facade. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for the scoring condition. b. Based on reasonable line of sight and cumulative distance between buildings, 50m (for building less than 18 storey) and 100m (for building higher than 19 storey) will be used as a maximum guideline and viewing angle at 120-degree.

Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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5. This stack is directly facing/ within close proximity (75m radius for Major source and 38m radius for Minor source) to social activity source (precinct pavilion/ children's playground/ commercial activity) and minor vehicular source (MSCP/ internal service road/ etc.) Notes: a. Absolute data from noise pollution in dB varies greatly, thus we measure based on number of sound disturbance source. 6. Lift ratio for this block is at 1:68. This ratio is beyond the comfort level of recommended 1:40-60. Notes: a. Having higher lift ratio will translate to estimated higher usage, longer waiting time and potential higher maintenance issue in the future (i.e. breakdown). 7. This stack will have up to 30m from the nearest lift. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance. b. US regulation allow for maximum 30m travelling distance for disable while UK allow for maximum 50m travelling distance without rest for mobility impaired using stick individual. c. Homeowner may choose to omit this attribute should there be no consideration for elderly mobility.

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Off South towards South West facing stack: 1645 1. This stack is facing off South towards South West. This stack will have up to 5 months of 3pm west sun exposure. Gable end wall (with or without corner window) will be exposed to west sun at least 3 months in a year. This will induce additional heat into Master Bedroom. Notes: a. Please refer to following page 3pm sun diagram. b. Avoid top most level unit as roof above will allow additional heat intake. c. Details from NEA on uv exposure can be found here: https://www.nea.gov.sg/weather/ultraviolet-index/uv-radiation-uv-index 2. Based on weather data collected by NEA from 2014 to 2017, this stack will not have exposure to prevailing wind potential. Notes: a. Prevailing wind exposure for each stack and condition for its exposure will be summarized in scoring chart and scoring parameters and definition. b. Prevailing wind exposure is being estimated based on exposure to the main façade and the back of unit (yard, kitchen, etc.) c. Please take note that prevailing wind from N, NE occur between November to April while prevailing wind from S, SSW occur between May to October. 3. This stack will enjoy a building distance of up to 30m (distance being measured perpendicularly from the main façade to the nearest opposite block). This stack will be looking towards Block 438C to the South. View will be greatly restricted by Block 438C. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance and please take note of the condition for the distance. 4. This stack will have a viewing angle of 25/120 (viewing distance of up to 25m with viewing coverage of 120 degree) measured from main facade. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for the scoring condition. b. Based on reasonable line of sight and cumulative distance between buildings, 50m (for building less than 18 storey) and 100m (for building higher than 19 storey) will be used as a maximum guideline and viewing angle at 120-degree.

Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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5. This stack is directly facing/ within close proximity (75m radius for Major source and 38m radius for Minor source) to social activity source (precinct pavilion/ children's playground/ commercial activity) and minor vehicular source (MSCP/ internal service road/ etc.) Notes: a. Absolute data from noise pollution in dB varies greatly, thus we measure based on number of sound disturbance source. 6. Lift ratio for this block is at 1:68. This ratio is beyond the comfort level of recommended 1:40-60. Notes: a. Having higher lift ratio will translate to estimated higher usage, longer waiting time and potential higher maintenance issue in the future (i.e. breakdown). 7. This stack will have up to 30m from the nearest lift. Notes: a. Please refer to scoring chart for exact distance. b. US regulation allow for maximum 30m travelling distance for disable while UK allow for maximum 50m travelling distance without rest for mobility impaired using stick individual. c. Homeowner may choose to omit this attribute should there be no consideration for elderly mobility.

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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435B 1537 1535

438A 1607 1605

438B 1645 1643

JAN FEB MAC APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC

>50% shielded by sun shade/ other block exposed to direct sun fully shaded due to sun angle

10 am sun diagram 435B 1537 1535

438A 1607 1605

438B 1645 1643

JAN FEB MAC APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC

>50% shielded by sun shade/ other block exposed to direct sun fully shaded due to sun angle

3 pm sun diagram

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Reference for the sun diagram

Exposed to direct sun

Fully shaded due to sun angle

Shaded by sun shade/ other block

Exposed to direct sun

Fully shaded due to sun angle

Shaded by sun shade/ other block

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Sun and shading analysis

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Block 435B (stack 1537) - 3pm

Block 435B

Stack 1537

Block 435A

Stack 1537

Block 435A

Jan 21st Block 435B

Feb 21st

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

Block 435B

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Stack 1537

Block 435A

Stack 1537

Block 435A

Mar 21st Block 435B

Apr 21st

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

Block 435B

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Stack 1537

Block 435A

Stack 1537

Block 435A

May 21st Block 435B

Jun 21st

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

Block 435B

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Stack 1537

Block 435A

Stack 1537

Block 435A

Jul 21st Block 435B

Aug 21st

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

Block 435B

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Stack 1537

Block 435A

Stack 1537

Block 435A

Sep 21st Block 435B

Oct 21st

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

Block 435B

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Stack 1537

Block 435A

Stack 1537

Block 435A

Nov 21st Block 435B

Dec 21st

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Scoring Chart

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Scoring chart for all 3-rm stacks

GOOD HOUSING attributes west sun exposure (months)

score

prevailing wind

building score distance (m)

viewing score angle (m/ degree)

1535 1537

5 5

2 3

N N

1 1

>100 >100

4 4

50 / 120 50 / 120

4 4

1605 1607

0 0

4 4

NE NE

2 2

90 80

3 3

50 / 120 50 / 120

1643 1645

5 5

3 2

-

1 1

30 30

2 2

25 / 120 25 / 120

score

total score

-

4 4

15 16

4 4

V, v V, v

2 2

15 15

3 3

s, v s, v

3 3

12 11

score

sound disturb.

435B 438A 438B

additional attributes total total lift distance units in in a lift ratio score to lift (m) a block block

score

total score

total score

208

3

69

2

37 36

2 2

4 4

19 20

241

3

80

2

30 33

3 3

5 5

20 20

273

4

68

2

28 30

3 3

5 5

17 16

Notes a only applicable to units above landscape deck/ MSCP b dimensions based on measurement provided in HDB brochure c based on current surrounding situation (HDB brochure as guide) d e f g

RED indicate point being deducted unit with corner window/ gable end expose to west sun will deducted 1 point from 'west sun exposure' to reflect lesser desirable unit with main façade facing future development will be deducted 1 point from 'prevailing wind' to reflect future reduced wind potential unit facing major arterial road, industrial area will be deducted 1 point from 'viewing angle' to reflect lesser desirable

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Scoring Parameters and Definition GOOD HOUSING attributes 1. West sun exposure (base on 3pm) (Lesser monthly exposure denotes better unit) 1 pt - 9 to 12 months of direct sun exposure in a year 2 pt - 6 to 8 months of direct sun exposure in a year 3 pt - 3 to 5 months of direct sun exposure in a year 4 pt - Less than 3 months of direct sun exposure in a year (1-2 months) Notes 1. point deduction for stacks with additional exposure to gable end wall/ corner window

2. Prevailing wind (More prevailing wind allows for better ventilation, thus denotes better attribute) 1 pt - N/ S/ SSW 2 pt - NE/ NE+N/ NE+S/ NE+SSW/ N+S/ N+SSW/ S+SSW 3 pt - NE+N+S/ NE+N+SSW/ NE+S+SSW 4 pt - N+NE+S+SSW Notes 1. Prevailing wind based on data collected by NEA (2014-2017) at Changi monitoring station 2. Prevailing wind exposure based on exposure to Main façade and back of unit (yard, kitchen, etc.) 3. Only 4 major prevailing wind sources will be used for analysis as these 4 directions have recorded highest frequency during monsoon season.

3. Building Distance (m) (Lesser obstruction in front of Living room or Master bedroom of a unit will achieve a better view and increase distance will provide more privacy) 1 pt - refer to image 1 (less than 50m) 2 pt - refer to image 2 (less than 50m with lesser obstruction in front) 3 pt - refer to image 3 (50m – 100m) 4 pt - refer to image 4 (more than 100m)

Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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Notes 1. measurement taken mainly for units above school (or land reserved for education), MSCP (multi storey car park), existing industrial facility (or land reserved for Industrial) 4. Viewing angle (m) (Wider viewing angle with farther distance denotes better unit) 1 pt - 25/60 (distance up to 25m and the viewing coverage at 60 degree due to blockage) 2 pt - 50/60 (distance up to 50m and the viewing coverage at 60 degree due to blockage) 3 pt - 25/120 (distance up to 25m and the viewing coverage at 120 degree due to blockage) 4 pt - 50/120 (distance up to 50m and the viewing coverage at 120 degree due to blockage) 5. Sound disturbance (Lesser pollutant/pollutants source denotes better attribute) Major pollutant source (3 pt each) C – construction source (existing/ future) V - vehicular source (primary road/ highway/ elevated MRT) I – industrial source (factory) Minor pollutant source (1 pt each) s - social activity source (precinct pavilion/ children’s playground) r - religious activity source (existing/ future place of worship) e - educational activity source (existing/ future education facility) v - minor vehicular source (MSCP/ internal service road/ etc.) 1 pt - 3 or more elements Major pollutants from the list above (9 pt) 2 pt - 1 Major pollutant + 1 Minor pollutant (4 pt)/ 1 Major pollutant + 2 Minor pollutants (5pt)/ 2 Major pollutants + 1 Minor pollutant (7 pt)/ 2 Major pollutants + 2 Minor pollutants (8 pt) 3 pt - 1 Minor pollutants (1 pt)/ 2 Minor pollutants (2 pt)/ 3 Minor pollutant (3 pt)/ 1 Major pollutant + 1 Minor pollutants (4 pt) 4 pt - no pollutant from the list above (0 pt)

Copyright © 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this publication


Punggol Point Crown 3-rm Sep 2019

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additional attributes 6. Lift ratio (Lesser number of units sharing 1 lift will allow shorter waiting time for residents) 1 pt - more than 80 residential units sharing 1 lift 2 pt - 61-80 residential units sharing 1 lift 3 pt - 41-60 residential units sharing 1 lift 4 pt - less than 40 residential units sharing 1 lift 7. Distance to lift (m) (Shorter distance to lift core will reflect faster access to vertical mechanical circulation, lift) 1 pt - more than 50m from unit main door to nearest lift 2 pt - 36-50m from unit main door to nearest lift 3 pt - 26-35m from unit main door to nearest lift 4 pt - less than 25m from unit main door to nearest lift

Copyright Š 2020 by chua.soon.ching@hausanalyst.com

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