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A Hatton-Brown Publication

Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. Street Address: 225 Hanrick Street Montgomery, AL 36104-3317 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2268 Montgomery, AL 36102-2268 Telephone: 334.834.1170 FAX: 334.834.4525

Volume 45 • Number 2 • March 2020 Founded in 1976 • Our 461st Consecutive Issue

Publisher: David H. Ramsey Chief Operating Officer: Dianne C. Sullivan Editor-in-Chief: Rich Donnell Senior Editor: Dan Shell Senior Associate Editor: David Abbott Senior Associate Editor: Jessica Johnson Associate Editor: Patrick Dunning

Renew or subscribe on the web: www.timberprocessing.com

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ISSUES

Familiar Face To Lead Endowment

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NEW SAWMILL

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KING LUMBER

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MACHINERY ROW

Classified Advertising: Bridget DeVane • 334.699.7837 800.669.5613 • bdevane7@hotmail.com

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POLE HANDLING

Advertising Sales Representatives: Southern USA

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Publisher/Editor Emeritus: David (DK) Knight Art Director/Prod. Manager: Cindy Segrest Ad Production Coordinator: Patti Campbell Circulation Director: Rhonda Thomas Online Content/Marketing: Jacqlyn Kirkland

Randy Reagor P.O. Box 2268 Montgomery, AL 36102-2268 904.393.7968 • FAX: 334.834.4525 E-mail: reagor@bellsouth.net

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Edwards Adds To Lumber Roster Concentration Yard Still Going Strong

USNR Reveals Worldwide Projects

Stella-Jones Handles With Care

LOG LINE PREP

Taking Care Of Business Up Front

AT LARGE

UK Port Shapes Up For Timber

COVER: Edwards Wood Products has added to its lumber production capacity with a new green end at Laurinburg, NC, including this canter and gang line from Cone Machinery. Story begins on PAGE 12. (Jessica Johnson photo.)

Midwest USA, Eastern Canada John Simmons 32 Foster Cres. Whitby, Ontario, Canada L1R 1W1 905.666.0258 • FAX: 905.666.0778 E-mail: jsimmons@idirect.com

VISIT OUR WEBSITE: www.timberprocessing.com Member Verified Audit Circulation

Western USA, Western Canada Tim Shaddick 4056 West 10th Avenue Vancouver BC Canada V6L 1Z1 604.910.1826 • FAX: 604.264.1367 E-mail: tootall1@shaw.ca Kevin Cook 604.619.1777 E-mail: lordkevincook@gmail.com

International Murray Brett 58 Aldea de las Cuevas, Buzon 60 03759 Benidoleig (Alicante), Spain Tel: +34 96 640 4165 • + 34 96 640 4048 E-mail: murray.brett@abasol.net

Timber Processing (ISSN 0885-906X, USPS 395-850) is published 10 times annually (January/February and July/August issues are combined) by Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc., 225 Hanrick St., Montgomery, AL 36104. Subscription Information—TP is free to qualified owners, operators, managers, purchasing agents, supervisors, foremen and other key personnel at sawmills, pallet plants, chip mills, treating plants, specialty plants, lumber finishing operations, corporate industrial woodlands officials and machinery manufacturers and distributors in the U.S. All non-qualified U.S. Subscriptions are $55 annually: $65 in Canada; $95 (Airmail) in all other countries (U.S. Funds). Single copies, $5 each; special issues, $20 (U.S. funds). Subscription Inquiries— TOLL-FREE: 800-669-5613; Fax 888-611-4525. Go to www.timberprocessing.com and click on the subscribe button to subscribe/renew via the web. All advertisements for Timber Processing magazine are accepted and published by Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. with the understanding that the advertiser and/or advertising agency are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The advertiser and/or advertising agency will defend, indemnify and hold any claims or lawsuits for libel violations or right of privacy or publicity, plagiarism, copyright or trademark infringement and any other claims or lawsuits that may arise out of publication of such advertisement. Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. neither endorse nor makes any representation or guarantee as to the quality of goods and services advertised in Timber Processing. Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. reserves the right to reject any advertisement which it deems inappropriate. Copyright ® 2020. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without written permission is prohibited. Periodicals postage paid at Montgomery, Ala. and at additional mailing offices. Printed in U.S.A.

Postmaster: Please send address changes to Timber Processing, P.O. Box 2419, Montgomery, Alabama 36102-2419 Other Hatton-Brown publications: Timber Harvesting • Southern Loggin’ Times Wood Bioenergy • Panel World • Power Equipment Trade

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THEISSUES

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Rich Donnell Editor-in-Chief

WHAT IS AN ENCODER ANYWAY?

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e’ve been having some fun with sawmill terminology lately. We always do when we hire a new editor fresh out of college, who has been a sportswriter, and who is much more familiar with terms like three-point shot than three-dimensional scanning. As I write this, our newest associate editor, all 22 years of him, is en route to a hardwood sawmill in West Virginia. I feel sorry for him. Not because of the 10 hour drive to get there, but after nine months of employment here he was just getting the hang of what goes on in a softwood lumber sawmill, and then I send him to a hardwood sawmill, which in general may have less sophisticated technology than a softwood sawmill, but which has its own language of grades and markets, not to mention multiple species and bigger logs. And I didn’t tell him that a lot of the hardwood lumbermen haven’t been in too good of a mood lately (China tariffs and all, you know). You try to prepare the boy as best you can—read some old hardwood sawmill stories, do some googling of hardwood sawmills in action. He’s done pretty well with the softwood sawmills he has visited; that is, he hasn’t quit yet. One of the mills completed a major upgrade with some new profiling technology. I had told the mill owner, whom we’ve known forever, that I was sending him a greenhorn and to go easy on him. When I read our boy’s transcript of the interview, I was really appreciative of the guys at the mill. They had gone above and beyond and provided our novice some sawmill 101 basics as they went through the mill flow. Of course I had already loaned to the kid the greatest book on sawmills ever written: Lumber Manufacturing: The Design and Operation of Sawmills and Planer Mills, by the legendary Northwest consultant Ed Williston. When I handed it to him, I said, yep, somebody actually wrote a book on sawmills. And then I proceeded to give him way too much information on how the book had saved my career. It really did, back in the mid 1980s, not long after I had moved from the newspaper business to this business, and found myself getting stuck on sawmill words like “encoder.” I had attended the sawmill machinery show in Portland, which was hosted by the publishing company, Miller Freeman, which in addition to producing forest industry trade magazines also published technical books, and one of them was this one. It had been published in 1976, and Williston had revised it a couple of times since. It had chapter titles like: Introduction to Lumber Manufacture, The Log Yard, Merchandising and the Long Log Deck, The Headrig, Principles and Systems for Primary Log Breakdown, Ponies and Resaws, Edgers, Trimming Rough Lumber, Scanners and Computers and right on through the planer mill and filing room, and then it had this absolutely glorious glossary of sawmill terms and appendix of measurements and conversions. I could understand what the heck was going on in a high-tech sawmill, as long as the book was in reach. Sure a lot has changed in sawmills since the book’s last edition in 1988, but a TP lot hasn’t changed.

Contact Rich Donnell, ph: 334-834-1170; fax 334-834-4525; e-mail: rich@hattonbrown.com TIMBER PROCESSING

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NEWSFEED ENDOWMENT PICKS PETE MADDEN U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities announced that Pete Madden has joined the staff as President. “Our Board and staff are excited to share with our partners and collaborators that Pete will be coming aboard,” says Endowment President and CEO Carlton Owen. “This decision is the culmination of more than two years of thoughtful and deliberate succession planning to ensure that the Endowment continues to advance its dual mission of keeping working forests as forests and advancing familywage jobs in forest-rich, rural communities.” Madden joins the Endowment with more than 30 years of experience in the forest sector. He has held roles in land management, procurement, supply chain and logistics, and renewable energy within wellknown and respected industry players including Westvaco, Georgia-Pacific and Plum Creek. Most recently, he led Drax Biomass, Inc. as President and CEO. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Marlboro College in Vermont and both a Master of Science in Forestry and an M.B.A. from the University of New Hampshire. Endowment Board Chairman Mark Emmerson, who is Chairman of California-based Sierra Pacific Industries, notes, “We are fortunate to have had consistent, stable, and visionary leadership since the Endowment’s creation in 2006 and are happy to report that Carlton Owen will continue as CEO for an extended period.” “I have watched the Endowment emerge as one of the most progressive and impactful players in the greater forest sector bridging academia, conservation, government at all levels, and in6

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dustry,” Madden says. Madden will work out of the Endowment’s headquarters and plans to relocate his family to Greenville, SC. The Endowment was established in September 2006 at the request of the governments of the U.S. and Canada in accordance with terms of the 2006 Softwood Lumber Agreement.

ENDLESS PURCHASES UK’S BSW GROUP BSW Group, the UK’s largest integrated forestry and sawmilling business, has been acquired by private equity firm Endless LLP as part of a multi-level growth plan for the company. The market-leading sawmiller, which employs more than 1,200 and turns over £350 million annually, has previously expanded the business and integrated its supply chain through acquisitions such as Tilhill Forestry, Alvic Plastics and, more recently, Maelor Forest Nurseries. Endless’ purchase of BSW provides the capital to support BSW’s ambitious future growth plans through further expansion of its market position. Founded in 1848 in Berwickshire, BSW is the largest sawmilling group in the UK and within the top 20 timber producers in Europe. BSW Group has five main operating divisions: tree nurseries, forestry, sawmilling, timber manufacturing and energy. The group has seven sawmills in the UK: in Newbridge-onWye, Southampton, Carlisle, Dalbeattie, Petersmuir, Fort William and Boat of Garten, and one in Riga, Latvia. The headquarters remain in Earlston, Berwickshire, where the business originated. BSW manufactures and supplies a wide range of quality, FSC-certified sawn prod-

ucts for an array of industries, including fencing, landscaping, cladding, construction, DIY, decking, and packaging. This covers everything from C16 construction timber to innovative products such as composite decking and acoustic fence panels. The company also offers fencing components – such as posts, rails, and boards, in addition to sleepers, purlins, beams, baulks and large sections (up to 8m long). Byproducts such as sawdust, shavings, chips and bark are also supplied into pulp and paper, chipboard, horticultural and energy generation sectors.

BRAZIL, CHINA UNDER THE GUN U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross announced the initiation of new AD and CVD investigations to determine whether wood moldings and millwork products from Brazil and China are being dumped in the United States, and to determine if producers in China are receiving unfair subsidies. These AD and CVD investigations were initiated based on petitions filed by the Coalition of American Millwork Producers, whose members are Bright Wood Corp. (Madras, Ore.), Cascade Wood Products, Inc. (White City, Ore.), Endura Products, Inc. (Colfax, NC), Sierra Pacific Industries (Red Bluff, Calif.), Sunset Moulding (Live Oak, Calif.), Woodgrain Millwork, Inc. (Fruitland, ID), and Yuba River Moulding (Yuba City, Calif). In the AD investigations, Commerce will determine whether imports of wood moldings and millwork products from Brazil and China are being dumped in the U.S. market at less than fair value. In the CVD investigation, Commerce will determine whether Chinese producers of

wood moldings and millwork products are receiving unfair government subsidies. Commerce is initiating an investigation into 37 alleged Chinese subsidy programs, which include preferential lending programs, export credit programs, tax programs, indirect tax programs, grant programs, and the provision of inputs at less than adequate remuneration. If Commerce makes affirmative findings in these investigations, and if the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) determines that dumped and/or unfairly subsidized U.S. imports of wood moldings and millwork products from Brazil and/or China materially injure, or threaten material injury to, the U.S. industry, Commerce will impose duties on those imports in the amount of dumping and/or unfair subsidization found to exist. In 2018, imports of wood moldings and millwork products from Brazil and China were valued at an estimated $291.8 million and $208.4 million, respectively.

FOREST INDUSTRY SUPPORTERS RALLY A large group of forestry supporters, including a convoy of logging trucks from Vancouver Island, gathered at the BC legislature in Victoria in February to deliver an 8,000signature petition that asks for the province to support a working forest. The petition, organized by the BC Forestry Alliance and titled “Saving the working forest for all generations,” was addressed to BC Premier John Horgan, asking the government to bring into legislation, “The working forest, defined and dedicated to the purpose of harvesting and economic activities.” The group was met by BC forests minister Doug Donaldson. “I appreciate the

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NEWSFEED input I received today from members of the BC Forestry Alliance, and I can assure them that our government is more than willing to work with them to build a better future for BC’s forestry sector,” he said in a statement following the rally.

WASHINGTON HIT WITH LAWSUITS Following the late 2019 release of a plan to conserve marbled murrelet habitat on state-owned timberland, the Washington Dept. of Natural Resources (DNR) has been hit by three lawsuits, two claiming that DNR is abandoning its mandate to maximize timber sale revenue for state schools and another claiming the state didn’t go far enough in protecting murrelet habitat. A small seabird that spends

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much of its time over salt water and nests in older age class coastal trees, the murrelet is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, and the DNR was required to produce a murrelet conservation plan. The plan released by the state lowers timber harvest levels for 10 years, and sets an average harvest target of 465MMBF, which is 85MMBF less than the previous decade’s target that wasn’t ultimately met. Upon creation of statehood in 1889, Washington was given more than 3 million acres, and the state constitution says they should be managed to fund schools and other public institutions. Washington DNR manages these and additional lands, mostly Depression-era tax foreclosures, that fund additional services such as fire

protection and public libraries. Yet the DNR also has to follow state and federal environmental laws. Skagit County, which relies heavily on revenues from state lands, was the first to file suit, claiming the DNR wasn’t following its constitutional mandate for maximizing school revenue. Another suit was filed by a group of timber-dependent counties and school and fire districts that make the same claim, but also that the DNR didn’t prioritize beneficiaries, used old data for its plan and failed to consider other plans that would have had less impact on school revenues. A separate lawsuit filed by a coalition of environmental groups claims the plan doesn’t do enough to protect the murrelet and the state needs to find a new mechanism to fund schools.

RY JUGGLES LUMBER OUTPUT Officials with RY Timber in Townsend, Mont. announced the company would indefinitely close its Townsend sawmill, and in turn expand operations at its Livingston, Mont. facility. The closure is expected to begin in April and affect 70 employees. Company officials say the Livingston, Mont. mill will add 35-40 jobs after the Townsend closure, and some former Townsend employees may be transferred there. The two mills have each been operating at 50%-60% capacity, and the Townsend closure will put Livingston at full production. RY Timber executives blame uncertainty surrounding federal stewardship projects in the area for log sup-

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NEWSFEED ply issues that led to the closure, but add they hope they can reopen the Townsend mill in a few years if several projects move forward. According to news reports, RY Timber gets about 70% of its log supply from federal lands.

WEYCO SELLS MONTANA LAND Weyerhaeuser is selling 630,000 acres of timberland in Montana to a private timberland investment company for $145 million in cash. “The sale of our Montana acreage is part of our ongoing effort to strategically optimize our timberland portfolio,” comments Devin Stockfish, president and CEO of Weyerhaeuser. “The transaction includes a diverse mix of softwood species and an existing 110,000 acre conservation easement which preserves public access in perpetuity.” The transaction is expected to be completed in the second quarter of 2020. The company’s three manufacturing facilities in Montana are not affected by this announcement. “Our manufacturing operations in Montana continue to deliver strong results,” Devin adds. “Our people have done an outstanding job driving improvement in safety and operational excellence over the past several years, and they also do terrific work to support the communities where we operate.” In November Weyerhaeuser completed the sale of 555,000 acres of timberland in northern Michigan.

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GOING

WITHPINE By Jessica Johnson

Longtime hardwood manufacturer completes startup of greenfield sawmill for high production of pine to boost pallet production.

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LAURINBURG, NC dwards Wood Products (EWP), founded in 1969 by Carroll Edwards, began as a small pallet manufacturer in an abandoned chicken house in Marshville, NC. Beginning at age 9, Jeff Edwards worked after school, swept the floors, stacked lumber at the turntable and learned the ropes. By the time he finished high school, Edwards knew his future was in the family business. He says he never looked back after joining the business full-time. Working alongside his father as the company grew at an impressive clip was thrilling—adding its second sawmill in 1989, then three acquisitions before another greenfield startup in

2018—and knowing he’s kept his family’s business thriving for more than 50 years has been a source of real pride, especially now that his dad has passed. Careful consideration of location has been a factor for continued growth. Edwards has mills spread across North Carolina and one in South Carolina, because procurement has always been a challenge. Not necessarily because of competition for hardwood, but mainly because of the large-scale pine operations in the region. Spreading mills out a bit helps take pressure off a tight procurement radius. He’s a stone’s throw from some of the biggest single site pine sawmills in the country. EWP owns about 35,000 acres of timberland, mainly pine plantations,

The startup timeline for Edwards Wood Products’ Laurinburg pine sawmill was quick—it went from construction to first board in almost exactly one year.

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The new sawmill includes a Piché trimming and sorting line.

and it is not always cost effective to truck to the company’s new pine mill. Sometimes it makes more sense to sell pine logs off Edwards’ own timberlands to markets that are closer. Edwards’ portfolio, which includes three scragg mills, two chip mills, five hardwood grade mills and the new pine mill, consumes around 350 loads of wood daily. One of the driving factors in every single decision Edwards has made for the business has been how to get the highest and best use, while also being strategic in location of acquisitions of both land and sawmills. Those moves benefitted greatly in 2017, when he first began seriously planning a pine and mixed hardwood alternating sawmill designed to feed the company’s pallet operations —all of course driven by Edwards noticing that the market demand for kiln dried pine pallets was increasing, and his pallet operations were geared mainly for hardwoods. “When I was thinking about the location of the new mill, I did substantial research before I made the decision to start the project. I would have preferred to locate the new mill on property beside one of our existing mills in Peachland, NC, but from a procurement standpoint I felt, in the long run, we would be better off in the Laurinburg area,” he says. The new pine sawmill in Laurinburg is 60 miles from company headquarters in Marshville. The company’s overall production capacity is 175MMBF of hardwood and 90MMBF of pine, with the new sawmill making strides every day to increase production. Edwards says that he’ll be happy when the combined production is 300MMBF, including grade hardwood lumber, industrial timbers, pine and hardwood pallet stock, with much of the pine being produced at the new mill.

Jeff Edwards continues to expand the business.

NEW SAWMILL Edwards had been in discussions with ConeOmega about building and laying out a pine sawmill that could also saw soft hardwood, as well as manufacture pallets on site. Edwards acquired an existing metal manufacturing complex on 100 acres, including 300,000 sq. ft. under roof; he closed the ➤ 18

A Timber Automation LogPro bucking line sends stems to primary breakdown. TIMBER PROCESSING

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Porter Engineering worked on site for over a week with the EWP team getting the programming and scanning correct.

Cone-Omega Tru-Positioning infeed

EWP counted on McDonough for the primary twin and downstream horizontal resaw.

The mill ultimately targets 6 in. and 8 in. cants.

Omega Solutions provided primary breakdown sharp chain system.

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The radial crane and a small amount of equipment was pulled from a shuttered sawmill in Hickory, NC.

Laurinburg Operations Manager Terry Williamson is a veteran of the sawmill business, and had been with EWP for years before coming to Laurinburg.

Side view of the Cone-Omega Tru-Position log positioning with Porter Engineering scanning

Timber Automation (Baxley) edger optimizer

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Outfeed of Cone-Omega curve canter

13 ➤ deal with Cone-Omega at the SFPA Expo in Atlanta in summer 2017. Construction of the new mill was on a relatively quick timeline, once the decision was made to go forward. Old equipment in the existing building was

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removed in early 2018, and construction began in April 2018. Edwards contracted with Quality Construction in Lake City, Fla. to handle most of the work, which included demolishing one portion of the building that wasn’t tall

enough to accommodate part of the primary breakdown, as well as adding a new building for the log merchandizing line. At one year since construction began in earnest, the first boards came off the line. As the mill production continues to

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Edwards worked with vendors he knew could create a mill that would be flexible.

grow, it will account for one-third of what EWP produces overall, fed mainly by gatewood from wood dealers in the surrounding areas and a smaller portion from stumpage purchased by EWP, as well as logs generated from EWP’s own timberlands. Three resaw lines make pallet stock, and there are two pallet assembly lines in the

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building. Pallet stock is also shipped to Marshville for pallet production, using the company owned trucking fleet. Some higher grade pine is sorted at the trimmer/sorter line and sold to outside markets. Currently the kilns are being used for predominately pallet stock. A lot of the production of the mill winds up in pallets. The mill was built with the ability to

run crossties and timbers, utilizing soft hardwoods as well, and they have done some of that. Edwards admits getting the mill up and going and new people trained has been challenging, so for the time being they are focusing on pine lumber and pallet stock production. Some soft hardwoods have been processed to make sure that the controls and programming were properly set up and tested. “We want to be flexible and maximize value, but we’ve got a tremendous appetite for pine pallet stock to support our pallet production. We wanted to make sure the mill could do a lot of different things,” he explains of the choice to build a mill that cuts both— even though the initial focus is on pine.

MILL FLOW At the sawmill proper the 175 ft. PSI radial crane, a Nicholson A8 debarker, some log decks and vibrating conveyors were recycled from a shuttered sawmill

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The Piché trim sort line is fully automated and also handles some higher grade pine.

Edwards bought near Hickory, NC that didn’t survive the downturn. ConeOmega supplied the brunt of log sawing machinery and Piché provided downstream handling equipment. Since EWP built the greenfield mill in an existing building, Laurinburg Operations Manager Terry Williamson notes that everything about the sawmill is under roof, and 75% of the log line is also under roof. Logs are weighed, scaled and sorted and fed to the mill, through the debarker and through Porter log scanning, prior to entering a Timber Automation LogPro five-saw bucking station. The pieces then proceed through an MDI metal detector. “We’re not a conventional 2x4 sawmill, though we could be with the mill that we designed and built,” Williamson explains. “What we want isn’t just whatever you can fit into the log. With the focus we put on making pallet stock, the length of finished pallet components needed drives the length of cants and boards made at the sawmill. This makes it a little challenging when the customer buying the higher grade boards that we ship to external markets wants 12 ft. and 16 ft. lengths, while the pallet stock needed internally requires more 10 ft. and 14 ft., cuts. It can be a complex process.” Pieces enter a Cone-Omega Tru-Position line—an endo feeding sharp chain line with linear motion log turner that feeds the Tru-Position module, placing the center of mass of the log on the cen22

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ter of the sharp chain. Logs run through multiple Porter scans before entering a canter twin section featuring the Omega slant canter and McDonough twin band. The outfeed of the twin is composed of a double screwroll section that sends boards to the edger or either doubles to the resaw or side cants to the curve canter and gang. Any chips that are produced are fed to a BM&M chip screen using action vibrating conveyors and on to a Peerless chip bin. This system lets EWP process larger logs than normal because it produces side cants. This gives the mill a lot of flexibility in product mix and the ability to change products on the fly. Williamson really likes the entire line. The Nicholson debarker and log bucking system are electric, which eliminates problems with hydraulics during cold weather. Cone-Omega also supplied its curve canter and curve gang system, which ties into the outfeed of the sharp chain to accept the center cant and side cants. Williamson says the mill targets 6 in. and 8 in. thick center cants. These sizes work well for pallet part production, as well as lumber being made for external markets. The cants are singulated and loaded into an infeed system, scanned transversely by a Baxley cant optimizer and then placed on the optimized feedtable. The cants ride on a sharp top chain through the curve canter that chips the curved profile of the cant. The cants are swept off behind the canter onto another

deck with a series of queuing hooks. The cants are then placed on a linebar feedtable and are sawn in a Cone curve-sawing gang. The gang is a 10 in. bottom arbor gang with one shifting timber pocket as well as double shifting timber pockets. All the pockets can shift from 3.5 in. to 12 in., providing great flexibility for product mix. Boards generated anywhere in the mill that need edging are all sent to a ConeOmega high speed four saw edger system featuring Baxley optimization and controls. The system was delivered complete with the infeed from the unscrambler and singulation components through to the edger feedtable, a four saw edger module and batwing outfeed system for high speed accurate strip separation. Both the edger feedtable and the curve canter feedtable feature Omega’s latest design called “Super Fetchers,” that ride on linear bearings and ways, creating a robust, virtually trouble free operation. From the edger, boards travel to a Piché trim sort line, which was designed to handle everything from 1x3s to large cants from the lug loader to the sorter. The bin sorter is designed to accept a large variation of products while preserving high speed and efficiency. The Piché sorter is fully automatic, and therefore unmanned. It feeds a MoCo stacker. From the stacker, boards and cants are moved to the kilns for drying or to one of the three resaw lines to be processed into pallet components. Piché also supplied a fully automatic cant trimmer that feeds two gang lines in the adjacent pallet line; a special feature is that when production is changed to a different product, the new dimensions are entered on the touch screen and everything gets to the proper position in automatically—no more lost time on manual adjustments. All boards used in pallets are dipped with a mold inhibitor. The mill is SHARP certified, and all trucking, HR, payroll, sales and accounting is handled through the corporate TP headquarters in Marshville.

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PASSING

THE TORCH By Patrick Dunning

New ownership enhances inventory controls with more upgrades on the horizon.

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King Lumber, A Lincoln Company, currently produces 40MMBF annually.

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FOREST, Miss. he Gaddis family has turned over a new leaf. After more than 50 years as a lumber remanufacturer, last October they sold King Lumber to Lincoln Companies, a parent company that accumulates diversified operations in the wood and wood fiber industries. Age and timing played a large role in the decision for the Gaddis family to sell the business, but the spirit of King Lumber remains. In 1964 Edward Gaddis and Lewis Eure purchased the company from brothers J.B. and Ira King. In the mid ’70s Ed bought Eure out. The name King Lumber was kept because of its reputation in the community. The King brothers were previously taking advantage of the post-war boom in new homeowners. Owning a small sawmill they’d cut house bills full of materials purposed for constructing subdivisions in Birmingham and Detroit. Growing up in Morton, Ed had enrolled at Mississippi State University and enlisted in the Navy shortly after. When his term of service expired at the end of World War II, he moved to Forest and started a chicken business with his brother, Fred. From there he owned a GMC Buick car dealership on the edge of town. In the ’70s Ed started his sons in the row

crop farming business. One of his sons, current Sales Manager Mark Gaddis, 61, compares his father to the likes of a Swiss army knife. “Dad was really innovative, entrepreneurial, he just had his hand in a lot of different businesses growing up.” When the five siblings (Mark, Jeff, Gay, Johnny and Mike) were home for Christmas in 1982, Ed offered them all positions at King Lumber. “He wanted us all working together,” Mark says. “That was one of his dreams.” Mark came back in January 1983 after graduating from Mississippi State University with a degree in Seed Technology and having worked at Standard Seed Company in Louisiana for a period of time. As other siblings continued to come into the business, Mark was put on the road procuring green, 1 in. SYP lumber to increase production. As raw material was found, next came the addition of another planer, stacking machines and more dry kilns. Ed passed away in 1990 from cancer, bringing the family closer. “When Dad asked us to come work with him, I think he knew he was getting sick,” says Jeff, 55. The Gaddis siblings all found their place in the business where they could be most effective. “We’ve fought, fussed, loved. A few knockdowns, not much TIMBER PROCESSING

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1 in. green lumber is acquired through several vendors.

blood,” he laughs. “We’ve worked well together over the years.” Jeff manages the mechanical upkeep of machinery and hiring employees. Mike manages the daily flow of lumber from the moment it arrives until it’s loaded and ready to haul. Johnny supervises maintenance and Gay Gaddis Grantham formerly was responsible for administrative duties before retiring once Lincoln Companies took over. “We work surprisingly great together. My goodness, we have the family dynamic,” Mark says. Lincoln Companies identified King Lumber during a market analysis phase in 2015 as a strategic opportunity to continue penetrating the 1 in. niche market. President and Chief Financial Officer of Lincoln Companies, Jim Kelly, says after doing their homework and talking to people within the industry, Lincoln executives believed King Lumber was a fantastic fit. “The first thing we noticed was they were a well-respected organization,” Kelly says. “You could tell they really had a grasp on the market from both the raw material and sales aspects.” Taking the best practices from Lincoln’s corporate side, and combining them with King’s operational side, was a recipe for success. 26

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SYP boards are trimmed to length.

Founded in Conroe, Texas in 1975, Lincoln expanded regionally over the years with facilities in Moscow, Crockett and Jasper, Texas, as well as York, Ala., and a recently automated reman facility in Union Point, Ga. The most recent purchase has been renamed King Lumber, A Lincoln Company. Kelly was impressed how alike their

business philosophies are. “They have integrity; when they say they’re going to deliver it at this date, time and condition, it gets there as advertised. And if it doesn’t, they’ll make sure to correct the issue and take care of their customer. They truly care about the interaction, which is truly an important thing to us as well.”

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A beehive of forklifts keeps lumber headed in the right direction.

It’s been a process molding the concentration yard into what it is today. Focused on the 1 in. market, King Lumber is known for capitalizing on the ebbs and flows of the market. Mark agreed with Lincoln to stay on for the next 24 months

to smooth the transition before stepping into retirement. “We’ve been in the process of finding a buyer for close to three years,” Mark says. “We didn’t have a third generation interested in learning the business.”

MILL FLOW On the west end of town sitting on 13 mostly paved acres, the folks at King Lumber are pushing 40MMBF of 1 in. SYP dimension lumber annually.

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Both Yates-American planers have inverters to help maximize feet-per-minute.

One-inch green southern yellow pine (1x4, 1x6, 1x8, 8-16 ft.) is purchased from several vendors within a 200-mile radius. Green lumber is transported quickly from sawmills to eliminate the possibility of stain. Then it is stacked, dried, surfaced, graded and pulled to length. A fleet of 10 Taylor forklifts accompanied by two Clark and three Caterpillar transports boards from the staging area to a Carbotech drop sorter with a lumber stacker bought used and installed two years ago.

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Ed Gaddis (right), pictured with his brother Fred (left) at a Chicken Festival dinner.

The sorter features 22 bins and presorts 1x6 and 1x4 prior to drying to increase volume in packaged dry kilns. A Morris Industrial stacker is also used to stack lumber that comes in pulled-to-length and then is fed into one of three dry kilns constructed in-house with aluminum panels. It takes 32-36 hours to reach 12% moisture content. Boards are then processed S4S through one of two Yates-American A25 planers, ’80s and ’90s models. PLC controllers by

Allen-Bradley are used on both trim saws, drop sorter, stackers and dry kilns. The planers are equipped with inverters to control infeed speed and maximize feetper-minute while maintaining a quality finish. Boards are manually graded leaving the planer, and the mill offers D&btr, #2, and #3/4 mix of grades for its 1 in. products. C grade is pulled in 1x6 also. Once trimmed to length with a HEMCO trimmer, boards are handstacked and packaged and staged in sever-

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In-house constructed kilns dry to 12% in 32-36 hours.

al custom-built sheds until distributed. Though parting with the reman business, the Gaddis family still retains their trucking company, Triple G Trucking, and hauls green lumber into facility and finished lumber to distributors, secondary manufacturers, treating plants, exporters and retail markets, in conjunction with King Lumber, A Lincoln Company. Since the turnover, Lincoln has implemented some immediate changes but they’re adamant about keeping the integrity of King Lumber. “We didn’t feel the need to come in and blow everything up,” Kelly says. “When acquiring a successful operation, it’s a bad practice to say ‘you’ve been really successful doing it this way for 40 years, now we’re going to do it this way.’ That’s just not a smart way to do things. We want to prune the tree effectively, we’re not going to scalp the tree and start from scratch.” One of the first processes that changed after Lincoln acquired King Lumber was converting to an ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) system called Agility, from DSMI. Different modules within the software have special roles that work simultaneously. All sales and purchase orders are done through the sales module. Arranged with historical prices, the average cost of all inventory per different footage is displayed. The accounting module files all invoices and cash receipts. Anything from screws and nails to multi-million-dollar machines are tracked through the purchasing module. The operations module is last in the sequence before specific orders are inputted to reman inventory “So, it’s A+B=C. A is the raw material you’re inputting into your system, B is what you did to it, either ripped or planed and resawn, and C is the output. I took this raw material, did this to it, this was the end result,” Kelly explains. “During the manufacturing process you continually print out the tags. We have tag printers at the outfeed of the line, so as they’re accumulating material, we’re adding that material to the output of the reman and printing tags to be secured to the units.”

The Gaddises still retained their trucking company, Triple G Trucking. 30

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From left: Mike Gould, Johnny Gaddis, Mark Gaddis, Jeff Gaddis

During the integration period of bringing King into their fold, they did several physical counts of the material on hand, entered those counts into the system, and then printed tags to get them on individual units that were in inventory at the time of acquisition. After this process was completed, their inventory was traceable and visible to the combined sales offices located in Texas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Maryland. Kelly says this software helps integrate their accounting, operations, inventory and supply chain functions, giving them more accountability in inventory cycles now. Lincoln switched from TPI (Timber Products Inspection) to SPIB (Southern Pine Inspection Bureau) to better suit their plans. Formerly interfacing with both, Kelly says it makes more sense to have a unified structure with the regulatory agencies. Their internal processes were also changed to include tagging units as they are produced off the line. Moving forward, mill managers are looking into auto-feeders, auto-stackers and auto-graders to increase output and efficiency.

THE GOOD LIFE Following his retirement, Mark plans to continue sowing into the prison ministry through his local church, All Seasons Worship Center. “I always tell people, God has a sense of humor to use somebody like me as his instrument,” he says. “But he’ll use anybody.” His life verse, Romans 8:28, is the backbone of the testimony he preaches. Mark admits the most remarkable thing he’s ever had a chance to be a part of is baptizing men in jail. He ensures they understand they’re not only getting wet, but what it symbolizes. Having the opportunity to baptize 41 people, Mark says it’s the coolest thing in the world. Mark also loves wing shooting. He was in Argentina a week prior to Timber Processing’s visit to Forest, and laughingly says his shoulder is still a little sore from shooting more than 8,000 rounds of bird shot. He’s married to Patti Reed, and they have two grown sons. One works at a car dealership in Jackson, and the other is enlisted in the Navy studying Mandarin Chinese in Monterey, Calif.— both taking pages out of their grandfather Ed’s playbook. Mark is a member of the Lions Club, a civic organization, a member of the local Chamber of Commerce and on the board of the Mississippi Lumber Manufacturers Assn. TP 32

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EARLYLOOK EDITOR’S NOTE: The following companies have signed on to exhibit at the Timber Processing & Energy Expo to be held September 30 to October 2 at the Portland Exposition Center in Portland, Ore. Exhibit space is still available. Contact Fred Kurpiel: fredkurpiel@gmail.com or Dianne Sullivan: dianne@hattonbrown.com. Acrowood Akhurst Altec Integrated Solutions American Wood Dryers AMS Solutions ANDRITZ Iggesund Tools Arrow Speed Controls Autolog BEP Engineering Services BID Group Biomass Engineering and Equipment BM&M Screening Solutions Bruks Siwertell Brunette Machinery Brunner-Hilderbrand Brunson Instrument California Saw & Knife Works Can-Am Chains Canadian Forest Industries Carbotech Colonial Saw Columbia River Staple–Intertape Polymer Group Con-Vey Connexus Industries Corbilt Group of Companies Cortex North America Crow Engineering Delta Computer Systems DK Spec DO2 Industrial Dykman Electrical EBI Dry Kiln Duty Motors Endurance Equipment Evergreen Engineering EWTA FinScan Fromm Packaging Systems Galardy Technical Services Gilbert Products Greg F. Smith Grenzebach HALCO Software Systems Hatton-Brown Publishers HewSaw Machines IBC International Bar Coding Systems & Consulting IDCAM In Stock Parts International Forest Industries 34

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James G. Murphy JoeScan Key Knife KoneCranes Kop-Coat L.G. Isaacson Lewis Controls Lico Machinery Lignomat U.S.A. Linck Logging & Sawmill Journal-Timberwest Lonza Wood Protection Lucidyne Technologies Mac Chain Machinery Sales Metal Detectors Inc. Mill Tech Industries Modern Engineering MPM Engineering MTS Sensors Mühlböck Technology Murray Latta Progressive Machine Nelson Brothers Engineering Newman Machine Nicholson Manufacturing Novilco OES Automation Oleson Saw Technology Opticom Technologies Optimil Machinery Optware Solutions OSELA Owens Corning–InterWrap Pantron Automation Pape Material Handling Paw-Taw-John Services Peerless Saw Piché Platt Electric Supply Porter Engineering Precision Husky Premier Bandwheel & Equipment Pro Mac Manufacturing Purakal Cylinders Raptor Integration Raptor-Sundog RFID Staples Rawlings Manufacturing REA JET Redwood Plastics Corporation Reliability Resources

Rogers Machinery S. Huot Samuel Packaging Systems Group Saw Control Systems SAW-ADD ScanMeg SCS Forest Products by Finna Sensors Sering Sawmill Machinery Serra Sawmills Sharp Tool SiCam Systems SICK Sensors Signode Packaging Systems Simonds International Slatercom Lighting Solutions SolaGen SonicAire SparTek Industries Spotnails Springer Microtec Starcyl Cylinders Stringer Industries Taihei Machine Works Taylor Machine Works Tebulo Industrial Robotics Telco Sensors TerraSource Global Timber Automation Timber Machine Technologies Timber Products Manufacturers Assn. Tolomatic Top Wood Jobs TS Manufacturing U.S. Metal Works USNR Valutec Wood Dryers Vecoplan VK North America Wagner Meters Webster Industries Wellons Group West Coast Industrial Systems West Salem Machinery Westcoast Cylinders Westmill Industries Williams & White Equipment Wolftek Industries Wood-Mizer Blades Wood-Mizer LLC Z-Tec Automation Systems

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MACHINERYROW Norra Timber Adding USNR Edger System A modern band saw line will be complemented with a new edger system from USNR later this year as Norra Timber continues to advance its prospects at its Sävar Sawmill in Sweden. “It is fantastic that we have succeeded in developing the saw line to the point that we now need new edging to keep up

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with production,” comments Fredrik Samuelsson, Sävar Sawmill Manager. In 2016, a Catech 4000TS edger line was installed from USNR, and the following year it was followed up with a brand new band saw line also from USNR. But in order to handle the increased flow of sideboards from the saw line, Norra Timber has now taken the next step and signed a contract with USNR for another Catech system with a

capacity of 57 boards per minute. “We aim to increase our productivity by at least six percent each year. The cooperation with USNR has helped us to match our goals, and it has undoubtedly been very important to us,”Samuelsson adds. This edger system will be equipped with USNR’s BioLuma 2900L sensors, offering the highest resolution profile scanning. Together with the USNR optimization platform and the newly developed top arbor climb cut sawbox 7100D, Sävar’s edger line will be the most modern of its kind. The new system is expected to be in full operation in November. USNR announced several other projects: • Downie Timber of Revelstoke, BC is investing to upgrade its edger line with BioVision technology. At its twoline sawmill the company processes primarily Western red cedar, and also Douglas fir, spruce and hemlock. The company’s goal with the edger line investment is to improve grade recovery, edging accuracy, and production throughput. The new equipment starts downstream from the existing unscrambler, with new backlog table, flitch loader, scanner transfer, tipple drop out, and Model 625 edger positioning infeed. A new scan frame will be fitted with 22 BioLuma 2900LVG vision sensors. The new optimization platform will use Deep Learning technology to improve recovery and increase uptime. The edger line will utilize the MillTrak lumber flow management system to maximize material flow to the edger. The new equipment is scheduled for commissioning in September. ● Collums Lumber of Allendale, SC is replacing an outdated tilt hoist with USNR’s continuous tilt hoist with advanced features that will remove operator intervention and dramatically reduce the maintenance requirement. This tilt hoist will come with a new feature for automatic leveling. The automated leveling feature uses a distance range sensor array mounted to a support frame on the tilt hoist, and is designed to allow automated adjustment of the leveling mechanism for more precise, reliable operation. This removes operator intervention and eliminates a high maintenance point in the unstacking process. This automated leveling feature is installed and operating at several mills. ● Estonian Tori Sawmill in Pärnu and USNR have signed a contract for a complete Cambio debarking line. The delivery will take place in late spring 2020.

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MACHINERYROW The mill is focused on processing hardwood species like aspen, alder and birch; however the new line will also be used with spruce and pine. This order comprises a CIM 501 debarker infeed, a Cambio 460 debarker and a CamTrail outfeed. ● StoraEnso Bad St. Leonhard and USNR have signed a contract for a debarking line for the customer’s sawmill in Austria. The order comprises a CIM 750 infeed, a Cambio 800 debarker and a CamTrail outfeed. The mill has an annual capacity of 350 000 m3 of sawn timber, 280,000 m3 of value-added timber products and and 77,000 m3 of CLT (cross-laminated timber).

sawmills, barge ports…all invited by their dealer to receive the same factory training as the technicians within the family of Sennebogen’s service network. At no cost! Like the machines that Sennebogen sells, the facility housing the training school has been “purpose-built” to support dealers and customers in the U.S., Canada, Mexico and South America. Here in Stanley, NC, the classrooms and instruction

bays are part of the 100,000 sq. ft. headquarters opened by Sennebogen LLC in 2009, just outside the city of Charlotte. Shared with Sennebogen’s massive parts warehouse along with sales, engineering and administrative offices, the Training Center is actually “firewalled” from the building’s other operations, so attendees aren’t distracted or interrupted by the outside. It provides classrooms fully equipped with the latest teaching and e-

Training Center Works For Sennebogen

Small class sizes provide technicians with true hands on learning.

The group of students with many different company names on the shirts are all gathered close to the green machine where their instructor has opened a side hatch to demonstrate some key service points. The group talks casually with questions for the instructors, while they each share some of their personal experiences from the field. In most ways, it’s just another training session for heavy equipment technicians. But, on a second look, a few differences from the norm become apparent. For one: the shop itself. It’s a clinically pristine workspace three floors high, overlooked by a viewing gallery. For another: the machine. Parked here in this bright, climate-controlled classroom is a 140,000 lb. (65,000 kg) Sennebogen 850 material handler that stands with its boom and stick folded down. Then there are the people. Only half of the class came here from Sennebogen’s dealer staff. The others work for Sennebogen customers: recycling yards, TIMBER PROCESSING

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MACHINERYROW learning technology along with the threetiered training bay with a pit big enough for the whole class to safely be under the machine, component room, models and breakout boards for hands-on instruction. But Sennebogen long-time Service Manager, Jim Westlake, believes that the most valuable feature of the Training Center is the distance it puts between trainees and their everyday workplace. “It seems to change the expectations of the principals and the customers who send their people here,“ Westlake says. “They are being selective in who they send. We see more senior technicians now—the ones who are in the best position to pass along what they learn to others in the shop. Since we started bringing technicians into our facility, the type of calls we

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get from their shops have changed—we don’t get questions about issues that were already covered in class. It works for us, and it works for our customers.” Roger Hardin, the Chief Trainer in the school, adds, “This is no holiday camp. We always maintain a level of professionalism throughout the time they are with us.” Hardin says he enjoys the program because it gives him the chance to “give them the kind of training I wanted.” He had 41 years of practical experience as a service mechanic before joining Sennebogen, including 15 years as a trainer. Westlake and Hardin both place a high value on hands-on instruction. “Here, you see exactly where to find things on the machine so you’re better prepared to

troubleshoot it when you’re in a hurry in the field,” Hardin says. Trevor Reid, responsible for C&C Resources sawmill located hundreds of miles from the nearest city in central Saskatchewan, also appreciates having knowledgeable staff on-site. Our technician came back with rave reviews about the Sennebogen facility, and all it cost us was airfare and a hotel room.” Constantino Lannes, President of Sennebogen LLC, feels that his investment in training and support has been key to the company’s continuing success. “When the Sennebogen family decided to bring their material handlers to the Americas, they knew that support would be absolutely critical to customers here. This facility and the concept of ➤ 60

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NO WASTED MOTION AT POLE FACILITY hen the 830 M-T log handler W reached the end of its six-year lease term with 22,000 service hours,

Stella-Jones Inc. Plant Manager Darrin Vigue did his due diligence to choose its replacement. But in the end, Vigue returned to the machine that had served him so well for the previous six years. “We considered other makes, including two of the industry’s top OEMs,” Vigue says. “But there were really no other options for us. The Sennebogen is a good machine; everyone is happy with it.” The facility that Vigue manages at Galloway is one of several wood utility pole treatment plants that Stella-Jones operates in British Columbia. Western red cedar and Douglas fir poles are first trimmed and debarked at another facility, then distributed to various yards such as Galloway for further treatment. Reliable uptime is crucial to Vigue’s operation. He keeps the 830 M-T running 16 hours a day to handle the yard’s full range of loading, stacking and picking duties. This model was specially engineered by Sennebogen for log handling, with modifications to the under-

carriage for enhanced traction and trailer-pulling capacity. The new unit features a beefed-up stick with a live heel to handle poles up to 115 ft. (35 m). Such long poles are straight stacked but, more typically, the poles arriving by truck and rail are unloaded and square-piled in 25 ft. (7.6 m) blocks to allow maximum air flow for natural seasoning. Vigue explains, “Our only backup is an old Prentice log handler—just try to get an operator into one of those now! The accessibility of service and parts from Great West Equipment, located in Cranbrook, just down the road, was a critical factor in our decision to stick with Sennebogen. If there is a problem, we can count on Great West to be onsite within the hour.” The Galloway yard is a 36-acre gravel-based site, plus 10 acres of leased Crown land. Vigue describes it as a long narrow yard, so the wheeled 830 machine is well-suited to the long travel cycles that are sometimes needed to haul trailers carrying 20,000-30,000 lb. (9,070 - 13,600 kg) loads.

Great West fitted this 830 with a BC Forestry cab mated to Sennebogen controls. As Vigue notes, “Loading these poles is a delicate operation; we have to take care to avoid scarring or damaging the wood. Our operators are more than happy with the precision and responsiveness of the Sennebogen hydraulics. Pole butts and tops are usually mixed on the trucks coming in, so we usually take a maximum of five logs in a bite. The rotating head and live heel on the stick lets us alternate their orientation on each layer in the stack, without having to change position as we’re unloading.” The 91,300 lb. (41,413 kg) 830 M-T comes standard with a hydraulic elevating cab that can rise up to 20 ft. (6 m) above ground level, allowing the operator an unobstructed view for efficient high-stacking. Powered by a 225 HP (168 kW) Cummins diesel engine, the 4wheel-drive system features dual transmissions providing direct drive to each axle, achieving the highest drawbar pull TP in its weight class. Article and photo provided by Sennebogen: www.sennebogen-na.com

Stella-Jones relies on the 830 M-T log handler at the Galloway pole facility through two non-stop shifts every day. 42

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LOGLINE

EDITOR’S NOTE: The following companies were invited to send in editorial profiles of their products and technologies related to the log merchandising area of the sawmill. They are also advertising in this issue. All statements and claims are attributable to these companies.

AUTOLOG Autolog launched the foundation of its new GEN3 software for its optimizer solutions in 2019 with resounding success at the primary breakdown. Autolog will introduce GEN3 for secondary breakdown this summer. Autolog will install its first GEN3 log merchandiser next spring at Central Alabama Wood Products. This new optimizer will optimize your stem to get the most value/volume out of them based on your needs. It is built to work with full 3D capability (linear or transverse scanning) or just for a single axis scanning (circle modeling) depending on your layout. No matter the scanning configuration, the optimizer will have full modeling of downstream machines with log rotation and curve-sawing, boards modeling with wane rules, butt management and penalty cost that you can use on actions that will slow down your production. The optimizer can manage any type of layouts including multiple saws or a single saw with or without a fence. Users can easily build sawing patterns based on the products list by using the user-friendly tool provided in the all-graphic UI. Length and grade constraints can be added for more control over the solutions. Visualization of the solutions is very intuitive and lets you see the whole stem by section or only the one log with the solution (cutting pattern). GEN3 software from Autolog comes with solid and tested software. Here are some examples of its features: high definition, browser-like user interface allowing multiple screens across all systems and flexible, per-user customization; multiple screen views of the log including high resolution 3D view and raw/filtered data view; seamlessly integrated document viewer for archiving, exporting, reporting and printing in most popular formats (XLS, PDF, etc.) and complete log journal of user activity and parameter changes. See advertisement, page 43. 44

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LOGLINE

CARBOTECH

It is with great pride that Carbotech launched this past fall its newest piece of equipment, a strong and efficient log feeder: THE STREAM. In order to contribute to the advancement of the industry, the company is constantly focusing on R&D. With THE STREAM, Carbotech is widening its service offering in the wood handling industry by contributing to the sawmill log feeding process. Luc Houde, Carbotech General Manager, declares: “It is a key piece of equipment for efficient sawmilling. Our team knew how to respond to the industry’s expectations.’’ In addition to its continual high-speed rhythm and strength, THE STREAM benefits from a brand new gap control designed by the Carbotech engineering team. This system will allow it to stand out from the competition by reaching higher levels of efficiency. l Why THE STREAM? Carbotech decided to launch production of STREAM thanks to its team of engineers that are experienced with this kind of equipment. The mission was to create a piece Carbotech “The Stream” log feeder of equipment that reflects Carbotech, meaning both strong and efficient and available at a competitive price. The name chosen refers to a current with a continual flow that reflects the image of continually bringing logs to the entrance of the facility, as water is brought to the mill. The first STREAM was installed at Spruce Products in Manitoba. Other installations are planned in the upcoming months. Like all other Carbotech equipment, THE STREAM is offered with after-sales service, better known as CarboCare. See advertisement, page 47.

COMACT (BID GROUP) Comact has installed several optimized bucking systems in recent years. For each system, the optimization is configured according to the sawmill priorities and the bucking executes optimal stem cutting by taking into consideration the anticipated value of the pieces as well as yield. The configuration of each installation combines “L” shaped scanners equipped with 3D Pro laser heads for fast and efficient optimization of logs on the V-belt conveyor. The system also includes a split transfer to improve performance and flow. The distinctive feature of this new generation of bucking systems is the saw sequence. Unlike previous generations, the saws position themselves while the stem is approaching. Then, the stem is pushed towards the saws to be cut. The required sawing time is reduced while maintaining the same accuracy as with the previous generations. Comact also added a camera to detect stem presence during positioning. As opposed to photocells, which could Comact provides more options for optimized bucking. sometimes fail at detecting small diameter logs, the camera ensures reliable, accurate stem positioning. The two-way outfeed conveyor also allows diverting logs meant for the manufacturing of special products from the standard production line. Optimized veneer solutions, based on new algorithms developed by the Comact team, are also among the new bucking options. Once a stem is scanned, the software assesses both its shape and roughness to anticipate the presence of large knots. If the surface and shape meet the criteria, the optimizer attempts to position the veneer patterns at various places on the stem. The veneer solution is retained only if its value is greater than the standard sawing solution. Another new feature is that the optimizer can now receive PLC input when metal is detected in the stem. Therefore, the optimizer will avoid cutting the metal and it will find an optimized solution to reduce loss. There are also several other new optimization features to help mills maximize their flow. If you value the quality of your logs and better recovery, contact Comact to find out more about bucking optimization. See advertisement, page 37. TIMBER PROCESSING

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LOGLINE

JOESCAN

Pollard Lumber in Appling, Ga. is once again blazing new trails with the technology for their recently upgraded bucking line. The sawmill is proud to announce that the world’s first next-gen JS-50 laser scanners are now up and running. The new Nelson Brothers Engineering (NBE) optimizer receives geometric data from a single overhead bank of 12 dual camera JoeScans. The scanners are arranged linearly in 12 zones with 65 inches between each zone. This setup allows for stems up to 65 feet long to be scanned with a very short infeed. It also allows for optimized solutions to be delivered before the stem reaches the saw. This speed is critical for the bucking line to keep up with the pace of the rest of the mill. Pollard Lumber Vice President Andy Pollard is no stranger to the benefits of optimization technology. “There’s a misconception that bucking optimization is easy because the cuts are simple to make,” Pollard says. “But every other Pollard Lumber implements bucking scanning and optimization. decision downstream depends on this first bucking solution.” Robert Cecil of Cecil Company provided the optimizer integration for the project. He very much agrees with Andy Pollard’s assessment. “If you buck a log to 10 feet, you won’t produce many 12 foot boards from it,” Cecil adds with a laugh. Cecil and Pollard worked together to fine-tune the price-driven optimizer algorithms so that a good mix of log lengths are produced. “Andy is a really sharp guy,” Cecil says. “It’s great for the optimizer to be able to include his intuition with the speed and precision of the new JoeScan heads.” Overall, everyone has been extremely happy with the smooth startup. The optimizer produces very good decisions that even a veteran operator would miss. The new single cable Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) connectors and QuikLock mounting plates make the JS50 easy to install and easy to work on. The Pollard Lumber team described the startup process as “plug and play.” Cecil and the Nelson Brothers Engineering team were impressed with the simplicity of the new scanners and how easy they were to interface with at the software level. So what’s next for the sawmill in Appling? The speed and simplicity of the new JoeScans may lead to a second bank of JS-50s on the bucking line, or even upgrades to the edger and trimmer using the same model scanner. Pollard Lumber holds the title as the first sawmill in the world to run JS-50 scanners, but there are sure to be many more following in their footsteps in the near future. See advertisement, page 10.

LINDEN

Linden high speed log merchandising system

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Linden’s high speed custom log merchandising systems deliver the cutting edge in a broad spectrum of sawmills in North America. Single logs that have been scanned for defect, diameter, sweep and length are discharged into a Linden log ladder. An even-ending system in the log ladder is used to position the log for optimum recovery. As stems advance to the cut cradle, the traveling merchandiser saws position for the cut. The entire merchandiser system can be operated with electric motors and drives, avoiding the need for any hydraulics. Accurate and stable high performance saws travel at high speeds up to 137 in./second and shift to the required position before the stem arrives in the cut cradle where high speed saws cut in under two seconds with Linden proven bell crank saws. Other combinations of Linden’s proven log feeders and saw systems are available to suit many different log merchandising applications and mill requirements. See advertisements, pages 58 and 65.

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LOGLINE

MEBOR

Mebor manufactures a wide range of sawmilling machines for small, medium and bigger scale sawmills, including the log debarking machine, SLH 1200. The heavy-duty, high-capacity machine features remote control and automatic operation, so constant presence of the operator is not required. The 10-14 tonne (22,000-31,000 lb.) machine is equipped with a simple scanner to recognize the position and diameter of the log. This allows the machine to work automatically and is controlled using a remote control unit. The debarking speed is set automatically according to the log diameter. After the log is debarked, the debarking head automatically returns to its initial position. In case of bad-shaped logs, the operator may also operate the debarking head manually. Large log rotating wheels include a dented surface that provide good grip on the logs. The SLH 1200 may optionally include a butt-end reducing unit. It allows simultaneous debarking and butt-end reducing, normally with no extra operation time needed. The reducing Mebor log debarker SLH 1200 head automatically detects the size of the butt-end and works without the constant presence of the operator. SLH 1200 can take logs up to 1200 mm (4 ft.) in diameter. The debarking head with knives is powered by a 22 kW (30 HP) motor. Hydraulic pressure and debarking depth can be adjusted. Wide range of additional options and equipment includes log loading decks, different sorting systems, metal detecting system, waste conveyors and more. All Mebor machines are equipped with high quality and reliable components from renowned manufacturers and most of the parts used are of standard sizes. See advertisement, page 52.

METAL DETECTORS INC. Since 1965, Metal Detectors, Inc. (MDI) has been a proven leader in providing top of the line metal detection solutions for the forest products industry and beyond. Technological advancements in today’s mills can cause increasing environmental interference due to electrical noise. With this in mind, MDI continuously strives to develop the most advanced metal detection systems that are capable of operating at maximum sensitivity even in the harshest of environments. MDI’s premier metal detector system, the TWA5000-X Series, will save your company costly production downtime, preventing lost opportunity and increasing production profits. The new technology in our TWA5000-X gives our coils more consistent targeting of contaminants and better environmental interference rejections, which increases overall system stability and performance. The most exciting addition to the TWA5000-X is our new MDI View-Link option which allows MDI to remotely link to your metal detector in order to monitor, diagnose, and custom program your system in order to optimize performance. When properly connected, MDI’s Service Department can directly access and adjust the metal detector to aid in identifying unwanted metal tarMDI TWA5000-X metal detector gets, environmental interference, and improve or customize your sensitivity levels. If the technician cannot resolve a problem through the programming in the software, the View-Link will allow for the metal detector to be monitored remotely, potentially providing crucial information that could lead to resolution of the interference. It’s like having an MDI service technician right there in your mill! MDI TWA5000-X metal detectors are designed to scan up to 60 in. diameter softwood or hardwood logs and comes with a threeyear warranty. In addition, MDI offers unlimited lifetime telephone technical support for all our products at no additional charge. Customer satisfaction is important to MDI. Therefore, we always strive to provide the right metal detector system to meet the requirements of each individual application. When comparing the cost of an MDI metal detector with the cost of downtime as a result of metal contamination, a large return on investment will become clear, and you will soon realize that a MDI metal detector will quickly pay for itself! See advertisement, page 28. 48

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LOGLINE

MICROTEC

Microtec’s Logeye 300 multi-sensor quality scanner allows log scanning and optimization of the bucking, primary and secondary breakdown processes according to geometric, surface, and internal quality features of the log, extracting the highest value for your plant. l Advantages: Precisely measures logs for breakdown, bucking and sorting. Accurately determines log density, internal features such as knots and rot, and volume over and under bark. Increases throughput, productivity, and value of final products. Stereoscopic imaging technology—scan true shape of vibrating, moving or shifting logs! l Microtec’s new Logeye 300 Stereo true shape log scanner incorporates revolutionary new stereoscopic imaging technology to allow you to scan a vibrating, moving, or shifting log. The original true shape of the log, including sweep, is reconstructed, and thus usable for breakdown or bucking applications. By avoiding the significant capital costs of adding scan conveyor length for log stabilization, Logeye 300 Stereo opens up many possibilities for log scanning and optimization which were previously thought impossible, such as: —Dramatic reduction of log load to scan zone length, decreasing overall length for a single length infeed. —Scanning in transitions between conveyors, or even directly behind the debarker. —Scanning during charger rotation prior to the end-dogger or Microtec Logeye 300 Stereo true shape log scanner carriage. See advertisement, page 33.

PORTER ENGINEERING Porter Engineering was founded in 1971 to offer specialized equipment engineering services for the forest products industry. Now, we are a leader in sawmill optimization and automation control. We focus on merchandizing, primary, and secondary breakdown systems. We also specialize in updating older systems to extend usable life of in-place machinery. We install leading edge hardware and custom-built software for each client in every installation. Our staff is primarily degreed electrical engineers and computer scientists. And our service and installation technicians have years of experience. By careful planning and frequent contact with client and supplier engineers, our startups are historically on time with some of the shortest startup curves in the industry. We test all equipment and software in-house before shipping. Our service department will answer the phone 24/7. Phone/online help is free, no que, no ticket, just help when you need to get back up and running. Porter systems have a proven track record of improving value, recovery, and piece count. Our systems maximize productivity by minimizing log gap and set times, while maximizing recovery and value through realtime optimization and advanced AI setwork control. Our systems include diagnostics for quick troubleshooting to maximize uptime and easy setwork tuning. Porter’s reputation for improving recovery, productivity and superior service is one of our most valuable assets. We would like to show you how you can leverage that asset to improve your value, recovery and productivity. Give us a call to schedule a demonstration or a visit. See advertisement, page 20. Porter offers optimization beginning at the log line. 50

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LOGLINE

PRECISION HUSKY l Here’s The March Madness Tip-Off: Put Precision Husky on your sawmill team and you’ll go on a winning streak like you won’t believe. Why? Because our rosserhead debarkers are super-efficient, built to last and more dominating than a seven-footer in the paint. Our rosserheads are without question the slam-dunk champions of the industry. One reason is because they reduce bark content to as low as three-tenths of one percent on average. That’s the lowest bark per ton and cost per ton in the industry! If you’re using any other machine, you’re not really in the game. l Stop Calling Time Out Downtime is madness! Our crew knows that. So like every single piece of our world-class forestry equipment, Precision Husky rosserheads are better engineered, built heavier and stronger and offer you more constant overall production. We keep making them big and strong so you can score profits today and down the stretch. Precision Husky rosserhead debarkers are “final four” status. Precision Husky believes in reliability, performance and the latest innovations. For more than 50 years our company has been building top quality forest products. But we aren’t satisfied with what happened yesterday. We never stop improving the toughest, most tested forestry equipment in the world. l Like Our Chances? We certainly hope so. Your work site is no place for second-string equipment. Before you take the floor be sure you’ve got industry leading Precision Husky equipment on your side. Precision is more than our name. It’s our number one goal. With more than 100 experienced, highly dedicated and motivated employees, many of whom are former loggers and wood processors, Precision Husky is showing the industry just how fantastic one company can be. From humble beginnings, we now work from a 165,000 sq. ft. manufacturing facility in Leeds, Ala. Our president Scott Smith is a second-generation innovator like his father, company founder and CEO Bob Smith. Together they have seen Precision go from a small regional provider to a worldwide leader in timber processing technology, with customers in 120 countries. l Let’s Huddle Up Schedule a demo, a tour of our facility or simply drop by to talk about rosserhead debarkers with one of our team members. See advertisement, page 38.

PROGRESS INDUSTRIES The Progress flared butt reducer has been designed for milling off and reducing root flares of logs. Reduced butt ends facilitate debarking, decrease the debarking diameter, increase alignment precision at the saws and reduce disturbances in the production process. The log is fed from the side into Vblocks, with its butt end above the cutter, and triggers the automatic start of the work cycle. The hold-down arm goes down and holds the log. The cutter goes up, the rotation wheels rotate the log while the cutter mills off the root flares. The log rotation is Progress Industries flared butt reducer load-controlled. The log is rotated once. After reduction, the cutter goes down, the arm goes up and the kickers unload the log while signal is given for the infeed of the next log. The frame of the cutter unit carries the hold-down arm and the movable cutter. The cutter is placed below the V-block level and powered by an electric motor via a coupling. The cutter head is made in replaceable segments. Knives are four-sided for turnable usage. See advertisements, page 58 and 64. 54

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LOGLINE

TELCO SENSORS

The SpaceScan series from Telco Sensors is a high-power, self-contained, industrial light curtain system made for the sawmill and wood products industry. Generating a dense infrared multi-beam light grid, the system offers a sensing range of 10 meters with high excess gain and 100,000 lux light immunity. The series is available in a wide array of sensing heights, ranging from just 160 mm up to 2460 mm, making it suitable for almost any application. The light curtains are housed in sturdy aluminum profiles which are fully sealed for a waterproof IP67 rating and are designed to withstand severe vibration, shock and misalignment. Available with discrete or analog output, the SpaceScan series offers 5 mm, 10 mm, 20 mm, or 40 mm beam spacing for accurate detection of even the smallest items. The SS 01 provides a discrete, solid-state relay output for reliable presence detection anywhere in the log handling process where detection over a large area is required. Automatic sensitivity adjustment continuously maintains the ideal gain level and compensates for buildup of dust and contamination. Cross-beam/parallel-beam mode and blanking function are wire-selectable and require no external controller or DIP switches. The SS 02 offers both analog and discrete outputs for sizing and sorting applications. The analog output can be used for measuring log diameter at the debarker infeed to preset press rolls and adjust chain speed; for log sorting based on size; and at the merchandiser for setting bucking saw position based on log diameter. Easy setup and configuration are via free PC software interface, which allows the user complete control over output type, gain level, and Telco SpaceScan 02 with beams blanking function, as well as the ability to configure the system to ignore smaller objects like sawdust and flying wood chips. New functions include analog function filtering, zone detection, and an alarm output tied to signal level. Both the SS 01 and SS 02 series are available with UL Class II Division 2 rating for operation in hazardous locations. See advertisement, page 15.

WEST COAST INDUSTRIAL SYSTEMS

WCIS log merchandizer knows no limitations.

WCIS supplies all levels of merchandizing systems—from a single saw up to our flagship six-saw fully automated merchandizer. Based on the patented Flare system, our flagship mutli-saw shifting system is unique in that the log is loaded onto arms attached to the saw module. This eliminates the restrictions of cut lengths other systems have due to mechanical parts in the cutting zone. West Coast Industrial’s log bucking systems allow you to cut any length log, anywhere with no limitations of log location in relation to steel carrying arms. There is an exclusive sequential segment discharge option to control block gap into your mill. See advertisement, page 27.

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LOGLINE TIMBER AUTOMATION LogPro has been the leader in innovation of high-speed merchandising systems for more than two decades, and we’ve refined our system for accuracy, speed, ruggedness and safety. More mills continue to choose our optimized log bucking system than any other because it is the most accurate and highest producing system on the market today. Recover more value from every stem by integrating Timber Automation’s scanning and optimization solutions into our industry-leading merchandising system. Full-fit modeling optimizes the entire stem in less than one second to accommodate close-coupled systems. Based on parameters set by the user, the optimizer makes near end trims to eliminate lily pads and flared ends as well as far end trims to take care of overlength segments or hooked ends. The software also identifies defects between segments and optimizes the solution, allowing the bucking system to reLogPro multi-saw bucking systems are a familiar sight in sawmills. move these with minimal waste. Fully programmable parameters through an intuitive user interface allow you to quickly and easily make changes based on your needs. The optimizer’s solution history shows every combination that was considered along with side-by-side comparisons, so you know exactly why the optimizer chose the solution it did. Robust hardware is another key benefit of the system. The scanner heads are self-contained and low maintenance. Our fiveyear warranty is the best in the industry, giving you peace of mind should an issue arise. Simplified system integration will get you up and running faster. The scanner heads and PLC all connect through an ethernet switch, leaving a clean cabinet and no extra cards or wiring. Achieve higher throughput every shift with our advanced controls for consistent, tight stem gapping. Our high-resolution cameras are unaffected by precipitation and can handle varying lighting conditions in day or night. Mounted away from potential stem damage, the system requires little to no maintenance. Avoid the headaches of traditional methods and increase production $30,000 per eight-hour shift by closing the gap. See advertisement, page 11.

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MACHINERYROW 40 ➤ transparency along with providing free training not only to our dealers but the end users, represents our commitment to the marketplace. The end result is that the dealers and their customers bond during their training programs and feel a new kinship with them.” According to Lannes, the goal of the Training Center is to cultivate the nation’s largest network of technicians with specialized factory training on material handling equipment. To date, the Center has graduated more than 1,000 technicians through its five-day Service Level 1 program. After returning home to put their new knowledge to work, graduates are eligible for the advanced Service Level 2 course for five additional days of in-depth troubleshooting instruction.

Södra Investing In Värö Sawmill Södra is making extensive investments in the sawmill at Värö, Sweden primarily in final trimming and drying, but also in other parts of the facility. “In April last year, we announced our plans to build a cross-laminated timber (CLT) facility at Värö. We can now see that our investment in the CLT facility will also make it possible for us to improve the flow and customer offering for our sawn timber, and have therefore decided to make additional investments in Värö,” comments Jörgen Lindquist, President of the Södra Wood business area. Other benefits will be more stable and

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higher quality products, since an automatic grading system will be installed for the sideboards, instead of today’s manual sorting. Investment will also be made in increased drying capacity, which will improve the drying quality and lead to a better product. “We will also be able to offer a higher proportion of planed products from Värö. That is positive, because we see continued growth in the market for processed products. In turn, that will also provide opportunities for higher pellet volumes,” Lindquist adds. When investments in the production of CLT at Värö are completed, Södra will be one of the leading players in solid construction timber in the Nordic region. “A large CLT facility and Sweden’s largest sawmill in the same geographic location will present excellent opportunities to leverage synergies at Värö that will strengthen our customer offering,” Lindquist says. The investments in the sawmill are scheduled for completion in latter 2021.

Carolina Mill Goes With Cortex Upgrade Charles Ingram Lumber in Effingham, SC recently upgraded all of the heads on it small log breakdown system to the Cortex Solid Head Design. Before, they were using standard chipping heads but upgraded those heads with the Cortex bolt on solution last year in order to double the knife life and reduce knife and

wear part costs. As those older heads continued to wear out, the mill decided to upgrade all to the Cortex heads. The project is another example of how Cortex can meet the customer where they are in the life cycle of their chipping heads—provide a simple bolt on solution or existing knife profile, or replace the heads completely. Performance results include a smoother cut with solid head; extended knife life— even from previous Cortex bolt on system; and reduced operating costs.

Carbotech Names Project Manager Pierre Lafond, head of Carbotech project management, announced that Jon Comber is now Project Manager. This announcement supports the growth management plan that was put in place slightly more than a year ago. Comber will have the main task of taking charge of client projects, from equipment design to installation to implementation on production lines. He will oversee various markets including Canada, the U.S. and abroad. With an undergraduate degree in engineering, Comber also has pertinent management experience in manufacturing production and various projects within the forestry industry. He has also supervised infrastructure development and production expansion for a sawmill operation in the Northeastern United States over the past few years.

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MACHINERYROW Wright Joins Wagner Meters Wagner Meters announced the addition of Jason Wright to the sales team as a Business Development Specialist for New Products. Wright brings more than 32 years of flooring experience specializing in hardwood flooring. Starting in 1986 with a small sundry distributor in Medford, Ore., Wright moved on to ascend through positions in Product Development, Support, and Marketing programs for several flooring companies to become the national sales manager for Tarkett Group, a global flooring solutions provider. Wright brings a wealth of experience from starting new companies to supporting the flooring industry within the wholesale and retail sectors.

stantially. To meet the expansion of its dealer base, Maxam has brought on additional Customer Service Representatives (CSR) to provide knowledgeable assistance on account-related matters. “The decision to expand our customer service team in Boston was a logical step into our business growth strategy. Boston is filled with diverse talent and with the Maxam Global Dealer Servicing Network growing over 1,800 strong, we need a ded-

icated group of people to help us stay true to our mission of being a valuable business solutions provider,” says Troy Kline, President of Maxam Tire North America.

One Stop Trading In Shanghai Shanghai International Furniture Machinery & Woodworking Machinery Fair (WMF) has been co-located with CIFF

Tigercat Teams With Bejac Corp. Tigercat announced that Bejac Corp. is now the authorized Tigercat dealer for California and Nevada. With more than 35 years of experience in the heavy equipment industry, Bejac is a leader in the sale and service of machinery for niche markets including the forestry, scrap and waste recycling, green waste, and demolition industry. Headquartered in southern California, with 10 locations in California, Nevada and Arizona, Bejac is strategically positioned throughout the Southwest to deliver its products and services quickly and effectively. “We are very happy to welcome Bejac to the Tigercat dealer network,” says Kevin Selby, Tigercat sales manager for the U.S. “Bejac is a leader in specialty sectors and is focused on emerging products to help customers improve their businesses. Bejac’s commitment to customer support will be a great match for our products.”

Maxam Expands Customer Service Team To accommodate rapid growth and leverage customer support services, Maxam Tire announced the expansion of the Customer Service Team based in Danvers, Mass. With major investment and continued growth in its specialty segments such as mining and forestry tire products, the Maxam dealer network has grown subTIMBER PROCESSING

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MACHINERYROW (Shanghai) at Shanghai Hongqiao, China since 2018. The two fairs together attract more than 1,500 exhibitors to display products that include furniture products, woodworking machinery and accessories in the 400,000 m2 fairground. WMF serves as a one-stop platform connecting upstream and downstream enterprises and stretching across the entire production chain of woodworking industry. WMF will be held September 710, 2020 at the National Exhibition and Convention Center, Shanghai Hongqiao By assembling a variety of cuttingedge machines and a wealth of market information, the exhibits in WMF span across wood primary processing, wood based panel production, sawmill technology, automation machinery, machinery for custom production, wood architecture, green production and safety control, CAD/CAM and wood products packaging. WMF will be occupying Hall 7.1 & 8.1; it is expected to have 420 exhibitors from around the world in an exhibition area of 53,000 m2. “Tech Talk” received strong reviews in WMF 2019, claiming that it provid-

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ed professional and first-hand market news to the audience. WMF 2020 will continue to hold different concurrent events, with topics including: 1) New Products and Technologies in Woodworking Machinery, e.g. Industry 4.0/smart production, application of 3D Cloud in design aspect, digital printing. 2) Marketing Trends—suppliers will be invited to discuss popular materials, color, pattern and sustainable development technology. 3) Solutions to the New Market Trend—speakers will introduce innovative products and technology, smart production chain and smart furniture etc. WMF offers more than just an exhibition; there are conferences and business matching services between exhibitors and buyers provided on the spot to enrich visitor experience. Registration for WMF 2020 is open now on www.woodworkfair.com. Exclusive benefits will be offered to registered visitors, including free admission (one badge, two fairs: WMF + CIFF (Shanghai)), one free copy of the show catalogue and priority to participate in conferences.

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ATLARGE Boise Announces Personnel Moves Boise Cascade Co. announced three promotions. Rob Johnson has been promoted to Vice President of Engineered Wood Products (EWP) Sales and Marketing. Johnson joined the company’s Wood Products division as a business optimization engineer in 2014, and accepted a director position with EWP Sales and Marketing in March 2019. Chris Seymour has been promoted to Vice President of Manufacturing Operations, Wood Products. Seymour began his career at Boise Cascade in 2000 and has held several leadership roles in the

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company’s manufacturing division. Jeff Strom has been promoted to Vice President & General Manager, Eastern Region, Building Materials Distribution. Strom joined Boise Cascade in 2006 as a sales representative and has taken on increased responsibility over the last 14 years. Previously, Boise Cascade announced that Nate Jorgensen becomes its new CEO effective March 6. He replaces Tom Corrick, who is retiring from his roles as CEO and director. Jorgensen has 33 years of experience in the forest products industry, joining the Boise Cascade engineered wood products (EWP) marketing team in 2015. He was promoted to senior vice president in 2017

to lead the EWP sales and marketing organization, and was named chief operating officer (COO) in January 2019. Corrick began his Boise Cascade career in 1980 as an internal auditor. He went on to hold a number of leadership roles, culminating with his appointment to CEO in March 2015.

UK Port Expands For Timber Trade A major new facility for UK timber trade has opened up on the River Medway in Kent following a £27m investment by operators Peel Ports. The site at Wellmarsh provides scope for storage, processing and handling of all timber types. The facility is based at the Port of Sheerness, which is the largest terminal of its kind in the UK, handling 1.1 million tonnes of timber and forest products a year. The port already has 40 acres of timber storage facilities and Peel Ports’ investment takes it to a total of more than 50 acres. There is a further option for international distribution. The Port of Sheerness has 11 meters of water depth with no tidal restrictions or lock system, allowing for unrestricted 24 hour berthing. Port Director Richard Goffin comments: “This investment is a direct response to the interest we’ve had from throughout the construction sector in using the Port of Sheerness as the ideal location for serving the southeast construction market. As well as supporting the local business community, we’re also proud to have created a number of new permanent jobs at the port, underlining the role we play as a major employer in the region.” ➤ 66

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ATLARGE Former Hardwood Leader Passes Orn Gudmundsson Sr. of Louisville, Ky., former president of the National Hardwood Lumber Assn and CEO of Northland Corp., died February 1 after an extended battle with Parkinson’s disease. He was 73. Gudmundsson was born January 4, 1947 in Reykjavik, Iceland. He moved to Louisville in 1950 with his parents, Jon and Sesselja. He graduated from Louisville Country Day School, where he was co-captain of the football team, and the University of Louisville’s undergraduate college of business. Afterward, he served as an officer in the United States Navy Supply Corps on the NATO base in Keflavik, Iceland, with a final rank of Lieutenant (junior grade). After the Navy, he joined Northland Corp., the family hardwood lumber business, serving in various roles and rising to become its President, CEO and Chairman. As a leader in the hardwood industry, he served as President of the National Hardwood Lumber Assn. and the Hardwood Distributors Assn. He also served on the boards of the Hardwood Manufacturers’ Assn., the Hardwood Federation PAC, and the Tropical Forest Foundation. He developed and maintained many strong friendships through the Bluegrass Chapter of Young Presidents Organization, where he served as President. He was a long-time member of Harmony Landing Country Club and the Pendennis Club. Orn had a love for the outdoors and spent many wonderful days hunting ducks and geese across North America. Orn is survived by his wife of 51 years, Susan Varga, and by their son Orn, Jr. (Greta) and daughter Harper Becker (Aaron), brother Jon, Jr. (Susan Swinney), sister Hilda G. Davis, and several grandchildren.

Forest History Group Has New NC Facility Forest History Society (FHS) recently moved to a new 16,750 sq. ft. facility in Durham, NC, this past January. The move concludes a successful $7.1 million capital campaign to build a new library, archives and headquarters. The new facility is more than twice the size of FHS’ former building, and its location on an eight acre site allows for future expansion. Forest History Society is the ➤ 69 66

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WOOD PRODUCTS MARKETPLACE NORTH AMERICA

■ Minnesota

■ North Carolina

■ Canada ■ Ontario Buyers & Wholesalers We produce quality 4/4 - 8/4 Appalachian hardwoods • Red Oak, White Oak, Poplar •

Green Lumber: Air Dried, Kiln Dried Timbers & Crossties

• Hickory, Sycamore, Beech, Gum & Elm • Custom Cut Timbers: Long lengths and wide widths

Sales/Service: 336-746-5419

336-746-6177 (Fax) • www.kepleyfrank.com

■ Tennessee

STACKING STICKS

FOR SALE

Next closing: July 6, 2020

AIR-O-FLOW profiled & FLAT sticks available Imported & Domestic

■ United States

DHM Company - Troy, TN 38260 731-446-4069 Fax: 707-982-7689 email: kelvin@kilnsticks.com www.KILNSTICKS.com

■ Georgia Beasley Forest Products, Inc. P.O. Box 788 Hazlehurst, GA 31539

beasleyforestproducts.com Manufactures Kiln-Dried 4/4 Red and White Oak, Poplar, Ash and Cypress Contact: Linwood Truitt Phone (912) 253-9000 / Fax: (912) 375-9541 linwood.truitt@beasleyforestproducts.com

Pallet components, X-ties, Timbers and Crane Mats Contact: Ray Turner Phone (912) 253-9001 / Fax: (912) 375-9541 ray.turner@beasleyforestproducts.com

■ Kentucky HAROLD WHITE LUMBER, INC. MANUFACTURER OF FINE APPALACHIAN HARDWOODS

(606) 784-7573 • Fax: (606) 784-2624 www.haroldwhitelumber.com

Ray White

Domestic & Export Sales rwhite@haroldwhitelumber.com Cell: (606) 462-0318

Green & Kiln Dried, On-Site Export Prep & Loading Complete millworks facility, molding, milling & fingerjoint line

WANT TO GET YOUR AD IN OUR NEXT MARKETPLACE? Call or email Melissa McKenzie 334-834-1170 melissa@hattonbrown.com 02/20

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Call Toll-Free: 1-800-669-5613

EMPLOYMENTOPPORTUNITIES JOHN GANDEE

FOREST PRODUCTS RECRUITING SINCE 1978

The Jobs You Want — The People You Need WWW.SEARCHNA.COM

CONTACT CARL JANSEN AT 541-593-2777 OR Carlj@SearchNA.com

& ASSOCIATES, INC

GW Industries www.gwi.us.com

Depending on Circumstances / Needs

“Your Success Is Our Business” Serving the Wood Products and Building Materials Industries For more than 26 years.

3220

Jackie Paolo 866-504-9095

greenwoodimportsllc@gmail.com

jackie@gwi.us.com

WORN OR MISALIGNED CARRIAGE RAILS? A Proven Process

Top Wood Jobs Recruiting and Staffing George Meek geo@TopWoodJobs.com www.TopWoodJobs.com (360) 263-3371

Dennis Krueger 866-771-5040

PROFESSIONALSERVICES

Call or Email me anytime! john@johngandee.com www.johngandee.com

Austin, Texas

Importers and Distributors of Tropical Hardwood Kiln Sticks “The lowest cost per cycle”

Contingency or Retained Search

512-795-4244

GREENWOOD KILN STICKS

127

Executive – Managerial – Technical - Sales

SEARCH NORTH AMERICA, INC. IT'S YOUR MOVE...

1615

Recruiting Services

LUMBERWORKS

3779

Contact Us Cell: 541.760.7173 Office: 770.364.0917 www.acculine-rails.com chris@acculine-rails.com

• Rails straightened & ground in-place at a fraction of the cost of rail replacement • No down time for the mill • Restores carriage rails to optimum sawing efficiency •Precision Laser Alignment • Machining and Grinding • Carriage and Bandmill Alignment 489

ATLARGE 66 ➤ only organization dedicated to the preservation and dissemination of forest history around the world, particularly the relationship of humans and trees and forests through time. The library’s 12,000 volumes and its extensive archival holdings contain information on such topics as water, wildlife, recreation, range mining, climate, transportation and agriculture as it relates to forests.

La. Forest Festival Set for April 24-25 One of the few festivals in the U.S. that truly celebrates the timber industry, the Louisiana Forest Festival in Winnfield, La. is set for April 24-25. This year’s event features numerous logging equipment displays and related exhibits. There are 13 lumberjack events to cheer on, featuring pro timber sports competitors from across the U.S., including six different chain saw events. The festival features great food (It’s Louisiana after all!), a children’s area with fun games and crafts, plus contests and prize drawings. Special events include recognition of the Louisiana Logger Assn.’s (LLA) outstand-

ing logger of the year and an “in memory” logger, plus a concert from Nashville entertainers Ashton Shephard and Jeff Bates and some excellent local musicians. Noting that timber is the number one agricultural crop and industry for Winn Parish, and the state of Louisiana, Toni McAllister, executive director of the Louisiana Loggers Assn., says, “The Louisiana Forest Festival represents both historical and modern forestry and logging practices as we pay homage to our history and celebrate our future with deep roots in the timber community around us.” For more information visit www.laforest festival.com or the Louisiana Forest Festival Facebook page. Note: Entry to all events is free.

Log A Load Breaks $2 Million In 2019 Last year was another successful year for Log A Load for Kids and Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals (CMN), with a grand total of dollars raised to benefit local children’s hospitals in 2019 of $2.2 million. Whether it’s skeet shoots, fish fries, golf tournaments or auctions, the

creative fundraising platforms are never lacking, and neither are the dollars raised. As the charity of choice for loggers across the country, CMNH is always so amazed and grateful by the uniquely focused, grass-roots efforts from Log A Load to raise money for network hospitals. In addition to the great fundraising that took place, this year was a monumental year for Log A Load. For the first year since its inception, Log A Load is now operating as an independent 501c3. Log A Load can now create a strong org structure within the logging community to maximize and leverage local corporate sponsors on a national scale. In short, it’s a great beginning to what should mean more money for kids in need. With this change came the separation from a long time, valued partner for many years, Forest Resource Assn. (FRA). Many thanks go to the FRA family for the key role they played in the laying the foundation for Log A Load for Kids. All across the U.S. there are Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, and Log A Load’s fundraising efforts have been vital to their local CMN Children’s Hospitals helping sick or injured children. TIMBER PROCESSING

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MARCH 2020

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MAINEVENTS MARCH

SEPTEMBER

8-10—2020 NAWLA Leadership Summit & WWPA annual meeting, JW Marriott Desert Resort & Spa, Palm Desert, Calif. Call 503-224-3930; visit wwpa.org.

30-October 2—Timber Processing & Energy Expo, Portland Expo Center, Portland, Ore. Call 334-834-1170; visit timberprocessingandenergyexpo.com.

10-11—Wood Bioenergy Conference & Expo, Omni Hotel at CNN Center, Atlanta, Ga. Call 334-834-1170; visit bioenergyshow.com. 12-13—Panel & Engineered Lumber International Conference & Expo (PELICE), Omni Hotel at CNN Center, Atlanta, Ga. Call 334-834-1170; visit pelice-expo.com. 16-18—Dubai Woodshow, Dubai World Trade Centre, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Call +971 4 39 23232; visit dubaiwoodshow.com. 25-27—Hardwood Manufacturers Assn. 2020 National Conference & Expo, JW Marriott, Nashville, Tenn. Call 412-244-0440; visit hmamembers.org. 25-27—2020 SLMA & SFPA Spring Meeting & Expo, Hotel Monteleone, New Orleans, La. Call 770-631-6701; visit slma.org.

APRIL 2-4—SPIB sponsored Planer Operators Training Course, Morgan Lumber Company, Red Oak, Va. Visit spib.org/wood-services/training/planer-operator-course. 3-4—Loggers Plus Expo, Bloomsburg Fairgrounds, Bloomsburg, Pa. Call 315-369-3078; visit northernlogger.com. 7-9—Kentucky Forest Industries Assn. annual meeting, Brown Hotel, Louisville, Ky. Call 502-695-3979; visit kfia.org. 14-16—American Forest Resource Council annual meeting, Skamania Lodge, Stevenson, Wash. Call 503-222-9505; visit amforest.org. 26-28—American Wood Protection Assn. annual meeting, Hyatt Regency Lake Tahoe, Incline Village, Nev. Call 205733-4077; visit awpa.com. 28-May 1—Virginia Forestry Summit, Hotel Madison, Harrisonburg, Va. Call 804-278-8733; visit vaforestry.org.

MAY 1-2—Expo Richmond 2020, Richmond Raceway Complex, Richmond, Va. Call 804-737-5625; visit exporichmond.com. 12-15—Southeastern Dry Kiln Club annual meeting, NC State University, Raleigh, NC. Call 919-515-5581; visit research.cnr.ncsu.edu/blogs/wpe/southeastern-dry-kiln-club-2. 15-16—Loggers’ Expo, Champlain Valley Exposition, Essex Junction, Vt. Call 315-369-3078; visit northernlogger.com. 26-29—Xylexpo 2020, Fieramilano Rho Fairgrounds, Milan, Italy. Phone +39-02-89210200; Visit xylexpo.com/index.php/en. 70

MARCH 2020

Listings are submitted months in advance. Always verify dates and locations with contacts prior to making plans to attend.

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This issue of Timber Processing is brought to you in part by the following companies, which will gladly supply additional information about their products. ADVERTISER Acrowood American Wood Dryers Andritz Iggesund Tools ARS Automation Design Autolog BID Group Brunner Hildebrand Calibre Equipment Carbotech International Cleereman Industries Con-Vey Cone Omega Corbilt Group East Coast Sawmill Expo Easy-Laser Evergreen Engineering G F Smith Holtec USA Hurdle Machine Works Hurst Boiler & Welding ISK Biocides JoeScan Johnson & Pace Linck Linden Fabricating London Economics International Lucidyne Technologies Mebor Metal Detectors Microtec SLR GMBH Mid-South Engineering Muhlbock Holztrocknungsanlagen Nelson Bros Engineering Northeastern Loggers Association Oleson Saw Technology Opticom Tech Pantron Automation Piche Porter Engineering Precision-Husky Premier Bandwheel Progress Industries Rawlings Manufacturing Sennebogen Sering Sawmill Machinery Serra/Wintersteiger Sharp Tool Company Signode Simonds-Burton-BGR Saws-CutTech Smithco Manufacturing Telco Sensors Timber Automation USNR Valutec Vecoplan West Coast Industrial Systems Wood-Mizer

PG.NO. 62 61 2 65 43 37 49 53 47 32 31 14 43 67 40 60 18 72 8 71 21 10 62 63 58,65 35 7 52 28 33 58 59 47 59 29 40 65 23 20 38 62 58,64 64 19 66 57 35 51 3 66 15 11 9,39 41 30 10,27 31

PH.NO. 425.258.3555 503.655.1955 813.855.6902 336.316.1204 450.434.8389 843.563.7070 615.469.0745 +64 21 586 453 800.387.6317 715.674.2700 541.672.5506 229.228.9213 250.838.0848 804.737.5625 +46 31 708 63 00 888.484.4771 971.865.2981 800.346.5832 901.877.6251 877.774.8778 800.238.2523 360.993.0069 903.753.0663 936.676.4958 250.561.1181 617.933.7200 541.753.5111 +386 4 510 3200 541.345.7454 +39 0 472 273 611 501.321.2276 +43 7753 2296 0 888.623.2882 800.318.7561 800.256.8259 800.578.1853 800.211.9468 833.574.4333 604.273.1868 205.640.5181 604.591.2080 205.655.8875 866.762.9327 704.347.4910 360.687.2667 801.550.4878 800.221.5452 800.323.2464 800.426.6226 800.764.8456 800.253.0111 501.623.0065 800.289.8767 +46 0 910 879 50 336.861.6070 541.451.6677 800.553.0182

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