Issuu on Google+

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 1:11 PM Page 2

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THdec13pgs_SS_Layout 1 11/8/13 11:47 AM Page 3

A Hatton-Brown Publication Co-Publisher David H. Ramsey Co-Publisher David (DK) Knight Chief Operating Officer Dianne C. Sullivan PUBLISHING OFFICE Street Address: 225 Hanrick Street Montgomery, AL 36104-3317 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 2268 Montgomery, AL 36102-2268 Telephone (334) 834-1170 Fax 334-834-4525 Executive Editor David (DK) Knight Editor-in-Chief Rich Donnell Western Editor Dan Shell Senior Associate Editor David Abbott Associate Editor Jessica Johnson Associate Editor Jay Donnell Art Director/Prod. Mgr. Cindy Sparks Ad Production Coord Patti Campbell Circulation Director Rhonda Thomas CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING Bridget DeVane 1-800-669-5613 ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES SOUTHERN USA Randy Reagor • P.O. Box 2268 Montgomery, AL 36102-2268 (904) 393-7968 • Fax: (904) 393-7979 E-mail: randy@hattonbrown.com

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers Browse, subscribe or renew: www.timberharvesting.com Vol. 61, No. 6: Issue 641

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

OurCover In addition to logging operations, Erickson Timber Products maintains a wood yard in northern Minnesota to help supply various markets in Canada and the U.S., including its own sawmill at Baudette. Owner Dale Erickson is highly regarded for his business skills, operations professionalism and industry activism. Story begins on PAGE 10. (Photo by Rich Donnell)

OurFeatures

14

18

MIDWEST USA, EASTERN CANADA John Simmons • 32 Foster Cres. Whitby, Ontario, Canada L1R 1W1 (905) 666-0258 • Fax: (905) 666-0778 E-mail: jsimmons@idirect.com WESTERN USA, WESTERN CANADA Tim Shaddick • 4056 West 10th Avenue Vancouver, BC, Canada V6L 1Z1 (778) 822-1826 • Fax: (604) 264-1367 E-mail: tootall1@shaw.ca INTERNATIONAL Murray Brett Aldea de las Cuevas 66, Buzon 60 03759 Benidoleig (Alicante), Spain +34 96 640 4165 • Fax: +34 96 640 4022 E-mail: murray.brett@abasol.net Timber Harvesting & Wood Fiber Operations (ISSN 01606433) is published 6 times annually (January/February, March/April, May/June, July/August, September/October, November/December issues are combined) by HattonBrown Publishers, Inc., 225 Hanrick St., Montgomery, AL 36104. Subscriptions are free to U.S. logging, pulpwood and chipping contractors and their supervisors; managers and supervisors of corporate-owned harvesting operations; wood suppliers; timber buyers; businesses involved in land grooming and/or land clearing, wood refuse grinding and right-of-way maintenance; wood procurement and land management officials; industrial forestry purchasing agents; wholesale and retail forest equipment representatives and forest/logging association personnel. All non-qualified U.S. subscriptions are $50 annually; $60 in Canada; $95 (airmail) in all other countries (U.S. funds). Single copies, $5 each; special issues, $20 (U.S. funds). Subscription Inquiries— TOLL-FREE 800-669-5613; Fax 888-611-4525. Go to www.timberharvesting.com and click on the subscribe button to subscribe/renew via the web. All advertisements for Timber Harvesting magazine are accepted and published by Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. with the understanding that the advertiser and/or advertising agency are authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The advertiser and/or advertising agency will defend, indemnify and hold Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. harmless from and against any loss, expenses, or other liability resulting from any claims or lawsuits for libel violations or right of privacy or publicity, plagiarism, copyright or trademark infringement and any other claims or lawsuits that may arise out of publication of such advertisement. Hatton-Brown Publishers, Inc. neither endorses nor makes any representation or guarantee as to the quality of goods and services advertised in Timber Harvesting & Wood Fiber Operations. Copyright ® 2013. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. Periodicals postage paid at Montgomery, Ala. and at additional mailing offices. Printed in USA.

Member Verified Audit Circulation POSTMASTER: Send address changes to TIMBER HARVESTING, P.O. BOX 2419, Montgomery, AL 36102-2419

Feller-Bunchers Bunched

Karl-Gunnar Gustafsson

Features At A Glance

Swedish Contractor

20

22

Angst Over Labor

Recent Shows Summarized

Survey Reveals No Surprises

Upbeat Sentiment Prevailed

OurDepartments My Take __________________________________________________ 4 News Lines _______________________________________________ 8 People Power ____________________________________________ 25 Equipment World _________________________________________ 28 Building Blocks___________________________________________ 30 Dust & Rust______________________________________________ 32 Select Cuts ______________________________________________ 34 THExchange _____________________________________________ 35 Events/Ad Index __________________________________________ 38 Other Hatton-Brown Publications: Southern Loggin’ Times • Wood Bioenergy Timber Processing • Panel World • Power Equipment Trade • IronWorks

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THdec13pgs_SS_Layout 1 11/8/13 11:47 AM Page 4

MyTake D.K. KNIGHT

Group Warns Of ULSD’s Hazardous Nature; TEAM Continues Fire Awareness Work The ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel that petroleum refineries have been producing for several years is a cleanerburning formulation, but it’s also more hazardous, as noted recently by the Assn. of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM). The group recently issued Practices Guidance Bulletin 6/13 that warned of higher static electricity fire/explosion risks during refueling. With most of the sulfur removed, the fuel is less conductive, and its ability to hold a static charge is increased. Regardless of its formulation, diesel fuel has never been a great conductor of electricity, but with most of the sulfur removed, its poor-to-moderate conductivity has been diminished. Thus, its hazardous status is elevated. Static charges can build up in the fuel as it flows through a delivery system and could result in a fire or explosion if they discharge while combustible vapors are present. To dampen this threat, AEM recommends that the entire fuel system— storage tank, transfer pump, transfer hose, nozzle, etc.—be properly grounded and bonded. Those who refuel equipment would do well to abide by this recommendation. The AEM bulletin was discussed at the September 19 meeting of Timber Equipment Applications Management (TEAM). Insurer representatives in the group were unaware and surprised by the hazard potential of ULSD and departed determined to get the word out to their customers. If it has anything to do with the threat of forest machine fires and the fallout thereof, TEAM is on point. The group consists of forest machine manufacturers, logging contractors, insurance providers, fire suppression systems manufacturers, association leaders and others. It provides a forum for developing and distributing risk management information. Formed in 2001, it first focused on heightening forest equipment fire awareness and educating machine owners and operators about fire prevention. This has resulted in fewer and less severe forest machine fires. In recent years its has 4

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

dwelled on more thorough maintenance practices (clean-inspect-repair) on the part of machine owners/operators and improved design (compartmentalization-fire detection devices) on the part of manufacturers. Its Fire Safety Video, created about three years ago and distinguished by its “loggers talking to loggers” format, has been well received and has certainly raised the awareness of equipment fire prevention. It has been viewed by thousands of loggers and machine operators in multiple states, not to mention scores of equipment engineers. The organization has plans to place the video on YouTube and to produce a Spanish version. A revised DVD set will incorporate much of the existing video while focusing on two components: 1) fire prevention; and 2) fire extinguisher types. It will also include warnings of increased fire risks from the hotter-bydesign exhaust of lower emission Tier 4 engines, the proper refueling techniques regarding ULSD, and logger liability should a machine fire expand to surrounding woods or beyond. As I understand it, at least some Tier 4 engines have larger exhaust after-treatment devices. This larger surface area, combined with the engines’ hotter exhaust temperatures, increases the possibility of fire, and only accentuates the need for loggers and operators to follow proper service and maintenance procedures. Some loggers are already on the right track. It was noted that in many cases loggers who choose to keep their machines longer have stepped up their maintenance and cleaning routines, with some offering incentives to operators for looking after their mounts more diligently. This seems to be particularly the case in New England. The wildfire/logger liability issue is also significant, given two cases that come to mind, one of which was discussed at length by TEAM members. Interestingly, machine fires were not involved in either incident, the most recent of which occurred earlier this year in Wisconsin. A logger’s feller-

buncher struck a rock with its felling head, allegedly resulting in sparks that touched off a blaze that quickly got out of control and burned through 7,500 acres and destroyed 17 houses. According to the dialog, the logger has been billed for more than $600,000 in firefighting costs alone. Another wildfire incident that a logger got caught up in occurred in 2007 in California. Howell’s Forest Harvesting was working as a contractor for Sierra Pacific Industries, but on other privately owned land, when the fire broke out. By the time it was subdued two weeks later, the fire had charred some 65,000 acres, 45,000 of it in two national forests. The federal government subsequently sued the logger, Sierra Pacific, and other private landowners. The case was eventually settled, with Sierra Pacific paying $47 million in cash and $67.5 million in land. Owners and managers of the land where the fire started paid $7 million. The logger accused of starting the fire—sparks caused by a bulldozer crossing rocks were touted as the igniter—paid $1 million. It was pointed out during the TEAM meeting that while forest equipment fire claims are down and losses are smaller, they continue to outnumber fire claims for construction and mining equipment. A spokesman for Daigle & Associates said that of 300 claims in the past 18 months, 177 were for fire damage. In the forest category during this period there were 66 skidder fires and 55 feller-buncher fires, with an average loss after deductions of $55,100. A majority of fire losses across the U.S. involved machines 5-20 years old that belonged to either second of third owners. Insurance representatives told that, in the South, chippers and grinders have now surpassed feller-bunchers in fire losses. With pellet markets rapidly emerging in recent years, many more chippers and grinders are being sold and deployed. They also noted that fire suppression systems, properly maintained, result in an 85% fire loss save rate, but high installation and maintenance costs discourage their use. Generally, insurance providers have not yet developed risk management programs that require and support the use of such systems.

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 1:11 PM Page 5

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/11/13 2:22 PM Page 6

NewsLines moval. Approximately 50 million board feet of timber could be harvested over 10 years; however annual harvest amounts are subject to negotiation. Forest Service officials say the contract could become a national model. The 54,000 acres are in the Three Rivers Ranger District’s Mill Creek watershed. Some ponderosa pine stands in the watershed have thousands of trees per acre, according to Russ Vaagen, the company’s vice president, adding that the dense stands are unhealthy and prone to catastrophic fires. The Colville National Forest already used stewardship contracts for smaller projects and was receptive to the idea of a larger pilot project. The number of Colville National Forest employees has dropped by about 70% during the past 20 years, with current budgets allowing the forest to harvest 40 million board feet per year. Logs from the projects will be taken to Vaagen Brothers sawmills in Colville and Usk, Wash. Eventually, the contract might generate enough work to add a second shift at the Usk mill, Vaagen says.

Nation’s Loggers Gather In Marksville, Louisiana American Loggers Council (ALC) held its 19th annual meeting at the Paragon Casino Resort in Marksville, La. September 26–28. Among the 185 logger members and their families who attended were representatives of several sponsors that have helped support the work of the ALC over the past 12 months. “I am proud of the supportive efforts that all of our members, committees and sponsors have put forth over the past year,” said outgoing president Travis Taylor. “We’re excited about the progress that has been made and look forward to extending those efforts as we head into 2014. We are confident that we’re headed in the right direction with our goal of being the national hub for logger information exchange, linking local, state and regional organizations around the country.” The conference included a swamp tour, technical sessions, business meetings and awards presentations. North Carolina logger Bobby Goodson and Caterpillar Forest Products President Kevin Thieneman received the President’s Award for their integrity and support, respectively, and New Hampshire businessman Jeff Eames, president of Fort Mountain Companies, received the prestigious Timber Harvesting Logging Business of the Year Award. The Board of Directors and full membership meetings included reports from the legislative, transportation, biomass, communications, membership, Master Logger and nomination committees. The legislative committee gave updates on efforts by the council to support legislation favorable to the timber harvesting community while the transportation and biomass committee reported on issues impacting those two sectors. The biomass committee recommended that the ALC create a position statement on the benefits of utilizing woody biomass to be delivered to the EPA, as well as a position on the economic impacts of over-regulation to the timber harvesting industry. During the closing dinner on Saturday night, newly elected logger and businessman Brian Nelson, Cornell, Mich., was officially introduced as the new ALC president, with California logger Myles Anderson, Florida logger Richard Schwab, and Mississippi logger Ken Martin filling the vice presidents and secretary/treasurer positions on the Executive Committee. Nelson commented: “I plan on keeping the momentum that we have built up during Travis’ administration moving forward…there are still many issues that we should focus on as we start to experience economic recovery within the industry.” ALC Executive Vice President Danny Dructor wrapped it up in a brief statement by thanking Taylor for his leadership under trying health conditions and looks forward to his continuing input into the council, as well as working with Brian Nelson to ensure that the American Loggers Council will continue to be “the national voice for professional timber harvesters.”

Vaagen Brothers Teams With Colville NF Colville National Forest has awarded a 10-year stewardship contract worth up to $30 million—called The Integrated Resource Service Contract (IRSC)—to Vaagen Brothers. Lumber Inc. of Colville, Wash., which was the sole bidder. The goal of the IRSC is ecological restoration at a landscape scale. The IRSC will be used to eventually treat approximately 54,000 acres on the Colville NF. These treatments are scheduled over the 10-year period of the contract. The contract will provide opportunities for restoration work, including the removal of timber and biomass through the treatment of large landscape areas. This will provide jobs and forest product processing in local communities. 6

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

Plum Creek Purchases 500,000 Acres From MW

“The Colville National Forest is proud to be on the forefront of innovation in the agency and is looking forward to learning as much as we can from this project to help improve the pace and scale of restoration in the future,” says Forest Supervisor Laura Jo West. “This approach will create capacity and flexibility on the Forest by contracting out project work that would normally require additional appropriations if completed by Forest Service staff.” The contract requires Vaagen Bros. to complete necessary National Environmental Policy Act planning before work begins. The IRSC will include various types of work such as pre-commercial thinning, mechanical fuels reduction, road maintenance, and timber product re-

Plum Creek Timber Co., Inc. has signed a $1.1 billion agreement to acquire approximately 501,000 acres of industrial timberlands, associated wind and mineral assets, and an interest in approximately 109,000 acres of highvalue rural and development-quality lands from MeadWestvaco Corp. Specifically, Plum Creek has agreed to acquire 501,000 acres of industrial timberlands in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia for $869 million; an investment in joint ventures consisting of 109,000 acres of high-value rural lands and developmentquality lands near Charleston, SC for $152 million; subsurface rights, mineral rights and wind power assets associated with the timberlands for $65 million. Rick Holley, Plum Creek CEO, comments, “These timberlands have a long history of excellent forest management. The high stocking levels and older age of the timberlands make them particularly attractive. These assets should integrate seamlessly into our existing timberland ownership in the Southeast and add to our presence in key markets.” The timber harvest from the ac-

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 1:11 PM Page 7

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/11/13 2:22 PM Page 8

8

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/11/13 2:22 PM Page 9

NewsLines quired lands is expected to average nearly 3 million tons annually over the next 10 years, growing Plum Creek’s total annual harvest more than 15% from recent levels.

Government Allies With Bioenergy Groups The Pellet Fuels Institute joined the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and three additional biomass groups in signing a memorandum of understanding, signifying a commitment by the federal government and industry to jointly grow and promote the wood-to-energy sector. Biomass Thermal Energy Council, Biomass Power Assn. and the Alliance for Green Heat also signed the MOU at an event held at the USDA. The MOU recognizes the shared goals and interests amongst the signers in expanding the use of wood to energy: creating local jobs, increasing affordable heating and electricity options for rural Americans, improving forest health, reducing wildfire risks, and promoting efficient biomass technologies across residential, commercial and industrial segments of the wood energy arena.

electrical power generation markets. As reported at the Sampson meeting, the project there would bring an investment of between $95 million to $117 million in taxable property, as well as 79 direct jobs and another 130 indirect jobs in the forest supply and logistics chain, as well as 300 contractor and project crew jobs during construction. Enviva proposes to develop and

construct a 500,000 metric ton wood pellet production facility, which would utilize wood biomass feedstock. A plant at Clinton would apparently follow the same model. According to an Enviva statement, “Enviva is currently evaluating a number of opportunities for future growth throughout the Southeastern United States, including potential operations in the Wilmington region.”

Enviva Considers More Pellet Mills Enviva, which already has wood pellet production capacity of 1.1 million metric tons (1.24 million tons), and has another 500,000 metric tons plant in construction, is looking at potential wood pellet plant sites in North Carolina, at Sampson and Clinton, located in the southeast portion of the state, north of the port of Wilmington. Company officials appeared before Sampson and Richmond county board of commissioners in early September to discuss community and operational benefits and gain feedback from the county with regard to incentives and hear from county residents. Headquartered in Bethesda, Md., Enviva operates new pellet plants it built at Ahoskie, NC (365,000 metric tons) and Northampton, NC (500,000 metric tons), and plants it purchased in recent years at Wiggins, Miss. (136,000 metric tons) and Amory, Miss. (90,000 metric tons). Enviva is currently constructing a 500,000 metric tons plant at Southampton, Va. The company ships its pellets to overseas Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

9


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:32 PM Page 10

Go-To-Guy In Minnesota Dale Erickson leads by example, in business and personally. RichDonnell

A

t 58, Dale Erickson of Erickson Timber Products, based in far north Minnesota at Baudette, has been around the block a few times, but even Erickson is doing a double-take at the recent changes in ownership of a couple of his key markets. In late October, Erickson’s primary market, the Boise paper mill at International Falls, Minn., was sold, along with Boise’s numerous other assets, to Packaging Corp. of America (PCA). Earlier in the year, Boise had laid off a considerable number of workers at International Falls and reduced paper production by roughly 10%. Following PCA’s acquisition of Boise, there remains some uncertainty about the status of the International Falls plant, mainly because its primary production is copier paper and PCA is heavier into containerboard and corrugated packaging products. But Erickson, whose two (some-

10

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

times three) crew operation moves three-quarters of its pulpwood production to the International Falls plant, prefers to look at the positive side. “Sure, something like that always makes you anxious to a degree,” he says. “But when the company coming in

Erickson works mostly in state forests.

is in the business, it’s also kind of reassuring. It’s better than a group of investors buying it and you really aren’t sure what is happening.” In September, LP Building Products announced it is purchasing Ainsworth Lumber, which includes another important pulpwood market for Erickson Timber Products—the Ainsworth oriented strandboard plant (OSB) at Barwick, Ontario, which is only 30 miles and across the Rainy River and the U.S.-Canada border due east from Baudette. The International Falls plant is another 40 miles east from there. The good news here, Erickson notes, is that Ainsworth has had some financial issues in recent years, and that LP is a longstanding forest products business, whose financial portfolio appears to be stable, and that wants to build up its assets in Canada. The Barwick plant is one of four Ainsworth OSB plants in Canada that are

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:32 PM Page 11

merchandise logs more efficiently. (Dale’s brother, Gib, works primarily with the lumber operation.) The additional machinery was put in a gutted building, which Erickson Timber had once used to merchandise logs for chips and lumber. Erickson Timber also used to run a chipper in the woods, but chip production basically ceased when Boise brought much of its chipping in-house. Erickson Timber still produces some chips today from its sawmill.

In The Woods Erickson grew up working with his dad, Gerald, in logging and sawmilling. Gerald, who started the logging business in the 1930s and the sawmill in 1975, died in 2008. The company caught a break in 1990 when Boise added another paper machine at International Falls. Erickson Timber eventually expanded to three crews, but today is gradually cutting back a crew, and will go with one conventional job and a cut-to-length job. “We have excess capacity, especially in the summer months,” Erickson says. “I don’t need all the equipment I’ve got.” Today his son, Cameron, who has been working in the business for several years, watches over the trucks and the woods crews. Another son, Grant, recently came on full time and is learning the ropes. They try to keep an inventory of a year or two of timber on the stump, but sometimes it’s seat-of-the pants. “When I came in this morning I didn’t know where my crew was going to go, though I had an idea,” Erickson says. “But in two hours that idea was out the window and I had another tract lined up for them. You piece things together as you go along.” Erickson Timber deals with Nortrax on John Deere equipment. The equipment lineup includes:

being sold to LP (the transaction is expected to be finalized soon). For now, Erickson Timber Products expects to continue its annual production of 25,000 cords from mostly stateowned forestland and some private timberland, and most of it is SFI and FSC certified. Species includes black spruce, aspen, red pine, jack pine, even some beetle-damaged tamarack, as well as some hardwood. About 80% of production occurs from December through March. Erickson contracts some wood production seasonally, describing that period as “a mad rush.” In addition to moving wood directly from forests to mills, Erickson Timber Products stockpiles as much as 50,000 tons of logs at its wood yard in Baudette, designated for the International Falls plant, the Barwick plant, as well as pulpwood markets such as UPM in Grand Rapids, NewPage in Duluth, and sawlogs to the Potlatch stud mill in Bemidji, and Erickson Timber’s own sawmill operation at its complex in Baudette. The company has been operating a small, conventional sawmill since 1975, but this summer it added machinery to produce higher grade hardwood lumber from ash and birch, as well produce pallet stock and crating. Erickson spent the summer helping to install a band resaw, edger and trimmer. The sawmill helps to Left to right, Cameron, Dale and Gib Erickson

● three Serco loaders with HanFab slashers ● two feller-bunchers, an 822C Tigercat and 753J John Deere with Quadco head ● Link-Belt 210XW/453 ProPac delimber ● two 240LX Link-Belt track loaders ● 700J and 650G John Deere dozers ● 1270D John Deere harvester and 1110D John Deere forwarder ● 10 trucks, mostly Internationals and KWs The operation also has available a 2008 Morbark Wood Hog grinder. Cenex in Baudette takes care of Erickson’s oil and fuel needs, with bulk delivery on both. They also track Erickson’s usage, with Erickson Timber calling in fuel and oil levels on Tuesday mornings. “I should mention the good service we get from them,” Erickson says. “There’s really no preference on brands; service is the key for me.” Erickson Timber purchases tires mostly from Jake’s Quality Tire in Duluth. The business has developed a strong reputation for conducting harvesting operations in a manner that is sensitive to environmental quality and landowner objectives; and their work adheres to the states’s Voluntary Site-Level Forest Management Guidelines. They also emphasize safety, as crew leaders are trained in CPR and first aid, and employees participate in the Minnesota Logger Education Program Log Safe training on an annual basis and are enrolled in a drug and alcohol testing program. Minnesota Timber Producers Assn. has recognized Erickson Timber Products with safety awards in the logging, trucking and sawmill categories. Nathan Heibel, district wood procurement manager at Boise White Paper, comments of Erickson Timber: “The company always takes the proper steps to take a close look at the timber sale prior to road building or felling to make sure that they have a good knowledge of the land. This diligence pays off in the excellent results they get on their harvests.” Heibel adds that Erickson Timber demonstrates professionalism and strives for excellence in all aspects of their operations. Key workers include Brian Laughrey, Paul LaValla and Todd Griffen. Mark Hanson works in the shop, and Alice Steinhofer is in the office.

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

11


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:32 PM Page 12

Long-time truck drivers include Ken Steinhofer, Jean Reinhart, Bob Roberts and Gary Plovie. The business employs 20. Erickson estimates the asset value of the business is around $4 million.

Activism If Dale Erickson’s name rings a bell, it’s because he was the Forest Resources Assn. Lake States Region Logger of the Year in 2012 and was a finalist for the related national award. He was also the Minnesota Sustainable Forestry Initiative Implementation Committee 2012 Logger of the Year, and noted for serving as a major economic driver in the Baudette/Lake of the Woods County area. “We’ve been at this long enough we’re logging in some spots for the second time,” Erickson says. “That shows how sustainable the forest is and that loggers in Minnesota are doing a good job.” Erickson serves on the Board of Directors of the Minnesota Timber Producers Assn., and served as president from 2003-2006. He was also appointed by the governor to serve on the Minnesota Forest Resources Council, a group created by the state legislature through the Sustainable Forest Resources Act of 1995. The council serves as a forum to discuss and advise the governor as well as federal, state, county, and local governments on sustainable forest resource policies and practices, and facilitates the development and implementation of various programs. The 17-member council includes representatives from the logging and wood products industries, environmental organizations, landowners, higher education, the Forest Service, wildlife, tourism and labor. Erickson hosted the council to his operation in September for a two-day annual meeting. It was the first time the group had met in northwestern Minnesota. “I wanted to show the larger scale version of things they see on a much smaller scale in other parts of the state, like the road system and the importance of fighting fires and the overall health of the forest,” Erickson says. “They saw some dead tamarack stands caused by the beetle.” Recently Erickson spoke at a Forest Resources Assn. gathering in Duluth to deliver the perspective of a Minnesota logger. He repeated what two loggers had both said to him, that ‘I don’t think 12

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

I can get any more efficient than I am.’ “That tells me that guys are getting to the end of their rope, as to ‘what more can we do to get better,’” Erickson says. Erickson also talked about stiff transportation costs and the general uncertainty caused by some of the recent ownership changes of forest products companies. He also pointed to a lack of reasonably priced stumpage in the region. He says he always comes away from the Lake States FRA meetings feeling a little better. “In talking to the Wisconsin/Michigan guys I realize we are not alone,” he says. “Virtually every issue I have is the same as the ones they have.” The theme of the gathering was rebuilding the supply chain. “It was a mostly positive outlook,” he adds. Erickson is often sought out for his opinions and advice on forest issues. “Most issues are pretty black and white to me, and I tend to state them that way,” he says.

December through March is crunch time.

However, he adds, “I’ve always felt you won’t see my trucks at a protest rally or blockage. I’ve always felt that consultation is better than confrontation.” Well, not always. In summer 2011, as the state government prepared to shut down because of a fiscal dispute between the governor and the legislature, the Minnesota Dept. of Natural Resources halted timber harvesting on state lands. Erickson Timber Products, Hasbargen Logging and Whitefish Creek Enterprises took the matter to court as plaintiffs against the Minnesota DNR. Whitefish Creek Enterprises noted it had 5,000 cords of paid-for stockpiled wood in the state forest waiting to be trucked to mills. Erickson Timber had current contracts for harvesting state

timber; and Hasbargen Logging had also stockpiled wood in the state forest ready for transport. The parties claimed that a suspension of activities could irreparably harm their business operations, debt ratings, as well as the financial condition of their employees, and also do serious damage to economic activities in their communities. The plaintiffs won. On the eve of the shutdown, a judge issued a restraining order against the state, allowing current operations to continue. Erickson says it was a matter of the state honoring its contracts. “We had obligations to meet,” Erickson says. “If there had been any assurance it was a two-day thing, you wouldn’t go to this bother. But who knew?” The ruling affected more than 100 active contracts between loggers and the state. The shutdown lasted about three weeks. The loggers’ challenge gained national attention, including an article in The New York Times. Erickson says he gets along well with the Minnesota DNR and its forestry division, but other divisions within DNR place too many constraints. “You start to see some paralysis,” Erickson says. “But as I tell my sons, you have to keep the lines of communication open, keep talking.” Erickson says the state’s annual allowable cut is usually 800,000 cords, though there has been some talk of reduction. He also represented the logging industry in lobbying the Minnesota DOT and the state legislature to provide sufficient funds to make improvements to Minnesota Trunk Highway 11, the major artery along the state’s northern border that carries wood to the paper mill in International Falls. Once funding was secured, Erickson was active in working with the DOT in seeing the project to completion. Erickson’s activism goes back to when his children were in school and he served on the local school board for 12 years. He also donates to various community causes, such as providing lumber for ball fields. In addition to the logging business, Erickson and his wife, Deedra, run a farming operation with beef cattle, horses and more than 800 acres of land. Next year marks Erickson’s 40th year of full-time work in the woods. “I went from high school to the woods and have been working on my forestry degree ever since. These people are the best in the world. Any day you spend outdoors TH has to be a great day.”

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 1:11 PM Page 13

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:32 PM Page 14

Feller-Buncher Overview Manufacturers describe track/wheel machine features, benefits.

Barko Hydraulics

Following more than a year of engineering, market research and industry input, Barko in September introduced a new track-type harvester/feller-buncher, the model 240, a 45,000 lb. product that fills a void in lightweight class machines. The 240 is purpose-built with class leading power, unmatched performance, and is packed with features. The 240 is powered by a 220 HP Cummins engine that drives a custom designed IQAN hydraulic control system. An auto reversing engine fan increases cooling and fuel efficiency while keeping the engine temperature low. Swing torque comes from an oversized heavy-duty bearing and dual drive motors that generate unmatched power. The 240 is also uniquely serviceable: a patent-pending design allows the entire cab to slide forward, revealing unobstructed access to primary hydraulic components. A variety of attachments is factory approved for the 240, including a Barko CF-18 fixed processing head and various OEM fixed feller-buncher or dangle heads. Visit barko.com.

between front and rear axles. This revolutionary design gives the C Series unprecedented stability, even when carrying big timber on steep or uneven terrain. The C Series is the first wheel-type feller-buncher that can be serviced from ground level. This includes fueling. Also, hydraulic oil is added at ground level with a standard electric hydraulic pump and a quick coupler hose stored on the machine. The tilt cab and hinged doors on three sides and at the bottom of the engine compartment provide ground-level access to the engine, hydraulic pumps and other key components. The machine is segmented into pressurized compartments that prevent debris from entering. Less debris buildup means less time required for cleaning and better performance. The pressurized airflow keeps electronics, sensors and other key components cool during long workdays. Zero tail-swing Cat B Series and full tail-swing Cat Series 2 track-type feller-bunchers provide the best-in-class blend

Caterpillar Forest Products Caterpillar’s C Series wheel-type machines are more productive while burning less fuel than previous models. PowerDirect Plus, new technology that optimizes machine efficiency and productivity, delivers power where and when it is needed. Simultaneous lift-tilt and lift-steer functions are significantly faster than major competitive machines. Saw recovery time is also significantly faster. The engine is positioned at the back for better weight distribution and balance 14

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:33 PM Page 15

of lift, swing and travel power. Each line includes a leveling machine that features the only three-cylinder leveling system with simultaneous forward and side-to-side tilting throughout the full range of motion. This design significantly reduces stress on the lower structure and provides the most comfort for the operator. The tracks and all undercarriage rolling components in the B Series and the Series 2 non-leveling machine are 330 excavator-type. The Series 2 leveling machine features 345 excavator-type tracks and 330 rolling components. These high-grade components extend track life, cut repair costs and increase stability. Both the zero and full tail-swing product lines feature a high capacity cooling system and on-demand reversing fan that keep the machine debris-free and running at the proper operating temperature, optimizing performance, durability and fuel efficiency. Three hydraulic pumps power the hydraulics. Large structures such as swing bearings and booms provide for longer life and durability. With the IQAN control system, the operator can adjust control parameters, maximizing performance and productivity. Machine layout makes servicing easy. The clamshell style engine compartment provides easy access to all filters, oil dipstick, coolant reservoir, hydraulic fill pump, valves and hoses. Visit cat.com.

Track-Type Products—John Deere’s 700J and 900K Series track-type feller bunchers are power-packed machines that won’t disappoint when it comes to high production logging in tough terrain. Highlights of the 700J Series include a large-displacement 9 liter engine that delivers the power needed to get the job done quickly and efficiently. Combining hydraulics that are both smooth and fast with a best-in-class boom, these powerful, agile machines give more muscle to handle more trees, with a faster saw recovery time. Key features include a new high rotation FR21B felling head that enables operators to cut more trees, track less and be more productive. This head also features superior pickup force for effortless placement of cut trees. Stability is a key feature of these machines. With the larger U7 undercarriage option on the 753Js, operators have even more stability and tractive effort in rugged terrain. The 900K Series machines are now equipped to take on even more of the forest with the introduction of an updated boom structure and cooling system for all models. With an increased cutting swath of 30%, the machines cover more area so operators spend more time putting wood down and less time tracking. Visit johndeereforestry.com.

John Deere

Komatsu

Wheel-Type Products—Loggers need to be able to depend on their equipment, and that’s why John Deere built its wheel-type feller-bunchers with robust hydraulic and electrical systems and best-in-class axles. K Series machines are equipped with enhancements that give more power, greater productivity and higher uptime, allowing them to cut costs while cutting timber. A significant enhancement is the new FD55 felling head, compatible with the 643K and 843K bunchers. This head provides the versatility and durability loggers need to harvest various tree diameters, and is ideal for full-tree operations, from thinning to final harvests and everything in between. The FD55 head boosts productivity with its improved visibility to the cutting zone, high accumulation capacity, and ability to cut trees up to 23 inches in diameter. In addition, its tall horn structure design allows for more control and added stability when harvesting larger trees.

Komatsu’s XT series feller-bunchers set the standard for superior maneuverability, high-production harvesting and multi-function performance. Komatsu offers four purpose-built XT series machines with base weights ranging from 27-37 tons and 300 peak HP Cummins Tier 3 engines. There are up to five hydraulic configurations, with two reinforced boom and four arm options that work with a wide range of saw and processing heads. Komatsu machines are programmable and easily fine-tuned for smooth control and responsive performance. XT series machines have a redesigned crawler box for improved durability and the addition of a roller improves load distribution. The swing system runs in a sealed grease bath for improved pinion lubrication, with hardened gears for longer life. Eccentric drive mounting provides easy service adjustments. Easy-to-access grease fittings provide simple maintenance to help extend bearing life. Engine oil changes are quick with an easy-to-access engine oil filter location. Each model features a high capacity cooling package with

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

15


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:33 PM Page 16

a thermostatically controlled auto-reversing fan to improve engine and hydraulic cooling performance, reduce maintenance and improve fuel economy. Komatsu feller buncher cabs are quiet, spacious and designed for efficient operation. Ergonomic control layout, climate control and large tinted windows improve operator comfort during long shifts. Visit komatsuforest.us.

Madill

>Harvesting/Processing—dangle Rolly™ >Harvesting/Processing—controlled Rolly™ >Processing—dangle Cobra™ >Processing—controlled Cobra™ >Whole Tree Chipping—controlled Rolly Chipper™ >Pipeline—various tools and accessories Equipped with the latest technologies in engine, hydraulics and man/machine interfaces, the E-Clips sets a new standard in efficiency with brand-leading components such as Cummins, Sauer-Danfoss, Rexroth, and Flexxaire. E-Clips can be transformed to suit tomorrow’s environmental prescription. Its unique design offers the flexibility to change configurations to meet various applications without losing valuable investment. Visit risleyequipment.com. It all began with Sam Madill’s spar tree yarder in 1955. In the decades since, Madill’s purpose-built logging equipment has set the standard in performance, productivity and longevity. Its durable, tried-and-true machines are known to stand up to the most demanding environments. These qualities therefore distinguish the Madill 2250C Series II feller-buncher, which comes in flat and tilt versions and features an improved cab design, increased stability, better hydraulic performance and improved boom and stick. The house protecting the 300 HP Cummins engine is a single piece, heavy-duty unit with hydraulic tilt and large swing-out doors. The high visibility cab is ergonomically advanced. Reinforced at pin bosses, the Madill-fabricated boom has built-in guarding, is mounted rear of center and has increased lift capacity. Madill…the heritage continues. Visit madillequipment.com.

Tigercat

Risley Equipment Risley’s E-Clips® EZ-200 feller-buncher is designed from the ground up to be the “next generation” multi-purpose track-type machine. The E-Clips offers high-speed mobility with integrated “DOS”™ suspension and a revolutionary full motion “Flex-Trac®” pad, which eclipses traditional rail-based track undercarriages. Performance, serviceability and versatility set E-Clips apart from all other machines, given its ability to transform effective hydraulic horsepower to Risley’s range of “CutLine™” tools that include: >Harvesting—high-speed/high torque Rotosaw™ 16

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

Track-Type Models—Tigercat has an extensive offering for every application. Its C-Series machines are known for extremely long life, high availability, thoughtful component arrangement and service access, clear operator sightlines and high capacity variable-flow cooling. An important advantage common to all models is ER boom technology, which provides markedly increased production, especially in high cycle applications, compared with conventional boom systems. ER allows the operator to extend and retract the boom on a horizontal plane, using a single joystick. In doing so, ER transfers energy back and TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:33 PM Page 17

forth between the main and stick boom functions, reducing the energy required and freeing energy up for other machine functions or fuel savings. No other manufacturer has comparable technology. The zero tail 822C/L830C series are high production machines well suited to thinning and final felling. The closed loop track drive X-model provides higher performance in steep terrain, providing quicker track speeds when climbing, improved turning performance, better multi-functioning and more hydraulic efficiency. The L830C and LX830C share the same undercarriage and leveling components as the super duty L870C. The 845C is well suited to most applications and excels in high cycle applications. It is extremely fuel-efficient and offers excellent service access, especially for a limited tailswing machine. For tougher terrain and larger timber, the FH400-based 870C provides the extra track power, stability, boom reach and lift required to maintain the highest levels of production.

Wheel-Type Models—Tigercat started in the drive-to-tree buncher business. Today the company builds four models for thinning and final felling duties, primarily in plantation applications on dry and relatively favorable terrain. The 718E is the lowest cost, lightest weight, simplest, and most agile machine in the lineup. The 720E and 724E are versatile for thinning and clear-fell applications and the 300 HP 726E works in terrain and tree size that many would consider track buncher territory. From the 720E up, the machines are equipped with a high capacity cross-flow cooling system and a thermostat controlled variable speed, reversible cooling fan. The rear frame is compartmentalized for separation of engine, hydraulics and cooling system components. A great advantage of Tigercat feller-bunchers is the optional WideRangeTM drive system. Only Tigercat offers an infinitely variable transmission for drive-to-tree machines, which spend a great percentage of the total duty cycle driving. WideRange allows the operator to travel faster than more conventional machines. Quicker travel boosts productivity and reduces cost per ton. Another advantage for all Tigercat bunchers is an extensive line of felling heads. Tigercat bunching saws and shears contribute to significant productivity gains by increasing the number of stems per swing cycle. This results is quicker cycles, more trees felled per hour, less travel, reduced wear on drive system components, lower fuel consumption and optimized skidder bunches. Visit tigercat.com.

TimberPro

TimberPro offers technically advanced track and wheeltype feller bunchers. Their limited tail swing upper turntable, hydrostatic drive system, and powerful long-reach boomset makes them a perfect choice for both thinning and clear fall operations. The TB630 (6 wheels) and TB830 (8 wheels) are the only wheel machines equipped with a boomset that can handle heavier disc saw attachments. TimberPro’s wheel machines excel in scattered timberstands where travel speed matters and in rocky ground conditions. They can be equipped with a multitude of attachments. TimberPro is also known for its four-way leveling and non-leveling D6 and D7 size track machines. The leveling track machine is ideal for steep ground harvesting, leveling 28° to the front, 7° to the back and 24° to both sides. The machine can be equipped with a feller-buncher boomset that has 23'-5" of reach from the center of rotation to the pin location of the attachment, or a harvester boomset with 25'6" of reach. Both booms can be ordered with 6-foot squirt boom options. The TimberPro 300 HP power plant, advanced hydraulic package and fuel saving technologies combine to efficiently run any type of attachment. TimberPro machines are custom built to specific customer needs. Visit timberpro.com. Note: All claims herein are those of the various manufacturers. TH

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

17


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:33 PM Page 18

Satisfied, Optimistic Swedish logger Karl-Gunnar Gustafsson plows ahead, expects markets to improve. DavidAbbott

S

wedish logger Karl-Gunnar Gustafsson, 63, was among the many visitors to the Elmia Wood show in June. “It’s great,” Gustafson said. “It’s too big to see it all in one day. Two days is optimal.” Though many of those visitors traversed distances from around the globe, for Gustafsson it was practically in his back yard—in Jönköping, Sweden. He resides in Finspâng, not far away. Although Elmia taps business from the worldwide forest products industry, it is that local sector that concerns Gustafsson. Speaking of his domestic market, he says it is not so bad. But, he adds, “All businesses are trying to improve results by chasing cost down,

and companies like Holmen (his primary market) are reducing costs for the logs. Contractors are under constant pressure, and that’s a big concern.” The sawmill business in Sweden, he noted, is struggling because the Swedish crown is very high (Sweden is a member of the European Union but opts to keep its own currency, the crown, instead of the Euro). Even so, he calls himself optimistic. “The U.S. is beginning to build houses, and when it goes well in the U.S., Sweden and Europe will follow.” He admits the market has been down for a couple of years now, but he compares it to the ’90s, when interest rates reached 25%. “I have seen good times and bad times.

You have to adapt to the situation.” Although he stops short of calling the current situation profitable, he describes himself as being satisfied.

Deere Man Gustafsson’s equipment is all John Deere: 1270E and 1470E harvesters, with 480 processing heads, and 1210, 1510 and 1910 forwarders. The two larger forwarders pick up what the 1470 fells, while Gustafsson pairs the smaller 1210 forwarder with the 1270 harvester. In Sweden, Deere does not sell through a dealer network, so

Gustafsson, inset, operates the 1270E harvester himself, cutting and processing about 2,000 cubic meters a week.

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:33 PM Page 19

Gustafsson buys directly from the John Deere district office located in Jönköping, according to territorial Deere representative Dieter Reinisch. Gustafsson’s crews send out about 50 loads a week on average—slightly less on the smaller team. The 1270, he says, cuts about 2,000 cubic meters a week, and each truckload consists of 40 cubic meters. The consuming mill—usually Holmen Braviken—supplies transportation, so Gustafsson and team only have to stack the processed logs in a designated spot, and the mill’s truck drivers pick up and deliver the loads. At shift change—the teams work in two shifts daily, five days a week—the operators handle basic daily maintenance, such as greasing the booms (Gustafsson himself mans the 1270). At every 500 hour mark, machines go back to John Deere for scheduled maintenance, including changing engine oil and filters. Every other time—at the 1,000 hour mark—the shop performs a much more thorough maintenance, checking and replacing some items. This is covered under the logger’s service agreement with Deere. Saw chain on the head has to be changed or sharpened daily, as rocks are a hazard in the terrain and, despite operator diligence, cannot always be avoided. Like many contractors in the region, he keeps a small mobile shop and inventory of spare parts in a service wagon on the job site. For most of his supplies and supplemental materials, Gustafsson turns to the John Deere brands, as specified in the service agreement; including oil, hoses, filters and such. The tires represent one exception. He generally buys Nokian. “Sometimes I buy from John Deere but they are not the cheapest always,” he laughs. Standard practice for Gustafsson is to replace machines after three or four years of service, though depending on circumstances he has stretched that into the five and six year range. Getting rid of used equipment is difficult today, he reports. Large forestry companies— Södra, Holmen among others—canceled and renegotiated contracts with all suppliers recently. “In that period, nobody knew if they had a job tomorrow, and some didn’t get their contracts back,” he says. “That makes it tough when you are thinking of selling machines and the colleagues don’t know if they have a job tomorrow, they are probably not buying.” As such, John Deere takes used machines and sells them in Russia and Spain.

Markets For the most part, Gustafsson contracts under the Holmen company, delivering spruce to its Holmen Braviken sawmill in nearby Norrköping. Holmen also has a paper mill and another sawmill, much further away, that processes Scotch pine. However, when Timber Harvesting visited with Gustafsson in June, Braviken was full and taking no more spruce for a while, so Gustafsson was working a red pine tract for delivery to a different mill, which had an exchange agreement in place with Braviken. Normally in this area a logger would cut most of the standing timber,

to sign a contract in Sweden at that time was 21—his mother had to sign for the loan. By the early 1970s he had a felling machine, and into the 1980s he acquired a processor. Some of the first machines, he says, separated the felling from the processing components —in some cases requiring two operators in different cabs on the same machine. Sounding not so different from loggers in the U.S., Gustafsson says his wife Ulla and daughter Liisa generally handle the bookkeeping portion of the business. For example, they look after the company’s sustainable forestry certifications, which involves quite a bit of paperwork, he says. They (K-G and

The 1910 forwarder is the largest of the three forwarders in the Gustafsson fleet.

Gustafsson says, but since the order at the time was for pine only, he left the spruce standing. He was named Holmen’s top logging contractor for 2012.

Roots Gustafsson caught the logging bug at 14, when he lived at a school that offered courses on working in the woods. The school had some early prototypes of then-modern equipment, allowing the young students to train. That, he recalls, is when he really got hooked on forestry and on forestry machines. His grandfather had worked in the woods with horses, and Gustafsson knew this was his path as well, so when he finished basic school he went to three years of specialty training at forestry school—common among loggers in Sweden. When he finished in 1967, he started his business, at age 17, using a horse at first. At 18 he bought a forwarder, but because he was so young—the legal age

Ulla) have three children: Liisa, Tobias, and Joakim. Tobias, his oldest, runs his smaller crew. The family has a work shop at home for smaller repairs, where the fiancé of daughter Liisa, a capable mechanic, handles many of the smaller repairs. Perhaps unlike the experience of some loggers in the U.S., Gustafsson reports no trouble finding younger hires. He has recently hired six employees, all trained in forestry school, and all about 20 years old. The company employs 15 total; the oldest is 65, but most are under 25, and all have been trained in forestry school. The three-year training program, Gustafsson says, includes “theoretical studies, like everyone else,” along with forestry-related areas of study and training in machine operation. By the time they get in the woods they are prepared, he says, but it still requires quite a long time to attain real proficiency in the sophisticated cut-to-length machines. TH

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

19


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:33 PM Page 20

Workforce Anxiety Survey: For many loggers, finding and keeping quality employees is an uphill challenge.

I

n cooperation with the Forest Resources Assn., earlier this year Hatton-Brown Publishers, parent company of Timber Harvesting & Wood Fiber Operations, circulated an on-line survey link to 400 of its logging contractor subscribers who had provided e-mail addresses. The list was selected to provide distribution roughly representative of logging business density in all U.S. regions. The purpose of the brief survey was to learn the extent of loggers’ concern about attracting new personnel to logging employment, what factors they feel discourage employees from seeking such employment, and to uncover what loggers consider to be good selling points for potential entry-level workers. Following a second reminder solicitation, 110 loggers—a strong 27%—responded. Responses were fairly evenly distributed among the regions in proportion to current logging demographics. Labor issues have vexed some loggers for years, and today, even with a persistently high unemployment rate, the problem continues for many. Survey results indicate that anxiety about obtaining qualified, motivated employees is a strong but not universal concern, and that concern varies somewhat by region, and even within a region. For example, it is a near universal matter in the West but not as universal in the South, perhaps with the exception of Texas, Oklahoma and Louisiana, where oil and gas industry employment opportunities are significant.

Summary Question 1: Are you having difficulties, or do you expect to have difficulties, in attracting qualified logging employees? 78 respondents—71% yes, 29% no. Only those who answered yes were asked to proceed with the rest of the survey. 20

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

Question 2: Please identify up to five reasons from the following list that you find it difficult to attract qualified logging employees. 1) They don’t like the long hours or work schedule. .....................................48 2) I can’t compete with “welfare” or unemployment benefits. ......................40 3) The necessary skills are difficult to acquire. .................................................39 4) They don’t like physical, outdoor, all-season work. ...................................34 5) I can’t promise them work will be steady. ...................................................34 6) Other employers offer better pay for similar skills....................................30 7) Drug or alcohol problems sideline possible applicants. ..............................30 8) Applicants don’t see opportunities for advancing........................................30 9) Logging work has low prestige locally. ..................................................14 10) Potential workers find the rules and procedures unattractive.................10 11) Potential workers don’t want to stay in (or come to) our community. .....5 The survey invited respondents to write in “other” reasons, some of which follow: A. Better benefits with large companies. B. Living and working in a national forest, I cannot promise work availability when the federal government controls what, when, and how logging is to be done, not to mention the usual “red tape” and “hoops to jump through” to get jobs going. C. (Consuming mill) has cut our money so much we just can’t compete with other jobs. I have 15 employees; they need more money and insurance. D. The cost of insurance. E. 90% of all employees that I find or work in the logging industry have a drug or alcohol problem. If loggers in my area gave a drug test, then there would not be very many

employees to select from. F. The older workers are getting too old to hold up to the everyday grind, and the younger people want to be inside on a video game or computer instead of on a piece of equipment that they have to maintain and work on. G. The paper mill and all the sawmills were shut down over 12 years ago and there are no workers left with logging skills. H. A young worker can find better pay and benefits as a common laborer at a union job. I. How do you encourage anyone to get into a industry that is market-driven, and we cannot compete in the cost of raw material (stumpage) compared to areas with warmer climates or 3rd world countries advancing themselves? We haven’t seen the majority of our large paper mills reinvesting for the long haul; just enough to run for today. J. Truthfully, our business has become increasingly financially strained in the past 12-24 months. We are in our 7th year of working at the same cut and haul rate. It is unfeasible to continue much longer. Thus, while we know it is difficult to attract qualified personnel, we will not be attempting any recruiting for the foreseeable—possibly permanent— future. Fortunately, we feel we will be able to apply our business and operational skills elsewhere, outside of the timber and wood products industries. Question 3: If you were promoting your business as a great place to work, what would you single out to tell a potential employee? A total of 59 of provided a write-in response, some of which follow: A. You can work as many hours as you like. B. Steady work all year. C. Stay at home work, good wages, medical insurance, and great outdoor recreation opportunities.

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/11/13 8:49 AM Page 21

D. Seeing the beauty of nature every day and knowing that the trees you harvest are improving the forest by enabling new growth. E. That an employee would have the opportunity to advance and possibly have his own business, if he would learn the logging skills and was businessminded. F. The physical and mental benefit of working outdoors all day. The satisfaction of working with a team and getting a job done. The pay is more than factory or store work and comparable to construction work. G. Positive work environment. H. I try to keep my equipment updated, which helps in being able to get employees I. If they will work every day, and do what’s right, they can make good money. J. As long as you are self-motivated and willing to work, you work on your own, learn many mechanical skills. K. Company has been in operation by the same family for over 30 years. L. That we treat our employees like family, so we try to promote a very safe workplace. M. Steady employment, challenging, rewarding beyond monetary benefits. N. I’ll treat you like I would want to be treated, and I will not ask you to do anything that I have not done or would not do myself or put you in any unnecessary danger, but do remember we work in a dangerous environment. O. To be honest the way the logging industry has changed, you can’t promote your business as being a great place to work. The mills and timber companies are out for what is going on now and not out for the future, so there are not any new young loggers getting into the business. I’m trying to hang on myself, being one of the last new young loggers to start up a business, but the mills are constantly pushing me out and not giving me a chance. If you want a good survey, ask the mills and the timber companies what are they doing to actually promote the need for young people to get into logging, where they can actually hire good employees. I would love to see their answers to that. To attract new people to logging, you have to start from the top down, and us loggers are on the bottom, picking up the leftovers and trying to survive. P. I can’t honestly say my place is a great place to work, with so-so wages and few benefits. Until the owners can make a profit to pass along to their

workers we are not going to be able to train and keep good workers. Q. Our pay is good for the area we work in, and we have excitement. R. Lots of overtime, good benefits. S. Once you obtain the necessary skills to perform your job function, you’re basically your own boss. Meet your production goals and maintain your equipment would be your only concern. T. Logging provides individuals with rewarding work, constantly changing

work locations, and opportunities to interact with a lot of different individuals and situations. U. We are on the cutting edge of forest technology and practices. However, this makes our work more expensive. Since wood consumers seem to place a higher emphasis on dollar cost per ton rather than safety, efficiency, and quality of harvest, I would discourage any potential employees from seeking work in the wood products TH supply chain.

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

21


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:34 PM Page 22

Shows Mirror Improved Markets A recap of August-September events in Arkansas, Michigan and North Carolina

S

tatic and live forestry expositions held in August and September mirrored steady and/or improved markets, at least in some parts of the country. The common denominator was an upbeat attitude among most vendors and attendees. A recap: Southwest Forest Products Expo, staged August 23-24 at the Convention Center in Hot Springs, Ark., attracted about 50 exhibitors and 1,600 visitors, according to leaders of the Arkansas Timber Producers Assn. (ATPA), which has sponsored the event since founding it in 1999. ATPA dovetailed a board meeting with the expo and also offered training sessions for loggers. At-show sales were made by some exhibitors and others have since sold equipment and supplies as a result of their participation. The John Deere 848H skidder that Stribling Equipment repainted in Arkansas Razorback red and displayed—it stopped many attendees in their tracks—was sold in October to R&B Logging, Inc. of Glenwood, Ark. Richard Vines and his wife, Beth, own Activity inside the convention center at Hot Springs, Ark. the company; Curly Ward is the operator. Brad Akins, Stribling’s territory manager out of its early November, ATPA was deliberating on whether to keep Texarkana store, made the sale. its future shows static or take them live. In the past, ATPA has Representatives of John Deere, Tigercat and Barko, at the teamed with the Forest Resources Assn. (FRA) to periodically show in support of respective dealers Stribling Equipment, conduct a live show, In-Woods Expo (2004, 2007 and 2011). MidSouth Forestry Equipment and Crouse Truck Parts, conWithout FRA, that event is tentatively scheduled again for firmed very strong forest machine sales this year. Tigercat 2015 in the Hot Springs area. Executive Director Larry BocCEO Ken MacDonald said the company was on track to carossa said ATPA will announce its plans in coming weeks. build a record 1,200 machines in 2013. Several Arkansas loggers indicated Stribling Equipment raised some stronger traditional markets are making $2,500 for Log-A-Load for Kids. In their lives a little easier but noted that another LAL fund raiser, logger Mike decent profits remain elusive, given high Pennington sold tickets on a new ATV, operating costs. While some loggers in the drawing for which will be held later other southern states are benefitting from this year. Also, at an after hours auction new pellet or other biomass markets, held Friday night on the show floor, those in Arkansas are not. However, logATPA generated $5,360 for its scholargers and landowners are hopeful that curship program. rent talk about a new pulp mill in the A great majority of vendors indicated state may eventually materialize in actual they were “very likely” to participate in construction. Foreign interests are considBrad Akins, left, sold red JD 848H skidder to future shows sponsored by ATPA. As of ering the proposed project. Beth and Richard Vines.

22

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:34 PM Page 23

The annual (68th) Lake States Logging & Heavy Equipment Expo, held in Escanaba, Mich., attracted 164 outdoor and 148 indoor exhibitors and drew almost 9,000 with its new two-day time frame (September 5-6). Attendance was up 9% from last year, according to the sponsor, the Great Lakes Timber Professionals Assn. In addition to racking up record new machine sales at the event, Ponsse hosted a customer appreciation party for its customers, guests and employees, providing food and smiles for more than 400. Ponsse recognized its first U.S. customer, Earl St. John of Spalding, Mich., who took delivery of an HS15 harTop finishers in the Prentice Loader Championship at the Lake States event were, from left, in jackets: Ron vester in 1970. At the show Ponsse Shamion Jr., third; Matt Hartwig, second; and Brian McCumber, first. Future contestant Thomas McCumber displayed that machine, still going joined his father. Flanking them was Jason Koskinen, left, Caterpillar Forest Products territory manager, after more than 36,000 hours. and Todd Gustafson, forestry product specialist for FABCO, Cat dealer in Upper Michigan. Ponsse chairman Juha Vidgren presented Dennis Schoeneck with Ponsse’s Einari Vidgren with products offered by Serco, Prentice, Hood, and Rotobec. Award, named for the company’s founder. The passionate Attachment manufacturers included Ryan’s Equipment, Schoeneck, a logger from Rhinelander, Wis., was singled which featured its latest felling head for excavators. Owner out for his willingness to help promote the forest industry Don Ryan reported a very active booth and that he took orand to help educate young people about it. ders for several of his products. TimberPro, Rottne, and Log Max were well represented Tim Murphy was seen in the Nortrax booth greeting by Pioneer Equipment of Rhinelander, Wis. President Steve many of his friends and customers. Murphy, a regional manOry reported strong leads on carriers, harvesters and proager for Nortrax for years, earlier this year was promoted to cessing heads. Nortrax president and relocated to Tampa, Fla. Rumor has it Barko made a big splash with its loaders and mulchers that his golf game, always good, has improved. and the new branding of some recent acquisitions. The forNext year’s event is set for September 5-6 in Oshkosh, Wis. mer Puma forwarder and harvester now carry the Barko moniker and the company’s signature burnt orange and The live biennial Mid-Atlantic Logging & Biomass black color scheme, as do the Dynamic ‘Cone Head’ chipExpo, which took place near Selma-Smithfield, NC Septempers. Barko also revealed it will soon debut a track-type harber 20-21, attracted 75 exhibitors and 2,700 attendees, the vester, the 240, which was undergoing extensive pre-prolargest component being logger families and employees. duction testing in early September. Friday brought some damp, gray weather but the show went Komatsu continued its tradition of holding a forwarder on. Saturday brightened up a bit, and the event was packed. operator competition, as did Caterpillar with its popular PrenThe show returned to the same tract as in 2011. The central tice loader championship. location of the site proved ideal, and the show benefitted furIn this part of the country, trucks with self-loaders are a stather from improved demand for wood products in the region. ple, leading several major truck dealers to show trucks fitted Ken Murray, owner of Maxi-Load Scales, commented: “Lots of people, lots of interest, and confirmed sales were a bonus. This was the best show I have attended, period.” Logger Roy Reeves of Cullen Falls, Va. was on hand to

Four generations of St. Johns, from left: Earl, Tom, Jase and Jordan. Tom is Earl’s son, Jordan is Tom’s son, Jase is Jordan’s son.

Mid-Atlantic Expo Prentice Loader Championship winners were, from left, Roy Reinford, first place; Robert Lussier, second place; and Joah Hackman, first place.

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

23


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:34 PM Page 24

Attendees watch Deere loader feed Morbark whole tree chipper.

check out some Tigercat machinery. Peter Anderson and his family from Tarboro, NC were interested in in-woods chippers primarily, citing new and upcoming markets in the area. Clay Harmon from Warrenton, NC was researching a planned new feller-buncher purchase in the near future. Dusty Cordelle from Andrews, NC said he was there to look at “anything and everything on the good old wish list,” including a hoped-for new cutter. As part of a North American factory tour hosted by Caterpillar in Georgia and Illinois, a group of New Zealand loggers took time to take in the show. Vendors and loggers alike were pleased with site layout and sales, according to North Carolina Forestry Assn. (NCFA) Vice President Jack Swanner. “The Selma-Smithfield community again supported this large undertaking,” says Doug Duncan, Executive Director of the NCAPL. “Many thanks to the Johnston County Visitors Bureau for lining up local food vendors and promoting the show. Pulling off a live harvesting outdoor event is no small feat and the excellent partnership with the NCAPL, NCFA and

24

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

Hatton-Brown came through again. We look forward to 2015 and are now identifying future sites in the area.” Hatton-Brown Publishers, the parent company Timber Harvesting, partnered with the NCAPL and NCFA to sponsor the event. Many loggers and foresters alike noticed improvements to the show and commented on the positive family friendly nature. Robert Rich, from Garland, NC with Robert Rich Timber Harvesting, Inc., brought his whole family out, letting his future logger see all the new trucks and trailers. “He’s getting an eyeful,” Rich said with a laugh gesturing to his toddler. Families like the Riches really sum up the whole experience at Mid-Atlantic, where over 380 children registered with logging professionals. Loggers were able to enter one of two loader competitions that were both played to consistently packed stands. John Woodie Enterprises sponsored a Barko loader competition, and Caterpillar Forest Products sponsored its popular Prentice loader championship as well. Both donated entry fees, along with matching funds, to local charities. TH

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 12:34 PM Page 25

PeoplePower! WENDY FARRAND

Strengthen Employee Engagement By Holding Regular Crew Meetings Holding regular crew meetings can be a challenge—on the job it seems that something is always getting in the way—but such meetings pay off by boosting morale, improving communications and strengthening employee engagement. Loggers are constantly dealing with the urgent—all the day-to-day developments that seem to naturally evolve: a blown hose; the failure of an engine part; a missing employee; a flat tire; foul weather; a trucking snafu; to name a few. Those are the issues that you as a contractor, or crew supervisor, are forced to deal with, no matter what else is going on. These are the things that can rob you of a planned activity, such as a crew meeting. ■ “We can’t meet today, we’re about to move.” ■ “We need to move lots of wood today; there’s no time for a meeting.” ■ “Can’t meet; we have a piece of equipment down.” Any of these reasons sound plausible enough, but might I tell you that any of these reasons are more of a reason to have your planned meeting. The times when you feel that the meeting should be canceled are the times when you need that meeting the most. Spending a little time to shore up the lines of communication can save you time spent in fending off needless problems or other taxing issues. Staff or crew meetings are not only mediums to share valuable information and strengthen communication, but they also create a structure that will build the confidence of the crew. Your number one job as a crew leader or contractor is to build the confidence of your crew. Having regular staff meetings can help you to accomplish that. Knowledge is power, and a knowledgeable crew is a powerful crew. A powerful crew is also a safer, more productive crew. In my opinion, the ideal meeting schedule would be a 10-minute power meeting at the beginning of each day or shift and then a good 60-minute staff meeting once a week. Now, I know because of locations of crews in proxim-

ity to each other can make this a challenge, and sometimes you may have to go to once every other week, but if you can make this happen weekly, you will be building the power of your people. Either way, make sure it is consistent, as there is added power in consistency. Consistency trumps complacency, and the result is an even safer workplace! This ideal arrangement would amount to about two hours out of the workweek dedicated to building a stronger team. Can you spare two hours? Have you had to deal with two hours of downtime and lost production when the cause was perhaps totally preventable? Regular meetings can help prevent those costly stops in workflow and interruptions in production rhythm. Think about the magnitude of what you are doing. You are changing the landscape while working in one of the most dangerous professions on the planet. Doesn’t this warrant paying attention to strong communication? What I’ve found to be very powerful is to watch the exchange that happens between support staff and crew in the field. The learning that can take place can definitely have an impact on paperwork and the understanding and appreciation for the job that each employee of your company has to do. The people who work in the office gain a better understanding of what goes on in the woods and vice versa. Suddenly the person in the office who is always hounding the crew for things turns into a person struggling to get important aspects of the business taken care of, instead of being “just a nag” or other choice names that can not be repeated here. My very simple formula for understanding the dynamics of what takes place in the woods is this: US+CREW=TEAM. Anything that you can do to strengthen that formula is strengthening your company and making it a safer place to work. “US” is the person running the show. Whether owner or crew supervisor, you need to be aware of the power you have to make your job the safest it can be. I’m not talking PPE here. A good

supply of PPEs will never save a disengaged employee from an accident on the job. Only you can save a disengaged employee by keeping the engagement level on your job up. You can’t change other people, so as crew supervisors or contractors you need to impact that formula in any way you can. A consistent, timed staff meeting is one way to do that. In a 10-minute power meeting, ask for important issues to be shared, then “problem solve” and get right to work. Staff meetings take a little more planning, but your agenda should be the same each week, with a portion at the end devoted to employee feedback. The employee feedback session is where you will gain valuable information that will make your jobsite safer. Your crew is your eyes and ears on the job, so glean the information you need from them to run your crew more effectively. Feedback will take a while to come. Workers will need to know and trust that they won’t be ridiculed for sharing. Keep it in there, each week. Say, “Employee feedback time; anyone have anything they’d like to share?” Then wait, then close the meeting. Do that over and over, until someone shares. It is your responsibility to control the feedback portion and keep it a serious and non-judgemental. To strengthen employee engagement: have regular meetings, short power meetings at the beginning of each day or shift and weekly or biweekly staff meetings that are structured, timed and consistent and offer room for employee feedback. Look at those meetings as the glue that will cement your team together. The more glue, the stronger the team! People Power! Without it everyTH thing stops! Wendy Farrand is a forest industry consultant who emphasizes the value of strengthening the people side of a logging business and the impact it has on safety, production, efficiency and professionalism. Operating as WFarrand Consulting— wendyfarrand@gmail.com or 207-8384435—she brings her workshop series, The People Side of Timber Harvesting, to logging professionals around the country. Her most popular workshop, How to Build a Kick@$% Crew, has gained notoriety throughout the Northeast.

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

25


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 3:13 PM Page 26

EquipmentWorld

Ponsse Builds 9,000th Machine, Plans New Products On October 10, 2013, Finnish forestry equipment manufacturer Ponsse built its 9,000th machine, an Elephant King forwarder. For the family operated company, which was founded in 1970 by logger Einari Vidgrén and eventually emerged as a leader in designing and building cut-to-length (CTL) equipment, 9,000 machines is a significant accomplishment. While Ponsse continues with a very strong presence in Scandinavia, it is interesting to note that its 9,000th machine was sold to a logging company based in eastern Canada, where CTL harvesting is common but not as dominant as it is in many other places around the globe. As parts of North America become even more focused on the CTL method, Ponsse leaders believe the demand for harvesting equipment such as the ElephantKing will grow. Ponsse officials estimate that of those 9,000 machines, 7,000 are still working. Ponsse machines are found

26

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

Antti Räsänen climbs up and points out key features on Scorpion.

in all forested areas of note around the world (almost 40 countries). In celebration of the 9,000th machine, the company’s increased presence in North America, as well as the introduction of new machines— some of which will be deployed in North America next year—Ponsse hosted a group of forest industry trade press representatives in early October. During this celebration Ponsse officials made presentations about the company’s history, including details about the life of colorful founder Vidgren, the market outlook in Europe and North America, market projections in Europe, Latin America and North America, and the new machines and attachments coming in 2014. The first new item Ponsse unveiled will make its official debut at the Oregon Logging Conference (OLC) Feburary 20-22 in Eugene, Ore. The H10 processing head is the “biggest and the baddest,” according to Antti Räsänen,

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THnovDec13pgs_cs_Layout 1 11/8/13 3:13 PM Page 27

EquipmentWorld Marketing Manager of Product toring the position of the crane. Lines. It has three feed rollers When designing the Scorpiand a feed speed of 15.7 feet per on, Ponsse was concerned with second. Also making its debut at operator comfort and the OLC will be Ponsse’s popular machine’s efficiency. And with H8 processing head fitted with a every element of the machine top saw option. It will be disthose goals are visible. Ponsse played with a 900 mm main saw Chairman Juha Vidgrén, and the bar and a 640 mm top saw bar, founder’s son, said that Ponsse as well as four delimbing blades. was simply following the path Ponsse’s biggest splash for the outlined by his father: “Machine year will be the new Scorpion users are the best experts, so we harvester, which will not offiVarious members of the forestry trade press watch Scorpion in action. always listen to them.” cially come out until late sumThe Canadian customer is mer. Measuring 316 inches long and ble. In order to improve stability, the Enterprises Forestières Lemieux & typically weighing 45,856 pounds, the balance point of the crane is placed Girard Inc., owned and operated by Scorpion is, to borrow the marketing near the machine’s centerline. Réjean Girard and his family and is slogan, “a real beast of a harvester.” It The Scorpion will carry Ponsse’s based in Labrecque, Quebec. The is offered with a Mercedes-Benz new C50 crane, which has been company purchased its first Ponsse OM936 286 HP engine, and either the designed with a two-arm lift boom machine in 2007. Ponsse model H5 or H6 harvester head. that moves over the cab. Räsänen says With a capacity of 20 metric tons, One of the most innovative elethis boom’s position increases visibilithe eight-wheel-drive ElephantKing ments of the Scorpion is its leveling ty and balance while improving the was introduced last year and is Poncapability. The machine’s axis point movement. The C50’s reach is 10 sse’s largest forwarder. It is well suited of lateral leveling is as low as possimeters (about 33 feet), according to to challenging terrain and condible, according to Räsänen, so not only Rasanen. Scorpion’s stabilization systions—steep slopes, long distances are the crane and cab leveled; there is tem keeps pressure on the rear frame and deep snow—found in eastern as little sideways movement as possiin the direction of the weight by moniCanada and elsewhere.

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

27


THdec13pgs_SS_Layout 1 11/8/13 11:47 AM Page 28

EquipmentWorld Morbark Hosts Fall Demo Days Morbark, Inc., opened its seventh Demo Days event—its second of the year—with current and potential customers and members of their authorized industrial dealer network in attendance for factory tours, networking opportunities, vendor booths, an informational

seminar, and the first Boxer Rodeo Team Leader Competition. The event concluded with demonstrations of equipment for the forestry and recycling markets. Thursday’s seminar featured Aaron Cozart from Cummins Bridgeway; Steve Kimbell of Superior Diesel, Inc. (John Deere); and Shane Patzer of Michigan CAT; speaking on the upcoming Tier 4 Final engine standards. The Boxer Rodeo showcased Morbark’s newest equipment line, the Boxer compact utility loaders, as staff members raced the mini-skid steers while performing a variety of tasks. Mike Hadanek, Morbark Research and Development Specialist, won the competition. Approximately 150 people from eight countries attended. Morbark listened to customer feedback when choosing the equipment to run, which included the 2755 Flail Chiparvestor as well as the new 40/36 Whole Tree MicroChipper, which debuted in May. The MicroChipper is designed to produce superior microchips for use by pellet mills and as supplemental fuel for cogeneration at coal facilities. Completing the demonstration were the Beever M20R forestry chipper, the 50/48 NCL whole tree drum chipper, the 6600 track Wood Hog horizontal grinder, and the 1600 tub grinder.

Wallingford’s Partners With Clark Tracks Ltd. Clark Tracks Ltd. has appointed Wallingford’s Inc., as its representative in the U.S. forestry market. “With Wallingford’s vast experience in traction products and Clark’s long history of manufacture of quality tracks, this is a perfect fit for both companies. We couldn’t be more excited about this opportunity,” says Shawn Grant, Director of Marketing for Wallingford’s, which already has a good supply of Clark tracks in stock. Stewart Kelly, Clark Tracks’ Product Manager, points out that Clark Tracks has invested heavily in developing additional capacity at its production facility in Scotland. This led to the relationship with Wallingford’s. “This appointment gets Clark Tracks the market knowledge and experience required for operations in the USA, Wallingford’s gets a quality ➤ 37 28

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/11/13 8:41 AM Page 29

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THdec13pgs_SS_Layout 1 11/8/13 11:47 AM Page 30

BuildingBlocks

Consider Five Tax Reduction Strategies CAMERON C. TAYLOR Americans pay more in taxes each year than they spend on food, clothing, and housing combined, so reducing your taxes to the legal minimum can greatly increase your ability to build wealth. Judge Learned Hand said, “Anyone may so arrange his affairs that his taxes shall Cameron Taylor be as low as possible; he is not bound to choose that pattern which will best pay the treasury; there is not even a patriotic duty to increase one’s taxes.” Supreme Court Justice Sutherland declared, “The legal right of a taxpayer to decrease his taxes or to altogether avoid them by means which the law permits cannot be doubted.” Consider the following five strategies to reduce your taxes to the legal minimum. Create Non-Taxable Income—The IRS allows you to rent your home for up to 14 days each year without having to declare the rent as income. When a business partner or client stays at your home, you can charge your corporation rent for the room. You can also have a company party or conduct employee training at your home and rent your home to your corporation for the day. The corporation deducts the rental expense, and you enjoy the rental income tax free. Spread Income—If you are in a federal tax bracket higher than 15%, you may be able to reduce your taxes by setting up a Nevada C corporation and have up to $50,000 of your income flow to this corporation. Nevada has no state income tax and has a federal tax rate of 15% on the first $50,000 of taxable income. Your corporation can retain these earnings, so you are not double taxed. If you had a personal marginal federal income tax rate of 28% and a state income tax rate of 7%, you would pay $17,500 in federal and state income tax on this $50,000. If, however, this $50,000 flowed to a Nevada C corporation, you may only pay the federal

30

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

corporate tax rate of 15% (depending on the activity of the corporation), or $7,500, saving you $10,000 in taxes. Another application of this strategy is to spread income to children in lower tax brackets. Instead of paying your children’s expenses directly with after-tax dollars, hire your children and pay them for the work they do and have your children pay for their own clothes, food, school, etc. from the money they earn. You can deduct the wages as a business expense, and your children will pay taxes at their lower tax bracket. Maximize Deductions—There are thousands of items that are allowed as business expenses. You want to make sure as many expenses as possible are deducted as business expenses. Expenses you may not be taking full advantage of as a business deduction are your medical expenses. Within a sole proprietorship or an S corporation, there is a limit on the medical expenses you can deduct. With the right provisions in a C corporation, you can deduct all medical insurance premiums and all out-of-pocket medical expenses for co-pays, medications, first aid items, etc. Defer Income—One way the IRS allows you to defer income is by contributing to a retirement plan. A retirement plan that works well for a business with no employees (you may have another business with employees) is a Simplified Employee Pension Individual Retirement Account (SEP IRA). The IRS allows you to contribute 18.58% of net profit (maximum of $50,000 per year) to your SEP IRA for retirement. If you have $100,000 net profit in your business, you would be able to contribute up to 18.587%, or $18,587, to your retirement account. You would get to deduct the contribution, saving you thousands in federal and state taxes. Thus, money goes into your SEP IRA tax-free and grows tax-free. SEP IRA

funds are taxed at ordinary income tax rates when qualified withdrawals are taken after 59.5 years of age. Proper Use Of Entities—The tax rules are different for S corporations, C corporations and Sole Proprietorships. You want to use the entity or entities which require you to pay the least amount of tax. For example, if you operate your business as a sole proprietor, all profit (up to the taxable maximum) is subject to Social Security and Medicare taxes. In an S corporation, profits are distributed through a K-1 and are not subject to Social Security and Medicare taxes. Having your profits flow to you as K-1 income, instead of as profit from a sole proprietorship, could save you thousands each year in Social Security and Medicare taxes. For example, if a sole proprietorship has a profit of $100,000, a 15.3% tax (12.4% Social Security tax and 2.9% Medicare tax) would have to be paid on the entire $100,000, totaling $15,300 ($100,000 x 15.3%). In comparison, if an S corporation has a profit of $100,000 and you pay yourself a reasonable salary of $40,000, the other $60,000 would flow to you as profit (K-1) and is not subject to Social Security and Medicare taxes. You only pay social security and Medicare tax on the $40,000 salary, for a tax of $6,120 ($40,000 x 15.3%). In this scenario, using an S corporation would save $9,180 ($15,300 - $6,120) in taxes each year. While it would be nice to have the whole $100,000 excluded from Social Security and Medicare tax, the IRS requires that owner-employees of an S corporation be paid a salary that is a “reasonable amount” for the work being performed. According to the IRS commissioner, millions of taxpayers are overpaying their taxes each year. Are you among them? Taylor is the president of the American Society for Asset Protection. To receive a complimentary audio CD on Tax Reduction, Lawsuit Protection, and Estate Planning, send your mail address to cd@assetprotection asap.com or call 800-848-9238.

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 1:11 PM Page 31

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 2:30 PM Page 32

Dust&Rust Readers are encouraged to send historical items.

Late 19th Century Northwest Logging: Hundreds Of Ways To Get Hurt Or To Die In the loggers’ woods, a cacophony of sound assailed the ears: thwacking axes and rasping saws, clanking chains and roaring machinery—and above all, the rending crack and crash of trees shaking the earth as they fell. During working hours, only a tragedy was capable of stilling the industrious din. But that occurred with terrible regularity. A Puget Sound lumberjack named Torger Birkelann remembered an afternoon when “everything seemed to stop. No whistles, no sound in the woods. After a while we saw men coming down, walking slowly and unsteadily. They were carrying something. We hesitatingly walked up to meet them and found it was Edvin, the whistle punk.” The boy was only 16; he was part of a donkey (steam engine) crew, signaling the engineer by means of a long wire attached to a whistle on the donkey when it was time to haul in a log. Somehow he had been caught in the bight of the main line—a limp and harmless-looking length of steel cable that instantly snapped tighter than a bow-string every time the donkey pulled on it to drag in a log. He had been hurled into the brush. “Tenderly carried in and laid on the nearest bunk, Edvin never regained consciousness; nothing could be done,” Birkelann recollected. “There was no doctor within reach and it would not have done much good if there had been, for Ed’s back was broken. Unashamed tears trickled down the cheeks of those rough-appearing, kindhearted men of the Northwest woods as we stood helplessly by and watched this 16-year-old boy pass into the Great Beyond. A sad day. No one felt like going back to work. ‘Just a boy,’ they said, while aimlessly walking around.” In 1896, a 25-year-old Swede named John Nordstrom was felling trees on a steep hill by Hood Canal. Another faller—also a Scandinavian— named Johnson was chopping away with him. Below them the sunlit waters, smoky blue as a Viking’s eyes, stretched away to the north in a vista reminiscent of home. Sweating, the 32

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

two fallers completed their cuts on a great fir. They shouted “Timber! Down the hill.” The tree “talked” as its last fibers snapped, then leaned and toppled. Nordstrom leaped aside and then heard a cry. “I turned around,” he recalled, “and saw the tree carrying my friend with it down the hill. By the time I reached him he was nearly gone and I realized his back was broken. He lived only for a few minutes.” Nordstrom helped carry Johnson’s body back to the logging camp, helped fashion a rough coffin out of split cedar boards, and the next day he rowed 16 miles down the channel, the coffin balanced athwart the rowboat, to a point where a ship could take it aboard. He sadly accompanied the body to Seattle for the funeral, then left the woods for good. There were hundreds of ways, none of them pleasant, to get hurt or to die. The loggers tried as best they could to look out for their own and one another’s safety, just as miners, sailors and cowboys had to do at a time when no one else did. There were no unions or accident-insurance policies in existence, few safety regulations and inspections; and whenever a man or boy was injured or killed, his bosses had the tendency to blame it on his own inexperience or carelessness or bad luck. But even for the experienced, careful and lucky individuals, accidents lurked at every stage of the dangerous logging, milling and shipping process. When a mishap occurred, it generally went unreported in public prints—loggers were regarded as faceless, anonymous men anyway—or else it was recorded as a laconic squib in such trade journals as West Coast Lumberman or The Timberman. Before his blade or saw ever bit into the bark, the axman or bucker walking from camp to tree was in danger. Weighed down by heavy wedges, balancing an ax on one shoulder and a limber saw twice as long as his height on the other, he could fall and be cruelly slashed if he so much as tripped over a root. While making his cuts in a huge tree trunk, he could lose his balance

and tumble off his springboard eight or more feet to the ground. If the crown of his falling tree, hundreds of feet aloft, tangled with those of its neighbors, the tree trunk might not fall in a proper line; the severed base could leap backward, or twist and “walk” across its own stump, sometimes catching the faller before he could jump out of the way. An industry paper noted one of many examples: “Frank Blomquist was killed at work at camp. The tree, in falling, split and kicked back, striking the unfortunate man with such force as to cut his body in two.” If the crashing tree should happen to knock loose a branch, the severed limb—often as thick around as a man’s body—could plummet downward and explode like a mortar shell, its point of impact on the ground anywhere within a radius of a quarter of a mile. For some curious reason the loggers, although most of them were unmarried, called these large pieces of debris widow makers. They were deadly enough by any name. “The carelessness of woodsmen is proverbial,” another trade journal reminded the employers who read it. “A proof of this is at hand in Mason County, Washington. Two choppers were debating whether a limb that was swinging back and forth would fall. They realized that if it did, somebody would get hurt, however, and they decided to cut the tree down and trust to luck. They went to work, the limb fell and one man was instantly killed. They could just as well have cut down a score of other trees that were safe, but perhaps the element of danger decided the case.” A story not reported in any lumber paper, but passed along from one camp to another, told of a grisly suicide. A faller chopped out the undercut of a tree with his partner, then helped complete the upper or back cut. He said nothing about what he intended to do next. When the tree quivered and began to fall, the partner leaped down to safety—and the suicide flung himself into the undercut, to be crushed as the tree came down. Few jobs were as lonely or dangerous as that of the windfall bucker, whose task it was to saw apart windfelled trees in order to get them out of the way of good timber purposely

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 2:30 PM Page 33

Dust&Rust Readers are encouraged to send historical items.

being felled. Nobody could tell in advance which way the logs might pitch or roll. And the bucker had to look out for more than the huge, multiton logs he was sawing through. Buckers preferred to work at least 1,000 feet away from a team of fallers, so as

to be well clear when a tree crashed to earth. But that was not always possible, and the fallers were not always aware of how close to a bucker they were chopping. The bucker might hear a cry of “timber,” hear the familiar swish of a falling tree and look up to see a giant Douglas fir coming straight for him at lightning speed. If the bucker failed to show up for the next meal, the rest of the crew might assume he had cleared out. He might not be missed, or his body found, for days. The high climbers, the spar men and pulley riggers on their lofty perches 200 to 300 feet above the forest floor, risked a grim variety of accidents. A climber could sever his safety rope with a misdirected ax blow (to reduce that risk, ropes in later years were made with wire cores). A gust of wind could catch the falling top of the tree a man was topping and swing it around to brush him from his perch. Or the

swaying trunk could split and spread apart, giving the high climber only a moment to drop far enough down the tree to avoid being pinched to death between his rope and the trunk. Once in a while a high climber seemed to have a charmed life. Loggers on Washington’s Olympic Peninsula never stopped talking about Haywire Tom Watson’s incredible escape from death. One of his fellow workers, Tom Mansfield, recalled the circumstances: “I was working with him one day, and I saw him fall 120 feet, while going up a fir. He hit the mud feet first.” The deep, soft mud cushioned Watson’s fall and “when they drove him off, he was still smiling and waving his arms, as if in victory over death. The doc found nothing wrong with him, so he put his clothes back on and came to work.” Source: The Loggers, Time-Life Books, 1976

From the windfall bucker to the high climber, inset, all logging tasks in the big timber were extremely dangerous. Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

33


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 2:30 PM Page 34

SelectCuts Documentary Series Spotlights Anderson

As We (ALC) See It

The Logging Capacity Issue: Labor BRIAN NELSON The term “logging capacity” appears to be the latest in buzzwords in our industry. There has been considerable discussion on the subject from mills to timberland owners to loggers and most everyone in between. While I admit that the issue is serious to the long-term sustainability of the timber industry, the reasons for the shortage are as varied as the potential solutions being offered. To complicate things even further, the reasons and potential solutions are generally quite different, depending on which segment of the industry one is speaking to. Numerous articles have been written dealing with the many facets of the logging capacity shortage but the one I’d like to touch on is labor. For a business to succeed it has to have an experienced and stable workforce, among other things. For a business to continue for generations it needs an experienced management team that can take over when the current owner decides to exit. Like many in this industry my brother and I got started at a very early age by following dad to the woods on weekends and during summer vacations. We learned to run each machine by “getting in and pulling levers to see what they do,” as our dad would always tell us. We learned to run the operation by following in his footsteps, asking a lot of questions, and learning from our mistakes. While it hasn’t always been easy, there is nothing that I’d rather be doing. Logging is all I’ve ever done; all I’ve ever wanted to do. With each passing year we get older and closer to calling it quits and the need for someone to take over our operations increases. The question is, “Who is that someone and where are they to get the experience needed to take over a logging business?” For many the answer could very well be our own children. Logging, much like farming, is often a generational undertaking; many of the businesses are family owned and operated and are passed along from parents to children. The two are also very similar in the sense that you are either born into it or are 34

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

married into it. The number of young people getting into the industry without any family history in logging is few and far between, and with good reason. While many of us started learning the ropes at a young age, today that is not legally possible per federal Child Labor Laws. Logging is considered a hazardous occupation and therefore no one under the age of 18 can be employed in it. I understand the reason for the law is to protect the young and inexperienced, and I surely wouldn’t want to see anyone get injured, but I believe the law is a bit antiquated. The reason I say that is because it was written in the days when hand falling and bucking with chain saws were the norm, but today, at least in the Lake States Region, chain saws are the exception, not the rule. Mechanization has greatly improved safety over the years and many of today’s modern machines are safer to operate than less dangerous than some of the tasks our kids are allowed to do. The American Loggers Council (ALC) has been working on this issue for a number of years with members of Congress and the Dept. of Labor. We have been trying to get the same exemption afforded our counterparts in agriculture for our immediate family members between the ages of 16 and 18. Today’s modern logging operations are labor-intensive, highly mechanized, technical careers that require on-the-job training so that the next generation will be proficient and productive. This exemption would ensure that the next generation of mechanical timber harvesters can gain the needed onthe-ground training and experience under the close supervision of their parents, who have a vested interest in their children’s safety and in passing down the profession to tomorrow’s timber harvesters. Nelson, 45, is the president of the American Loggers Council. He and his brother, David, 44, and father, Marvin, own and operate Marvin Nelson Forest Products, Inc, based in Cornell, Mich. The American Loggers Council is a non-profit 501(c) (6) corporation representing professional timber harvesters in 30 states. Visit american loggers.org or phone 409-625-0206.

Myles Anderson, representing Anderson Logging Inc., a fourth generation logging company based in Fort Bragg, Calif., is among five people included in the debut of Shell Rotella’s Unsung, a dynamic short-form documentary series that tells the compelling stories of unsung heroes and how their work and lifestyles are intertwined. Formed in 1976, Anderson Logging operates multiple yarder and ground skidding sides, often working among steep slopes to harvest redwood, Douglas fir and other species. Its equipment arsenal includes yarders, bulldozers, loaders, feller-bunchers, trucks, trailers and various support apparatus and shop. The company also clears forest underbrush with a tracktype machine fitted with a brushcutting/mulching attachment. Visit andersonlogging.com. To view the videos visit youtube.com/rotellaunsung. Myles Anderson currently serves as vice president of the American Loggers Council. The Unsung series is a continuation of efforts by Shell Rotella to honor hardworking Americans from around the country. “The Shell Rotella brand is excited to shine a spotlight on people that work day in and day out to help Americans go about their daily lives,” says Chris Guerrero, Shell Rotella’s global brand manager. “This series pulls back the curtain, revealing the unseen side of hardworking people from various walks of life and provides them with the recognition they deserve.”

Iron Triangle Awarded Malheur NF Contract The Malheur National Forest (MNF) in central Oregon recently awarded a major 10-year stewardship ➤ 38 contract worth up to $69 mil-

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THdec13pgs_SS_Layout 1 11/8/13 1:41 PM Page 35

THExchange

24 Hour Ad Placement Service: 1-800-669-5613

5078

TOLL FREE 1-800-251-2789 ● DIRECT 936-829-7278 ● FAX 936-829-7283 Email: apacgeneral@aol.com

ROCKWELL, EATON, FUNK, COMMERCIAL, BULLDOG, SPICER, DURST, GEAR PRODUCT

TIDEWATER EQUIPMENT CO. KEN • 803-300-7837 Call or visit our website: www.tidewaterequip.com SKIDDERS

FELLERBUNCHERS

2005 Timberjack 460D ............$57,500 2004 Tigercat 630C.................$80,000 2006 Deere 648GIII .................$60,000 2004 CAT 525B........................$33,300 2004 Tigercat 630C.................$61,100 2005 Tigercat 630C...............$105,900 2009 CAT 525C .......................$89,500 2006 Deere 648GIII .................$83,000 2007 Deere 648GIII .................$65,000 2007 Tigercat 610C.................$75,000 2010 Deere 648H ..................$108,125 2008 Deere 748H ....................$78,000 2007 Tigercat 630C.................$88,900 2008 Tigercat E620C ............$110,000 2004 Tigercat 620 ...................$50,000 2005 Tigercat 620C.................$77,800 2006 Tigercat 620C.................$60,000 2011 Tigercat 620D...............$165,000 2003 Tigercat 630C.................$50,000 1998 Deere 648G ....................$18,500 2004 748GIII ............................$41,250

2008 Prentice 2570 ..........$100,000 2008 Prentice 2470 .................$87,775 2007 Prentice 2470 .................$65,000 2007 Tigercat 718E .................$82,000 2010 Tigercat 720E ...............$135,000 2005 Tigercat 726D.................$55,000 2004 Timberking TK 340.........$22,000 2005 Timberking TK 340.........$30,000 2002 Hydro-Ax 411EX.............$27,800 2004 Tigercat 718 ...................$60,000 2005 Tigercat 720D.................$75,000

LOG LOADERS 2005 Prentice 280 ...................$44,400 2009 Prentice 2384 .................$85,000 2004 Prentice 410E .................$25,000 2007 Tigercat 234 ...................$75,000 2002 Tigercat 240B.................$28,000 2009 CAT 559B........................$90,000

INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 2002 Morbark 30NCL Chipper ...........................................$105,600 1997 Morbark 22 .....................$69,000 2007 Morbark 3800 Wood Hot $212,500 2005 Tigercat M726D............$169,598 2009 Morbark 30/36A ...........$234,275 2008 Cone Head 535 ..............$37,500

MISCELLANEOUS Assortment of tires and rims for Deere/Tigercat CTR 314 and 400 Delimbers .............................$1,000 to $18,000 Tigercat Shears and Saws ................................$2,500 to $20,000

LIQUIDATION SALE 2009 570 Conehead $74,900

View our web site for over 200 listings with newly reduced prices and pictures

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

2687

35


THdec13pgs_SS_Layout 1 11/8/13 11:47 AM Page 36

THExchange

24 Hour Ad Placement Service: 1-800-669-5613

WANTED DEAD OR ALIVE

3191

USED FORESTRY EQUIPMENT Also Used Forestry Equipment For Sale

3214

Top Quality Used Parts Our Specialty Fair Prices Customer Satisfaction

CALL FOR INFO 352-239-1549

Caterpillar Franklin Clark Timberjack John Deere Tree Farmer Hydro-Ax

2005 CAT 525B dual arch, 67x34 tires $44,500

Tigercat Prentice Barko Husky Kobelco Timberking

2004 Tigercat 630B 9267 hours, dual arch, new Crate engine, 35.5x32 tires $64,900

In Business 40 Years P.O. Box 98 • Moncks Corner SC 29461 • 843-761-8220 Fax: 843-899-2492

2010 Tigercat 724E fellerbuncher, 4912 hrs., 5600 Tigercat saw $145,000

Night Equip. Sales: Allen Ward — 843-509-0005 Mat Ward — 843-312-1018 Night Used Parts: Robert Mullinax — 843-569-3513 Toll Free: 800-845-6648 www.wwtractor.com

2583

1926

VISIT US ONLINE: www.timberharvesting.com

We are in the New and Used Business— Riley Delimbers & Slashers, Primex Tires, Stihl, Prolenc, Gator Saw Teeth, McClendon Trailers We Sell Nationwide • Our Pricing is FOB the Buyers Location in the Continental US

WE WILL MATCH OR BEAT ALL PRICES ON PRIMEX TIRES!

4433

36

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


THdec13pgs_SS_Layout 1 11/8/13 11:47 AM Page 37

THExchange

24 Hour Ad Placement Service: 1-800-669-5613

EUREKA! EUREKA! EUREKA! OWNERS HAVE OVER 30 YEARS COMBINED EXPERIENCE!

EUREKA SAW TOOTH CO., INC.

7180

We can save you money on Saw Teeth. Hundreds of satisfied A NOW CCEPTIN G customers. Rebuilt Exchange or New. We specialize in rebuildCREDIT ing Koehring 2000, Hurricana, Hydro Ax split teeth and all CARDS other brands. Call Jimmy or Niel Mitchell. Quantity Discounts!

4275 Moores Ferry Rd. • Skippers, Virginia 23879 PH./FAX (day) 1-434-634-9836 or Night/Weekends • 1-434-634-9185

EquipmentWorld 28 ➤ track product in its portfolio and loggers get choice and competition for high quality band tracks,” Kelly says. Founded in 1975, Wallingford’s is a large international wholesaler of tire chain and logging and industrial supplies. Its sales and marketing offices are located in Oakland, Me. It operates a distribution, assembly, and administrative facility in New Hampton, NH and maintains distribution centers in Edmonton, AB, Canada, and Hoofddorp, The Netherlands. Visit wallingfords.com Clark Tracks has manufactured tracks for 25 years and supplies many of the world’s largest forest machine manufacturers. All Clark Tracks products are manufactured from special boron alloy steel, which is heat-treated for maximum hardness and toughness by special induction heating processes. Visit clarktracks.com.

Michigan Kenworth-Gaylord Michigan Kenworth has relocated its parts dealership in Gaylord, Mich. to a full service facility with expanded customer support. Located 3.5 miles southwest of its former parts facility, at 1134 Milbocker Rd., the dealership’s new, nearly 14,000 sq. ft. facility has 14 bays and a large, well stocked parts department. Brothers Vince and Norm Brecheisen, previous owners of the truck service facility, are the operations manager and new truck sales manager, respectively.

Foremost Authority For Professional Loggers

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

37


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/11/13 2:21 PM Page 38

SelectCuts 34 ➤ lion to logging contractor Iron Triangle LLC of John Day, Ore. The Integrated Resource Service Contract (IRSC) aims for widespread ecological restoration on a landscape scale, covering thinning and understory removal on between 180,000 and 500,000 acres. According to federal officials, the restoration project could produce up to 500MMBF of sawlogs and 3.5 million green tons of biomass during the life of the contract. The late September decision was great news in John Day, where three sawmills and a biomass plant operated 10 years ago, but due to the economic downturn and reduced federal timber harvests, only Malheur Lumber Co. and its pine cutting mill and new pellet plant remain. Malheur Lumber was planning to close at the end of 2012, but expedited timber sales in the meantime and now the stewardship project decision have given mill owners certainty for the future. Following the contract award, Malheur Lumber officials announced they’d like to spend up to $4 million in mill improvements to handle smaller logs— though they’re waiting a year to see how much progress the MNF makes in moving timber projects.

Lawsuit Challenges Sale Of NC’s Hofmann Forest Amid controversy, the North Carolina State University’s (NCSU) Board of Trustees of the Endowment Fund and the Natural Resources Foundation, Inc. as of early November was moving ahead with the proposed sale of the institution’s Hofmann State Forest. Earlier this year the board agreed to sell the 79,000-acre property, located near Jacksonville, NC, to the owner of an Illinois-based farming and farm supply business for $150 million. However, in late September a group of professors, foresters, landowners and wildlife conservationists filed a lawsuit to enjoin the Board of Trustees of the Endowment

Listings are submitted months in advance. Always verify dates and locations with contacts prior to making plans to attend.

January 14—Missouri Forest Products Assn. annual membership meeting, Jefferson City, Mo. Call 573-634-3252; visit moforest.org. January 14-16—14-16—Associated California Loggers annual meeting, Peppermill Resort, Spa & Casino, Reno, Nev. Call 916-441-7940; visit calog.com. January 29-30—16-18—Associated Oregon Loggers annual meeting, Valley River Inn, Eugene, Ore. Call 503-364-1330; visit oregonloggers.org. January 29-30—California Forestry Assn. annual meeting, Napa, Calif. Call 916-444-6592; visit calforests.org. February 6-8—Sierra-Cascade Logging Conference, Shasta District Fairgrounds, Anderson, Calif. Call 530-222-1290; visit sierracascadeexpo.com. NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2013

In late September the Forest Resources Assn.’s Appalachian Region and Stihl Inc. honored Trott Lumber Co. of Shelbyville, Tenn. as the region’s 2013 Outstanding Logger at an annual awards dinner in Norton, Va. Trott Lumber principals Sam and Jennifer Trott own and operate the family company, which consists of a logging operation— Sam’s responsibility—and hardwood sawmill, which Jennifer supervises. Their children are also involved. Appalachian Region Chairman Brian Gingerich, left, presented the Trotts with a wooden crosscut saw plaque, and Mid-Atlantic Stihl’s Mike Preddy, right, presented a MS 461 saw and a $250 check. Stihl sponsors the association’s regional and national logger awards.

Fund of NCSU, which owns the forest, from selling the property. The plaintiffs assert that the forest is a unique, irreplaceable asset for both the university and the natural environment of the state. Hofmann State Forest has been owned and managed for the benefit of NCSU’s College of Natural Resources since its initial acquisition under the leadership of founding Dean Julius (Doc) Hoffman in 1934.

AdLink

EventsMemo

38

Trott Lumber Company Honored

Easy Access to current advertisers! http://www.timberharvesting.com/advertiser-index/ This issue of TIMBER HARVESTING is brought to you in part by the following companies, which will gladly supply additional information about their products. American Logger’s Council Barko Hydraulics Cat Forest Products Cleanfix Reversible Fans Dynamic Manufacturing East Coast Sawmill Expo Enviva LP Forest Chain Log Max Morbark Oregon Cutting Systems Peterson Pacific Prolenc Manufacturing Risley Equipment Rotobec USA Seppi Tigercat Industries Wallingford’s

27 13 2 27 7 31 8 24 39 9 29 5 26 8 21 27 40 28

409.625.0206 715.395.6700 919.550.1201 519.275.2808 715.395.6700 804.737.5625 804.338.5435 800.288.0887 360.699.7300 800.831.0042 503.653.8881 800.269.6520 877.563.8899 866.783.7243 855.768.6232 218.461.4747 519.753.2000 800.323.3708

ADLINK is a free service for advertisers and readers. The publisher assumes no liability for errors or omissions.

TIMBER HARVESTING & WO OD FIBER OPERATIONS

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 1:12 PM Page 39

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH_1213_ASM_Layout 1 11/8/13 1:12 PM Page 40

CLICK HERE IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY OPTED IN!


TH 1213 Digimag