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Office of Career Services Presents

NAVIGATING SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES Published by Harvard Student Agencies


TABLE OF CONTENTS Navigating Summer Opportunities............................................................................2 Getting Started.................................................................................................3 About the Office of Career Services....................................................................5 OCS Summer Planning Worksheet....................................................................7 Navigating Harvard Funding.....................................................................................8 Domestic Funding Resources chart...................................................................9 International Funding Resources chart...........................................................10 Summer Research Programs..........................................................................12 Summer Study Abroad...................................................................................13 International Internships and Volunteer Programs...........................................14 Domestic Public Service Programs..................................................................17 Arts and Creative Internships..........................................................................20 Thesis Support...............................................................................................22 Short-Term Opportunities................................................................................22 Summer Options for Pre-med Students...........................................................23 Navigating the Summer Internship Application Process..........................................24 Finding a Summer Internship..........................................................................25 OCS Programs and Career Fairs......................................................................25 The Networked Search....................................................................................26 Internship Databases.....................................................................................26 The General Application Process....................................................................26 The Campus Interview Program.......................................................................27 Resume Sample.............................................................................................28 Cover Letter Sample.......................................................................................29 Identifying Your Skills.....................................................................................31 Deciding Between Options.............................................................................31 Internship Logistics........................................................................................32

Office of Career Services

Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University 54 Dunster St, Cambridge, MA 617-495-2595 ocs_summerfunding@fas.harvard.edu Instagram: @harvardocs Navigating Summer Opportunities

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NAVIGATING SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES

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GETTING STARTED WHAT DO HARVARD STUDENTS DO DURING THE SUMMER? Over your three summers you will have time to explore diverse interests. As you can see from the chart below, about 25% of students will spend one summer studying for credit, close to 40% will engage in research, and over 75% of students will do at least one internship during their three summers. Over 55% of students participate in an internship with a for-profit organization and over 40% of students engage in a not-for-profit or government internship across their time at Harvard. More than 50% of students choose to do one of these activities in an international setting. What you choose to do and the order in which you try different options varies from student to student. Some students, especially first-year students, may prefer an activity closer to home. Others feel ready to travel to a new city or abroad. Talk to lots of people to get ideas about what might be a good summer experience for you.

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ABOUT THE OFFICE OF CAREER SERVICES The Office of Career Services (OCS) is your guide to experiential learning outside of the classroom. OCS offers over 300 programs and 20 career fairs per year and posts over 8,000 jobs and internships in our database Crimson Careers to help you explore options. Come to daily drop-in hours (Monday-Friday, 1-4pm) for advice on how to get started exploring summer opportunities. Don’t miss the OCS Summer Programs & Funding Fair during reading period in December.

LANDING SUMMER FUNDING PROGRAMS To learn about both domestic and international funding for summer study, research, internships, or public service, attend one of OCS’s many “Navigating Summer Funding” programs and other information sessions offered by Harvard’s Centers and offices. After attending a drop-in or an OCS Navigating Summer Funding program, you will be eligible to sign up for a one-on-one “Navigate Summer Funding Appointment” through Crimson Careers. OCS Summer Funding Advisers can help you discover the funding sources across Harvard and give you tips for being a competitive candidate. Check out many of the funding opportunities at Harvard by looking at the Funding Resources Charts in this booklet and view and apply for many funding sources in the CARAT database (https://carat. fas.harvard.edu). Each funding source has its own eligibility rules and deadlines, so read carefully before applying!

OFFICE OF CAREER SERVICES SUMMER FUNDING The Office of Career Services funds approximately 500 students every summer. The office provides funds to support many of the excellent summer programs administered by Harvard’s Centers and offices. Students should apply directly to these programs for funding. In addition, OCS administers summer funding for eight-week or longer experiences in the following categories: • International Independent Internships (For-Profit or Not-for-Profit/NGO) • International Research (non-thesis) • International Public Service/Volunteer Programs • A three-week Coach-for-College Public Service Program (for Varsity Athletes) To be eligible for this funding, students should apply directly to the international organization and then apply to OCS for funding by the February deadline. NOTE: Students do not need to be accepted into an internship, research, or public service/volunteer program to be eligible to apply for OCS funding. Students will have until April to confirm their acceptance. This funding is competitive and is awarded to students mature enough to travel internationally on their own and whom the selection committee feels will be a good ambassador of Harvard.

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FINANCIAL ISSUES Although funding or wages can cover many expenses, students sometimes need additional money to help pay for other expenses, such as housing, local transportation, clothing, travel, visa, or immunization costs. Some, but not all, funded opportunities cover the summer earnings contribution for students on financial aid. To cover these additional costs, students can work before and/or after their summer experience for Dorm Crew, or for the Harvard Alumni Association during alumni reunions. Students can also work at other short-term paid positions during the summer or academic year in order to save some extra funds for the summer. Students on financial aid studying abroad can also take out an interest-free loan from the Financial Aid Office. OCS advisers look forward to speaking with you about how to make your summer plans work for you and your family’s finances.

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NAVIGATING HARVARD FUNDING

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SUMMER RESEARCH PROGRAMS Many students find that conducting research during their undergraduate years enhances their academic experience and prepares them for future work and graduate school. Research opportunities exist for students at all skill levels, across all academic disciplines, at Harvard and beyond. Harvard sponsors a number of residential programs where students live on campus during the summer along with other student-researchers. There are also many opportunities to take part in research at Harvard while living off campus. Other students pursue research outside Harvard, both in the U.S. and abroad. Some research opportunities are fully or partially funded, and others require that students find their own funding. The Office of Undergraduate Research and Fellowships (URAF) is the central hub of information about how to navigate the complexities of the research world. URAF offers introductory programming and drop-in advising to help students navigate the numerous research opportunities and programs available at Harvard and beyond. See the URAF website at uraf.harvard.edu for more information. Research programs include: • PRISE (Program for Research in Science and Engineering) for research in the physical sciences, biological sciences, engineering, or applied sciences. • BLISS (Build Learning through Inquiry in the Social Sciences) for research in economics, government, sociology, psychology, anthropology, and other social science fields. • PRIMO (Program for Research in Markets and Organizations) sponsored by the Harvard Business School focuses on business research. • SHARP (Summer Humanities and Arts Research Program) supports humanities and arts-based research. • PCER (Program for Community-Engaged Research) provides for research that is responsive to community interests and needs. • SURGH (Summer Undergraduate Research in Global Health) for research on critical issues in global health. • Harvard Amgen Scholars Program sponsored by the Amgen Foundation focuses on biotechnologybased research in the life, physical, engineering, mathematical, and applied sciences. • Harvard College Research Program provides research funding in any discipline during the fall and spring terms as well as summer. • Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship supports the work of marginalized researchers, primarily in the humanities and social sciences, throughout their junior and senior years with programming, mentorship, and support. Many other offices and International Centers also offer funding for research experiences related to their region or field of study. Check out the funding chart in this booklet to learn more.

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SUMMER STUDY ABROAD Harvard College is one of only a few institutions that offers funding for summer study abroad. The

Summer Funding Office at the Office of Career Services is a major source of funding for study abroad for courses lasting eight weeks or longer, along with a few other centers on campus that also offer funding. The CARAT database (carat.fas.harvard.edu) and the funding chart in this booklet provide more information on sources of funding for summer international study and experiences. Most application and funding deadlines are from early January through mid-February, so be prepared to apply as soon as you return to campus in January. For more information on funding, contact the Summer Funding Team in the Office of Career Services at ocs_summerfunding@fas.harvard.edu. For information on study abroad programs, speak with the advisers at the Office of International Education (OIE).

Office of International Education (OIE) Summer Study Abroad Offerings

Earn concentration, secondary field, and/or elective credit through studying in locations around the world, in a wide variety of disciplines through the programs offered by the OIE. To get started on your study abroad experience, stop by the OIE to speak with a staff member or peer adviser for guidance in finding the program best suited for your personal and academic needs and interests. The OIE team looks forward to speaking with you about the variety of options available, and can answer any questions that you have about the application and credit-transfer processes, as well as any other questions regarding summer (and term-time) study abroad. The OIE holds daily drop-ins, Monday through Friday, 2-5pm.

Harvard Summer School Study Abroad Programs

Harvard Summer School offers study abroad programs that allow students to engage with Harvard faculty and earn Harvard credit through study in numerous locations around the globe in a range of subject areas—from focused foreign language and culture courses to immersive study of locationspecific topics in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Learn more about the programs at summer.harvard.edu/abroad. OCS offers funding for students enrolled in Harvard Summer School; see the OCS website for more information.

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INTERNATIONAL INTERNSHIP AND VOLUNTEER PROGRAMS Harvard helps connect students to a broad range of international internships, both at for-profits and nonprofits/NGOs. Opportunities cover diverse areas such as global health, environmental issues, education, direct public service, government affairs, business, and being a research assistant at leading institutes. Harvard’s excellent International Centers sponsor many offerings. See below for examples: Coach for College (ocs.fas.harvard.edu/summer-funding): OCS offers funding for Harvard athletes who help youth in Vietnam develop long-term goals and increase their motivation to complete their education and develop life skills. Students partner with Vietnamese college students to teach sports and academics in three-week summer camps held in rural Vietnam. David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies Summer (DRCLAS) Programs (drclas.harvard.edu/summer-opportunities): DRCLAS offers structured internship and immersion programs and opportunities in the following countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, Panama, and Peru. Subject areas include Spanish language, health care, journalism, computer science, governmental, nonprofit, and environmental research. DRCLAS also offers January programs in Latin America. Students with a minimum of intermediate Spanish or Portuguese are eligible. Harvard China Fund Student Internship Program (HCSIP) (hcf.fas.harvard.edu/programs/students/internship): The Harvard China Student Internship Program is offered in partnership with Chinese corporations, NGOs/NPOs, and multinational companies in China. Students experience modern China through their internship placements and gain an introduction to Chinese history and culture, all while learning first-hand about life in the workplace. Harvard Global Health Institute (HGHI) (ghhp.fas.harvard.edu/summer-opportunities): HGHI partners with research groups, nonprofits, NGOs, and other organizations to offer undergraduates paid summer internships in public health and global health. Internships are available in the United States and in over ten other countries, including Switzerland, South Africa, and India. Students may also apply to HGHI for funding for their own global health projects or internships. Let’s Go Travel Guides International Researcher-Writer (letsgo.com): Researcher-Writers spend the summer abroad, traveling from neighborhood to neighborhood along guided routes designed by Let’s Go. As they travel, the RWs create content such as writing, photography, and other multi-media detailing their travels and experiences. In addition to traveling, their work is published in their print travel guide Let’s Go Europe as well as their other media platforms.

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Eight-Week International Independent Internships or Volunteer Opportunities Funding (ocs.fas.harvard.edu/summer-funding): OCS administers funding which can be used to support eight-week international internships or volunteer opportunities. Students can either secure their internship or volunteer opportunity independently and demonstrate that this will be a significant cultural immersion experience or apply to an international volunteer program offered by a nonprofit organization. Volunteer programs offered by nonprofits typically have an application process and charge a fee for participation. Summer international experiences must be at least eight weeks in duration and take place in one location in one country. Institute of Politics (IOP) Director’s Internship Program International Offerings (iop.harvard.edu): The Institute’s Internship program arranges paid summer internship opportunities for undergraduates interested in exploring a summer in domestic or international politics and public service. The IOP offers international internships in locations such as Chile, Greece, Vietnam, Switzerland, and England. Minda de Gunzburg Center for European Studies (CES) Summer Opportunities (ces.fas.harvard.edu/opportunities/undergraduates/internships): CES helps students get internships in some of the highest European public service offices, private enterprises, and research institutions. Reischauer Institute for Japanese Studies’ Summer Internship Program in Japan (rijs.fas.harvard.edu/undergraduate/internship): The Reischauer Institute, in partnership with the Program on US-Japan Relations at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, coordinates a wide array of summer internship opportunities in Japan. Students learn about the local culture of their city and workplace, while contributing to a project defined by the host organization. Students have used their skills and applied their knowledge to consulting and financial firms, tech and startup companies, international and local newspaper offices, design and architectural firms, research think tanks and educational organizations, offices of parliamentary members and NGOs, and even to a luxury, traditional Japanese inn. The Program also strongly encourages students who desire very specific projects and tasks to self-arrange an internship through Harvard’s vast alumni network in Japan and apply to the Program for funding support only. For those who are interested in science research internship, apply to the Japan Summer Science Undergraduate Research Program (rijs.fas.harvard.edu/ undergraduate/science). Weatherhead Center for International Affairs Canada Program (programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/canada_program/student-funding/thesis): The Canada Program at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs offers funding support for students engaged in winter break or summer internships with non-governmental and nonprofit organizations that have relevance for, and a focus on, Canada. Students are expected to arrange their internships independently, and to apply directly to the Canada Program with proposals that include budgetary requests. The Canada Program also offers grants to support thesis research at the exploratory or writing stage. Students whose research pertains to Canada are welcome to submit applications through CARAT at carat.fas.harvard.edu. Navigating Summer Opportunities

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DOMESTIC PUBLIC SERVICE PROGRAMS Many students hope to find ways to extend their term-time public service into the summer or use the summer to explore new passions at a nonprofit, government office, or other mission-driven organization. A number of Harvard’s Offices offer outstanding summer public service experiences: The Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC) (publicservice.fas.harvard.edu/cpic): CPIC helps students connect to public service opportunities in many major cities and offers summer fellowships, post-graduate fellowships, and professional development opportunities for students. CPIC staff engages Harvard’s vast alumni/ae network to sustain community partnerships and create opportunities for students to serve. CPIC offers the following programs for students: • CPIC Mindich Summer Service Fellowships offer Harvard College students an outstanding pathway to explore public service work for 10 weeks during the summer. Through this program, students are paired with mentors from Harvard’s alumni/ae network and participate in structured pre-professional reflection sessions throughout the summer. CPIC has established over 75 partnerships with leading public service organizations across the U.S. • CPIC Summer Fellowship Grants provide funding and staff support for students to design their own projects. Grants come from Harvard Alumni/ae Clubs and Shared Interest Groups, the Arthur Liman Public Interest Law Fellowship Program, and federal work-study funds. • CPIC Winternship Program offers short-term opportunities for students to engage in volunteer service at a public service program during Harvard’s Winter Break in January. These programs provide opportunities for students to gain experience working at non-profit and public interest organizations, and allow students to explore careers in the arts, public interest law, journalism, the environment, medical research, education, and housing and urban development. The Institute of Politics (IOP) (iop.harvard.edu): The IOP offers comprehensive internship opportunities in politics and public service during the summer. The IOP provides resources to enable students to incorporate their passion for politics into their summer and post-graduation experiences. • The Director’s Internship Program offers internships with high-profile organizations and elected officials around the world to provide substantive, career-oriented summer internships for students interested in politics, government, and public service. • Summer Stipend Program offers funding for non- or low-paying summer internships in local, state, or federal government, public interest groups, non-governmental organizations, political organizations, and political campaigns. Students are responsible for obtaining their own internship. • The Summer in Washington (SIW) Program organizes political and public-service focused events in DC over the summer months and is often referred to as the IOP’s “third semester.” It is as an opportunity for students to gain exposure to the broad range of careers and experiences in politics and public service—from meeting with elected officials to visiting polling firms and think tanks, museums, and much more—and to create a community for Harvard undergraduates around politics and public service. Open to all Harvard Undergraduates living and/or working in Washington DC, the program also provides opportunities to interact with Harvard alumni, explore Washington DC, and connect with peers. No funding is offered.

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Phillips Brooks House Association’s Summer Urban Program (SUP) (pbha.org): SUP is a set of 10 student-run summer camps at 12 different sites for children in Boston and Cambridge. Each summer, approximately 130 college students work in these communities as directors and senior counselors. Serving over 800 youth, the summer programs are structured as mornings of curricular, classroom-based enrichment and afternoons of field trips in and around Boston. In addition to SUP, there are a number of additional PBHA summer programs, such as SCAS, Chinatown ESL and Citizenship, Habitat for Humanity, Harvard Square Homeless Shelter, and more. • PBHA’s STRIDE Scholarships are awarded to income-eligible undergraduate students to support a consistent, year-round commitment to service. Scholars join a community of undergraduates dedicated to service and social justice. The group engages in reflection and shared learning, guided by program staff and community members. In addition, scholars receive financial support to make their service work possible and one-on-one mentorship in social justice values and careers. Any enrolled fulltime college student eligible for Federal Work-Study, significant financial aid, or from a low-income background is invited to apply. Scholars engage in year-round meaningful service starting in the summer each year. Applications are due at the end of April and can be found on the PBHA website along with more details. Harvard’s Presidential Public Service Fellowship (PPSF) Program (service.harvard.edu) supports a broad range of summer-long opportunities that serve the common good. Fellows are involved in meaningful projects that affect communities across the United States. They are active in programs that focus on education, the arts, and government; work in social services and human rights organizations; and seek improved outcomes in health, the environment, and the justice system. The prestigious PPSF program selectively awards grants to 10–12 applicants from the many who apply each year seeking support for their innovative projects that serve the public. Degree seeking students from Harvard College, Harvard’s graduate and professional Schools, and the Division of Continuing Education are eligible to apply. Please note that applicants must be returning to campus in the year following the fellowship to continue their degreeseeking coursework.

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ARTS AND CREATIVE INTERNSHIPS Students can also use the summer to pursue their artistic passions or to explore what it might be like to work at an arts organization. Interested students should explore broadly, as some of the research programs mentioned before (SHARP) may also be a chance to fulfill your summer goals. Also explore resources and options for public service, as many arts organizations are nonprofits. See the specific arts funding examples below: American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.) (americanrepertorytheater.org): As the professional theater on campus at Harvard, the A.R.T. is dedicated to producing world-class performances in which the audience is central to the theatrical experience. Internships at the A.R.T. are based around the season calendar, which varies from year to year. In the past, internships have been offered in departments such as Artistic Management, Development, Education & Community Programs, and Marketing & Communications. All A.R.T. internships are unpaid but students may be considered for Office of Career Services summer funding should they meet eligibility requirements. Interested applicants are encouraged to check Crimson Careers at the beginning of the Spring term for information about the summer’s opportunities. Artist Development Fellowships (ADF) (ofa.fas.harvard.edu/adf-guidelines): The ADFs are intended to nurture the artistic development of promising students in the arts. Artist Development Fellowships are awarded annually by the Council on the Arts, a standing committee of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences under the direction of the Office for the Arts. Fellowships support student development in the practice of the arts, including but not limited to work in dance, literature, music, theater, studio art, film, mixed media, and arts practices that are multi-disciplinary in nature. International Arts and Creative Internship Funding (ocs.fas.harvard.edu/summer-funding): The Office of Career Services administers Rockefeller and Weissman funds which can be used to support eight-week (or longer) summer international arts and creative internships that meet Harvard’s health and safety review. Students are encouraged to explore opportunities and to see where Harvard students have reported positive experiences in the past.

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THESIS SUPPORT According to the History department website, “It is not necessary to conduct summer research in order to write an excellent senior thesis. Many students do, however, choose to take advantage of the many generous thesis research grants available to visit libraries, archives, laboratories and historic sites around the world.” Many departments and centers support thesis research. Check out CARAT at carat.fas.harvard.edu.

SHORT-TERM OPPORTUNITIES Students are sometimes looking for ways to use Winter Break to explore career and service interests through winter experiences that can range anywhere from a few hours to a few weeks. While these experiences outside the classroom can be transformative, it is important to remember that the Winter Break can also be just that—a break to recharge for the Spring Term. For this reason, many students who opt for a winter experience choose something near home, friends or family. • January Experiences (ocs.fas.harvard.edu/wintersession): A Wintersession internship or unpaid job-shadowing experience can last anywhere from a few hours to 15 days during the January winter break. These opportunities are posted on Crimson Careers, or may be independently created together with an employer, an alum, or by another Harvard office. • Office of Career Services (OCS) Site Visits (ocs.fas.harvard.edu/wintersession): Join a small group of Harvard students in visiting diverse organizations local to the Boston/Cambridge area. You will have the opportunity to experience an organization’s culture first-hand; network with alumni and top professionals; learn an organization’s history, culture, and mission; explore the various roles and functions; and learn about internships and jobs in the sector. • Center for Public Interest Careers CPIC Winternship Program (cpic.fas.harvard.edu): CPIC offers short-term opportunities to volunteer with a public service organization during Harvard’s January Break. These programs allow students to gain experience working at non-profit and public interest organizations, and allow students to explore careers in the arts, public interest law, journalism, the environment, medical research, education, and housing/urban development. • Office of Career Services Arts & Museums Winter Intern Program (ocs.fas.harvard.edu): This OCS program places interns in arts organizations and museums for a three-week, full-time, project-based internship over the January break (5-8 hours per week). All interns receive a stipend through the Office of Career Services, and local interns receive free on-campus housing. Past interns have worked at the following arts organizations: A.R.T., Boston Casting, Boston Center for the Arts, Boston Children’s Museum, Handel & Haydn Society, Harvard Forest’s Fisher Museum, Harvard Museums of Science and Culture, Boston Baroque, Pao Arts Center, Company One Theatre, StageSource, and Jose Mateo Ballet Theater. Opportunities are posted in Crimson Careers on the OCS website during the months of September and October.

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SUMMER OPTIONS FOR PREMED STUDENTS The three Harvard College summers present an extraordinary opportunity for all students, including those who ultimately hope to go to medical school, to gain in-depth experiences that are harder to come by during the busy school year. Many students will use the summer to gain research experience or gain clinical experience by volunteering and shadowing in a clinic or hospital, or working at a camp for individuals with disabilities or chronic illnesses. Serving as a volunteer or intern with a service or nonprofit organization is another common summer experience that many pre-health students will find rewarding and valuable. Others will use the opportunity to engage in an international experience with Harvard funding or obtain an enriching experience with Harvard Summer School abroad programs. Still others will use the time for career exploration in other fields. There are many clinical and research programs at medical schools around the country created to give premedical students a taste of the hospital or the medical school. Many but not all of these programs target students who are from groups that have been historically underrepresented in medicine. Most of them provide housing and funding. OCS compiles a sample list of these programs in November of each year, but see the OCS website for a copy of last year’s version if you would like to get a sense of different options. Finally, while summer can be a wonderful time to explore areas related to medicine, it can also be a wonderful time to just explore. Medical schools want to see that you have used your time well, and successful medical school applicants have spent summers in theater productions, archaeological digs, and exploring new parts of the world. There is no specific premed summer funding at Harvard, but all of the many summer funding options listed in this booklet and more are open to you.

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NAVIGATING THE SUMMER INTERNSHIP APPLICATION PROCESS

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FINDING A SUMMER INTERNSHIP

An internship is a chance to test your interests and work on real projects alongside professionals. Your search for an internship is a “contact sport,” where making professional connections will help you through every step of the process. In the fall, there are many events on campus where you can explore different organizations, professions, graduate programs, and interests. Across the University you’ll have the opportunity to attend events where you can connect with people in sectors that interest you and in which you might want to try working.

OCS Programs and Career Fairs

The Office of Career Services conducts over 300 programs and 20 career fairs each year. Many programs feature alumni and employers excited to connect with you and share information about their pathways, experiences, and internship opportunities.

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THE NETWORKED SEARCH OCS offers many panels of alumni and other professionals. Attend events that interest you and stay afterwards to talk with speakers one-on-one. In addition, reach out to alumni through the Alumni Directory or LinkedIn. Many first-years and sophomores attend events before they are actively seeking opportunities, to get a head start on how the process works for the future. There is no single timeline for all internships. Check out the Career Pathways section of the OCS website to learn about timelines and options in different areas. OCS advisers can help you connect with alumni and employers in all fields.

INTERNSHIP DATABASES

Each year, employers and organizations post over 8,000 jobs and internships specifically to Harvard students through the Crimson Careers database, accessible from the OCS website. If you are interested in internships in other parts of the country, check out the postings in UCAN, the multi-school consortium which can also be accessed through Crimson Careers. Want to work internationally? Access international resources through the OCS website to learn how to land and interview for jobs in different sectors. Finally, review the Vault Guides, accessible on the OCS website, that offer valuable insider intelligence about many fields.

THE GENERAL APPLICATION PROCESS Every opportunity has its own application process and timeline. Start exploring your options and educate yourself about application requirements in the fall, so you can line up your materials ahead of time and not scramble when most applications are due in winter and early spring. Some application materials that you might see across different options include resumes, cover letters, and faculty letters of recommendation. Each employer, organization, or program determines its own application requirements. Make sure to apply to a number of opportunities, since most internships are competitive and organizations receive many applications for each spot. Advisers at OCS can help you design a strategy for your search. Letters of Recommendation: In some cases, such as those that provide funding for internships, you may be required to submit a letter of recommendation. This letter should ideally be written by a member of the Harvard community such as your professor, teaching fellow, tutor, proctor, or resident dean. It is helpful to provide anyone you ask to write on your behalf a copy of your resume and a letter outlining what you are applying for and some points about why this experience is a good fit for you.

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THE CAMPUS INTERVIEW PROGRAM The Campus Interview Program brings mostly large, for-profit companies in technology, finance, consulting, and consumer products on campus for first-round full-time job and summer internship interviews. You can check out many of these employers at the Business & Technology Fair in the early fall or by attending the many employer networking and information sessions held on campus in September and early October. Remember that the program is only one source of employment, since most organizations do not source talent through this structured process. There are limited opportunities for first years and sophomores through Campus Interviews, because these mostly forprofit employers seek juniors to fill their internships with a goal of finding talent they can hire full-time after graduation. Some employers are willing to look at sophomore and first-year applicants for their summer internship programs, but statistically very few are offered positions. Resumes & Cover Letters: Most applications require a resume and often a cover letter as a way to introduce yourself and explain your interest in the internship. For some programs, the cover letter is replaced by a statement of purpose or an essay. For help with your resume or cover letter, consult the OCS website and use the OCS Harvard resume template. You can have your resume and/or cover letter reviewed at OCS Drop-Ins every weekday 1:00-4:00pm.

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IDENTIFYING YOUR SKILLS

Employers are looking for skills developed through a variety of experiences including internships, research, coursework, group projects, extracurricular activities, leadership roles, volunteer work, athletics, part-time jobs, and various summer experiences. Use the OCS Skills Tracker Tool available through Crimson Careers to document the skills you are acquiring and to identify where you might have gaps. This will help you build your resume, write effective cover letters, improve fellowship applications, and most importantly, offer you a selection of stories you can use to illustrate your skills as you prepare for job, fellowship, and/or graduate school interviews.

DECIDING BETWEEN OPTIONS Harvard students often have many options, and selecting among them can be difficult. Try to think about all of your time at Harvard, and when is the best time for each goal you hope to accomplish. While some experiences build on one another, it is often not overly important for experiences to occur in a particular order. Therefore, you should be opportunistic about taking advantage of what is offered to you. Many students wish they could review all application and funding offers they might receive before making a decision. However, since each organization, employer, or program follows its own timeline, you will often need to decide before you have heard from all of your options. If you would like advice on deciding between options, come to OCS Drop-Ins or make an appointment with an OCS adviser.

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INTERNSHIP LOGISTICS Once you make a decision, stay in close communication with those you will be working with about start and end dates, paperwork, and other details. If necessary, apply for a visa and a passport early. During your summer experience, ask questions and learn as much as you can. Perform all tasks assigned to you to the very best of your ability. Remember that administrative tasks may be a part of what you are asked to do, and your attitude across all assignments may be seen as a test of your dedication to the goals of the organization. Wrap up your experience in a positive way so that you leave the door open for returning or obtaining a recommendation for future work or graduate school. For help “Making the Most of your Summer Internship,� watch the online workshop available on the OCS website. Want to learn more about how Harvard students have found funding and spent their summers?

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Profile for Harvard OCS

Navigating Summer Opportunities OCS Guide  

Navigating Summer Opportunities OCS Guide  

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