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CONTENTS

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April 2015

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NEW THIS MONTH 25 TOP 20 Launches, special offers and events for April 29 ZEITGEIST What everyone’s talking about this month 33 TRUE BRIT She may be London-born and Yorkshire-bred, but Eleanor Tomlinson has scooped the lead in the Cornish romantic saga Poldark, setting her on course for instant stardom

FASHION COVER

Photographer SOPHIE DELAPORTE; Fashion Editor VICTORIA GAIGER; Hair YOSHITAKA MIYAZAKI at Untitled Artists Ltd; Make-up KENNY CAMPBELL at Premier Hair and Make-up; Model CÉCILE D at Premier wearing Prada top £1,050

37 AMAZING LACE Forget saccharine frills and bridal clichés – designers are putting a new spin on the centuries-old fabric 40 PS I LOVE YOU Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez have gone from bright young things to establishing the next American fashion empire 43 TREND WATCH: WHITE NOISE To wear head-to-toe white with aplomb requires a blend of prep, poise and peroxide 46 WOMENSWEAR NEWS Yves Salomon’s summer furs; the new flying tourbillon watch from Cartier; Jason Wu’s latest collection for Hugo Boss; AWAKE’s Natalia Alaverdian talks costumes and Japanese culture 48 FREE SPIRITS Flowing silhouettes, ethnic detailing and Woodstock-style embroidery give this season’s designs a folkloric feel 52 WOMENSWEAR NEWS Giambattista Valli and 7 For All Mankind do basics; Annoushka’s anniversary earrings; structured evening gowns from Toujouri; Zoë Jordan talks childhood memories

80 FIT FOR PURPOSE The latest movement in men’s fashion teams luxe-sportswear shapes with functionality

BEAUTY 89 LESS IS MORE Dewy skin, bleached brows, blotted lips and shimmery shadowing. Spring’s make-up takes itself lightly yet still makes an impact 95 BEAUTY NEWS Hydrating masks; Kiehl’s Clearly Corrective Dark Circle Perfector; Rodial’s Pink Diamond Instant Lifting Serum; everything’s coming up roses for Miss Heaven Scent 96 HIGH FIVE Editor Jan Masters reveals her top beauty treats for the month

FOOD, INTERIORS & LIFESTYLE 99 NET BENEFITS Fall hook, line and sinker for Cornish wild bass, a fish that is much leaner and more flavoursome than its farmed cousin 104 GOOD CATCH Whet your appetite with the best condiments for wild bass 106 THE REAL THING Only those fine wines sourced directly from producers come with guaranteed provenance and condition 108 FOOD NEWS Tartufi & Friends restaurant; reasons to love riesling; The Chocolate Libertine’s eggs; Easter treats 110 SHAPING SPRING Among the leading looks this spring, there’s a defiant need for the home to be a place for optimism

57 MENSWEAR NEWS Biker influences at Barbour; summer suits from Polo Ralph Lauren; IWC’s new Portugieser watch; designers do an about turn on trousers in Style Rules

117 WE NEED TO TALK When it comes to personal devices, Samsung has it taped. Neil Monger, Samsung’s national trainer (a tech genius) gives us a rundown, while Jan (hasn’t a clue) Masters translates

58 BLUES BROTHERS Rugged or refined, dégradé or distressed, denim has been reimagined in myriad ways

123 INTERIORS NEWS Lago’s levitating furniture; Marcel Wanders for Alessi; Wedgwood’s Anthemion Ruby collection; Burrwood Boards; Sub-Zero’s wine storage; April cookshop events

60 A LIGHTER SHADE OF PALE A palette of natural nudes, subdued saffrons and ballet-slipper pinks gives spring fashion an irresistibly easy, softly-softly appeal 70 MOVING ON UP Denim has reached a true-blue high. Whether you add sheers, fur or leather, the accent is on laid-back luxury

125 LIFESTYLE NEWS Harrods’ Green Man competition; personalised holiday brochures; Sprout by HP; books for art lovers 130 MY STYLE: ANYA ZIOUROVA The New York-based model-turned-stylist reveals her obsession with Dior earrings and Adidas Stan Smiths HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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3H\UJOLZZWLJPHSVăLYZHUKL]LU[ZMVY(WYPS 1. Miu Miu Madras bag In crocodile with gold-tone hardware, the Miu Miu Madras bag has had a ’50s makeover. £18,000. Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor 2. Donna Karan SS15 Inspired by street art, Donna Karan’s SS15 collection features fabrics covered in scribbles and paint splatters. Top £925 and skirt £1,499. International Designer Collection, First Floor 3. Solo Loewe Cedro eau de parfum Soft vanilla mingles with rich amber wood, vetiver and cedar in Loewe’s latest fragrance, Solo Loewe Cedro. 100ml, £96; exclusive to Harrods. The Perfumery Hall, Ground Floor 4. Audemars Piguet Ladies Royal Oak The Ladies Royal Oak Selfwinding watch has been given a feminine update, complete with white alligator strap and diamonds. £17,300. The Fine Watch Room, Ground Floor 5. Transform your Cash Reward For every 500 Rewards points you earned by shopping at Harrods in 2014, a £5 Cash Reward has been credited onto your Rewards card, making it time for a visit. Visit harrods. com/cashreward for more information. 6. Viktor & Rolf Flowerbomb A floral heart weaves through sparkling bergamot and patchouli in Viktor & Rolf ’s Flowerbomb, which turns 10 this year. 50ml, £65. The Perfumery Hall, Ground Floor 7. Knowhow Set-Up Service As well as offering advice and tutorials, Knowhow will configure your new device just as you would like it. From £35. Harrods Technology, Third Floor 8. Giorgio Armani SS15 Echoes, Armani’s latest collection, features simple silhouettes in a nod to its tailored past. Jacket £1,425 and trousers £410. Men’s International Collections, Ground Floor 9. YSL Beauté Touche Éclat Rock Lace The design of YSL Beauté’s Touche Éclat Rock Lace Edition is reminiscent of fishnet tights. Ooh la la. £25. The Colour and Cosmetics Halls, Ground Floor 10. Mulberry SS15 floral scarves Botanical prints abound on Mulberry’s SS15 silk and wool scarves. £250. Luxury Accessories, Lower Ground Floor HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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11. Harry Winston Incredibles collection The Incredibles line from Harry Winston features exceptional diamonds and sapphires. Necklace, price on request. The Fine Jewellery Room, Ground Floor 12. The Gift Bureau Register with The Gift Bureau to create the perfect gift list for your special occasion. Second Floor 13. Michael Kors womenswear For SS15, Michael Kors has created the prettiest of dresses in crisp white broderie anglaise. Dress £1,565, belt £260 and sandals £285. International Designer, First Floor 14. Be Dior bag The Be Dior bag has both a short handle and a cross-body strap, and comes in crocodile, monochrome or multicoloured versions. £2,300. Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor 15. Loro Piana menswear The Italian brand has used a hybrid linendenim fabric for its latest nautical-inspired collection of men’s jackets. Jacket £1,680. Men’s Luxury Collections, Ground Floor 16. Personalised chocolate Easter eggs What could be better than a chocolate egg? A personalised one, of course. From Wednesday 1st to Saturday 4th April, the Food Halls team will personalise yours. Food Halls, Ground Floor 17. Jeanrichard Aquascope To commemorate the Newton Women’s Boat Race, Jeanrichard has launched the waterresistant Aquascope The BNY Mellon Boat Race watch. £2,500; exclusive to Harrods. The Fine Watch Room, Ground Floor 18. Saint Laurent Emmanuelle bag The fringed Emmanuelle bag from Hedi Slimane for Saint Laurent makes the perfect accessory for the house’s rock’n’roll fanbase. From £1,235. Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor 19. Tory Burch SS15 Inspired by Picasso’s muse Françoise Gilot, the SS15 collection from Tory Burch is a lesson in chic holiday dressing. Skirt £370. Fashion Lab, Fourth Floor 20. Clinique gift with purchase A complimentary spring make-up bag filled with eight Clinique favourites is yours with the purchase of two or more Clinique products, one of which must be skincare, between 2nd and 18th April. The Beauty Apothecary and The Cosmetics Hall, Ground Floor

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PEOPLE & PLACES in the air in April BY

JEWELLERY Valérie Messika, designer “As a child I played with diamonds instead of dolls,” says Parisian jewellery designer Valérie Messika. “So my career was pretty predestined.” Messika spent her early twenties travelling around the world with her father, a prominent diamond dealer, sourcing precious stones. Her light-bulb moment came in 2005; frustrated by the lack of “everyday” diamond jewellery, she decided to fill the gap in the market herself. She launched her self-titled jewellery line, focusing on diamond-centric designs and innovative settings. Messika spent over 18 months creating her first piece (a minimalist strand of diamonds made elastic thanks to a system of invisible nanosprings), and the collections that have followed feature diamonds that appear to float in midair and stones that slide in their settings, catching the light as they move. “I wanted to go beyond the tennis bracelet,” the designer says. “I hope my designs prove that diamonds can feel easy, effortless and, above all, playful.” Available from Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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Electric Prisms by Sonia Delaunay

EXHIBITION Sonia Delaunay

(JY\JPHSÄN\YLPU[OL,\YVWLHU H]HU[NHYKLVM[OLLHYS`[OJLU[\Y` :VUPH+LSH\UH`L_WLYPTLU[LK^P[O WHPU[PUNHUKKLZPNUHUK[OPZTHQVY YL[YVZWLJ[P]LZOV^JHZLZIV[O6U KPZWSH`HYL[OLILN\PSPUNJHU]HZLZ[OH[ L_LTWSPM`OLY\ZLVM]PIYHU[JVSV\Y HUKIVSKS`HIZ[YHJ[NLVTL[Y`HZ^LSS HZOLY[L_[PSLZMHZOPVUKLZPNUZHUK JVZ[\TLZMVY[OL)HSSL[Z9\ZZLZ From 15th April to 9th August at Tate Modern

BOOK Love, Sex & Other Foreign Policy Goals by Jesse Armstrong

The bumbling efforts of an amateur theatrical troupe to help a war-torn land are the premise for a richly satirical first novel by hotshot TV scriptwriter Jesse Armstrong (Peep Show, The Thick of It). It’s 1994, and politically aware builder Andrew drives a group of students to the Balkans in a transit van to put on a play in the war zones. His objective? Nothing less than peace, but perhaps also romance with beautiful playwright Penny. Armstrong’s novel is a provocative reminder of the gap between the ideals and the realities of human nature. £12.99. Available from Harrods Books & Cards, Second Floor

DANCE Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch Here’s a thrilling chance to see the British premiere of two works by the late, brilliant German choreographer Pina Bausch. On the Mountain a Cry Was Heard (15th to 18th April) is a quintessentially Bauschian vision: across a stage strewn with dirt and felled trees, a succession of figures act out their impossible yearning for love, accompanied by a soundtrack of Edith Piaf and Billie Holiday. Ahnen, meaning “ancestors” or “foreboding” (23rd to 26th April), is perhaps even more wondrously bizarre: an engrossing, philosophical and darkly comic exploration of survival and mortality featuring guns, giant cacti and a pounding punk-rock score. From 15th April at Sadler’s Wells Ahnen by choreographer Pina Bausch

Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts in While We’re Young

FILM While We’re Young Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts star in this winningly acute observation comedy from director Noam Baumbach (Frances Ha, The Squid and the Whale). New Yorkers Josh and Cornelia are enjoying a happily settled relationship until they befriend a cool and endearing young couple, Darby (Amanda Seyfried) and Jamie (Adam Driver). The result: soon Josh has taken to wearing a hipster hat and Cornelia is busting her moves at a hip-hop dance class. Along with Stiller’s pitchperfect and painfully honest performance, Watts shows a flair for comedy as Baumbach conjures a warm, reflective look at the pitfalls of growing up. Opens on 5th April in the UK

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ZEITGEIST Musicians from the Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club

EXHIBITION Converse x Dazed Emerging Artists Award 2015 For the first time, the Royal Academy’s Burlington Gardens galleries will play host to the five finalists of this coveted prize. Each of the artists has been given £1,000 to create a site-specific piece, so prepare for their creativity to run wild in a bid to claim the £5,000 grand prize. Previous winning entries include the curiously shrouded figures of Peter Ainsworth, and window blinds with eccentrically decorated slats by Samara Scott. From 18th April to 17th May at the Royal Academy

MUSIC Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club

Damian Lewis

THEATRE American Buffalo Three low-life hoodlums are embroiled in plans to break into a house to steal a historic coin – known as an American Buffalo – that might be worth a fortune. But will the robbery come off? And can these criminals trust each other? This terrific showcase for David Mamet’s trademark hardboiled dialogue is a classic of modern American drama, and this welcome new production – the first London revival of the play for 15 years – marks the long-awaited return to the stage of Homeland star Damian Lewis. From 16th April to 27th June at Wyndham’s Theatre

They already harked back to another age when the Grammy-winning album Buena Vista Social Club made the Cuban ensemble global stars. Now, 18 years later, the players and their Latin big-band sound are truly about to become a thing of the past. Their Adios Tour gives us one last chance to savour live the seductive rhythms that were first concocted in a Havana club in the 1940s, then revived in the 1990s. Trombonist and bandleader Jesus Ramos is joined by other band members, including legendary singer Omara Portuondo, a recording artist since the 1950s. 5th April at the Royal Albert Hall The Donmar Warehouse hosts The Vote

Lewis ŠiBRODIEfoto

THEATRE The Vote

;OL\WJVTPUNNLULYHSLSLJ[PVUPZ[OLMVJ\Z VM[OPZWSH`^OPJOPZZL[PUHWVSSPUNZ[H[PVUPU [OL TPU\[LZILMVYLP[JSVZLZ>YP[LY1HTLZ .YHOHTOHZKYHTH[PZLKWVSP[PJZILMVYLPU [OL5H[PVUHS;OLH[YLOP[;OPZ/V\ZL/LYL OLL_WSVYLZHTVTLU[IV[OWYP]H[LÂśPU[OL ZLJYLJ`VM[OLIVV[OÂśHUKKLĂ„UP[P]LS`W\ISPJ 0M`V\JHUÂť[NL[H[PJRL[^H[JO[OLSP]L;= IYVHKJHZ[MYVT[OL+VUTHYVU4VYLVU LSLJ[PVUUPNO[4th April to 7th May at the Donmar Warehouse HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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I N T E RV I E W

“I sometimes have a love/hate relationship with this industry. You have to be strong, and have that drive, or you won’t survive” status, which is naturally then reflected in how she dresses. “She goes on such a journey. It was so interesting how different a smock [what Demelza wears as an urchin] makes you feel compared to a corset, which almost makes you hold your head up. When you’re not shooting something in sequence, it’s really helpful to put something on and know immediately that you are in episode eight.” In real life, Tomlinson claims to have “no fashion sense whatsoever” – although this surely can’t be true as, sitting opposite, she’s all low-key chic in skinny jeans with chunky black platform boots. “I can’t bear shopping,” she continues. “I’ll go into town with my boyfriend and have a coffee while he shops. I’m much more an outdoorsy type.” Born in London, Tomlinson moved to a small market town in Yorkshire called Beverley when she was two years old. Her parents are both in show business – her father Malcolm is an actor [he’s been in Emmerdale, Casualty and The Bill] while mum Judith is a variety singer. Even her younger brother Ross is involved. “Growing up, we were impossible!” she says. “We were those kids who entertained anyone and everyone who came to the house, whether they wanted to be entertained or not. We all love musicals and, when the film Chicago came out, there were lots of hilarious renditions of those songs.” It was growing up watching her parents perform that made her want to act. “It was something I wanted desperately,” she says. “I even persuaded dad’s agent to take me on when I was 11.

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THIS PAGE Issa dress £450; Monica Vinader bracelet £320 and rings (from top) £225 and £150; Christian Louboutin shoes £665; OPPOSITE PAGE Elie Saab jumpsuit £1,750

Available from Designer Accessories, Lower Ground Floor; Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor; Designer Studio and International Designer, First Floor; Harrods Shoe Heaven, Fifth Floor; and harrods.com

I was a rather determined kid.” Since then, she’s worked almost continuously, starting off with TV drama Falling then The Illusionist with Jessica Biel. Yet she’s also had to deal with setbacks. She had a leading role in the big-budget film Jack the Giant Slayer, playing opposite Nicholas Hoult and Ewan McGregor. But the film sank without a trace. The experience toughened her up. “I sometimes have a love/hate relationship with this industry,” she says. “You have to be strong, and have that drive, or you won’t survive.” She says that 95 per cent of actors’ auditions don’t result in landing the part. “Usually, it’s not that bad,” she says. “You’re like, ‘Oh, well. Next!’ But when you get close to a big job, waiting to hear is really, really horrible. I stare at my iPhone continuously. Then, if I don’t get it, it hurts big time. I console myself with a McDonald’s and a good cry.” A Maccy D isn’t something you often hear young actresses admitting to indulging in. “I’m one of those really irritating people who is naturally tiny, but I know it will eventually catch up with me,” she concedes. Tomlinson also likes going for walks in the countryside, and today she has a special hiking partner waiting for her at home: Burt Bacharach, the family’s red collie dog (the family – as you may have guessed – are huge fans of the award-winning singer-songwriter). “He’s staying with me while I’ve got a bit of time off,” she says. “I’ve been taking him to Richmond Park, although he doesn’t quite know what to make of the deer.” Although Tomlinson lives alone, she does have a boyfriend, who is also in the entertainment industry. “He’s a trick rider,” she says. Come again? “A trick rider. It’s basically acrobatics on horses.” She’s also a keen horsewoman, so the pair often go riding at Stag Lodge Stables in Richmond Park. “I’ve ridden horses since I was a little girl, but it’s just for fun. Saying that, I’m very competitive. If I can’t do something, I get annoyed and keep going until I get it right.” For now though, she’s gearing up for a promotional trip to Los Angeles. “I’ve only been there once before, so it’s quite daunting,” she says. And she certainly has no plans to move to LA anytime soon. “Bill Nighy once told me, ‘Never live in the States; just visit.’ But if an amazing part meant I must live there? An Oscar-worthy part? Then maybe...” HMN Poldark is on BBC1 Niki Browes is associate editor of InStyle magazine


Hair BEN COOKE at Frank Agency Make-up AMANDA GROSSMAN at Frank Agency Nails CHISATO at Terri Manduca Photographer’s Assistant PHILLIP BANKS


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THE LATEST LOOKS FROM THE INTERNATIONAL CATWALKS

AMAZING LACE

Fashion has fallen for lace this season. But forget saccharine frills and bridal clichés – designers are putting a new spin on the centuries-old fabric BY

Lanvin dress £4,199 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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E de Chloé

Givenchy

E lio ucci

Sometimes the appeal was in the contrast: Chloé’s Clare Waight Keller enlisted precise tailoring to counterbalance the prettiness of her pristine white cutwork, while relaxed styling meant Chanel’s semi-opaque pinafore looked insouciant rather than prissy. Lace has always been a leitmotif of Dolce & Gabbana’s, and the duo took their signature Sicilian-widow dress and slashed it to the thigh, sending it down the catwalk paired with embroidered knee-high boots, blood-red lips and a vampiric pallor. Such dark, dangerous romance is usually Roberto Cavalli’s style, but this season the Italian showed long guipure gowns that had an ingénue spirit rather than allout sexiness. The trend for coloured lace – kick-started by Prada in 2008 and reinforced by Christopher Kane’s stellar SS11 collection – is still going strong. Standouts include Elie Saab’s disco-inflected lace dresses and jumpsuits, in a cornucopia of shades, and Emilio Pucci’s delicate purple minidresses made from crystal-encrusted crocheted lace. Alessandra Rich has been loyal to lace since she launched her business in 2009. “I love that it can be so many things at the same time,” she says. For SS15, Rich riffed on the eighties, executing sash-belted shirtdresses in Chantilly lace with elaborate trim. The results – which balance being daring and demure, graceful and playful – prove once and for all that lace is anything but straight. HMN Available from Eveningwear, International Designer and Superbrands, First Floor

Chanel and oberto Cavalli models backstage Jason Lloyd-Evans

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Roberto Cavalli jacket £4,805 and trousers £3,410

Emilio Pucci dress £7,350

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Dolce & Gabbana dress £1,600

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Chanel jacket, shirt and dress from a selection

Alessandra Rich dress £2,350

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Chloé jacket £1,525 and shorts £925

Givenchy dress £2,399

Elie Saab dress £7,075

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Erdem top £1,250 and skirt from a selection

Lanvin shirt £2,850 and skirt from a selection

Ch el Elie S b

Chanel shirt and dungarees from a selection

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he US cotton industry claims that cotton is “the fabric of our lives”, but surely lace – worn on christening gowns, wedding gowns and widow’s weeds – is an equally worthy contender? In the 16th century, the wildly expensive fabric was the ultimate signifier of prosperity and prestige, and even though the availability of massproduced machine lace means it’s no longer quite so recherché, it retains every bit of its original stardust. The Duchess of Cambridge’s wedding dress is partly responsible for lace’s recent renaissance, but it’s a fabric that’s rarely far from the catwalks. Its capacity to shapeshift means it never fails to capture designers’ imaginations: it can cast the wearer as grandiose or girlish, sepulchral or cheerful, a femme fatale or a free spirit. Fabrics that have a phoenix-like ability to rise from the ashes have always intrigued Alber Elbaz. Last spring, the Lanvin designer put a subversive spin on lamé, and this season he decided that precious French Chantilly lace was ripe for reinvention. Layers of spliced and fractured lace were used to construct cocktail dresses with unfinished hems and frayed, cobwebby edges. In another – less accomplished – designer’s hands they could have carried a hint of Miss Havisham, but Elbaz’s dresses have an heirloom quality and a roughed-up, deshabillé allure. The darker side of the delicate fabric was at the fore at Erdem, where a full-length finely wrought lace gown had a dose of gothic glamour, and at Givenchy, where antique-looking lace cut-outs were used as accents on corset dresses with armour-like studs.

Roberto Cavalli dress £5,930

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FA S H I O N


FA S H I O N I N T E R V I E W

I LOVE YOU In just over a decade, Jack McCollough and Lazaro Hernandez have gone from bright young things to designers on the brink of establishing the next great American fashion empire PHIL DUNLOP

BY DEPUTY F

It sounds like a classic Sliding Doors moment. Lazaro Hernandez, a young fashion student, sees US Vogue editor Anna Wintour boarding his flight and – after working up enough courage – sneaks into first class and slips her a note on a cocktail napkin asking for career advice. A couple of days later, the cocktail napkin lands on the desk of Michael Kors, who appreciates the aspiring designer’s chutzpah, offers him an internship and ends up donating fabric for the student’s final-year project. That collection – a collaboration with his Parsons School of Design classmate Jack McCollough – proves so promising that in a matter of months Hernandez finds himself back with the formidable editor; Barneys order under his belt and business partner in tow, he explains that, um, they actually have – sort of – met before, and yes, of course Vogue can borrow samples for a Helmut Newton shoot. “It’s true!” Hernandez confirms. “That’s how this whole mad thing started.” So a serendipitous encounter led to a chain of lifechanging events. But it’s probably not a stretch to say that Hernandez and McCollough would’ve ended up in the editor’s sleek Condé Nast office eventually, cocktail napkin or no. At its heart, the Proenza Schouler story is an old-fashioned tale of hard work and talent, but along the way it’s peppered with anecdotes involving auspicious timings and fortuitous coincidences. A case in point is the account of McCollough and Hernandez’s

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first accessory, the PS1. Introduced in 2008, the satchel was intended to be an “anti-It bag”. It was understated, utilitarian and so discreet it was almost anonymous: the opposite of what everyone else was doing. Yet even when they were being deliberately contrary, the designers accidently managed to – oops! – capture the zeitgeist. Suddenly the duo had their very own hit (and, whisper it, It) bag on their hands. A year later, on the back of that success, they beat Marc Jacobs to take the CFDA’s hallowed Accessory Designer of the Year award. The boys (as they’re still called in fashion circles, despite the fact Hernandez is 36 and McCollough 37) would probably say their most fateful moment was meeting each other. Project Runway presenter and former Parsons dean Tim Gunn agrees. “I know that without the collaboration Jack and Laz would still have garnered great success, but together, they create a whole that’s greater than the sum of its parts,” he says. “In their case, one plus one equals 10.” “They’re our great American ambassadors,” says actress Chloë Sevigny. “They have an ability to design modern pieces that are wearable and sexy season after season.” While the pair’s similarities are well documented (they both have boyish good looks, bucketloads of charm and an infectious energy), it’s their differences that drive them. “I think our secret is that we’re never on the same page,” laughs Hernandez. “Our design process involves a lot of figuring out how to make disparate things come together.” Hernandez, the only son of Cuban immigrants, was brought up in Miami, where he’d while away weekends X


Proenza Schouler top ÂŁ1,375 and skirt ÂŁ1,550; shoes from a selection


“We both assumed we’d have to go out and get jobs when we graduated. Working together in the real world felt like a fantasy” JACK M COLLOUGH C

at his mum’s beauty salon. McCollough, who is one of five, was born in Japan and lived there for four years, before his father’s banking career took the family back to the New Jersey suburbs. Both designers took roundabout routes into fashion. Prior to enrolling at Parsons, McCollough studied glassblowing in San Francisco and Hernandez was a medical student in his home state. “At one point, I actually wanted to be an Ob/Gyn,” he laughs. “After that, I became interested in plastic surgery, and eventually ended up in fashion design.” After a fluke meeting in a New York nightclub before term had begun, the pair started hanging out as friends (helping each other with homework, sneaking into Helmut Lang shows) before they became a couple. “By then, our aesthetics were totally intertwined,” McCollough says. In their last year, they managed to get permission to collaborate for their final project – a first for Parsons, after

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Proenza Schouler dress £1,999

their dean (Gunn) fought their corner. The collection, which combined couture-inspired construction techniques with a downtown-cool vibe, earned them the college’s prestigious Golden Thimble award. It also piqued the interest of fashion consultant Julie Gilhart (then the fashion director of Barneys) during the judging process. “Initially, I was attracted to the clean sophistication of their collection,” she says. “But when I met the boys, I knew they had the energy and talent to create not just clothes, but a business. New designers come on the scene all the time, but only a few have that special magic that allows them to become true fashion stars.” Not that the designers would have concurred with any of this. “We both assumed we’d have to go out and get jobs when we graduated,” shrugs McCollough. “Working together in the real world felt like a fantasy.” They did, in fact, apply for jobs – even bagging an interview for a design position working alongside Narciso Rodriguez – but their joint portfolio was a stumbling block. “He was like, ‘Wait, I’d have to hire both of you for one job? I’m confused… does that mean we’d have to pay you one salary or two?’” Suffice to say, they didn’t get the job. “We left feeling so confused,” McCollough sighs. On the walk home, they decided to start out on their own, but – unconvinced they would be successful – they conjoined their mothers’ maiden names for their company rather than using their own. (For the record, their oftmispronounced moniker is Pro-en-za Skoo-ler.) A few days later, their destiny was sealed when they received an out-of-the-blue email from Barneys with an order for every single piece in their senior project. They cut and produced the entire collection themselves, while simultaneously designing the next one. “All I can remember is that it was one crazy, crazy summer,” laughs McCollough. After that, the designers concede, things got even crazier. Their first collection was both a commercial and a critical hit (in fact, they’ve rarely had a less-than-rhapsodic review since), and a few months later they’d netted both a CEO and a financial backer for their nascent business. In 2004, they won the first CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund award, and followed it up by taking the CFDA’s top honour, the Womenswear Designer of the Year award, an unprecedented three times: in 2007 (when they tied with Oscar de la Renta), in 2011 and again in 2013. Their accession to the upper echelons of American fashion was fast-tracked, for sure, but today, 13 years on, their pace has accelerated rather than slowed. As well as accessories and show collections, they now produce pre-collections, shoes and swimwear; annual sales are approaching $50m and luxury conglomerate LVMH is said to be circling, hoping to acquire a stake in the brand. Michael Kors- or Marc Jacobs-level success beckons, but it’s clear that when it arrives, it will be on the designers’ own terms. “We do things because they feel right, never solely for business reasons or because they make strategic sense,” McCollough says. “It’s hard, as you grow, to keep that frame of mind, but it’s an important part of what we do.” Pushing boundaries, rather than the prospect of financial success, is what keeps the designers excited. Their experimental fabrics, for example, use techniques that sound like they originate in a science lab. What at first looks like lace is more likely to be embroidery eroded in acid; what appears to be tweed might actually be printed, perforated leather woven into a twill pattern. It makes you feel for their fabric developers. “Last fall, we were into the whole industrial thing, so we amassed a collection of


Proenza Schouler jacket and top from a selection and skirt £4,099 Hair RANELLE CHAPMAN Make-up LINDA ANDERSSON using Bobbi Brown Nails ZARRA CELIK at LMC Worldwide using Chanel Summer 2015 Model JULIA JOHANSEN at Elite Photographer’s Assistants DAVE ADAMS and ALEC MCLEISH Available from International Designer, First Floor

carpet pads and weird rubber floor coverings and asked our team to recreate them,” Hernandez recounts. Far from straightforward pillaging, the Proenza boys take pride in subverting the familiar. Those industrial fabrics, for instance, ended up as photo-printed jacquards and elegant flocked crepe. “What interests us is doing our own twisted take on classic codes,” McCollough says. Their SS15 collection is a case in point. The designers took their cues from American sportswear (which must rank among the most been-there-done-that design reference) and in a feat of alchemy, managed to make it appear of-themoment. A tongue-in-cheek take on argyle – an oversized sweater, its front punctured with cut-outs that mimic the preppy pattern – already has a waiting list. A riff on the racer-back (a basket-weave dress, precision-engineered to fall apart into kinetic fringing) is classic Proenza: cool, but a little off kilter; sophisticated, yet slightly undone. Sustaining such relentless creativity can mean a risk of burning out, but Hernandez and McCollough are strict about taking time off. After each collection, they fit in a two-week break, travelling to far-flung destinations like Fiji or the foothills of Mount Everest. “Of course we hope it’ll inspire us and lead us to the next collection, but sometimes it doesn’t and that’s OK,” Hernandez says. “It’s about cultivating new memories and having a life outside fashion.” As for their future plans, the designers cite the next logical steps for a fashion label – menswear, perfume, beauty ranges – but make it clear that their aspirations don’t begin and end with Proenza Schouler. “We’re just art-school kids who, in some weird twist of fate, ended up in fashion,” says McCollough. “For us, this isn’t the final chapter in our creative evolution,” adds Fernandez. “Our horizons are totally open.” HMN

Trend watch: WHITE NOISE To wear head-to-toe white with aplomb requires a blend of prep, poise and peroxide BY LA

TON

Fashion forecasters are warning of an unprecedented white-out this season, cautioning that it would be unwise to head into spring without first stocking up on essential provisions such as tins of corned beef, bottled water, bags of rock salt, and approximately 36 litres of stain remover. Official predictions are that this year’s sartorial blizzard will carry the force of both Bianca Jagger’s Seminal White Trouser Suit and Elizabeth Hurley’s Complete Collection of White Jeans combined. But how to survive this flurry without appearing to have joined either the Procession of the Vestal Virgins or Westlife during one of their deeply moving ballad performances? A groundbreaking investigation by the Whistler Institute of Pallor Studies has found that while there is undoubtedly some initial charm to playing the consumptive heroine, the thrill of Fantine-ing about in any social situation quickly fades. The answer, they argue, is to wear one’s white gown – Erdem’s delicate lace number, for instance – as warm-bloodedly as possible. This means that, however pale and wan your attire, you should defrost your look with a flare of sauciness or a suggestion of smouldering. Laboratory tests found that even the most Ice Queen-y of outfits could be thawed by simply thinking of crumpets and long johns. Elsewhere, representatives from the LaundryWorkers’ Guild have been offering their advice for a safe and stain-free summer of white. Tips range from the basic – avoiding red wine and mud-wrestling events while wearing your Chloé white peasant blouse and miniskirt, for example – to the more extravagant, such as employing a specially trained waterproof security team whenever you step out in your Dior white trousers and top. Lastly, researchers looking into the psychological impact of wearing white have found that a woman sporting a Christopher Kane knee-length frock with Grecian detailing is 67 per cent more likely to be viewed as sympathetic than someone wearing red, while a woman in Valentino’s long white skirt with intricate cutwork is 96 per cent more likely to be greeted as a “fair maiden” and invited to a Maypole dance. Available from International Designer and Superbrands, First Floor Laura Barton is a feature writer for The Guardian. She also writes for Q, The Word, Vogue and Red X WATCH Download the Harrods app for tips on getting all-white right

FROM TOP Erdem gown £4,775; Chloé top £1,475 and shorts £550; Dior top £1,300 and trousers £600; Christopher Kane dress £1,499; Valentino shirt £2,175 and skirt £4,335


NEWS

Pretty in MINK

Pastels and gingham are to be expected among the spring/summer collections; it is rather unexpected, however, to find them on seasonal furs. But then Yves Salomon – the third generation in a family of furriers – is so accomplished with the materials of his trade that anything is possible. For SS15, Salomon has been inspired by the directional looks of the sixties, resulting in a collection that, while maintaining sophisticated lines, has an irreverence about it. Pieces include shift, empire-line and drop-waist dresses in summer leather and fur, and lightweight cropped-sleeve coats, including the star of the show – a gingham-print mink swing coat. Yves Salomon coat £10,150. Available from International Designer, First Floor

One to WATCH Increasingly, women are investing in beautiful timepieces with excellent provenance. Now Cartier has created the Rotonde de Cartier Flying Tourbillon Reversed Dial, a watch combining Cartier’s historic expertise with a visionary, modern design. Innovatively, the dial displays the piece’s flying tourbillon in reverse, while the model is finished with Cartier’s signature blue steel hands and cabochon sapphire crown. Cartier watch £106,000. Available from The Fine Jewellery Room, Ground Floor

In the CUT

What do you get when a designer fêted for his eveningwear takes his expertise to a fashion house famous for tailoring? Superbly wearable womenswear. In his second season for Hugo Boss, Jason Wu has created a collection that’s influenced by the house’s suiting heritage without allowing it to dictate the silhouettes. This harmony of strength and femininity can be seen in linear shirt dresses with flirty, flicky A-line skirts; ultra clean-lined trench coats, shift dresses and miniskirts in soft fabrics; and perfectly tailored tux-style jackets with playful visible seam detailing. BOSS Womenswear coat £700. Available from International Designer, First Floor

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NATALIA ALAVERDIAN by Lindsay Macpherson

London-based label AWAKE was founded in 2012 by Natalia Alaverdian, a photographer, art director and former fashion director of Harper’s Bazaar Russia. She talks to Harrods Magazine about her love of costume and Japanese culture, and the stories behind her collections. “Costume, rather than fashion, was my first love. Looking at old paintings of women and studying what they were wearing in different eras fascinated me. A few years ago I decided to follow my heart. I fell into styling at university, and when I started working for magazines, I really enjoyed it. But designing was always in the back of my mind. I’m a bit of an insane mix. I have Armenian heritage, I’m Russian-born and Belgian-raised. I studied in Milan; my business is based in London and my family is scattered all over the world. Whatever I’m obsessed with infiltrates my designs. Often it’s something Japanese. Although I’ve never been to Japan, FROM TOP AWAKE I’m captivated by cape £699, skirt everything about the £280 and dress £850. art, dress and culture. Available from Studio, I think Japanese people First Floor have a very different, very creative mindset. Who else could come up with such inventive cartoon styles as manga and anime? When I was small, I couldn’t fall asleep until my grandma read me a fairy tale. That’s why there’s a storytelling aspect to my collections and a whimsical, dreamlike feel to the designs and prints. Each season I build a narrative around a different creature. I don’t plan it, but every time it just seems to come together like a puzzle. For SS15, I was inspired by the patterns on dragonflies’ wings and their beautiful iridescent colours. I was researching these amazing insects and found that in Japanese culture they are believed to symbolise summer. Suddenly the whole thing fell into place.”


FA S H I O N Chloé dress £2,425

The ESSENTIALS

From patchwork to fringing, this season’s accessories are infused with a ’70s spirit Emilio Pucci top £1,775

Alice and Olivia by Stacey Bendet skirt £610

2

1

Isabel Marant shoes £360

Shamballa Jewels ring £5,000

Isabel Marant top £385

Chloé

3

Free SPIRITS

Flowing silhouettes, ethnic detailing and Woodstock-style embroidery give this season’s designs a folkloric feel

Proenza Schouler bag £1,295

Etro dress £2,199

4

Alex Monroe earrings £174 Dorothee Schumacher dress £340 Elie Saab blouse £800

Etro jacket £2,875

Available from Luxury Accessories, Lower Ground Floor; Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor; Designer Studio and International Designer, First Floor; Fashion Lab, Fourth Floor; Harrods Shoe Heaven, Fifth Floor; and harrods.com

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Stylist Olivia Halsall

Paul & Joe shorts £230

Et o

Emilio Pucci skirt £650


Laced with sparkle Inspired by nature, femininity and the Renaissance, Buccellati’s jewellery is sumptuous, reďŹ ned and heirloom-worthy


NEWS

Jean THE APY The rarefied few who possess infallible style understand the importance of sourcing impeccable basics, such as the perfect white T-shirt. As for jeans, finding The Ones can take a lifetime, so 7 For All Mankind has teamed up with designer Giambattista Valli to make the quest a little easier. This spring, the brands have collaborated on a capsule collection of jeans and casualwear that brings together a couture sensibility and easy wearability. The pieces will be available in a spectrum of Valli’s beloved reds, from pink to rouge noir, as well as his signature animal prints. 7 For All Mankind x Giambattista Valli tops £235 each and jeans £285 each. Available from Fashion Lab, Fourth Floor

Gold

SH

Fine jeweller Annoushka Ducas celebrates a quarter of a century in the industry by creating the Art Deco-inspired Golden Pearls collection. Each piece is designed around rare South Sea golden pearls from Southeast Asia. For this very limited collection, Ducas went directly to the pearl farmers to ensure the fairest trade. The five items feature fluid leaf-like shapes crafted from black rhodium layered over 18kt white gold and set with pavé diamonds. Annoushka earrings £12,500; exclusive to Harrods. Available from Luxury Jewellery, Ground Floor

Pink LADY As founder and designer of womenswear brand Toujouri, Lama El-Moatassem juxtaposed bold, architectural shapes with uncompromised femininity for her SS15 collection. Organzacovered scuba fabric is used to create full, sculptural skirts that feel ultramodern but still play to El-Moatassem’s beloved “princess” gown. The skirts are kept minimal, while bodices feature embroidery and lace in a refreshing palette of shades of pink, lavender and buttercup yellow. Toujouri gown £2,399. Available from Eveningwear, First Floor

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ZOË JORDAN by Lindsay Macpherson Dublin-born, Londonbased designer Zoë Jordan launched her self-titled label in 2011, quickly gaining critical acclaim for her strong silhouettes, clean-lined tailoring and clever prints. Jordan talks to Harrods Magazine about the F1 sponsorship badges that bring back childhood memories. “My childhood was spent totally immersed in the motorsports world, which was a wonderful way to grow up. My father (the Formula 1 commentator and entrepreneur Eddie Jordan) was once Ireland’s racing champion and later managed his own team. It wasn’t a glamorous lifestyle. In the early days we travelled all around Europe for my dad’s races in a really tiny caravan – but it was an adventure and we always felt like part of the sporting community. All the team members and mechanics were constantly travelling like wandering gypsies, so it was quite a nomadic existence. I feel really lucky that I have life-long friends who’ve shared the same experiences. I’m always looking back fondly over my childhood, and my favourite things are FROM TOP Zoë Jordan mementoes from dress £1,550, top £280 that time. I have a and skirt £340. Available huge collection of from Designer Studio, sponsorship badges, First Floor; and harrods.com retro vest tops and historic helmets, even ’80s-style sports socks. I started my label in 2011, but it wasn’t until I was researching for a collection a few seasons ago that I decided to reference motor racing in my work. It was the first time I’d properly studied all those bits and pieces in ages, and it brought back so many memories. I ended up collaborating with the embroiderer Laura Lees to make my own leather sponsorship badges that read ‘Team Jordan’. As well as being a nod to my upbringing, they were a tribute to my dad: he’s been my biggest supporter.”


LIGHT TOUCH

Famed for its soft, lightweight cashmere, timeless clothing and exceptional craftsmanship, Loro Piana has a new collection tailor-made for the connoisseur


PROMO T ION

A

sk any expert to name the lightest, most luxurious cashmere, and Loro Piana is likely to trip off the tongue. The brand is renowned for both quality and innovation in luxury materials – which work beautifully for knitwear, jackets and accessories, and feel amazingly delicate against the skin. For six generations, Loro Piana has been sourcing the finest fibres, and researching and developing speciality fabrics. In the case of cashmere and baby cashmere, there is one harvest a year – in spring – from the hircus goats that live in the mountains of Mongolia and northern China; the precious fibres are teased from their undercoats with a comb. The baby cashmere comes from goats under 12 months old. These fibres are 15 per cent finer than those from the adult goats (it takes 19 baby goats to gather enough for one sweater), so the lightness and softness of this rare cashmere is unmatched, perfect for spring layering. A standout in the SS15 line is the Quimper double-breasted coat, casually elegant thanks to the chunky fluidity of its baby-cashmere knit. Loro Piana’s Only Double fabric creates pieces that are rich and warm, yet light as air. The double-cashmere material lends itself to two-way garments such as the Max reversible hooded poncho; treated with Loro Piana’s Rain System, it is water repellent. The Kian double-cashmere hooded vest is a versatile layering piece for spring; a special super-soft finish makes the Mathias stretch denim trousers an essential for the warmer months; and there is more expertise in evidence across the Loro Piana accessory collection – not least in the calfskin Mini Cluisée bag, the Russel crocodile-leather belt, and the downy-soft Ingrid felt hat, made from a blend of materials including beaver fur. Finally, the Elton jacket in silk-lined mink fur, with plongé leather trim, is the epitome of exclusive casualwear in exceptional materials. The last word in luxury. Available from Superbrands, First Floor

THIS PAGE, TOP Loro Piana Quimper coat £1,935, Coral Sea sweater £1,095 and Nuages shoes £590; THIS PAGE, RIGHT Loro Piana Max ponchos £3,280 each and Mini Cluisée bag £1,180; OPPOSITE PAGE, LEFT

Loro Piana Elton jacket £19,020, Kian hooded vest £2,185 and Port Au Prince sweater £760; OPPOSITE PAGE, RIGHT

Loro Piana Ingrid hat £825, Mathias trousers £405, Russel belt £1,265 and Mayotte Charms shoes from a selection


NEWS

Style rules: Trousers

BIKER GROOVE

So famous is Barbour’s waxed jacket, it’s easy to forget the British brand’s expertise also lies in designing functional activewear. Barbour’s 120 years of know-how is evident in SS15’s Tourer Lux motorcyclewear collection of worn-in leather jackets and acidwashed knitwear. Barbour has also created a Garage Essentials range – a selection of tops in super-light fabrics to sit comfortably under leathers. Barbour jacket £229, polo shirt from a selection and jeans £89.95. Available from Barbour, Fifth Floor

Prepped for SUMMER

Technically, Ralph Lauren is equal parts fashion designer and dream weaver, such is the sense of history, heritage and old-school style that he conjures up in his collections. For SS15, Polo Ralph Lauren captures this spirit in tailored pieces at ease in formal and casual settings. Vintagestyle suits made from silk, linen and fresco wool are designed to be worn with crested ties and boat-club-ready tasselled loafers. Naturally. Polo Ralph Lauren suit £495, shirt £85, tie £85 and shoes from a selection. Available from Men’s Collections, Lower Ground Floor

ule breaker When IWC’s Portugieser watch first launched in the late 1930s, it broke a number of boundaries and all the rules. Seventy-five years on, the Portugieser continues to set precedents with 2015’s Annual Calendar model. The timepiece carries IWC’s new double-barrelled 52850 calibre, which facilitates its innovative annual calendar display. IWC Portugieser Annual Calendar £16,900. Available from The Fine Watch Room, Ground Floor

There’s a revolution afoot below the belt as designers do an about turn on trousers BY LUKE LEITCH

After several seasons of relative neglect, designers are suddenly focusing on the potential of trousers to push the masculine look forward for summer. Here are a few pointers on pants. 1. Free your trousers from the suit If you favour tailoring, but want to nod to the progressive as well as the traditional, consider trousers that contrast with – but also complement – your jacket. This is tricky to pull off. When matching the trousers from one suit with the jacket of another, you have to consider the overall silhouette. But if you can make pattern and profile work together, as Ermenegildo Zegna has proposed, you’ll be right at the cutting edge. 2. Wear sweatpants – luxury sweatpants – everywhere We have to find a better word for sweatpants, because softly constructed trousers have been promoted from the gym bag to almost every part of the male wardrobe. Brunello Cucinelli makes them in cashmere; at Balmain they’re touched by biker detailing; and at Dsquared2 leather gets in on the action. Wear sweatpants where you want, how you want. They used to be trousers to wear after a break-up – now you could get married in them. 3. Try shorts with leggings underneath Every summer, designers propose shorts suits. And pretty much every man – unless he’s in Bermuda – ignores them. But, inspired by the ubiquity of sweatpants, designers have looked to the gym again. Wearing long shorts over leggings gives you freedom of movement and creates a fashion-forward silhouette. To be a step ahead, look to Cerruti 1881 Paris’ example. 4. Go large… The grip of skinny is slackening. A simple way to be both forward-thinking and comfortable is to loosen up. Try something slouchy, with a break – think Luke Wilson in The Royal Tenenbaums. Or combine Miami Viceinfluenced colour with roomy pants. Berluti is a winner. 5. …Or stay skinny Skinny trousers are not dead in the water, yet. If you love that slim silhouette, and are lean enough to make it work, visit 7 For All Mankind. Or go straight to the label that pretty much invented the style: Saint Laurent. Available from Men’s International Gallery and Men’s Collections, Lower Ground Floor; Men’s International Collections, Ground Floor; and harrods.com Luke Leitch has written about fashion for Vogue, Esquire, Vanity Fair, The Times and The Daily Telegraph X WATCH Download the Harrods app for the right trousers

FROM TOP

Ermenegildo Zegna Couture jacket £2,090, shirt £450, trousers £790, handkerchief £145 and trainers £360; Dsquared2 T-shirt £220 and trousers £390; Cerruti 1881 Paris jacket £1,799, shirt £1,250 and shorts £325; Berluti jacket £2,440, trousers £550 and sweater £580; Saint Laurent jacket £675 and jeans £335

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FA S H I O N

The ESSENTIALS

Gucci trousers £405

Miharayasuhiro jacket £650

This season’s urban staples are set apart by unusual fabrics and sleek styling

1

Kenzo jacket from a selection

e

Michael Kors shirt £120

2

Dio

o

Dior Homme coat £2,250, shirt £540, jeans £410, bag £4,500 and trainers £720

Bottega Veneta backpack £2,990

BLUES brothers Rugged or refined, dégradé or distressed, denim has been reimagined in myriad ways

Acne jeans £160

3

Alexander McQueen trainers £385

4

Oliver Peoples sunglasses from £205

Gucci jacket £1,280

AllSaints jacket £118

Available from Men’s Collections, Men’s International Gallery, and The Men’s Shoe Salon, Lower Ground Floor; Men’s International Collections and Sunglasses, Ground Floor; Men’s Designer Casuals, Fifth Floor; and harrods.com

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Stylist Becky Branch

Burberry Prorsum coat £1,295

u

y

Fendi shirt £375

Dior Homme jeans £410

su

Saint Laurent jeans £410


A LIGHTER SHADE OF PALE Pared back. Seductively spare. A palette of natural nudes, subdued saffrons and ballet-slipper pinks gives spring fashion an irresistibly easy, softly-softly appeal TE / F


FA S H I O N

Prada coat £4,810 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FA S H I O N

THIS PAGE 3.1 Phillip Lim jacket £585; Raoul skirt £325; OPPOSITE PAGE Dorothee Schumacher jacket £799; La Perla slip £388

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FA S H I O N

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THIS PAGE Lanvin dress £2,250; OPPOSITE PAGE Stella

McCartney dress £1,225


MOVING ON

Denim has reached a true-blue high, and style codes are all in the jeans. Whether you add sheers, fur or leather, the accent is on laid-back luxury HEA

AVELL / F


FA S H I O N

Zadig & Voltaire fur gilet £590; Sandro denim jacket £209; AllSaints vest £32 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FA S H I O N THIS PAGE Zadig & Voltaire

jacket £535 and jeans £155; Victoria Victoria Beckham T-shirt £175; Alex Monroe necklace £174; OPPOSITE PAGE Karen Millen top £99; Zadig & Voltaire skirt £125; Jimmy Choo sandals £1,395; Monica Vinader bracelets (from top) £80, £220 and £95


THIS PAGE Pierre Balmain

jacket £490; Reiss sweater £89; Club Monaco skirt £180; OPPOSITE PAGE Sandro jacket £209; Rails shirt £140; Pierre Balmain jeans £260; Prada sunglasses from £172


FA S H I O N

THIS PAGE Karen Millen jacket £199; Current/Elliott jeans £180; OPPOSITE PAGE IRO top £650; True Religion shorts £150; Dolce & Gabbana trainers £525; Monica Vinader earrings £115 and bracelet £220

Hair RICHARD SCORER at Premier using L’Oréal Professionnel Make-up DINA CATCHPOLE at Soho Management using Clarins Nails DAISY HASSAN using Chanel Model VALERIJA SESTIC at Select Model Management Fashion Intern KELLY BLUFF Digital Operator ELLIOTT COLE Photographer’s Assistants LEE GRUBB and MATT LAIN Available from Designer Accessories, Lower Ground Floor; Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor; Fashion Lab, Fourth Floor; Harrods Shoe Heaven, Fifth Floor; and harrods.com X WATCH Download the Harrods app for more desirable denim HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FA S H I O N

FIT FOR PURPOSE

The latest movement in men’s fashion teams luxe-sportswear shapes with functionality F

Alexander McQueen T-shirt £220 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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FA S H I O N

THIS PAGE Alexander McQueen T-shirt £225; Balmain trousers £550; Balenciaga trainers £405; OPPOSITE PAGE Cerruti 1881 Paris vest £280; 3.1 Phillip Lim trousers £510; Balenciaga trainers £405

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THIS PAGE Christopher Raeburn sweatshirt from a selection; Haider Ackermann trousers £625; OPPOSITE PAGE Balmain jacket £1,150; Christopher Kane T-shirt £280; Paul Smith trousers £380; Balenciaga trainers £405


FA S H I O N

THIS PAGE Façonnable

sweatshirt £210; 3.1 Phillip Lim trousers £510; Jimmy Choo trainers £995; OPPOSITE PAGE Alexander McQueen sweater £599; Dsquared2 trousers £1,599 Grooming MICHAEL GRAY at David Artists Models DAVID SEED at Models 1 and ROMAN TIO at I.C. Movement Senior Fashion Assistant BECKY BRANCH Photographer’s Assistant AMELIA KARLSEN Digital Operator PATRICK SCHUTTLER Available from Men’s Contemporary Collections, Men’s International Gallery and The Men’s Shoe Salon, Lower Ground Floor

X WATCH Download the Harrods app to get your wardrobe in shape for spring

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SKINCARE / COSMETICS / FRAGRANCE

Less is MORE

Dewy skin, bleached brows, blotted lips and shimmery shadowing. Spring’s make-up takes itself lightly yet still makes an impact BY

FASHION STYLING OLIVIA HALSALL

KISSED BY A ROSE

Cheeks were all a-flush at the Carven, Nina Ricci and Valentino shows. Swirl on rose-tinted blush and pair with subtle bronze shading on eyes for an ethereal seasonal take. BEAUTY Chanel Le

Blanc de Chanel Multi-use Illuminating Base £33; NARS Radiant Creamy Concealer £22; Guerlain Terracotta Joli Teint Beautifying Foundation £34.50 and Ecrin 4 Couleurs in Les Violines £39; Estée Lauder Pure Color Blush in Pink Ingenue £27 and Pure Color Stay-on Shadow Paint in Cosmic £20; MAC Fluidline Eye Pencil in Atomic Ore £15.50, Eye Kohl in Smolder £14, Studio Sculpt Lash mascara in Sculpted Black £14.50 and Studio Nail Lacquer in Skin £10; Dolce & Gabbana Classic Cream Lipstick in Sugar Pink £24.50; FASHION Maria Grachvogel gown £1,375 HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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NICELY NUDE

Bleached brows complement lighter skin tones and direct the focus to bone structure. Echo Alexander Wang and Temperley’s SS15 shows and keep skin deliciously dewy. BEAUTY Burberry Fresh Glow Luminous Fluid Base £34; Clinique Up-lighting Liquid Illuminator £22; Bobbi Brown Tinted Eye Brightener £20; Sisley Phyto-Ombre Éclat Long Lasting Eyeshadow in Mango £29; Dior Rouge Dior Baume in Bleuette £26; Guerlain Kiss Kiss Shaping Cream Lip Colour in Rosy Silk £26; Dolce & Gabbana Intense Nail Lacquer in Innocence £20; Essie Nail Lacquer in Limo-Scene £9.15; FASHION Jenny Packham gown £2,225


FLASH FORWARD

Duo and multi-toned eyes were spied on the SS15 catwalks; the boldest being Chanel with its retro-rainbow lids. To make your own statement, team a metallic with a matte, using one colour above the eye and one below, with a dramatic demarcation. BEAUTY Yves Saint Laurent Touche Éclat Blur Primer £29.50; Guerlain Precious Light Rejuvenating Illuminator £30.50; NARS Illuminator in Super Orgasm £23 and Duo Eyeshadow in Underworld £25; Burberry Sheer Eye Shadow in Lavender £23; Dior 5 Couleurs Eyeshadow Palette in Candy Choc £42 and Diorshow Maximiser Lash Plumping Serum £24.50; Lancôme Hypnôse Drama mascara in Excessive Black £22.50; Chanel Rouge Coco Ultra Hydrating Lip Colour in Catherine £25; FASHION Sandro top £199


BITE OF THE BERRY Subdued wine and red lips are ripe for an on-trend translation. Forget liner and diffuse a ruby colour out from the centre of lips, fading it at the edges.

BEAUTY Dior Glow Maximiser Light Boosting Primer £28.50; Guerlain Terracotta Joli Teint Natural Healthy Glow Powder £34.50; Clinique Touch Base For Eyes in Canvas Light £12.50; Dolce & Gabbana Dolce Matte Lipstick in Dolce Desire £26.50; FASHION Roberto Cavalli gown £5,930


BE AU T Y

VIOLET STORM

Make way for the shade of the moment – a lilac-purple that works well as an alternative to charcoal smoky eyes. Keep the outline graphic and smudge beneath the eye for a semi-grunge, semi-sophisticated effect. BEAUTY Dior Diorskin Nude Concealer £22

and Diorshow Iconic Overcurl mascara in Over Black £24.50; Guerlain Météorites Baby Glow £35.50; Chanel Joues Contraste Powder Blush in Rose Initial £31; Estée Lauder Pure Color Envy Sculpting Eyeshadow palette in Envious Orchid £40; Clinique All About Shadow Super Shimmer in Rock Violet £16; NARS Sheer Lipstick in Liguria £20; FASHION Victoria Victoria Beckham dress from a selection Hair JOSE at D + V Management Make-up ANITA KEELING at Jed Root Nails CHISATO YAMAMOTO at Terri Manduca Model ANNA EMILIA SEEWALD at The Hive Photographer’s Assistants BRIONI OATES and JOSH AUKE Available from The Colour and Cosmetics Halls, Ground Floor; Eveningwear and International Designer, First Floor; Fashion Lab, Fourth Floor; Urban Retreat, Fifth Floor; and harrods.com HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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NEWS

MISS HEAVEN SCENT

Good to GLOW…

Te

ey London

Dewy skin was big on the catwalks for this season, so hydrating masks are pitch perfect for spring

1.Treat your skin to moisture therapy with Sensai’s Cellular Performance Mask – a comforting cream designed to make skin instantly silkier with light and velvety oils. A refreshing blend of plum, orchid and jasmine notes scent the mask, which can be used as an overnight treatment or as a wipe-off quick fix. 100ml, £65 2. Inspired by Chinese medicine, SkinPointEight’s Age-Adapt Face Mask is a fine gauze with botanical extracts to plump and soothe: ginseng to aid collagen production, astragalus to stimulate circulation, and green tea to strengthen skin’s barrier function. £120 for 4 masks 3. Dip into the richness of Guerlain’s Abeille Royale Repairing Honey Gel Mask. A lightweight anti-ageing balm, it includes royal jelly to help stimulate skin repair, and Ouessant honey to help firm and improve elasticity. 50ml, £88

Sensai and SkinPointEight are exclusive to Harrods. Available from The Beauty Apothecary and The Cosmetics Hall, Ground Floor; and harrods.com

Brighten UP

Temperley London model Anthea Simms; diamonds Alamy

It isn’t only wrinkles that affect the eye area; dark circles can also be a problem. But while shadowing may be a result of thinning skin or poor circulation, UV damage and hyperpigmentation also play a part. Now a solution comes in the shape of Kiehl’s Clearly Corrective Dark Circle Perfector SPF 30, with vitamin C and liquorice-root extract to reduce the appearance of dark circles, plus UV filters to protect and mineral pigments to camouflage. 15ml, £29; exclusive to Harrods. Available from The Beauty Apothecary, Ground Floor

Girl’s best friend Rodial’s Pink Diamond Instant Lifting Serum is a real complexion brightener. Particles in the formula’s diamond powder reflect light, just like precious stones set in jewellery. Teamed with a “blurring” pigment to minimise the appearance of wrinkles, and a cocktail of age-defying peptides and tighteners, the serum leaves skin looking plumped. And for reducing free-radical damage and helping to boost collagen levels, there’s a dose of vitamin C. 30ml, £250; exclusive to Harrods. Available from The Beauty Apothecary, Ground Floor

lives l ie e

se

I’m not sure it would qualify as an obsession exactly, but I’ve always had a thing for roses. A serious thing. Bunches of red roses; single tea roses in little glass jars; the powdery sweetness of Turkish delight. So I’m pleased to announce that rose is in season, both as an essential ingredient in anti-ageing skincare and literally, as perfume houses gear up for May’s rose harvest in the south of France. To celebrate, I’ve selected the best new rose-centric fragrances, each with a special flourish. First, Aerin Lauder – the talented granddaughter of beauty’s fairy godmother Estée – is launching Rose de Grasse, the debut fragrance in her Premier Collection. (Turns out Lauder has a thing for roses too – it’s the key fragrance note in many of her cosmetics.) This modern interpretation of rose is grown-upfeminine thanks to its base of musk and violet wood, which combines with Otto Bulgarian rose, rose absolute and rose centifolia, handpicked in perfumery capital Grasse. In a completely different approach, Jo Malone London’s new Tudor Rose & Amber is inspired by England’s historical emblem. The accord offsets rose absolute and warm amber with a metallic note – a nod to the era’s steeliness. Robust and intense. For a cool, FROM TOP Aerin Rose de understated and Grasse 50ml, £135, exclusive to super-chic vision Harrods; Jo Malone London of rose, Stella Tudor Rose & Amber 30ml, £42; Stella McCartney McCartney’s eponymous 2003 100ml, £70; Maison Francis Kurkdjian À La Rose 70ml, debut fragrance £145. Available from The put rose centre Beauty Apothecary and The stage and went Cosmetics and Perfumery Hall, Ground Floor; and stratospheric. harrods.com This spring, the original composition gets an update in an eau de toilette that features Bulgarian rose essence at its heart. Finally, olfactive demigod Francis Kurkdjian has created À La Rose, a romantic dedication to the bewitching power of rose as a symbol of feminine beauty, and as muse to all forms of creativity. Each bottle also contains Grasse’s May rose – 250 of them – which creates a heavy floral base, balanced with the fruity Damascena rose in its top notes. – By Fleur Fruzza

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BE AU T Y

HIGH FIVE

Editor Jan Masters reveals her top five beauty treats for the month

When it comes to foundation, I’m really fussy, and it takes something pretty special to encourage me to use it on a daily basis. But the new Intensive Skin Serum Foundation SPF 40 from Bobbi Brown converted me on first application. Containing extracts of radiance-restoring bamboo grass and energising cordyceps mushroom, and skin-tonecorrecting pigments, it offers silky coverage and leaves my complexion looking more dewy than it has in years. Smells lovely too. 30ml, £39

I love the simplicity of dark, inky eye shadow and almost-white highlighter. The problem is finding a single, portable palette with just the right shade of both. Check out Tom Ford’s three new Eye Color Duos to solve the problem. Each has a dark shadow with a pale opal highlighter so you can select the tones that are right for you. What’s more, the powder can be mixed with water for a bold chromatic finish. £46

Ultra-nourishing with a warming floral fragrance, Diamond Absolute Damask Rose Body Oil is the latest creation from Spanish skincare brand Natura Bissé. I don’t like heavily scented body products, but this is beautifully aromatic with damask rose absolute mixed with hydrating grape-seed oil and antioxidant-rich rosehip oil to both soften and nourish. 60ml, £52 I’ve long been a fan of Sisley’s Eau du Soir – the 1990 chypre inspired by Countess Isabelle d’Ornano’s childhood memories of the gardens of Seville’s Alcázar. Now, Soir d’Orient pays homage to the palace’s exotic architecture. The mysterious scent opens with a luminous blend of lemon and galbanum infusing a rich heart of rose, geranium and piquant black pepper. At the base, incense swirls through earthy patchouli and sandalwood. Magical. 100ml, £165; exclusive to Harrods

Exfoliating is a great way to freshen skin and boost circulation on your face and body. I’ve learned it’s also good for your scalp, courtesy of Christophe Robin’s Cleansing Purifying Scrub with Sea Salt. It’s designed to relieve irritation, lift residues left by styling, colouring and pollution, and hydrate the scalp with a vegetable-based moisturiser. Simply use in place of shampoo once a week, gently massaging into the roots of wet hair and rinsing well. After use, my hair feels clean and light. 450ml, £55; exclusive to Harrods

Available from The Beauty Apothecary, and The Colour, Cosmetics and Perfumery Halls, Ground Floor; and harrods.com

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NET benefits

Fall hook, line and sinker for Cornish wild bass, a fish that is much leaner and more flavoursome than its farmed cousin BY PAT ICK MCGUIGAN / PHOTOG APHE MOWIE KAY FOOD STYLIN ECIPES EMMA MA SDEN

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FOOD

T

he sun is just starting to rise, but Newlyn fish market is still bitterly cold as prospective buyers huddle together and stamp around in their yellow wellies to keep warm. They have already cast their expert eyes over the ice-covered boxes of fish, which were landed just a few hours ago, and it’s not long before the white-coated auctioneer arrives and the bidding begins. The process is surprisingly quiet and efficient. A nod of the head or a flick of the hand is all that’s needed to place a bid. By the time morning has broken, all the boxes have been sold and are already on their way to restaurants and retailers across the country. It’s a scene that has been played out for more than a hundred years in this part of Cornwall, where fishing remains the backbone of the local economy. The mild, nutrient-rich waters support a diverse range of sea life, with around 35 different fish species sold at the market each day. Hake, mackerel, Dover sole and monkfish are regularly hauled from the depths, but for many, the ultimate catch is wild bass. This sleek predator of the sea is loved by chefs for its delicate flavour, meaty texture and versatility. A simple pan-fried fillet seasoned with salt and lemon is an elegant dish in its own right, but the sweet flesh can also stand up to bold flavours. In Mediterranean cuisine, tomatoes, red peppers and olive oil are firm friends with the fish, as is a splash of Pernod, while it also has an affinity with Asian flavours, from black bean to ginger. Much of the bass found on supermarket counters is farmed in Greece and labelled as “sea bass”, which is why Cornish fishermen prefer to describe what they catch as “wild bass” to avoid confusion. “There’s a massive difference between wild and farmed,” explains Naomi Bullus, a director at St Ives-based supplier Celtic Fish and Game. “Wild bass eat what they want, when they want. They’ve not been overfed and swim freely, which builds muscle and adds flavour. Farmed fish are reared in big pens, so tend to be fattier.” Celtic was set up 30 years ago by Bullus’ father Geoff, who started out catching fish in his own small boat. The business has grown since then – fish is now bought at Newlyn and direct from small day boats, and Geoff finally hung up his nets for good six years ago. “I got too bloody old,” he laughs. “I started when I was 20 and stopped when I was 60, so it was a long time. It’s about the hardest job anyone could ever do, but you get a buzz because you’re hunting.” The thrill of the chase has diminished over the years with sonar and satellite navigation, but knowledge and experience still play their part. In the winter, bass congregate in deep waters to spawn, which is when the big trawlers move in, but for the rest of the year they are relatively solitary fish, hunting around reefs and old wrecks. Most of the nine tonnes of bass sold by Celtic each year are caught by small boats using more selective fishing techniques than the big trawlers. The hook and line method is popular, as are gill nets, which float vertically underwater before being hauled aboard. While line-caught

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HOMEWARES, TOP

Rosenthal TAC bowl £13.95; ABOVE The small boats used for catching bass in Cornish waters; HOMEWARES, PREVIOUS PAGE Jars Tourron bowl

£13.95; Maison de la Truffe Extra Virgin Olive Oil with Black Truffle £14.50

bass is seen by many as the pinnacle of sustainable fishing, Naomi Bullus argues that gill nets have their advantages. “If you put a line down, you’re not sure what you are going to bring up,” she says. “It’s not very selective, so you can end up with juvenile fish that shouldn’t really be caught. With gill nets you decide the size of mesh, so smaller fish can escape.” Sustainability is an important issue for the Cornish fishing industry, which leads Europe on measures to maintain wild bass stocks, according to Paul Trebilcock, chief executive of the Cornish Fish Producers Organisation. Minimum landing sizes are higher than anywhere else in Europe – wild bass must be at least 37.5cm long compared with 36cm on the Continent, giving the fish extra time to spawn. Fishing is also forbidden in estuaries, which act as nurseries for the juvenile fish, while large swathes of the sea are closed to high-volume vessels. All of which means that while wild bass stocks in Europe are not in great shape, the situation is much more positive in Cornish waters. “If you want to enjoy bass, Cornish bass is the one to go for,” Trebilcock says. Geoff Bullus at Celtic couldn’t agree more. In his experience, there are plenty of fish in the sea. His only regret is that he’s not still out on his boat hunting for bass himself. “I do miss it,” he admits. “You’ll never get rich fishing, but it’s nice being your own boss out on the waves.” HMN Available from Food Halls, Ground Floor. Homewares available from Entertaining at Home, Second Floor Patrick McGuigan writes for Square Meal, ShortList and Restaurant


SEA BASS WITH MUSSELS, CREAMED SPINACH AND FENNEL Serves 4

SEA BASS CARPACCIO

2 tbsp olive oil 20g butter 2 shallots, finely sliced ½ tsp fennel seeds, crushed 1 fennel bulb, cut into wedges with fronds reserved 200ml dry white wine 200ml fish stock 20 mussels 100ml double cream 200g baby leaf spinach 4 sea bass fillets, trimmed 16–20 edible flowers (optional, to serve)

For the tapenade 75g stoned black or green olives preserved in brine, plus 1 tsp brine from the jar Zest of ¼ lemon ½ shallot, finely chopped 1 tsp thyme leaves 1–2 tbsp olive oil

Serve with...

1 Put 1 tbsp olive oil and the butter in a large pan and add the shallots, fennel seeds and fennel. Season well. Cook for about 5 minutes, tossing the fennel from time to time until it’s golden. 2 Pour in the white wine and fish stock, cover the pan with a lid and bring to the boil. Add the mussels and double cream and cover again. Simmer until the mussels open. 3 Stir in the spinach, cover again and turn the heat off. The heat of the pan will wilt the spinach. 4 Heat the remaining olive oil in a pan and fry the sea bass, skin-side down, until the skin is crisp and golden. Season, turn the fish over and cook for a minute or two more. 5 Divide the spinach and mussel mixture evenly among four plates, then top with the fish. Chop the fennel fronds, scatter over the top along with the edible flowers, and serve.

Castell del Remei Oda Blanc 2013, Spain £14.95

Serves 4

For the fish and salad 1 sea bass, filleted and skinned Juice of ½ lemon ¼ red pepper, finely diced 1 red chilli, finely diced Small handful of rocket leaves 4 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

1 Put the olives and brine, lemon zest, shallot, thyme and olive oil in a mini blender and season well. Blend to make a paste, then spoon into a bowl. 2 Finely slice the sea bass and arrange on four plates. Drizzle the lemon juice over the top and season with salt. 3 Sprinkle over the pepper and chilli, then garnish with the rocket. Spoon a teaspoonful of the tapenade onto each plate alongside the fish. Drizzle with olive oil, season again and serve.

Serve with... Isake Fat Samurai Japanese Sake £69

Riedel “O” Syrah-Shiraz wine glass £25 for two and “O” to Go white wine glass £17.50; Jars Plume dinner plate £29.95; Villeroy & Boch Sereno fish knife £15.50 and fork £15.50; Chilewich napkin £24.95

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Jars Tourron 26cm plate £27.95; Villeroy & Boch Sereno teaspoon £8.50; Alexandre Turpault napkin £24.95


FOOD

The SEA SALT Wild bass cooked in a sea-salt crust keeps the fish moist and locks in flavour, making for a fresher dish

Harrods Dill Sauce 170g, £4.25

Atkins & Potts Creamy Dill Mustard Sauce 200g, £3.95

The Great British Butcher Lemon & Mustard Crumb 50g, £3.95

GOOD catch Whet your appetite with a selection of

Palm Island Black lava salt 50g, £5.95

Primvs Pesto Genovese with Basil 180g, £14.95

Terre Exotique Alae Hawaiian red salt 55g, £4.95

Sabatino & Co White Truffle Flavoured Olive Oil 100ml, £14.95

Terre Exotique Diamond salt 250g, £9.95

San Román saffron 1g, £11.95

Navarino Icons Roasted Red Pepper & Tomato Dip 500g, £7.95

Mara Artisan Seaweeds 30g, £10.95

Available from Food Halls, Ground Floor; and harrods.com

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A l’Olivier chilli-infused olive oil 50ml, £15.50

Main photograph Mowie Kay; food styling Emma Marsden

the best condiments for wild bass


WINE

The REAL THING

Amid increasing concern over the authenticity of fine wines, only those sourced directly from producers come with guaranteed provenance and condition BY GUY WOODW

In the upper echelons of the wine world, dates matter. Long and heated are the arguments among connoisseurs over the merits of Bordeaux’s 2009 or 2010 vintage, while the year on the label can have huge ramifications for a wine’s price: the 2010 Château Lafite is currently selling for nearly fifty per cent more than the 2011. Yet there is one year in Bordeaux’s history that retains greater significance than any other – not for the quality of its harvest or the longevity of its wines, but for an event whose consequences are still keenly felt. When, in 1855, Emperor Napoleon III convened an international exhibition in Paris to show off France’s key products to the world, he decided the line-up of wines would have greater prestige if they were graded according to quality. So a panel of brokers set about coming up with a classification of the top châteaux, ranking them from first growth (premier cru) to fifth. Amazingly – bar Château Mouton Rothschild’s promotion from second to first growth in 1973 – the 1855 classification has remained virtually unchanged, meaning the place of Mouton, Haut-Brion et al within the Bordeaux wine firmament is guaranteed in perpetuity. Such a clear hierarchy only strengthens the reputation and desirability of these star names, but such status also exposes the system to greater potential abuse. There are just five first growths, taking their place among the usual suspects of the most coveted and traded wines in the world. The last few years have seen countless stories of counterfeit versions of these elite bottlings, diluting the confidence of buyers. The most high profile of these was the sentencing in 2013 of Rudy Kurniawan to 10 years in prison for a decade-long con in which $20m of fake wines were sold through auction houses as a result of Kurniawan’s home laboratory of bottles, corks, stamps and counterfeit labels. But it’s not just empty bottles of fine wines being refilled with plonk and sold on as the original that’s the problem. There have been several cases of online firms setting up and selling wines “en primeur” – while they’re still ageing in a winery’s cellar – taking payment and then vanishing when the time comes to deliver the final, bottled version. One of the latest examples concerned a firm called 1855.com, which was forced into liquidation with some 11,000 clients owed a total of $50m.

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Château Haut-Brion’s premier-cru wines are supplied to The Wine Rooms directly from its cellars

WINES, FROM TOP

Penfolds Grange Bin 95 Shiraz (2009) £450; Château Mouton Rothschild Pauillac (2000) £1,995; Château La Mission Haut-Brion Bordeaux (2004) £235

All of which has made it more important than ever that buyers of fine wines channel their custom to reliable sources. Maureen Downey, one of the world’s foremost experts on counterfeit wines, is in the process of setting up a new website – winefraud.com – to warn buyers of the dangers at the top end of the market. “Fraud has done enormous damage to collector confidence,” she says. “It’s a wake-up call to retailers who believe that this is an issue that only affects auction houses.” And it’s not just fly-by-night online retailers who can prove unreliable. The trade in old and rare wines has spread to bricks-and-mortar start-ups keen to cater for a new international clientele. When buying from such companies, it is imperative to establish the provenance of the bottles – something that not all retailers can guarantee, particularly at the highest level. The most watertight policy is to buy only “ex-château” bottles, which are sourced directly from the cellars of producers rather than through the labyrinthine network of selling channels that exist in the wine industry. Few retailers are able to offer such “château-to-shelf ” wines – particularly when it comes to older vintages, which may have been through multiple owners and cellars, raising concerns over their condition let alone any potential authenticity issues. While the most storied wines from outside of Bordeaux are not ratified by an official classification, the likes of Domaine de la Romanée-Conti (Burgundy), Tenuta San Guido (Tuscany), Penfolds (Australia) and Colgin (California) are firmly established at wine’s top table, making them equally susceptible to more unscrupulous brokers and less diligent merchants. Buyers beware. HMN Available from The Wine Rooms, Lower Ground Floor


NEWS

ste t e ts Looking for an extra dash of style for your Easter tea? From delicate cupcakes to a showstopping banana and pineapple cake, we have sweet treats worthy of any table.

HEAVEN ON EA TH Few foods convey indulgence quite as vividly as truffles. The rich, earthy tones of the tuber add lustre to sauces, pasta, even cheese. Now truffle lovers have the perfect destination to satisfy their cravings – and to explore more renditions of the delicacy. Tartufi & Friends serves everything from pizza with burrata, basil and truffle to vanilla ice cream with pine nuts and dried figs in truffle honey. The restaurant is also notable for its coffee, sourcing special blends from Puerto Rico, the Galàpagos and Hawaii. Tartufi & Friends, Lower Ground Floor

easons for riesling

Nested INTEREST

Some things look good enough to eat. Others look too good to eat. Such is the case with chocolate eggs by The Chocolate Libertine – aka Julie Devonald – who studied textile design before retraining as a chocolatier. Since founding her own brand in 2009, Devonald has made her name creating intricately designed chocolates with hand-painted flourishes. Her limitededition Harrods Artisan Easter Egg comes with a box of couverture truffles in a choice of white chocolate and pistachio, dark chocolate and raspberry, or milk chocolate and sea-salt caramel. And yes, it tastes as good as it looks. Harrods Artisan Easter Egg £195; exclusive to Harrods. Available from Food Halls, Ground Floor

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Easter cupcakes Choose from four flavours, including carrot cake with pecans and creamcheese frosting, and chocolate salted caramel with dulce de leche and hazelnut praline. £3.95 each; Sophie Conran cake stand £39.95; Alexandre Turpault napkin £24.95 Hummingbird cake If you want to go all out to impress, a banana and pineapple sponge with sweet creamcheese frosting will steal the show. £65; Sophie Conran cake plate £49.95 Available from Food Halls, Ground Floor; and Entertaining at Home, Second Floor

Easter sweets photographer Mowie Kay; food stylist Emma Marsden

Milk chocolate and apricot pots Not quite as innocent as they appear, pots of chocolate sponge layered with salted milk chocolate mousse and apricot compote, topped with a sugar “carrot” do not qualify as one of your five a day. £4.95 each

Riesling’s styles and sweetness levels can enchant and confuse in equal measure. The family-owned Egon Müller estate has been producing wines solely from the grape since 1797, though, and has it all worked out. Its Kabinett wines deliver a delicate off-dry rendition at lower alcohol; the Auslese wines offer a more unctuous flavour; and the Trockenbeerenauslese, notably the rare 1959, is the ultimate rendition of a rich, sweet wine. All are made that bit more special by a provenance note on the bottle detailing the release date from the Müller cellar. 1959 Scharzhofberger Trockenbeerenauslese £24,995. Available from The Wine Rooms, Lower Ground Floor

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The Chocolate Society, Hattie & Blythe and Biscuiteers Mix and match with The Chocolate Society’s valrhona chocolate egg filled with chocolate truffles; Hattie & Blythe’s speckled chocolate bird eggs; and Biscuiteers’ tin of chocolate biscuits featuring eggs, bunnies and lambs. Chocolate Society eggs £24.95 each; Hattie & Blythe tin £7.95 each; Biscuiteers tin £32; Sophie Conran bowl £29.95; Villeroy & Boch Mariefleur bunnies £14.90 each


Brooklyn industrial


BROOKLYN INDUSTRIAL Cultivated and confident. This is a look we’ve called Brooklyn Industrial, a sleek picture of ultra-urban sophistication – an unapologetic bachelor pad without the overt masculinity. Think Gordon Gekko’s Wall Street titan meets the genius of the late Steve Jobs. It is a style well suited to those who are gregarious and love to entertain with taste and elegance. It is extroverted and conspicuously slick, yet also contained and controlled. As such, monochrome is the dominant colourway. But the strong aesthetic is tempered by artfully sculpted wood as seen on the Porada Belt bench and Cattelan Italia Arabesque sideboard. The Bottega Veneta mesheffect leather and glass room divider and Ligne Roset Fifty cord-back chairs also work to contribute the all-important stealthy touches of texture that lift and lighten this otherwise frill-free look. Overall, the forms are graphic and geometric, finished mostly in the sort of polish that whispers carefully curated quality. However, the details are where this look really comes into its own: Baccarat and Saint-Louis crystal, Lladró ceramics, Georg Jensen porcelain and Rubelli fabric. The clever twist is underpinning the potentially austere look with a softening dose of pattern and delicate colour, introduced here via a flush of moody lilac on the walls and an oversized rug from The Rug Company.

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“Overall, the forms are graphic and geometric, finished mostly in the sort of polish that whispers carefully curated quality”


IN TER IOR S

TAILORED SCANDI Light and airy, with room to breathe, is a quietly contemporary ode to modern we’ve called Tailored Scandi. Clean, bright, light and vivaciously coloured, it has an openness and innocence that’s reflected in the natural materials. Classic oaks in furniture from Zanotta and the Porro Balancing Boxes side table are juxtaposed against the slubby linens of the Giorgetti Aton corner sofa, and a discreet touch of metallic bling courtesy of Tom Dixon accessories and leather. The overall feel is warm and gentle, simple and straightforward. This is about solid icons of design (Fritz Hansen’s Egg chair, the Anglepoise Type 75 Maxi floor lamp) that speak of an enduring and underlying sense of history, overlaid with a youthful freshness that ensures the mood stays completely contemporary. Despite its apparent simplicity, this is actually one of the harder looks to pull off; too minimalist, and it could feel cold and unwelcoming. The key is a liberal dose of colour, and plenty of pattern and texture via fabrics such as the Designers Guild and Colefax and Fowler prints seen here on cushions. The style embraces comfort married to optimistic modernity and, as such, fits the mood of spring perfectly.

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HOLLYWOOD GLAMOUR

“This is the ultimate stylistic escape from the stress and speed of contemporary life – a modern interpretation of nirvana through homewares”

Credits TK Images

This is a gloriously unabashed evocation of the allure and sophistication of the golden age of the silver screen. It recreates in silvery greens and pearly blues a fantasy of a time when stars sparkled as flawless avatars of their real selves, with no Instagram selfies to expose the cracks. This is the ultimate stylistic escape from the stress and speed of contemporary life – a modern interpretation of nirvana through homewares. You can almost imagine the sweet scent of camellias wafting through those windows, along with gentle birdsong and spring sunshine. In this world, there are no trials or tribulations, chores or traffic jams. Like elements of Hollywood itself, of course, it is a mirage, a myth, a room in which to lose oneself. Gorgeous and indulgent, this look is definitely best suited to a boudoir. For there, in the cocooning Fendi furs, silks and Celso de Lemos linens of your Frato Lagoa bed, you can dream undistracted of a perfect world – a world in which elegance and heritage reign supreme, and all glassware comes from Lalique, all tableware is Baccarat, all homewares Christofle and all luggage Prada.

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IN TER IOR S

RESTORATION CHIC This look is subtle, a style built upon the timeless pillars of superior craftsmanship and elemental materials: worn and woven leather, cast iron, a little lacquer, burnished aluminium and solid brass. It is a vision of a home founded on experience, well travelled and confident people who want to retreat to an environment that permits reflection and repose. It is a look for those who like to surround themselves with tokens of a cosmopolitan culture and facets of their personality, as seen in the many quirky touches: globes, Indian busts, artworks (here from Timothy Oulton and Roche Bobois). References are global (Persian rugs from The Rug Company to antique lanterns redolent of a Turkish bazaar from Eichholtz), yet the whole is unapologetically patterned and playful. And despite the eccentric touches, the overall impression is old-school, unpretentious and reassuringly anchored in quality; witness the generously deep-seated Eichholtz armchair and the linen-upholstered Flamant sofa. Sink back and relax in your cosy corner of the world. HMN Available from Food Halls and Luxury Accessories, Ground Floor; Bed Linens, Entertaining at Home, Home Fragrance, Luxury Home, Luxury Linens and Wedgwood, Second Floor; Anglepoise, Bang & Olufsen, B&B Italia, BoConcept, Bottega Veneta, Cattelan Italia, Classics Room, Eichholtz, The Fabric Library, Fendi Casa, Flamant, Frato, Giorgetti, Harrods Technology, Ligne Roset, Porada, Roche Bobois, Roche Bobois Nouveaux Classiques, The Rug Company, Timothy Oulton, Tom Dixon, Vitra and Yoo Home, Third Floor

Michelle Ogundehin is Editor-in-Chief of Elle Decoration UK HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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TECHNOL OGY NOW THAT’S JUS T SHO WIN G OFF

EEN YO U S E V A O L ED H ER AM P U S THE AY ? DISPL

We need to talk

When it comes to personal devices, Samsung has it taped. Neil Monger, Samsung’s national trainer (a tech genius) gives us a rundown, while Jan (hasn’t a clue) Masters translates BY J

/ ILL

Neil Monger: Let’s start with the Galaxy Note 4 and Galaxy Note Edge. We don’t really like the word “phablet” because… Jan Masters: Have to stop you there. What’s that? NM: A “phablet” is a mixture of a phone and tablet. JM: Sorry, I just heard it as “fablet” – as in a really fabulous tablet. NM: No, to qualify, the screen has to be over five inches (the Note is 5.7") and have call functionality. Once you’re talking seven inches, it’s generally classed as a tablet. Ours have the S pen, which launches Quick Commands. As you hover over the screen – something we call Air View – with one click, you can bring up, say, Action Memo, which allows you to link handwritten actions to tasks using Wacom technology… JM: Whoa. Wacom what? NM: As you write on what looks like a sticky note on your screen, the technology is so accurate, you don’t

NAT

experience any delay. It recognises your writing and tries to understand the patterns to correlate with an electronic version of it. JM: Any other functions? NM: The Notes have Quad HD display. Do you remember before we had Full HD TVs, we had 720p, which was HD ready? JM: Not really. NM: HD ready and HD were 720p (which refers to the number of pixels). That’s not quite 1080, which is Full HD. Have you heard of 4K TV at all? JM: No. Mostly, I just keep up with Scandi crime, what’s new to Sky Atlantic, and how many silk blouses Gillian Anderson can wear in one episode of The Fall. NM: Well, we have TVs out at the moment that are four times the level of HD. Now, we’re not saying the screens on the Notes have four times Full HD, but rather four times HD ready, so four times 720. That’s a really high X HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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TECHNOL OGY

“If you’re taking photos at Formula 1, the camera won’t struggle to focus”

Samsung NX1 camera body £1,599; kit £2,799

JM: That’s great. What’s next? That looks suspiciously like a digital SLR camera. NM: It’s our NX1 and it’s a compact system camera, competing with high-end DSLRs. It has a magnesium body and an S Series lens – once that’s on the body, it’s weather-sealed. JM: So I could shoot in the jungle and not worry about humidity. And I promise, that’s something I do. NM: Traditional DSLRs use mirrors and pentaprisms, but this system doesn’t need either because light comes through the lens, hits the sensor and portrays the image through the viewfinder – so the image is already processed before you’ve taken it. JM: Is there an issue with the speed with which that happens (and am I impressing you with that question)? NM: We’ve increased that speed, so when light hits the sensor, and within 0.005 of a second – so five milliseconds – it will be in your viewfinder. JM: Sounds whizzy enough. NM: Well, the human eye can’t detect anything below 20 milliseconds. It’s also back-illuminated, which means it works better in low-light conditions. We also have 153 cross-type focusing points covering 90 per cent of the sensor (many competitors have around 60). That means if you’re taking photos at Formula 1, when everything is moving quickly at different angles, the camera won’t struggle to focus. And with Active Focus, it can predict where, say, Cristiano Ronaldo is running, and set the focus. JM: Crikey – the England team could do with that. How fast can you shoot on continuous? NM: Fifteen frames per second, refocusing between each frame at full resolution.

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JM: You’ve sold it to me. Finally, you’re going to show me the Level Over headphones. NM: Yes: they sit over your ears, are wireless and provide noise cancellation. JM: Does that mean that if you’re on a plane, you can screen out crying babies, the drone of the plane, et cetera? NM: Yes. What’s also great is the left earphone is NFC tagged, so I could pair it up with a tablet by touching the two, and it holds the stream via Bluetooth. And the right earphone is your control system. It’s a touchpad. Slide up and it will turn the volume up, slide down and it will turn it down. Double tap and it will pause the song, double tap again and it will play, slide forward… JM: …Yes, I think I’ve got it. And that is a great function, as fiddling with controls is annoying. Although it might make you look like you’re miming to other passengers that you’re going slightly loopy. Well, thank you, Neil, I’ve learned from this session. But we never got on to the Beauty Face feature on your phones. NM: On selfies you can make eyes bigger, faces slimmer. JM: Good grief! There’s no end to the fun and deception one can get up to. NM: Wait till I help you get to grips with our new phone. That really is going to blow you away. JM: I can’t wait. But before that, I need to lie down in a darkened room and watch 100,000 shades of grey. HMN

Samsung Level Over headphones £299 Available from Harrods Technology, Third Floor


COOKING MASTERCLASSES

Demonstrating everything from chocolate-orange fondue and smoothies to a Heston-inspired savoury chocolate snack, chefs from leading appliance brands will satisfy the Easter cravings of even the sweetest tooth.

KitchenAid Thursday 9th & Friday 10th April, 11.30am– 4pm Learn how to make an array of cakes, including white-chocolate-iced cupcakes, using the KitchenAid 6.9L Artisan stand mixer.

Kuvings Saturday 11th & Sunday 12th April, 10am– 8pm Experts from Kuvings will be whipping up chocolate mousse and chilled chocolate smoothies.

Jura Saturday 11th & Saturday 18th April, 11.30am–2pm Baristas from Jura will make chocolate-infused cappuccinos using the latest Giga coffee machine, able to make two cups at once.

Nespresso Friday 17th & Saturday 18th April, 11am– 6pm Masters of making expert coffees with ease, the Nespresso team will use the Lattissima Pro to create frothy chocolate cappuccinos.

Sage Friday 17th, Saturday 18th & Sunday 19th April, 11.30am– 6pm Using the Heston Blumenthal-endorsed Boss blender, the Sage team will magic up an innovative three-course chocolate menu including avocado-and-cocoa pudding and chocolate pesto with sourdough.

Vitamix Thursday 23rd, Friday 24th, Saturday 25th April, 10am–6pm, & Sunday 26th April, 11.30am– 6pm The chefs at Vitamix will be whizzing up a heavenly chocolate-orange fondue with a touch of Grand Marnier using the Vitamix 5200 blender. Marshmallows will be provided for dipping.

Miele Friday 24th April, 12pm– 4pm Representatives from Miele, a brand renowned for hard-wearing appliances, will demonstrate its latest induction hob, while chocolatiers will make tantalising truffles and nutty chocolate slabs.

Café Godiva Open Monday to Saturday 11am–8pm & Sunday 11.30am– 6pm; for information, please call 020 7739 1234 Chocolate artisan Godiva really knows its cocoa beans. Café Godiva, on the Second Floor, offers rich hot chocolate, fondue pots and an array of pastries for the perfect post-shopping treat. For more information, call 020 7730 1234 and ask for Cookshop or Home Appliances. Please note: these are not ticketed events.


NEWS

FLOAT AWAY With a fourth-generation family member at the helm, Italian furniture brand Lago is all about creativity, design for real living and, unsurprisingly, family life. The pull of Lago is its sense of fun, and the brand’s latest range plays with the idea of gravity. Kitchen islands seem to levitate thanks to invisible stands, and shelving units are mounted to walls without brackets, appearing to float. Price on request. Available from Lago, Third Floor

WORLD OF WANDERS

How do you like your eggs in the morning? Marcel Wanders opts for boiled, complete with a crown-like eggcup and a teaspoon with a mini hammer on the end to crack the shell. They say breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and certainly Wanders’ third collection in collaboration with Alessi does it justice. Launched in 2011, the Dressed range has seen Wanders inject a bit of fun into the kitchen, which he fears is becoming too clinical. Focused around breakfast, additions to the collection feature the ornate swirly pattern previously stamped onto saucepans now added to a sugar bowl, a butter dish, serving platters and wooden centrepieces. Eggcup & spoon set £17; centrepiece £89. Available from Alessi, Second Floor

Scarlet STAR

Burrwood Boards chopping board Mowie Kay; food styling Emma Marsden

With a history that dates back more than two centuries, Wedgwood takes fine dining seriously. The Anthemion Ruby collection is handcrafted from fine bone china and gilded with 18th-century motifs from Wedgwood’s archives. 27cm plate £125, teacup £105 and saucer £80. Available from Wedgwood, Second Floor

ustic charm If you go down to the woods today, you may bump into Steph Kemp and Simon Cummins of Burrwood Boards scouring for fallen trees, from which they make chopping boards. The environmentally conscious duo use reclaimed British wood from sustainable forests and, whenever possible, fallen branches. The beauty of the woodgrain – whether oak, sycamore, beech, walnut, sweet chestnut or ash – is protected with Danish oil, and the latest collection uses copper leaf to fill imperfections. From £499. Available from Cookshop, Second Floor

The virtual CELLAR

Heat, light, vibration and humidity are seen as the four main enemies of wine. But Sub-Zero’s ICBIW-24 wine storage unit is preparing to take on these foes. With a 102-bottle capacity, the ICBIW-24 emulates cellar conditions, so oenophiles needn’t worry about their prized bottles. The unit includes two temperature zones to suit all wine types, a UV-protected glass door and a quiet compressor, which means wine is not disturbed by vibration. Cheers. £7,600. Available from Home Appliances, Second Floor HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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NEWS

fo

Green Man GOES GLOBAL

A Harrods Green Man has been on duty at every door of the store for more than 100 years, making this sight an established part of the London landscape. From 27th March, make a fashion or beauty purchase and you’ll be given a mini Green Man of your own. Take a snap of him anywhere in the world, upload it to Instagram, and the most ingenious image will win a VIP shopping weekend with a luxury stay at the Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park plus £3,000 to spend in-store. Runners-up will each receive £1,000. As we’re teaming up with Vogue for the Vogue Festival (25th and 26th April) – a fashion extravaganza with leading designers, photographers and models – the results will be announced at this special event. For more information, visit www.harrods.com or www.vogue.co.uk/voguefestival

BY THE BOOK Much of the pleasure in booking a holiday surely comes from the research – weighing up the options from all those pictureperfect azure seas and golden sands. Online searches are all well and good, of course, but why not work from a brochure curated by you, for you? Abercrombie & Kent’s print-on-demand booklets allow sun-worshippers and adventure-seekers alike to create a brochure with their preferences. Select your holiday shortlist from various destinations and types of trip, and a complimentary high-quality print version will be with you in three days. For more information, please visit Abercrombie & Kent at Harrods, Lower Ground Floor, or call 020 7173 6440

t love s

Painting Now by Suzanne Hudson Looking to find a rising art star? Critic and art historian Suzanne Hudson assesses the contemporary scene by profiling more than 200 artists in an up-to-date analysis of trends and the people shaping them. £29.95 Ways of Curating by Hans Ulrich Obrist The Serpentine Gallery’s director of international projects chronicles museums’ approach to exhibitions across continents and centuries to the present day. £16.99 Oxyrhynchus by Jenny Saville Arguably one of Britain’s most recognised figure painters, Saville uses oil, charcoal and pastel on canvas to deliver fascinating images of layers of bodies that take the Egyptian archaeological site of Oxyrhynchus as their reference point. £60

Sprouting wings

Machu Picchu Abercrombie & Kent

BOOKS

Now there’s proof technology gets better by the day. With Sprout by HP you can send 3D images of objects at the click of a button. The device features an Immersive Computing system that combines a scanner, depth sensor, high-resolution camera and projector, making it possible to capture physical items and then integrate them into a 3D digital workspace. It also makes it easier to collaborate remotely; users can connect online, then jointly manipulate digital content in real time. £1,899. Available from Harrods Technology, Third Floor

Cy Twombly: Late Paintings 2003-2011 by Nela Pavlousková Twombly was a postabstract expressionist, following in the footsteps of Rothko, Pollock et al. This collection of images and accompanying commentary explores the results of his final burst of creativity. £40 Painting Beyond Pollock by Morgan Falconer A historical look at the development of painting over the last 70 years, this retrospective traces trends, techniques and tastes. Ideal for collectors and novices alike. £49.95 Available from Harrods Books & Cards, Second Floor HAR RODS M AGAZINE

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Island LIFE

There is a special place on an idyllic island where you’ll find the very best that life has to offer. Welcome to the natural beauty and stylish glamour of Sardinia’s Costa Smeralda

Porto Cervo Getty Images

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t’s just one of those places that really does have it all. The turquoise waters lapping barefoot-beautiful sand. A fascinating history with ancient sites to explore. A vibrant culture that is celebrated at colourful festivals. Food that seduces the senses and contributes to the extraordinary longevity of the locals. And it’s super-glamorous too; not only is the nightlife starry and stylish, the social calendar is studded with fashion shows, exclusive concerts and fine-dining events. At Costa Smeralda – in northeast Sardinia, alongside the lively port of Porto Cervo – you can play golf, jet-ski, dive, hike, or simply lie back and relax. You can detox or indulge. Be seen… or escape. And in any one of the quartet of elegant and quintessentially Sardinian hotels in The Luxury Collection (part of the Starwood Hotels and Resorts portfolio), you’re ensured dream fulfilment – not to mention lasting memories – from the moment you arrive. Stretching along the bay like a picturesque village is the five-star Hotel Cala di Volpe. Sporting activities – including water-skiing and tennis – abound at the hotel, while golfers can head to the nearby Pevero Golf Club. Alternatively, the views from the restaurants, bars and terraces let you immerse yourself in the beauty of Costa Smeralda while enjoying local specialities such as fregola,


PROMO T ION

SOCIAL CALENDAR Spring and summer highlights 15th to 17th May Porto Cervo Wine Festival Taste the best Italian vintages, meet critics and bloggers, and sample gourmet dinners. 6th and 7th June Porto Cervo Food Festival Enjoy Sardinian dishes as well as foods from local producers. 15th June to 23rd August Eating with the Stars Italian chefs from Michelinstarred restaurants will, for one week each, serve a tasting menu of Sardinian produce.

“At Costa Smeralda you can play golf, dive, hike or simply relax. You can detox or indulge. Be seen... or escape” Sardinian pasta served with a seafood and vegetable sauce. Elsewhere, relaxation awaits. The enchanted Hotel Romazzino – with exceptional rooms and suites, and six private villas – is set in a verdant tropical garden, hugging the emerald sea fringed by the finest sand. Meanwhile, for the ultimate retreat surrounded by natural splendour, Hotel Pitrizza is a pure gem, with breathtaking views of the bays and a swimming pool carved out of rock; here, it’s impossible not to feel truly at one with this elemental land. Should you crave a more high-octane break, there’s Cervo Hotel; elegant, warm and inviting, the Costa Smeralda Resort is the buzzing heart and soul of Porto Cervo. Enjoy all that the hotel’s restaurants and bars have to offer before experiencing the glamorous boutiques and gregarious events dotted around the piazzetta. Visit www.destinationcostasmeralda.com or www.costasmeraldavillas.com for more information

Porto Cervo

Costa Smeralda Olbia

Alghero

SARDINIA

Cagliari

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP Tranquil Hotel Pitrizza is set in a perfumed subtropical garden; a Sardinian-style patio at Cervo Hotel; OPPOSITE PAGE, FROM TOP Hotel Cala di Volpe, nestled on the shore of the bay; Hotel Romazzino enjoys a magnificent setting

July Porto Cervo Fashion Week Hotel Cala di Volpe and Porto Cervo village host some of the most prestigious international fashion brands. July and August Gala Dinners with Concert at the Hotel Cala di Volpe Stars from Andrea Bocelli to Elton John have played; two more are set to join the list… August Porto Cervo Shopping Night The most exclusive boutiques open until midnight; cocktails, DJs, exhibitions and concerts enhance the experience. See destinationcostasmeralda. com/summerevents for details


THE BELVEDERE PENTHOUSE Chelsea Harbour, SW10 Located in the private marina of Chelsea Harbour, this penthouse apartment of approximately 4,780sq ft (444sq m) in The Belvedere is situated on the 18th, 19th and 20th floors (with internal lift) and has 360-degree views of London and the River Thames. There are four bedrooms (all en-suite), multiple terraces, a reception room with double-height ceilings, three underground parking spaces, and 24-hour concierge and security. Facilities at the marina include a five-star hotel, gym, spa and restaurant. The mainline station at Imperial Wharf (0.1 miles) provides direct links to Clapham Junction, Shepherd’s Bush (Central line and Westfield shopping centre) and West Brompton (District line). There is also a River Bus service at Chelsea Harbour Pier. EPC rating C. Leasehold: Approximately 98 years remaining Price on application 020 7225 5752 john.harris@harrodsestates.com

HARRODSESTATES.COM


HANS PLACE Knightsbridge, SW1 Arranged over six floors, this Grade II listed, sevenbedroom home of approximately 5,167sq ft (480sq m) comprises a reception hall, dining room, kitchen with breakfast room, library/sitting room, drawing room, master bedroom with dressing room, two double bedrooms with dressing areas and en-suite bathrooms, and three further bedrooms. There is a gym, utility room and wine cellar, and a self-contained staff flat with a separate entrance in the basement comprising reception room, bedroom, kitchen and bathroom. EPC rating C. Freehold Price: ÂŁ14,500,000 Also available for long-term rental 020 7225 6508 shaun.drummond@harrodsestates.com

KNIGHTSBRIDGE OFFICE: 82 BROMPTON ROAD LONDON SW3 1ER T: +44 (0)20 7225 6506 MAYFAIR OFFICE: 61 PARK LANE LONDON W1 1QF T: +44 (0)20 7409 9001 CHELSEA OFFICE: 58 FULHAM ROAD LONDON SW3 6HH T: +44 (0)20 7225 6700 HARRODSESTATES.COM


MY STYLE Going bright at New York Fashion Week AW14

YSL Beauté Touche Éclat £25

Cire Trudon La Marquise candle £64.95

Wearing an AWAKE dress at Paris Fashion Week SS15

On the front row at New York Fashion Week

Adidas trainers £79.95

ANYA ZIOUROVA

The New York-based model-turned-stylist reveals her obsession with Dior earrings and Adidas Stan Smiths, and explains how she feels about being papped at fashion shows BY

Louis Vuitton jacket £1,400, top £800 and trousers £610

Tibi top £525 and trousers £335

Tibi

Tibi top £225 and skirt £525

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Dior earrings £490

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Complete the sentence: My style is…? Effortless, chic, minimal with a twist. For example, at New York Fashion Week I’ve been known to wear an acid-yellow coat with a bright pink beanie hat. It was unexpected, but somehow they came together. Do you have the same approach when you style for work? I always try to make my work interesting and new, but sometimes you have to stay on the safe side – for instance when you work with celebrities. If it’s a fashion shoot, I like to go bold and create something more challenging. Who have you enjoyed styling the most? I don’t want to play favourites, but I had a great time with Monica Bellucci – she’s amazing. She’s very down-to-earth – we talked a lot about babies because I was pregnant and she had just had her second child. She gave me loads of tips, which I thought was so nice and motherly of her. And then all of a sudden she put on a Dolce & Gabbana bustier and turned into a sex bomb. You’re originally from Russia. Does Russian style influence your look? I’m sure it does. I love Russian ballet, music and art. You recently styled Tibi’s runway show. What was the experience like? It’s different from styling for a magazine. It requires a different pace and close collaboration with the designer. It was fun, as I was involved in all of it – casting and make-up tests, as well as styling the looks. You’re often papped at fashion shows. How have you embraced the whole street-style phenomenon? It’s more familiar now. You can’t escape it, so you do dress up for the photographers. I like to support some of my favourite labels or emerging Russian designers. But I would never wear something I didn’t like just for a picture.

What do you wear off duty? Very easy clothes. I’m always in jeans and I have about 25 pairs of Adidas Stan Smiths in black or white, which have to be pristine. I love my Yves Salomon parka for winter. But occasionally I will mix it up a bit. If I feel like wearing high heels to take my daughter to the park – why not? How do you approach your travel wardrobe? I always have basics with me, but, depending on the country, weather or occasion, I add special pieces that make a difference. And I always pick up something local. What’s on your shopping list for SS15? I’m desperate for the Louis Vuitton jeans from the summer collection. I also love the lacy boho-chic dresses from Chloé and everything Raf Simons is doing at Dior, especially the cotton embroidered shirt dresses and kaftans. And the earrings! I have tons and I always want more. Who are your favourite designers? Nicolas Ghesquière – whichever house he works for, he makes it great because his vision is authentic. And Prada; although it’s sometimes left-field, it’s always creative. What are your top beauty products? I love Kiehl’s shampoo, Shiseido moisturiser and YSL concealer – I’m very pared back when it comes to make-up. And I love Cire Trudon La Marquise candles. What’s your ultimate stylish destination? I had a wonderful time in Turks and Caicos with my husband and [street-style photographers] Tommy Ton and Phil Oh – we discovered the place together. Available from The Colour and Cosmetics Halls, Ground Floor; Studio and Superbrands, First Floor; Home Fragrance, Second Floor; House of Adidas, Fifth Floor; and harrods.com

New York AW14 Jason Lloyd-Evans; Paris and New York SS15, and with Dello usso Getty Images

Louis Vuitton

style

With Anna Dello Russo


Profile for Harrods online

Harrods Magazine April 2015  

Whether you want to go clean and tailored with Scandi-chic furniture, sit back in a slick, urban setting, relish the old school glamour of H...

Harrods Magazine April 2015  

Whether you want to go clean and tailored with Scandi-chic furniture, sit back in a slick, urban setting, relish the old school glamour of H...

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