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Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative

Job Shadow Day 2013 In partnership with the SustAINAbility Committee Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commmerce P.O. Box 1235 • Kailua-Kona, HI 96745 P.O. Box 722, Honoka’a, HI 96727 www.shyli.org


Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative’s Job Shadow Day 2013 Awards Ceremony in partnership with The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce Sust’AINAbility Committee February 22 was an important day for Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leaderships Initiative’s youth leaders. “We were all given the wonderful opportunity to attend Job Shadow Days molded to our future aspirations,” said Kohala youth leader Kynan Kawai, a senior at the Kamehameha Schools. “I was lucky to have three mentors combined into one great experience!” Jeff Turner of Aloha Business Services with his clients Bill and Brooks Wakefield spent the afternoon with Kynan on The Wakefield Coffee Farm in South Kona. For their first Job Shadow Day, SHYLI partnered with Kohala-Kona Chamber of Commerce Sust’AINAbility Committee. “Job Shadow Day puts youth in the shoes of our potential future,” Kynan adds. “We can then decide if we really like this, or if not, this is the perfect wake up call to start rethinking about what we want to do!” A reception was held on Monday, March 11 at Chamber member Jack’s Diving Locker. Award certificates were presented to youth and their mentors who will share their experiences. An aspiring architect and senior at Kealakehe High School, Allie Kitchens was matched with Holly Algood who shared her experience building their green home in Hawi. “The knowledge I gained from my time in Hawi will stay with me through my progression to my future and my struggles to succeed,” said Allie. “I had an enjoyable time in this SHYLI program and am thankful for this opportunity to grow and expand myself.” Allie volunteered for the Kona-Kohala Grand Green Homes Tour presented by the Chamber and organized by Ms. Algood. Allie had second Job Shadow Day experience with Stephen Grant Green at Stephen Green Architecture in Waimea who has also worked with large architecture firms in Asia, Chile, and San Francisco. Konawaena High School senior basketball team member and aspiring pediatrician Trevor Tanaka was matched with Dr. Eddie Herd, a pediatrician and Iron Man athlete. “The Kona community has an ongoing need for quality medical care,” says Dr. Herd. “That makes investing in the lives of young people like Trevor who show interest in a medical career a big part of the Hawaii Renewable-Sustainable efforts that will make a difference in all of our lives for generations to come. Having opportunities available like SHYLI’s Job Shadow Day allows the next generation to stand on the shoulders of those who came before them so that our youth can reach farther and deeper into areas that will make a difference for Hawaii today and well into the future.” He added, “Spending time with Trevor here


in my pediatric practice, it is easy to see that he embodies the spirit, drive, intelligence and desire we all should encourage along his path to success. Trevor's future successes will undoubtedly translate into a positive impact on our community and state for years to come. SHYLI has been and continues to be a part of that impact." Makana Tavares, a senior at Kanu o ka ‘Āina New Century Public Charter School in Waimea was matched with Phyllis Magal, Park Ranger at Puÿuhonua o Honaunau National Historic Park. “I learned that a career, a calling, is not something that we may always understand. It can come in the form of a profession stumbled into or a task we tailor to meet our individual standards,” said Makana. “Listening to Phyllis I felt proud of calling the people she spoke about my ancestors and gratified as she reinforced my own firm cultural foundation.” Makana’s dream is to combine her love for the Hawaiian culture with her developing passion for writing. “It was a privilege to meet Makana and find such depth and quality in someone who is at the beginning of her service to humanity,” says Phyllis Magal. “It gives me hope there are capable and committed young people out there who will be working on the immense challenges confronting our world at this time.” “Job Shadow Day made me really want to get my business degree so I can realize my dream career, combining my two passions Sustainable Business and Sustainable Agriculture,” says Kynan. “ We enjoyed our time with Kynan,” said Brooks and Bill Wakefield. “His excellent questions and responses were well thought out and articulate. His goals for his future are commendable. We have confidence that he is and will continue to be an inspirational leader in sustainability for the future. We thank SHYLI and Kohala-Kona Chamber of Commerce for helping the youth of our state realize their potential and dreams, and at the same time making our community a better place to live.” ####################################

About The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce and the Sust’AINAbility Committee Providing leadership and advocacy for a successful business environment in West Hawai`i is at the heart of every Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce initiative. Incorporated in 1968, KKCC’s core objectives are to strengthen the economy, represent business interests with government, promote the community, provide networking opportunities and lead political action. The SustAINAbility Committee, one of five standing committees within the Chamber, works to promote environmentally and socially responsible practices for business and community. Their Kuleana Green Business Program promotes integrity, commitment and respect for employees, customers, community and the environment in business practices. www.kona-kohala.com About the Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative SHYLI’s mission is to train young people from Hawaii to envision their dreams for their lives, their island and their world. SHYLI began on the Island of Hawaii in 2010. SHYLI is a project of the Stone Soup Leadership Institute, a 501c3 non-profit organization founded in 1997 on the island of Martha’s Vineyard. The Institute develops culturally sensitive educational tools and trains youth from islands to become leaders of a more sustainable world. The Institute organizes Job Shadow Day on other islands for years. The Institute’s Executive Director wrote the book and curriculum Stone Soup for the World: Life-Changing Stories of Everyday Heroes on Hawaii. It gives young people the tools to become servant leaders, create invigorated teams, strong economies and healthy communities. The Institute’s annual weeklong Youth Leadership Summit for Sustainable Development is held on the Martha’s Vineyard. In 2011, SHYLI’s first youth delegate to the Summit spoke at the APEC Voices of the Future Summit. The 2013 SHYLI Youth Leadership Forum brought together Hawaii’s leaders with SHYLI youth who shared their Sustainability-In-Action projects and vision for sustainable Hawaii. SHYLI Thanks All of Our Supporters: County of Hawaii, Hawaiian Airlines, Mokulele Airlines, Protect the Planet Foundation, Hawaii Community Foundation’s Kuki’o Foundation, Saffron’s, The W.K. Kellogg Foundation: www.shyli.org About Job Shadow Day Each February, the National Groundhog Job Shadow Day, a national campaign gives young people a new perspective on their studies through hands-on learning and a one-day mentoring experience. It is a joint effort of America's Promise - Alliance for Youth, Junior Achievement, and the U.S. Department of Labor. Nationwide, more than one million students and 100,000 businesses participate, and last year, more than 2,000 restaurants and hotels hosted nearly 20,000 students. Job Shadow Day helps translate youth passion with practical experience in the job market and the world of work. “We’ve discovered this one-day really helps young people focus on their future,” says the Institute’s Executive Director Marianne Larned. “It’s a good investment in their future and ours. Our goal is to give youth a positive experience of the world of work, promote a good work ethic, and develop longer-lasting relationships that contribute to the Island’s economy.”


Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative in partnership with The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce Sust’AINAbility Committee Job Shadow Day Reception Agenda Jack’s Diving Locker, Kona • March 11, 2013 Reception

5:30 p.m.

Opening Remarks: Marianne Larned • Welcome • Thanks to JSD sponsors and mentors • Job Shadow Day Overview Share about working with SHYLI youth and mentors for Job Shadow Day • SHYLI Youth Leadership Forum Survey Results: Kynan Kawai

5:45 pm

Presentation of Certificates 6:00 p.m. • Marianne Larned, Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative • Holly Algood, The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce’s Sust’AINAbility Committee Read certificates, present them, take photo, youth/mentor say a few words • Kynan Kawaii with Jeff Turner & Brook and Bill Wakefield, Wakefield & Sons Inc. • Makana Tavares with Phyllis Magal, Pu'u Honua o' Honaunau National Historic Park • Allie Kitchens with Holly Algood, Algood Consulting • Trevor Tanaka with Dr. Eddie Herd M.D. Pediatric Clinic and In Patient Services at Ali’i Health Care & Kona Community Hospital Close – Thanks for coming + Upcoming Events – see handout

6:20 pm.

• You can nominate Hawaii youth for SHYLI: 2013-2014 • Orientation: March-April • Youth Leadership Summit: June 22-28 • SHYLI sponsors for each youth Sponsor Recognition • Teri Leicher Jack’s Diving Locker • The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce’s Sust’AINAbility Committee members including Jeff Turner, Teri Leicher, Holly Algood, Lori Sasaki, Vivian Landrum

Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative www.shyli.org The Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce Sust’AINAbility Committee www.kona-kohala.com


Youth Leadership Summit for Sustainable Development on Martha’s Vineyard. She was nominated to serve as a youth delegate by her teacher Jenny White, Environmental Leadership Club for her commitment to sustainable. Allie volunteered with the Kona-Kohala Grand Green Homes Tour in partnership with the Kohala-Kona Chamber of Commerce’s Sust'AINAbility Committee.

Almarine Kitchens Future Architect Allie Kitchens is a graduating senior at Kealakehe High School in the class of 2013. Over the past four years Allie has dedicated significant effort into maintaining a high academic standard. She has taken a series of upper level courses including honors and AP programs in order to challenge herself and prepare for her future. Allie has also attempted to broaden herself through extra-curricular activities and community service. Through my school I am the Vice President of the National Spanish Honor Society and the National Honor Society. She is a member of our school’s largest service club, Interact, which is an affiliate of Rotary International. Allie is a student representative on the School Community Council that helps make decisions for the campus. Her largest commitment through the school is to the Environmental Leadership Club, where she serves as the President. With this Club she has worked to run her school’s recycling program, as well as start a petition to start recycling in all public schools on the island. Her work with the community through Habitat for Humanity is more directly related toward my dreams for the future. Allie has worked on several building sites and watched the progress of a home being built. This community service and her membership with American Institute of Architecture Students have helped give her an introduction to the architectural field that she wants to enter professionally. This fall Allie plans to attend a four-year university and study architecture. Following her bachelor’s degree she hopes to pursue a Masters in Historic Preservation. Her long-term goal is to be self-employed and design new buildings of a variety of types and work on restoration/ preservation of historic buildings. In June 2012, Allie served as a youth delegate to the 2012

Holly Algood Holly Algood is a partner with Algood Living LLC, Distributor for American Clay and Principle, Algood Consulting and Algood Bamboo Barn. The Algood businesses are based on a property that utilizes solar and wind power to generate all electricity and showcases multiple green building technologies and design features. Their products are eco friendly, green and promote healthy and sustainable living. They are the Hawaii distributor for American Clay Earth Plaster. Holly is actively involved with her community and island. West Hawai‘i Mediation Center mediator and Board member, Vice President, Ulumau, Hawai‘i Island Leadership Series Chair, SustANIAbility Committee/Kona-Kohala Chamber of Commerce, Advisory Committee Member of Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative, North Hawai’i Drug Free Coalition, Chair, Capacity Committee, Earth Team Volunteer, USDA NRCS (United States Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Services), Member HOFA (Hawai’i Organic Farmers Association) and President, Puako Condo Association. Dr. Algood received her degrees from Fielding Graduate University (MA and PhD); Renssellaer Polytechnic Institute (MS) and Indiana University (BA).


SHYLI Job Shadow Day 2013 Almarine Kitchens with Holly Algood, Algood Consulting A job shadow day in theory and practice is a rewarding experience. To be placed with a professional in the field you wish to enter can only help to broaden your understanding of the work that lies before you and the rewards that it may offer in the future. This has been my experience with SHYLI Job Shadow Day program. My professional interest is architecture and I was paired with Holly Algood for my job shadow day. I spent the evening at her home, a compound of her own design, learning about the processes of green building. While I was there I gained a good deal of information about the different features of a home that can be made “green” as well as the processes that are used to accomplish this. Everything from energy efficient appliances to adaptive reuse of materials were employed to lower the overall footprint of the site, making it a great example of work in this field. Ms. Algood’s insight into this field was also very helpful. Even though she is not directly part of the work I hope to do in my future I enjoyed being able to view this side of the construction process. The time she spent in designing and planning out her home shows immense dedication and demonstrates why the finished product is such an outstanding example of progressive building. Overall my experience with the SHYLI Job Shadow Day program has been rewarding and helpful. The knowledge I gained from my time in Hawi will stay with me through my progression to my future and my struggles to succeed. I had an enjoyable time in this SHYLI program and am thankful to have been given this opportunity to grow and expand myself.

Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative P.O. Box 1235 • Kailua-Kona, HI 96745 • P.O. Box 722, Honoka’a, HI 96727 www.shyli.org


Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative Job Shadow Day 2013 Almarine Kitchens with Stephen Grant Green Stephen Green Architecture Being able to spend time for Job Shadow Day with Stephen Green I was able to see at a greater distance what it’s like to be an architect. Having grown up surrounded by the field of design and architecture (my father), I have long been immersed in its practices and routines. However, with this close study of the job it isn’t hard to loose sight of the importance of each step of the design process. It really has helped me to put things back into prospective. Our first stop during our Job Shadow Day was an OAC meeting, or Owner/Architect/Contractor. These meetings are designed to keep an open dialogue between all the people involved in a building and to maintain steady progress on the project. At the meeting we attended, for a home designed by Mr. Green in Kauna’Oa, we discussed everything from scheduling to possible solutions to minor problems. Having been to similar meetings over the years I was able to follow much of their discussion and get a firm grasp of the dynamic of the interaction. Following the meeting we went to the build site to check the progress of the construction, a regular practice of most architects. As we walked around the site I was surprised to see the number of small details an architect has to keep an eye on in order to avoid serious mishaps. It had been a few years since I had been on a working construction site, but the feeling of potential was the same -- the ability to see through the bare-framed walls and imagine what the space will become; to see how it will function after the drywall; roof and furniture all come together and finish it up. The rapid pace at which progress can be seen in the first few weeks after the slab is poured is astonishing. Once back at Mr. Green’s office we discussed his previous work and how he started working on each new design. The number of projects he has worked on worldwide is very impressive. I find the international nature of architecture to be one of its most appealing elements. Having heard of his successful stories my interest in the field and the travel that it can provide has increased. As we spoke about the different software and modeling platforms used in architectural design, I saw that while I was knowledgeable in some areas, I am lacking in others. I already possess a good foundation in both AutoCAD and GoogleSketchUp, However I have no experience with modeling or hand drawing. With this in mind I am better able to understand what skills I most need to develop in my future – and with my college studies. The experience I gained in the few short hours I spent with Mr. Green was been exceedingly helpful. With this new knowledge I feel I am better able to say that I know what lies ahead of me in the architectural field. As time goes on I will be able to look on experiences like this and remember the reasons I am pursuing this career and the rewards I can gain in the end. Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative P.O. Box 1235 • Kailua-Kona, HI 96745 www.shyli.org


Kynan Kawai Future Sustainable Business/Agriculture Kynan Kawai is a senior at Kamehameha School Hawaii. He aspires to Sustainable Business, with an emphasis in Agriculture. Born and raised in North Kohala, Kynan attending public elementary and middle school. Kynan served as a Hawaiian youth delegate to 2012 SHYLI Youth Leadership Summit for Sustainable Development on Martha’s Vineyard. He researched and prepared a presentation on Sustainable Business and Agriculture. He was a “Visioneer” of this year’s SHYLI Youth Leadership Forum where Hawaii’s youth shared their vision with Hawaii’s decision makers from business, government, education and nonprofits – and their families, schools and communities. For 6 years Kynan was a student in the Ka Hana No’eau Mentorship program funded by Partners in Development in the rural North Kohala. He is supportive of the North Kohala Community Development Program (CDP)’s to reach 50% food self-sufficiency by 2050. He spoke at the "North Kohala Growing a Local Food System" with 75 decision-makers. He was chosen by the North Hawai’i Drug-Free Coalition to attend CADCA’s Mid-Year Training Institute in Nashville, TN. Kynan has seen an incline in underage drinking and substance abuse. He remembers that when he was a child, there would be sign waving groups in his community sponsored by the Kohala Let’s Kick Ice drug prevention program. He would tag along with his mom, helping create catchy signs, like one that read “cook rice, not ice.” Sadly, sign waving gatherings such as this have dwindled down to none. Kynan feels that sign waving was a very effective way of informing the public about being drug-free and is using the knowledge he gained in Nashville to revive sign-waving efforts in the North Kohala community. In college Kynan will study Business Administration, minor in Management.

Jeff Turner, Aloha Business Services Jeff Turner has over 40 years experience as an entrepreneur, CPA, and business consultant. He obtained a BA in Accounting from the University of Washington in 1967. Jeff arrived in Hawaii over 20 years ago, starting his own practice there in 1994. He also has a full civic life, serving on many boards and committees in the community over the years. Jeff brings this rich experience of business startups, organizational controls, and cost accounting to Cordon Development Group. He will be a key player in keeping track of everything for this development project. His permaculture training, dedication to the environment, and deep commitment to sustainability ethics add special insight and value to this project. Brook and Bill Wakefield, Wakefield Farm The Wakefield family coffee is grown at 1,500 feet elevation on the slopes of an active volcano, Hualalai in Kona. These perfect growing conditions, combined with our pesticide free farming, hand harvesting, sun drying and small batch roasting are what make Kona Coffee the finest of gourmet coffees with a fullbodied, rich taste. Bill Wakefield started farming just out of high school, though commercial fishing out of Kona was his passion. In 1982 he married Brooks and together they planted their 8-acre Keauhou farm with coffee and avocado. Bill fished his way to larger boats, until he owned his 42’ Radon and fished in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. Brooks taught science and math to middle school students at Hawaii Preparatory Academy for 7 years. After many years of working full-time and also farming the 8 acres, Bill and Brooks decided to focus on farming and to diversify. They downsized their fishing boat and bought another 5 acres, in Kailua, planted it with 5 different varieties of mangoes, and had it certified as organic. Bill and Brooks now sell their mangoes, avocadoes, and coffee locally, on the outer islands, and internationally.


Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leaderships Initiative’s Job Shadow Day 2013

Kynan Kawai Jeff Turner, Aloha Payroll Services Bill and Brooks Wakefield, The Wakefield Coffee Farm February 22, 2013 was an important day for Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leaderships Initiative’s youth leaders. For SHYLI’s first Job Shadow Day, we partnered with the Kohala-Kona Chamber of Commerce’s Sust’AINAbility Committee members. We were all given the wonderful opportunity to attend Job Shadow Days molded to our future aspirations. I was lucky enough to have two Job Shadow Day activities combined into one great experience. The objective of these Job Shadow Days is to put youth leaders in the shoes of our potential future. We were given the opportunity to decide if we would like this, if not then this would be the perfect wake up call to start rethinking what we really wanted to do! I was paired with the Jeff Turner of Aloha Payroll Services. Jeff Turner has over 40 years experience as an entrepreneur, CPA, and business consultant. Jeff arrived in Hawaii over 20 years ago, starting his own practice in Kailua Kona in 1994. He holds CPA certificate # 2887 in Hawaii. Jeff’s’ permaculture training, dedication to the environment, and deep commitment to sustainability ethics added special insight and value to my Job Shadow Day since I am very interested in Sustainable Business. While I was on the Job Shadow Day activity with Jeff, I learned that the basic objective of being a CPA is controlling other businesses books and payroll. I asked Jeff’s’ assistant what are some of the tasks you have to deal with that they don’t teach you in any college course of becoming an accountant. The answer to this question was people skills; sometimes there will be a situation where your client may be angry, you will have to deal with it, controlling yourself from being offended from what the client may be saying. Out all the wonderful advice Jeff gave me, I think the most memorable would be to never try to do your books yourself, if you mess up it’ll cost more to have someone correct the errors than it would have cost to have hired a CPA who really knows what they are doing. My other Job Shadow Day was with Bill and Brooks Wakefield of The Wakefield Coffee Farm. This Sustainable Agricultural business of coffee is grown at 1,500 feet elevation on the slopes of an active volcano, Hualalai, in Kona. Bill Wakefield started farming part-time when he was just out of high school, though commercial fishing out of Kona was his passion. In 1982 he married Brooks and together they planted their 8-acre Keauhou farm with coffee and avocadoes, and officially incorporated their business. Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative • www.shyli.org


At first, Bill and Brooks farmed when they weren’t busy with their other careers. After many years of working full-time and also farming the 8 acres, Bill and Brooks decided to focus all their energies on farming. They downsized their fishing boat and bought another 5 acres, in Kailua. They diversified their farm, planting five different varieties of mangoes. They had it certified as organic. Bill and Brooks now sell their mangoes, avocadoes, and coffee locally on the Big Island of Hawaii, as well as on the outer islands, to the mainland and even internationally. During my time with the Wakefield’s they emphasized these essential ingredients to success: 1. Set goals 2. Hard work 3. Do your homework. This homework is much more than just the general school kind of homework. If you have a problem with your business, you must research the issues and find ways to solve the problem. That is what “doing your homework” means in a business setting. In relation to Sustainable Agriculture, something special I learned from the Wakefield’s is to not dedicate your farm to just one crop. It’s important to diversify or even create a value added product. They showed me the beauty of agriculture, which I love, but also the risk you can be taking because you never know, there could be a pest who could endanger your entire crop. SHYLI’s Job Shadow Day was a great opportunity. It supported my reasons of attending college and majoring in Business. I learned a lot of information about being an accountant that I didn’t learn in taking the Accounting 1 class that I took in high school. It strengthened my passion for Sustainable Agriculture, while also revealing some of the struggles that I might encounter. This activity made me really want to get my business degree in college to be able to understand how to actually run a business, that business I hope will be agriculturally related. This would be my dream career, combining my two passions Sustainable Business and Sustainable Agriculture. It was an honor to be chosen and certainly our pleasure spending time with Kynan. He is such a polite, bright, and inquisitive young man. Brooks and Bill Wakefield

Kynan Kawai, is a senior at the Kamehameha Schools, Keaau. He was nominated by David Fuertes, Ka Hana No’eau, Partners in Development. Kynan shared his vision of Sustainable Agriculture & Business at the "North Kohala Growing a Local Food System" with 75 decisionmakers. For his Sustainability-In-Action project, Kynan was a Visioneer creating the successful SHYLI Youth Leadership Forum.

Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative


www.shyli.org


views this life goal as an opportunity to be both a teacher and a student in cultural exchange to both diversify and unite global communities.

Makana Tavares Future Cultural Anthropologist Makana is a senior at Kanu o ka ‘Āina New Century Public Charter School in Waimea and her dreams include combining her love for the Hawaiian culture with her developing passion for writing. She is an active participant in traditional Hawaiian practices including stewardship of the land, learning and speaking Hawaiian language, and dancing hula. Her involvement with her culture through her school, which has a project-based, place-based focus, is the basis of my interest in sustainability. She has studied the teachings of her Hawaiian predecessors and through their ancestral link has developed an appreciation for the symbiosis apparent between human communities and the land. Makana’s first published article was about her experience as a delegate to the 8th Annual Youth Leadership Summit. At the Summit, the focus of her presentation was Cultural Sustainability. Upon her return, she developed a Sustainability-In-Action Project on Cultural Sustainability to help restore kinship with her cultural roots as a step towards becoming more self-sufficient. For her senior project, she created an exhibit that allows students an avenue through which they can express their voices while expanding their perspectives and increasing their pride in our collective heritage. It incorporates peace poems by middle school students, which focused on their dreams for the improvements they wish to see in the world they will be a part of building. Makana’s other interests include Environmental Studies and Anthropology. She wants to travel the world as an ambassador for her culture. Learning is her primary passion, and truly her motivation, which is why she

Phyllis Magal Pu'u Honua o' Honaunau National Historical Park Phyllis is a Park Guide in the interpretation division of Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park. For the past four years Phyllis has worked there, starting as a laborer on a crew that was rebuilding and restoring all of the traditional structures at Puʻuhonua o Hōnaunau NHP. During this 16-month tour of duty she convinced her supervisor that she could document the process of building and thatching the two types of traditional buildings we have at the park. She completed a 100-page document that included writing, photographs and original drawings. The park now has a complete written guide for the process that was mostly kept as oral tradition. Her duties include public speaking to groups of people from all over the world. Phyllis has a deep concern for preserving traditional cultures because she believes there is much wisdom we are in danger of losing as this world becomes more homogenized. She is deeply committed to helping to preserve Hawaii’s unique culture - its values, its art forms, its traditions. “My career path has not been a straightforward one,” she says. “I planned to become a medical doctor, but was drawn to other explorations early on.” Her degrees are a BA in Art and a MA in Theology and Art. She has made her living as an artist selling to galleries across the country and as an entrepreneur working in the field of Personal Growth and Development.


SHYLI’s First Annual Job Shadow Day Makana Tavares with Phyllis Magal, Pu'u Honua o' Honaunau Live the questions now. - Rainer Maria Rilke At SHYLI’s Job Shadow Day I learned that a career, a calling, is not something that we may always understand. It can come in the form of a profession stumbled into or a task we tailor to meet our individual standards. My feelings about my future were corroborated by a day spent with Phyllis Magal at Puÿuhonua o Honaunau. Phyllis is a Park Guide who relishes and takes pride in a job that allows her to interact with visitors from around the world, educating them about the ‘wahi pana’ of Honaunau from an amazingly comprehensive perspective. I listened to Phyllis give a presentation, one of her many duties, introducing visitors to the singular environment that is Puÿuhonua o Honaunau, and moreover, Hawai’i. She shared history, the travels of Paÿao to these sublime shores before recorded history, the Kamehameha dynasty, and the abolition of the kapu system. I felt proud of calling the people she spoke about my ancestors and was gratified to have prior knowledge about much of what she was saying as it reinforced my firm cultural foundation. The listeners in my midst were uncannily focused on Phyllis’s words. I attribute this to her ability to weave other cultural perspectives independent of Hawai’i into her delivery. She presented information in a way that made it both relevant and relatable to all who chose to attune their ears. After her presentation, Phyllis and I had some private, one-on-one time together. I had prepared questions for her to review in advance. I asked her about how she reached her current position. She told me about her father, to whom she attributed her greatest influence, namely for his thoughtful perspective and vast interpretation of the world. I appreciated this as I too aspire to hone my views to represent a thought process that reaches beyond immediacy. Phyllis enjoyed most about working in the Park was that her position afforded her to opportunity to reestablish common bonds among people through the impartation of histories and sharing of cultural knowledge. She believes we should look deeper into our commonalities, including the convoluted nature of human society, rather than capitalizing on our differences and grievances. This is one of the


mainstays of my SHYLI presentation of cultural sustainability, which seeks to connect people to their histories, as it acts as a springboard off of which people of different backgrounds can truly realize their connectedness to those from whom they deem themselves different. I asked Phyllis if there was anything that surprised her about her job and she told me it was how much she enjoyed the public speaking she does. She came to realize that oratory is truly an art form, one where you do extensive research, synthesize information, and like an astute sculptor, add and subtract material, while still maintaining a credible presentation. I was fortunate enough to see this in action, witnessing how she molded her material to make it pertinent and apparent to her audience. Much like her approach to speaking, Phyllis said she has always been in the nature of “creating her own positions” in her professional life. I saw what she meant when she showed me a publication she had proposed and created, documenting the restoration of the traditional hälau at the Park. In 2008 she started as a laborer, working on rethatching the buildings in the Park. She took it upon herself to document and share the process for posterity, as prior to 2008 all of the knowledge related to the process had been retained in the traditional Hawaiian method of oratorical memory. Phyllis compiled photographs, her own drawings, and a complete written record of the thatching process, which is now the property of the National Park Service. She took on this endeavor of her own accord simply because it was something she saw that needed to be done, and she did it. I was amazed by the drive and dedication something of this magnitude must have required. Following this, the Park offered her a full-time position as a Park Guide, which she accepted and is currently working there. Phyllis’s career path has not been a straightforward one, she shared a statement about “staggering through life” rather than stepping, and this statement’s validity, because it is important to live with uncertainty. It is smart to have a plan, but even smarter to understand that this plan is subject to and will change. I was relieved to hear this because I am not certain of my professional interests. It was nice to be reassured by someone who I look at as being an apt and assiduous professional and keeper of cultural knowledge. Before leaving I asked Phyllis to describe her job in three words and these are what she gave me: kuleana, responsibility; mana, power; and connection, which at the time neither of us knew the Hawaiian word for, but we now know is pilina. Lastly, she reminded me of the importance of intuition in navigating through life, the value of trusting your sources, yourself, and your naÿau (gut) as sometimes your mind can be manipulative. After we said goodbye, I proceeded to explore the Park walking across the sands and within the rocks, taking in my surroundings, the value of which I now know there are industrious individuals working daily to maintain and preserve. Part of my job allows me the opportunity of meeting people from all over the world. It was a privilege to be able to meet Makana and find such depth and quality in someone who is at the beginning of her service to humanity. It gives me hope that there are capable and committed young people out there who will be working on the immense challenges confronting our world at this time. Thank you for giving me this opportunity to connect with Makana, and through her, the possibility of a more hopeful future. Phyllis Magal Makana Tavares is a senior at Kanu o ka ‘Āina New Century Public Charter School in Waimea and her dream is to combine her love for the Hawaiian culture with her developing passion for writing. http://www.hawaii247.com/2012/07/17/waimea-student-shares-sustainable-summit-experiences/ Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative • www.shyli.org


Trevor Tanaka Future Pediatrician Trevor Tanaka is a senior at Konawaena High School, in Kealakekua, Hawaii. He aspires to become a pediatrician. Trevor is a member of the Hawaii State Student Council and serves as Vice Chair of the Council’s Environment of Care Committee. Trevor is a Harvard Book Award recipient and Awardee of the County of Hawaii “Student Malama Award: Celebrating Student Leadership in Sustainability.” Trevor served as a youth delegate to the 2012 Youth Leadership Summit for Sustainable Development on Martha’s Vineyard. At the Summit, Trevor made a presentation on his Sustainable Education Resolution. He also appeared on the national radio program, Keep it Moving with Marsha Reeves-Jews. Following the Summit, Trevor participated in the yearlong fellowship program with Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative. He wrote and published two articles in Hawaii’s papers. Trevor made an inspiration presentation at SHYLI’s Youth Leadership Forum. Trevor is currently working with State Senator Denny Coffman is championing this legislative process with Senator Takumi (Chair, Education) and the Big Island Representatives. Senator Tokuda wil introduce the companion Senate Concurrent Resolution (SCR) and follow up with the Big Island Senators (Kahele, Ruderman, Green, Solomon) to sign onto the Senate version. Trevor goal is to obtain his degree(s) and return to the Big Island of Hawaii to pursue his career: Pre-Med and Engineering (Biosystems) with a minor in Business.

Dr. Edwin Phillip Herd, M.D. Pediatric Clinic and In Patient Services Ali’i Health Care, Kona Community Hospital Dr. Herd is board certified pediatrician with licenses in Hawaii, Colorado, South Dakota, Nevada, California and North Carolina. He received his degrees from the University of Colorado and University of South Carolina School of Medicine. A world-class long-distance triathlete and 14-time Ironman finisher Dr. Herd raises funds for the children of West Hawaii. The “A Heart for Kids” campaign has an ambitious goal of nearly $150,000 of life-saving medical purchases that includes a neonatal and material resuscitation simulator, infant CPAP resuscitation system, neo-natal resuscitation bed with warmers, and fetal monitors. “Two years ago I underwent heart surgery,” commented Dr. Herd. “It was a time in my life that I was confronted with serious life questions such as will I ever be able to do the things I did before and what matters most to me. As a physician, one would think with my line of work that these are easy questions to answer but they are not. Since then, I have been adamant about continuing to be active, living a healthy lifestyle and now doing the Ironman again, which I fortunately am this year, but also giving back to our community. Being a Pediatrician, it wasn’t difficult to decide to concentrate my efforts on children and Kona Community Hospital.”


Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative’s Job Shadow Day 2013

Trevor Tanaka Dr. Edwin Phillip Herd M.D. Pediatric Clinic and In Patient Services at Ali’i Health Care & Kona Community Hospital My Job Shadow Day was Dr. Ed Herd, a pediatrician with the Alii Health Clinic in Keauhou. I spent an afternoon with him that gave me a firsthand experience of the day-to-day life of a pediatrician here on the Big Island. This was very beneficial because one of my possible career choices is a position in the healthcare field. Pediatrics is my main interest at this time, but since I am not 100% sure yet, it was very important to observe and work alongside a practicing pediatrician to get a better idea of what he does on a daily basis. Having spent time with pediatricians as a patient, it was a totally different experience sitting in the office as an observer. During the four hours I was there, I observed Dr. Herd treat seven patients. At the beginning of each appointment, Dr. Herd introduced me and told the patients and their families that I was there observing and that I was interested in becoming a pediatrician.


The first two patients (a 3-yeard-old and a 7-year-old) had common cold symptoms. An 11-year-old had a sprained ankle. Dr. Herd talked directly to the patient about why he was in and how the sprain occurred. This really peaked my interest because I have had numerous sprained ankles from playing sports over the years and just got off crutches as the result of a badly sprained ankle. He recommended the “ice and elevate,” over-the-counter pain meds and rest. We also saw a 6-month-old and a 4-year-old patient for routine checkups. I was amused by the 4-year-old girl who came for “the kindergarten shots” (5 shots in all). She confidently announced to all of us that she was “not going to cry” and was going to “be brave like a big girl.” Dr. Herd and I had to leave the room to go on to his next patient while his nurse administered the shots. I could hear our brave little patient screaming down the hall over and over saying “Mommy, make them stop! Ow!” The last patient we saw was a 3-year-old girl who was being seen for painful abscesses. I felt a lot of compassion for her because I could tell she did not want to be there and she felt something bad was going to happen to her. As part of her treatment, Dr. Herd had to apply pressure to her abscesses and then had to clean them out. This was obviously very painful and uncomfortable for her. Her parents were holding her down, her arms were flailing, and she was screaming. Dr. Herd did warn her that it was going to hurt and kept apologizing throughout the session. She was not a happy camper and did not give Dr. Herd a hug at the end (but she did smile at me, probably because I had nothing to do with her painful experience). Prior to our day starting, Dr. Herd did say he was “on call” and may have to leave for the hospital if called. He said he would take me with him and we may possibly be called to the OR (Operating Room). This was very exciting to me. Unfortunately, he didn’t get called while I was shadowing him, so I did not get to experience that aspect of pediatrics, but it gave me an idea of how emergency situations can interrupt a physician’s schedule at a moment’s notice. He did share a particular emergency situation where he was called to the hospital and arrived before the OB/GYN doctor. He said he was VERY relieved the OB/GYN made it into the operating room just as the baby was being born. This made me a little nervous because I’m not interested in practicing in the field of obstetrics and gynecology, but it did give me insight on how OB/GYN and pediatric are connected. On the day I shadowed Dr. Herd, he had some “no shows,” which gave us the opportunity to spend more time together talking about his career and life experiences and my goals and aspirations. We talked about his journey to get where he is at today that made me think about my own journey. It was inspiring to learn how he put himself through college, first getting a degree in chemical engineering, pursuing a career as an engineer, and then later deciding to attend medical school and then become a pediatrician. Although I am interested in medicine, I am also interested in other fields. Dr. Herd’s journey proves you can do anything you want, and even change your mind down the road, if your heart is in it and you work hard for it. He also made a point of telling me to pursue my passions outside of medicine to create balance in my life. This is most valuable advice I received. He spoke of his passion for running and how it helped to rejuvenate him and deal with the stresses of college and medical school. I feel very fortunate to have had the opportunity to shadow Dr. Herd. He epitomizes the person I hope to become one day. He always thinks about others before he thinks about himself and wholeheartedly cares about the well-being of his patients and our community. He was very patient in answering all of my questions and his advice and experiences helped me re-focus on my own personal goals and choices. The opportunity for young people such as myself to participate in Job Shadow Day is invaluable. It allows us to make connections within our communities, develop relationships with mentors, experience careers that we are interested in, and educates us on what skills and education/training are necessary for particular careers and how to succeed in our careers. What a difference one job shadow day can make!

Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative P.O. Box 1235 • Kailua-Kona, HI 96745 • P.O. Box 722 • Honoka’a, HI 96727 www.shyli.org


SHYLI Job Shadow Day 2013