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realize that Richard Nixon could actually have been set up by some of the Watergate burglars, whose loyalty was really to the CIA. When you look at some of the data, you realize this possibility exists. Watergate was an attempt to get him out of the White House, because he was going where other powerful people didn’t want him to tread.1 The official history, of course, is that the breakin on the night of June 17, 1972, into the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex, was simply the latest in a long line of “dirty tricks” authorized by President Nixon. It just happened to be the time that his henchmen got caught. Ultimately, Watergate came to refer to the many illicit activities and the cover-up that led to Nixon’s resignation in August 1974. That’s the basic storyline of Woodward and Bernstein in All the President’s Men, and most other accounts. Nixon was the bad-guy who got carried away with his thirst for power, and that’s that. But maybe it’s as Watergate burglar G. Gordon Liddy once said: “The official version of Watergate is as wrong as a Flat Earth Society pamphlet.”2 Let’s start with the fact that Nixon had been haunted by the specter of the Kennedys ever since losing the election to JFK in 1960. He even happened to be in Dallas on November 22, 1963, for a Pepsi-Cola Bottler’s Convention! If Robert Kennedy hadn’t been assassinated, he’d have been the likely Democratic contender against Nixon in 1968, and quite likely Nixon would have lost. So what if, after his election, his obsession resulted in the beginning of a carefully orchestrated plan to get rid of Nixon? What if it all tracked back to the assassination of John F. Kennedy almost a decade earlier? What if the Watergate backstory is really about what Nixon knew, or wanted to know, about who killed JFK? Maybe Nixon was determined to find out what the CIA possessed about the assassination, out of curiosity and for his own purposes. He could then use that knowledge against the powerful Agency, if he had to. Or maybe Nixon himself knew something about the assassination, and was paranoid that the CIA might have the same secret knowledge. This knowledge could lead back to him, or people he knew. I’m not sure which it was, but I’ll bet it was one or the other. And the CIA was determined to stop his quest. Let’s start with a story that H.R. Haldeman, Nixon’s chief of staff, related in his memoirs. Soon after taking office in 1969, the president called him into the Oval Office and officially asked Haldeman to get hold of any and all documents from the CIA that pertained to the Bay of Pigs. This was the first of many

Profile for HAROLD ARROYO, JR.

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

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