Page 80

At the time Robert Kennedy was gunned down in the pantry of the Ambassador Hotel in L.A. on June 5, 1968, I viewed it more as a copycat political murder— this young Palestinian, Sirhan Sirhan, who didn’t like Kennedy’s policies toward Israel, much like five years earlier Oswald had been a disgruntled Communist. It was now a trend, a cycle, where if a Kennedy decided to run for president, some idiot would put an end to it. At that point, I still didn’t believe the government would lie to me. This was before my doubting the of the Warren Commission, which didn’t start until I got out of the military and heard Mark Lane speak. Later, the death of Robert Kennedy became the turning point where I felt either their father Joe had done something that was never going to be forgiven, or there certainly were forces out there ensuring another Kennedy would never occupy the White House. To say that my trust of the Establishment had deteriorated would be an understatement. Robert Kennedy was only 42 when he was assassinated and, having just won the California primary, was on his way to the Democratic nomination and likely the presidency. He would have begun withdrawing our troops from Vietnam and saved thousands of American lives. He’d already been talking with his aides about reopening the investigation into who killed his brother. I think it’s safe to say that, if he’d lived, we’d have a different kind of country than what we’ve become. Robert would have led a “compassionate” revolution—because he was a man not only of courage, but of compassion. That night in the Ambassador Hotel, it seemed a pretty open-and-shut case that Sirhan was another “lone nut.” After all, he was wrestled to the ground after firing his .22-caliber revolver from a few feet in front of Kennedy. The police soon found a diary, in which Sirhan wrote over and over that “RFK must die.” We soon learned he’d been stalking the senator, which again raises the question in my mind as to how come nobody in authority picked up on Sirhan as a potential threat. The curious thing, even at his trial, was that Sirhan had no memory of committing the killing. He still doesn’t. Let’s start by looking at the physical evidence. First of all, Sirhan’s revolver held only eight rounds and he never had time to reload. But a reporter’s recording has what audio expert Philip Van Praag has determined are thirteen shots in a little more than five seconds.1 Two of those are what forensic experts call “double shots,” meaning they happened so close together that there’s no way they came from the same gun. In pictures taken in the pantry later that night, you can see some policemen looking up at what they later said was a bullet hole in a ceiling panel. The trouble is, that’s behind where Sirhan was shooting from.2 The

Profile for HAROLD ARROYO, JR.

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

Advertisement