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Zandt, revealed that he had also been approached by “agents of Wall Street” to lead a Fascist dictatorship. Even Time, which twelve weeks before had made fun of the plot idea, came out with a small-print “footnote” that the committee was “convinced ... that General Butler’s story of a Fascist march on Washington was alarmingly true.” After that, though, the committee’s investigation came to a sudden stop. They never called any of the big financiers for questioning. In fact, when the transcript of the committee’s interview with Butler appeared, all the names he’d named were deleted. Some said that the names were omitted at the request of a member of FDR’s cabinet, who didn’t want to embarrass the two former Democratic presidential candidates that Butler identified. FDR never made any comment on the plot, so we can’t know what he might have said behind closed doors. Maybe he figured, now that this was public knowledge, he didn’t need to pursue it further. Maybe he dismissed the plan as a preposterous idea. For whatever reason, the Justice Department avoided any steps toward fuller investigation. That caused Roger Baldwin of the ACLU to issue an angry statement: “Not a single participant will be prosecuted under the perfectly plain language of the federal conspiracy act making this a high crime.” (Does this remind anyone of the current administration not wanting to prosecute the Bush people for their involvement in torture?) When Jules Archer interviewed John McCormack in 1971, the former House Speaker claimed he couldn’t remember why his committee had stayed away from implicating the bankers and corporate presidents. McCormack did say: “If the plotters had got rid of Roosevelt, there’s no telling what might have taken place. They wouldn’t have told the people what they were doing, of course. They were going to make it all sound constitutional, of course, with a high-sounding name for the dictator and a plan to make it all sound like a good American program. A well-organized minority can always outmaneuver an unorganized majority, as Adolf Hitler did.... The people were in a very confused state of mind, making the nation weak and ripe for some drastic kind of extremist reaction. Mass frustration could bring about anything.” Even though this happened more than 75 years ago, it’s worth paying attention to where the plot came from—and how its would-be perpetrators haven’t necessarily gone away but only taken on different faces. Let me start to explain that by telling you about a book called Tragedy and Hope: A History of the World in Our Time. It was written by a Georgetown University professor named Carroll Quigley, a well-connected academic who had many friends and

Profile for HAROLD ARROYO, JR.

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

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