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Little Rock bank. Several inquiries into Mena were stifled, and IRS agent Bill Duncan told Congress in 1992—during the Clinton presidential campaign—that his superiors directed him to “withhold information from Congress and perjure myself.”21 Looks like Clinton may have been tainted by the Iran-Contra madness himself. Okay, the Reagan-Bush gang is gone, and Clinton is now president. It’s 1996 when the San Jose Mercury News comes out with a remarkable 20,000-word series by reporter Gary Webb that he’d been researching for more than a year. It described a pipeline between Colombian cartels, middlemen, and street gangs in South Central L.A. that involved tons of crack cocaine. Webb’s article featured Oscar Danilo Blandón, a drug importer and informant who’d testified in federal court that “whatever we were running in L.A., the profit was going to the Contra revolution.” Blandón also said that Colonel Enrique Bermudez, the CIA asset leading the Contra army against the Sandinista government, was aware that these funds came from drug running. Except the CIA had squelched a federal investigation into Blandón in the name of “national security.” The crack was being funneled to a young new-millionaire named “Freeway” Ricky Donnell Ross, who supplied it to the Crips and Bloods and beyond. When Ross got nailed and went to trial in 1996, the prosecutors obtained a court order to prevent the defense from questioning Blandón about his CIA connections. All of which raised a huge question: how involved was the CIA in the crack epidemic then raging across our country?22 Well, you’d think Gary Webb should have gotten a Pulitzer. Instead, he got torn apart by the big media. In page-one articles, the Washington Post, New York Times, and L.A. Times insisted that Contra-cocaine smuggling was minor, and that Webb was blowing it all out of proportion. They made it look like Webb was targeting the poor CIA, when he’d never said that the CIA, per se, was arranging the drug deals, only that it was protecting the Contra dealers. In 2009, a new book came out that makes my blood boil. It’s called This Is Your Country on Drugs, and among other revelations, it tells of how the Washington Post “had facts at its disposal demonstrating that the [Webb] story was accurate,” except they ended up on the editing-room floor. That’s because National Security correspondent Walter Pincus made sure they would. Pincus, it turns out, had “flirted with joining the CIA and is routinely accused of having been an undercover asset in the ’50s,” a charge the journalist once called “overblown.”23 Here’s another example of the media’s role in the cover-up: the L.A. Times,

Profile for HAROLD ARROYO, JR.

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

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