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[unintelligible] had the telephone call. Remember, I had a call put in—Dulles just blandly said and knew why [unintelligible] covert operation—do anything else [unintelligible] .” Those “unintelligibles” might have told us something, wouldn’t you guess? The next day—seven days now since the Watergate burglars’ arrest—on the tapes Nixon made some more “unintelligible” remarks about Hale Boggs, the Louisiana congressman who had been another member of the Warren Commission and a dissenter to its conclusion that Oswald acted alone. A few weeks after whatever Nixon said about him, Boggs died in the crash of a light aircraft over Alaska. Some suspected sabotage. The Los Angeles Star (November 22, 1973) reported that “Boggs had startling revelations on Watergate and the assassination of President Kennedy.”18 The Mullen company’s man in Washington, Robert Bennett, met with his CIA case officer, Martin Lukoskie, in a Washington cafeteria. Lukoskie’s memo was considered so sensitive that he hand-carried it to Helms, saying Bennett had steered reporters at the Washington Post and Star away from pursuing a coup d’etat-type scenario that would tie the CIA into a Watergate conspiracy. Bennett later admitted feeding stories to Bob Woodward at the Post—“with the understanding that there be no attribution.” It’s yet another black mark against our media that the Post chose not to examine potential CIA complicity to any extent—despite the fact that every one of the Plumbers had a clear-cut CIA connection! Eleven days after Hunt was arrested, the FBI’s acting director, L. Patrick Gray, was summoned to the White house and instructed by Ehrlichman to deep-six the files from Hunt’s personal safe. Gray recalled being told that the files were “political dynamite and clearly should not see the light of day.” Gray said he took the material home and burned it in his fireplace.19 Hunt began to threaten the White House with public disclosure of his other secret activities, unless he was paid off. The House Banking Committee was starting to look into the Watergate breakin, so Nixon brought up the name of congressman Gerald Ford. “Gerry has really got to lead on this,” Nixon said. “I think Ehrlichman should talk to him. ... He’s got to know it comes from the top.” Not long after that, the banking committee voted against issuing subpoenas concerning the breakin. Why Ford? Almost a decade earlier, it was Nixon who recommended to President Johnson that Ford be put on the Warren Commission. There, Ford

Profile for HAROLD ARROYO, JR.

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

AMERICAN CONSPIRACIES, LIES AND DECEPTION FROM THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, JESSE VENTURA  

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