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West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism

Manhattan’s Acropolis

pedestrian’s experience and where it’s a real or perceived obstacle how we might mediate its effect.

Much of West Harlem’s uniqueness in contrast to the rest of Manhattan lies in its distinctive topography. To the west, are steep cliffs rising to great heights from the banks of the Hudson River, and just as dramatically to the east drop they to the plains of Central Harlem. Christened Morningside, those easterly cliffs have captured the light of the morning’s rising sun for millenniums. For generations of New Yorkers these distinct features have been an attraction for the sighting and building of residences like the Morris-Jumel Mansion and the Hamilton Grange, or served as points of strategic military advantage for observing and resisting the British during the Revolutionary War, finally culminating in the late 1800’s as Manhattan’s Acropolis, the perfect vista for sighting educational and religious institutions and a monument to an honored president. Today Columbia University, City College, Grant’s Tomb, the Cathedral of St John the Divine and others draw prestige from their lofty positions sited along the heights.

One great mediator of New York’s topography is its subway system, moving residential and working inhabitants around the city surmounting its geographic barriers. The system also serves as a critical link in distributing the millions of tourists that visit Manhattan to neighborhoods like Harlem, that reign high on the visitor’s cultural “must see” list. However, beyond the renown of the obvious, like the Apollo Theater the visitor’s knowledge of Harlem’s varied attractions is limited. We want to make West Harlem their destination. Beyond the earlier mentioned institutions we’d need to encourage visits to sites like Riverbank State Park, Trinity Cemetery, the Hispanic Society and programming at Harlem’s Stage, Dance Theatre and School of the Arts, all of which can be accessed from nearby public transportation hubs. However, the accessibility and immediate proximity to these transportation hubs to area institutions is not always clear to the untutored visitor.

This report will investigate and analyze how the local pedestrian and visitor access these West Harlem institutions and programs and how its topography impacts their experience. From this we will consider ways and ideas of how that topography might better reveal, assist and enhance the

HUB: 116th Street Subway Broadway & Columbia Campus High among the institutions associated with this area of West Harlem is Columbia University, an institution seen as a bastion of America’s east coast establishment, having educated

presidents, hosted world leaders and served as a backdrop to 1960’s student protest. Within that identity, the university sets in and apart from the Harlem community. Literally its gates serve as “gateways” to both worlds. At these transition points there are opportunities to better inform visitor and encourage their exploration of the area. Potential support resources; 

Campus Signage & Website: Columbia University signage and website support and cross promotion of area businesses, programs and institutions.

MTA Signage: Subway station, Broadway & 116th St, upgrade signage and local site map with information and histories on nerby institutions and sites.

Way-finding Signage: NYC Dept of Transportation Wayfinding Signage Program, signage, Broadway entrance Columbia University & Broadway Mall crossing at 116th Street.

Institutional Collective: Along Broadway north of 116th Street are Barnard College, Teachers College, Union and Jewish Theological Seminaries whose public exhibitions, programs and activities might be better packaged and promoted collectively.


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism and the Hudson River all free and worthy destinations for a visitor’s exploration. More adequate signage at the subway station or on Broadway near the entrance to Columbia would better assist in conveying information on and the proximity of these sites to visitors. Currently there are a range of Spring and Summer activities hosted in the area by universities and the community, including college commencements, Harlem Week events and Jazzmobile concerts, along with other assorted activities that could be more holistically promoted through maps and business related promotional materials that convey the rich wealth of cultural choices within walking distance of their activities. Potential support resources;

2. HUB: 116th Street Riverside Drive & Riverside Park For those pedestrians embarking or disembarking from public transportation at Broadway and 116th the proximity of institutions beyond Columbia University and Barnard College may not be immediately obvious. However just heading west on one 116th Street to Riverside Drive and walking a few blocks north is Grant’s Tomb which early in the 20th century was one of the most visited tourist sites in New York City. Neighboring the tomb are Riverside Church, Riverside Park

Informational Signage: NYC Dept of Transportation Wayfinding Signage Program, signage Riverside Drive at 116th Street.

Programming: Cross-promotion and partnering between the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation, Riverside Park Fund, Riverside Church, Inter-faith Center, Grant’s Tomb and Columbia University of public events and activities. Early in the 20th century biking to Grant’s Tomb was a recreational obsession with New Yorkers. Today that trip can still be made along the Hudson River Greenway, Manhattan’s Westside bikeway, running from to Battery Park in the south, north to Dyckman Street passing through Hudson River Park and Riverside Park, with a small gap in West Harlem where users must use streets. 

Bike Access: The Citi Bike program, currently concentrated below 59th Street could incorporate a location at Grant’s Tomb or Riverside Park promoting this picturesque destination to their biking audience, who in 2013 averaged a daily rate of over 28,000 cyclists.


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism

3. HUB: Cathedral St John the Divine, 112th St Broadway, Amsterdam Ave & Morningside Park Thanks to the television series, Seinfeld and its ever recurring reruns there is an audience of Americans who can as readily recognize the neon sign of Tom’s Restaurant at Broadway and 112th Street as they do the face of the show’s comedian Jerry Seinfeld. As one moves along the Broadway corridor of stores and restaurants south of Columbia’s campus, Tom’s serves as a guidepost as its corner signage raps around to direct one’s view to the Cathedral of St John Divine just a block away on Amsterdam Avenue. Clearly, a visitor’s choices traversed from along Broadway; with its sight advantages from along the ridge of the heights, making clear to the visitor his wide range of choices. From area eateries and shops to broad glimpses of local landmarks including Columbia University, Barnard College , Riverside Park and the

Hudson River. Sightseeing companies like Grey Line who tend to head up Amsterdam Avenue from downtown, stopping at the Cathedral of St John the Divine, but then continuing up the avenue and east on 125th Street and into Central Harlem, while avoiding Broadway and Morningside sites to the west. Are there ways a broader hop-off, hop-on opportunity that allows the vistor a longer exploration of the area might be possible. The Cathedral of St John the Divine and its tourist stream fed through Grey Line and other tourist conveyors offers an opportunity to attract this visitor as a potential audience for events and activities also being offered to the area’s resident audience. 

Sightseeing Tour Network: The collective institutions and businesses might explore negotiating with these sightseeing companies a hop-off package that lays out the sites open to visitors, as well as offering area store and restaurant discounts as an enticement.

Programming: For a visitor to New York, events like a film screening or jazz and music concert in Riverside and Morningside Parks are the sort of “real” New York experience that enhances one’s memory and enjoyment of the city. There would appear to be a benefit to developing, calendaring and promoting the

neighborhood’s seasonal offerings to the sightseeing network to pass along to their clients and thus better insuring that visitors can coordinate Morningside area activities into their visit. 

Informational Signage: Explore with NYC Dept of Transportation’s Way-finding Signage Program and the possibility of signage at 112th St Broadway Mall crossing and on Amsterdam Avenue near the Cathedral.

Trees & Landscape: Coordinated landscape planning with the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation’s, Million Trees program, to enhance the pedestrian experience and clarify the connectivity of the sites bordering 112th Street, Amsterdam Ave and Broadway.


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism 4. HUB: Cathedral St John the Divine Morningside Park, 110th St, Central Park North The 110th Street/Central Park North Corridor provides a picturesque route from which to traverse a variety of neighborhoods, parks and institutions. However, despite the routes clear direction its varied rewards are camouflaged by shifts in neighborhood character, topography and architecture that preclude an easy assessment of its true rewards. Numerous bus lines and subways access this corridor, but there needs to be a more concerted effort to map and promote its attractions, which include public monuments to two distinguished African Americans, Frederick Douglass and Duke Ellington, Central Park’s Harlem Meer and the Dana Discovery Center.

Frederick Douglass statue, Frederick Douglass Circle, Central Park West

Coordinated programming and promotion of the, Harlem Gateway, 110th Street corridor, should engage potential partners;

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110 Street, East-West Corridor: This scenic corridor links the Hudson River, and the greenery of three Manhattan Parks; Riverside, Morningside and Central to a variety of historic sites and institutions, along with direct access to 5th Avenue’s Museum Mile and the El Barrio in East Harlem. From the elevated topography of the “heights,” to the west, 110th Street drops dramatically as it moves east along the southern edge of Morningside Park to the level elevations to the north of Central Park to 5th Avenue.

Friends of Morningside Park

Morningside Area Alliance

Columbus/Amsterdam Avenue BID – 96th to 110th Streets

Central Park Conservancy

NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, Manhattan Commissioner

NYC Department of Transportation,

Duke Ellington statue, Frawley Circle, Fifth Avenue

Bike Access: 110th Street, East-West Corridor 

Community Board #7 currently has under review parts of the proposed bike system for the westside, which includes segments of 110th Street.

Charles A. Dana Discovery Center, Central Park, Harlem Meer


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism

5. HUB: 155th Street & Audubon Terrace Hispanic Society & Trinity Cemetery This area of West Harlem processes one of Manhattan’s most unique landscapes and serves as home to a historic cemetery, a world class museum of Spanish culture, an architecturally distinguished church and the oldest pre-revolution mansion on the island. These sites, Trinity Cemetery, the Hispanic Society of America, the Church of the Intercession and the Morris-Jumel Mansion offer the visitor a unique view of New York’s historic cultural, religious and architectural heritage. For the visitor however, the proximately of these assorted gems is not easily apparent and would benefit from having clearer connections drawn to advance the area as a tourist destination. 155th Street, East-West Corridor: This scenic corridor links the Hudson River, and the greenery of Riverside Park, Trinity Cemetery, Jackie Robinson and Highbridge Parks to area historic sites and institutions, as well as direct access to the Bronx. Due to the area’s steep topography there are numerous challenges for bikers looking to access the extreme east and west areas of the corridor.

Morris-Jumel Mansion

Bike Access: Promoted to the more athletic bikers this course offers a challenging and rewarding biking adventure that during the baseball season could end with cyclists attending a Yankee’s game in the Bronx.

Informational Signage: Developing signage with the NYC Dept of Transportation’s Way-finding Signage Program could serve to address information needs at the Broadway Mall crossing or at sidewalk sites.

Institutional Support: Provide better cross-promotion between institutions through program activities, website support and mapping.

MTA Station Signage: At Transit’s 157th Street and Broadway station there could be clearer signage, mapping and information on these nearby sites.

Trees & Landscape: Coordinated landscape planning with the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation, Broadway Mall Association & Trinity Cemetery could serve to enhance the pedestrian experience and clarify the connectivity of the sites bordering Broadway and 155th Street.


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism 6. HUB: Manhattanville – Brewery District Manhattanville and its Brewery Districts were once the center of West Harlem’s manufacturing, dairy and brewery processing and distribution. Today the neighborhood is in a period of substantial transition. Under construction to the west is Columbia’s expanded, Manhattanville Campus with construction phased over the next twenty-five years. East of Broadway development is focused on the brewery complex (Mink Building, etc) and an adjacent development site all controlled by a single developer whose phased rehabilitation of several buildings within the complex for office, art studios, potential light manufacturing and housing. In contrast to the predominantly new construction that will dominate the Columbia Campus, the Brewery District, though not landmarked, retains much of its industrial character and serves as an architectural and historic urban counter-point to the new development in the area. As these developments advance there are aspects of the urban infrastructure and streetscape that could be planned and pursued now for implementation in Phase 1; 

Landmarks: Craft and advance designation of a Landmarks District and/or designation of significant buildings contributing to the area’s history and architectural character.

Way-finding Signage: For the Harlem Piers Park there was excellent signage produced interpreting that area’s waterfront and industrial history. In a similar spirit through New York City’s Dept of Transportation Way-finding Signage Program or other means historic and directional signage should be created.

Street Trees: Long an industrial district the area is currently devoid of street trees. Developing a plan for the spacing and location of trees in partnership with the NYC Parks Dept and the Million Trees program could insure phased tree planting as the construction of the development advances.

Transportation: A Metro-North stop is planned for the rail-lines adjacent to Harlem Piers and the Riverside Drive viaduct, which would further serve to animate activity in the area by local residents, students and visitors due also to its proximity to the area’s subway, bus and bikeway routes.


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism

and 139thStreet, bordering Jacob Schiff Park or 140th Street to the gateways of the College. Thought should be given to the streetscape along these corridors with the addition of historic lighting, street trees and plantings.

7. HUB: Broadway & 137th Street Subway Montefiore Park & Plaza Scheduled for completion in 2018, the Montefiore Park & Plaza project is an example of City College design support, community engagement and an agency’s rethinking of a small park, its adjacent sidewalk and roadway conditions and crafting a better urban pedestrian experience. Located adjacent to the 137th Street subway station the park’s greenery was divided by several highly fenced paths. The new design claims a former block of roadway and sidewalk for additional greenery and plaza space.

New York City Department of Transportation, Plaza Program New York City Department of Parks & Recreation Capital Project: Scheduled Completion, 2018

Every day, the small park handles hundreds of students heading to and from the subway to City College. Currently, there’s barely a place to sit, and even where there is, the periodic pressing flood of pedestrians makes doing so uncomfortable. The new design will make a pleasant gateway for those pedestrians headed east from the station to their homes in the historic Hamilton Heights District or City College. Upon traversing what will be a unique park and plaza area the pedestrian will be taking the side streets of Hamilton Place,

Trees & Landscape: Coordinated landscape planning with the NYC Department of Parks & Recreation, Million Trees program could serve to enhance the pedestrian experience and clarify the street routes leading to the entrances of City College. Also, what plans if any are there for the Broadway Malls between 137th and 139th Streets.

Informational Signage: The Montefiore Park & Plaza design already plans to develop with the NYC Dept of Transportation Way-finding Signage. It might be worthwhile to consider additional support signage under this program that might be appropriate within the area.


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism

8. HUB: Corridor West 135th Street Convent Ave to Manhattanville, Hudson River

roadway of 135th Street to accommodate the incorporation of a planted median and sidewalk trees. This would present a more pedestrian friendly greenway connection between the campus, Broadway and west over to the Riverside Drive Viaduct and the restaurants of Manhattanville just below. 

With the improvements planned for Montefiore Park & Plaza the northeastern advance of pedestrians headed toward the central facilities of City College will be greatly enhanced. However, for those looking to access the new science buildings and cultural facilities of the college’s south campus, their route is lined with shabby business fronts along Broadway and a treeless tenement corridor along 135th Street. Between Riverside Drive and Amsterdam Ave, 135th Street is a two way street, with on street parking, to both sides and double traffic lanes running in each direction. However, the traffic volumes are greatly less than that of other east-west thoroughfares, like 145th Street, that move traffic completely across the island. With this lower traffic volume it could be advantageous to study a possible reconfiguration of the.

Trees & Landscaping: The corridor of 135th Street between Amsterdam Avenue and the Riverside Drive Viaduct is almost totally devoid of trees, so much so that there may be a sidewalk or roadway infrastructure reason that precludes their planting. However, sidewalk and median plantings would be a great enhancement. A coordinated investigation with the NYC Department of Transportation, NYC Department of Parks and the Million Trees Program are worth pursuing. Historic Roadway Lighting: The Riverside Viaduct once had a series of ornate lighting fixtures doting its pedestrian railing and the granite peers on its far ends. Today the viaduct’s roadway is lined with cobra head fixtures and the historic ornamental light fixtures

have been removed. Consideration should be given to approaching the NYC Department of Transportation about installing replicas of the historic light fixtures at their former stone peer locations, located at the north and south approaches of the viaduct. 

Informational Signage: It might be worthwhile to consider additional NYC Dept of Transportation Wayfinding Signage as a better possible way of informing pedestrians in the area of their proximity to Broadway transportation, Riverside Park, Manhattanville, City College, Harlem Stage and Aaron Davis Hall


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism 9. Hubs: Public Plazas & Squares Donellon Square, Johnny Hartman Plaza & Roosevelt Square West Harlem is dotted with several small green and shaded park-plaza sites similar to the Montefiore Park & Plaza. Three such sites are, Donellon Square, Johnny Hartman Plaza and Roosevelt Square, which are heavily trafficted do to their proximity to bus stops and residential developments that produce a large volume of pedestrain users, producing along with them a high levels of litter, and associated stress on plant material. 

Plaza & Squares: Redesign Working with the NYC Department of Transportation and the NYC Department of Parks these sites could greatly benefit from a user study and landscape annalysis that assessed ways to better design and maintain all three of these public sites.

Informational Signage: It might be beneficial to consider NYC Dept of Transportation Way-finding Signage at these locations could serve as a better way of informing pedestrians in the area of nearby historic sites and neighborhood attractions.

Donellon Square: St Nicholas Avenue and 150th Street This square offers a variety of seating opportunities, but the trees and plantings are so dense that activities in the square are not visible from the nearby and more highly trafficked stretches of St Nicholas Avenue. Even worse, at dusk the square’s lack of lighting and the thick foliage steers away the more passive pedestrian user and invites more aliased activities. 

Pruning: Trees & Plants Initially, a pruning back of trees and dense plantings could improve site lines and create more public visibility into the square as well as allowing in more lighting at night.

Johnny Hartman Plaza: Amsterdam Avenue & 143rd Street This plaza offers both shaded and sunny seating areas that attracts high levels of usage not only during summer, but through even the cooler months of late fall and early spring. The largest volume of plaza users are the area’s seniors, they tend to stay for long periods, with the site serving as a neighborhood social hub. Located on the site is a landmarked roadway light fixture in need of restoration and repair. 

Historic Roadway Fixture: Consideration should be given to approaching the NYC Department of Transportation about repairing and restoring the historic roadway fixture located at the northern tip of the plaza.

Plaza Expansion: There are striped areas in the roadway adjacent to the plaza that restricts parking and automobile traffic that could be incorporated as additional plaza space. Review and propose expansion with NYC Department of Transportation.

Roosevelt Square: 125th Street and Morningside Avenue Dominating the square is a bronze colored sculpture by the artist Richard Hunt, surrounded low plantings and fencing. There’s a small quantity of seating along the square’s perimeter and a bus shelter on the 125th Street side. The volumes of litter in and around the square are very high, and the sqaure’s current plantings and fencing detract, rather than enhance the site’s sculptural centerpiece. Landscape: Revised Plantings NYC Department of Parks & Recreation should be engaged to consider a revised planting scheme more flatering to the viewing sculpture and the user’s engagement with the site at seating areas and the bus stop.


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism

1..HUB: 116th Street Subway Broadway & Columbia Campus

2. HUB: 116th Street Riverside Drive & Riverside Park

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: M4, M60, & M10, M104 Subway: Broadway/116th St, #1

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: Riverside Drive, M5, Broadway, M4, M60, & M10, M104 Subway: Broadway/116th St, #1

Institutions: Columbia University, Barnard College, Union Theological, Teachers’ College, Jewish Theological Seminary Civic: NYC Parks & Recreation: Broadway Malls Broadway Mall Association – 110th thru 120th Street

Institutions: Riverside Church, Riverside Dr at 122nd Street Interfaith Center, 475 Riverside Dr at 120th Street Ulysses S. Grant’s Tomb, Riverside Park at 122nd Street International House, 500 Riverside Drive Civic: NYC Parks & Recreation: Riverside Park Riverside Park Fund


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism

3. HUB: Cathedral St John the Divine, 112th St Broadway, Amsterdam Ave & Morningside Park

4. HUB: Cathedral St John the Divine Morningside Park, 110th St, Central Park North

5. HUB: 155th Street & Audubon Terrace Hispanic Society & Trinity Cemetery

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: Amsterdam Ave, M11, Broadway, M4 Subway: Broadway/110th St, #1

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: Broadway/110th St, M4, Amsterdam Ave/110th, M11 Subway: Broadway/110th St, #1, CPW/110th St, B,C

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: Broadway, M4, Amsterdam Ave, M3, M100, M101 Subway: Broadway/157th St, #1, St Nicholas Ave, C

Institutions: Cathedral St John the Divine, Amsterdam Ave & 112th St

Institutions: Cathedral St John the Devine, Amsterdam Ave & 112th Street Amsterdam-Columbus Ave BID Morningside Area Alliance, 90 Morningside Drive

Institutions: Hispanic Society of America, 155th St & Broadway American Academy of Arts & Letters, 633 West 155th Street Trinity Cemetery, 155th St – Riverside Dr to Amsterdam Ave Church of the Intercession, Broadway at 155th Street North Presbyterian Church, 525 West 155th Street Greater File Chapel Baptist, 505 West 155th Street Wright Brothers: PS-28, 155th St & Amsterdam Ave Morris-Jumel Mansion, 161st Street & Audubon Terrace Broadway Housing Children’s Museum, West 155th St Dance Theatre of Harlem, 466 West 152rd Street

St Luke’s Hospital, Amsterdam Avenue & 114th Street Amsterdam Nursing Home, 1060 Amsterdam Avenue

Tom’s Restaurant, 2880 Broadway at 112th Street Broadway Businesses - 110th thru 116th Street Amsterdam Businesses – 110th thru 114th Street Civic: NY Public Library - Morningside Heights, 2900 Broadway US Post Office – Morningside Station, 534 W. 112th Street 112th Street Block Association

Civic: NYC Parks & Recreation: Morningside Park, Central Park, Frederick Douglass Circle -Frederick Douglass Monument Frawley Circle - Duke Ellington Monument Friends of Morningside Park, Central Park Conservancy NYC Dept Transportation

Civic: NYC Parks & Recreation: Highbridge Park, Jackie Robinson Park, Broadway Malls New York Restoration, Friends of Jackie Robinson Park, Broadway Mall Association -153rd thru 157th Street NYC Dept Transportation


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism

6. HUB: Manhattanville Brewery District

7. HUB: Broadway & 137th Street Subway Montefiore Park & Plaza

8. HUB: Corridor West 135th Street Convent Ave to Manhattanville, Hudson River

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: Bx15, M60, M101, M104, Subway: 125th St/Broadway, #1, 125th St/St Nicholas, A,B,C,D

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: M4, M5 Subway: Broadway, #1

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: M4, M5 Subway: Broadway, #1

Institutions: St Mary’s Episcopal Church, 521 West 126th Street Manhattanville Jr High School, 7 Old Broadway West Harlem LDC, 423 West 127th Street Heritage Health & Housing, West 127th Street MTA/NYC Transit :Amsterdam Bus Depot , Amsterdam Ave

Institutions: Jacob Schiff Public School, Amsterdam Avenue Broadway Mall Association – 135th thru 145th Streets Broadway Businesses - 135th thru 145th Street

Institutions: City College, South Campus Harlem Stage, 135th Street & Convent Ave Aaron Davis Hall, 135th Street & Convent Ave 3333 Broadway Residence, 135th Street Dorothy Day Houses, Riverside Drive & 135th Street

Civic: NYC Parks & Recreation: Sheltering Arms Pool 26th Police Precinct, 520 West 126th Street

Civic: NYC Parks & Recreation: Montefiore Park & Plaza, Broadway & 137th Street Jacob Schiff Park, Amsterdam Ave - 137th thru 139th Streets Broadway Malls Broadway Mall Association – 135th thru 140th Streets NYC Dept Transportation

Civic: NYC Parks & Recreation: St Nicholas Park, Riverside Park Friends of St Nicholas Park, Riverside Park Fund NYC Dept Transportation


West Harlem CB#9: Capital Projects, Planning & Cultural Tourism 9. Hubs: Public Plazas & Squares: Civic: NYC Parks & Recreation, NYC Dept Transportation

Johnny Hartman Plaza, Amsterdam Ave & 143rd Street

Donellon Square, St Nicholas Ave & 148th Street

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: Amsterdam Ave, M100, M101

Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: St Nicholas Ave, M3 Subway: St Nicholas Ave/145th St, A,B,C,D

Civic: NYS Main Streets Program, Heritage Health & Housing

Roosevelt Square, 125th Street & Morningside Ave. Transportation: NYC Transit Bus: 125th Street, Bx15, M3, M100, M101 Institutions: St Joseph’s R.C. Church, W. 125th Street NYCH: Grant Houses, 125th St – Amsterdam Ave to Broadway


West Harlem Survey & Assessment: Historic & Cultural Resources