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Lifelong Learning Program LEONARDO DA VINCI PARTICIPANT GUIDE: Augsburg

 

 


Table of Contents Table of Contents ................................................................................................................................. 2  Welcome! ............................................................................................................................................ 4  Leonardo da Vinci Programme: .............................................................................................................. 5  Guidelines ........................................................................................................................................... 5  Anti-social Behaviour ........................................................................................................................ 5  Provisions ........................................................................................................................................... 5  Accommodation ............................................................................................................................... 6  Support fromm Intercambio Training .................................................................................................. 6  The German Language ...................................................................................................................... 7  German Language Course ................................................................................................................. 7  Insurance ........................................................................................................................................ 8  Professional Experience & Placement .................................................................................................. 8  Embassies & Consulates in Germany ................................................................................................... 9  Health ............................................................................................................................................. 9  Intercambio Training .......................................................................................................................... 10  WHO WE ARE ................................................................................................................................. 10  MISSION AND VALUES .................................................................................................................... 10  OBJECTIVES .................................................................................................................................. 10  HOW ............................................................................................................................................. 10  WHY WORK WITH US ...................................................................................................................... 11  Federal Republic of Germany: Geography, Politics & History, In Brief ........................................................ 12  Augsburg a city of culture, industry & living ........................................................................................... 12  Geographical Facts ......................................................................................................................... 13  Economy and tourism in Augsburg.................................................................................................... 13  History .......................................................................................................................................... 14  Augsburg: Sightseeing ........................................................................................................................ 16  Architectural Sites .......................................................................................................................... 16  Attractions..................................................................................................................................... 17  Historic & Heritage Sites.................................................................................................................. 18  Museums & Galleries....................................................................................................................... 18  Religious Sites ............................................................................................................................... 19  Maps & Guides ............................................................................................................................... 19  Tours ............................................................................................................................................ 20  Augsburg: Arts & Culture .................................................................................................................... 20  Leisure and entertainment................................................................................................................... 21  Cinemas ........................................................................................................................................ 21  Sport ............................................................................................................................................ 21  List of major annual events in Augsburg ............................................................................................ 21  Night life ........................................................................................................................................... 23  Page | 2 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Augsburg Pub Guide ....................................................................................................................... 24  Food & Drink ..................................................................................................................................... 24  Coffee & Snacks ............................................................................................................................. 25  Shopping & Groceries ......................................................................................................................... 25  Transport .......................................................................................................................................... 26  Getting there & away: ..................................................................................................................... 26  Airports ......................................................................................................................................... 26  Airport Transfers ............................................................................................................................ 26  Getting to Augsburg by Train ........................................................................................................... 27  Around Augsburg ........................................................................................................................... 27  Taxis ............................................................................................................................................ 28  Driving .......................................................................................................................................... 28  Cycling .......................................................................................................................................... 29  Television & Radio .............................................................................................................................. 30  Free view TV .................................................................................................................................. 30  Cable TV ....................................................................................................................................... 30  Radio ............................................................................................................................................ 30  Telephone & Internet .......................................................................................................................... 30  Public telephones ........................................................................................................................... 31  Mobile phones (Handys) .................................................................................................................. 31  Internet ........................................................................................................................................ 31  Emergencies ...................................................................................................................................... 32  Who to contact in an emergency ...................................................................................................... 32  Medical Services ................................................................................................................................ 33  Finding and Visiting a Doctor or Dentist ............................................................................................. 33  Claiming medical care with your EHIC (European Healthcare Insurance Card) ........................................ 34  Pharmacies .................................................................................................................................... 35  Post & Financial Services ..................................................................................................................... 35  Sending mail.................................................................................................................................. 35  Receiving mail ............................................................................................................................... 35  Banks & Money .............................................................................................................................. 36  Community ....................................................................................................................................... 37  Business Hours (including museums) ................................................................................................ 37  Public Holidays ............................................................................................................................... 38  Weather ........................................................................................................................................ 39  Recycling System ........................................................................................................................... 39  Language Exchange ............................................................................................................................ 40  Meet ups ....................................................................................................................................... 40  Community / Announcement websites .............................................................................................. 40  Useful Resources ................................................................................................................................ 40 

Page | 3 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Welcome!

Dear Participants, affectionately known as “Leonardo’s”,

Welcome to the Leonardo da Vinci (LdV) programme. Intercambio Training is an organisation which hosts and promotes European Mobility projects, such as the Leonardo da Vinci programme. These projects provide an annual opportunity to complete a training period through the total integration of culture, language and work systems of the countries comprising the European Union.

For you, this means the improvement of your

professional skills, through a professional experience in Augsburg, in order to increase mobility and foster innovation.

We hope that you enjoy your stay with us, the programme and your time in Augsburg.

To facilitate you

‘settling in’ and enjoyment of the program in Augsburg, we have compiled this guide with an aim to provide the basic information you will need. If there is any information specific to the LdV programme that you cannot find in this document, the best person to ask is your contact at Intercambio Training in Augsburg – for more information, see the Support from Intercambio Training section following.

Whilst you are in Augsburg, the people at Intercambio Training are available to provide you with assistance should you have any queries or problems, please see the Support from Intercambio Training section for more information. We hope that you will achieve your goals for the programme, and we anticipate that this will be a rewarding and enriching experience for you, that will contribute positively towards the aims of the programme.

Good luck!

Verena Kuchenbauer and Salvatore Lascala Intercambio Training

Important:

This is a guide only, to provide information only.

The information in this guide is

subject to change at any time. You may need to verify information with the source.

 

 

Page | 4 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


 

Leonardo da Vinci Programme: Guidelines The participant undertakes to: 

respect the discipline imposed by the host organisation, its working hours, the rules in force, and any legal provisions on professional confidentiality. In the event of non-compliance with the above requirements, the person responsible in the host organisation reserves the right to terminate the traineeship after having informed all the contracting parties.



complete the full duration of the course. Failure to do so will be treated as abandonment, and the beneficiary will not be entitled to reimbursement of any funds or costs in relation to this. Consideration will be given to the waiver of such conditions in the event of abandonment by the beneficiary due to persistent illness or any such similar circumstances that are considered acceptable by Intercambio Training. A medical certificate must support such absence or other suitable evidence considered acceptable by Intercambio Training Ltd.

Should any participant vacate the programme without obtaining written permission from the sending organisation and Intercambio Training, this will be treated as abandonment. As a result the participant will not be entitled to any reimbursement for any costs. IMPORTANT: If the actual duration of the placement/exchange is less than that specified in the contract between parties, the sending organisation is entitled to require the whole of the Leonardo da Vinci GRANT to be refunded by the participant.

Anti-social Behaviour It is of extreme importance that group members conduct themselves in a sensible and restrained manner, showing respect for the host country's customs and habits.

Anti-social behaviour of any description, including alcohol or drug abuse, will not be tolerated and will result in the removal of the individual from the programme with the loss of any entitlements to the grant.

In the event of these circumstances occurring, it will be the individual's own responsibility to meet the extra expense incurred for the return journey to Germany. Neither Intercambio Training nor the host organisation will assist with repatriation in such circumstances.

IMPORTANT: Should the duration of the programme be curtailed without it being agreed upon by both sending and receiving organisations, the Sending Organisation will be entitled to require the whole of the Leonardo da Vinci GRANT to be refunded by the participant.

Provisions Page | 5 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


  Accommodation Throughout the programme you will be accommodated in shared apartments/houses on a self-catering basis. This accommodation will be shared with other members of your group, international students or the owner of the property. You may also be required to share your bedroom with another participant on the course. Please take your own towels, you will need sheets, blankets are provided. Basic furniture, cooking implements and some appliances are also provided.

This will be paid direct to the host organiser on arrival. The deposit will be refunded by the host organisation prior to departure, if the rooms are left in the same condition as found upon arrival. Any problems or faults with the accommodation should be identified and notified to the host organiser immediately.

We cannot guarantee that a telephone or internet will be available for your use; we therefore recommend that you take a mobile phone with you.

You will be responsible for cleaning your room, which should be left in the same condition as it was found on arrival. Laundry facilities will be available in the accommodation in most cases, if not you may have to use the launderette in the city.

You must ask permission from your landlord/landlady and agreement from your housemates before receiving any visitors.

Smoking in the accommodation is not allowed. Parties in the accommodation are strictly

forbidden.

Should you cause any damage to the property, it will be your own responsibility to pay for costs incurred. The Hosting and the Sending organisations do not accept liability for any damage caused by participants.

Whilst much care is taken when placing students in accommodation abroad, it should be borne in mind that living standards are different in every country. Accommodation can be basic, but is perfectly suitable providing you, yourself, keep it clean and tidy.

Participants must follow the regulations regarding the use of all accommodation scrupulously. These will be given to you upon arrival; disciplinary action will be taken should there be any breach of these regulations.   The Leonardo grant fully covers the cost of your accommodation for the full duration of your stay.

 

Support fromm Intercambio Training Page | 6 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


The team at Intercambio Training is available to you for support if you need it.

Please respect normal

professional courtesies when making contact with Intercambio Training, for example, make contact during business hours via telephone or via email, if you wish to visit the office please contact the office beforehand to advise your arrival or to arrange an appointment. You will be provided with an afterhours contact, this is for EMERGENCIES only.

In the case that you are unwell and cannot attend the language course or your work placement, you need to advise Intercambio Training as soon as you know that you are unable to attend.

Additionally, you need to

advise Intercambio Training of any travel plans that you have – you do not need to ask permission, just provide information of where you will be going, when and for how long. This is essential information that Intercambio Training need to have in case of emergency, or in case your return is delayed for any reason.

The German Language German (Deutsch) is a West Germanic language, thus related to and classified alongside English and Dutch. It is one of the world's major languages and the most widely spoken mother tongue in the European Union. Around the world, German is spoken by approximately 105 million native speakers and also by about 80 million non-native speakers. Standard German is widely taught in schools, universities and Goethe Institutes worldwide. Source: Wikipedia, German Language

German Language Course The full cost of language tuition will be covered by the Leonardo grant and from the partnerships own funds. The length and durations of the Language Course may vary, depending upon your placement; however it must be borne in mind that the accent of the course will be on the spoken, oral aspects of the host country language.

It is likely that there will be different levels of competence within the group and that weaker

members will have to be prepared to work harder in order to improve their language skills. students with a higher skills level will be expected to help the weaker students.

Conversely,

These factors need to be

realised and accepted. The Language Course will be held from Monday to Friday, for approximately 4 hours per day. The first day of the Language Course will depend on flight availability, and you will be expected to arrive punctually for each lesson.

IMPORTANT: AS MUCH TIME & EFFORT AS POSSIBLE SHOULD BE PUT INTO LEARNING OR IMPROVING YOUR GERMAN SKILLS & KNOWLEDGE. PLEASE REMEMBER THAT YOUR LEVEL OF LANGUAGE SKILLS WILL DICTATE YOUR WORK PLACEMENT- THE HIGHER YOUR LEVEL, THE MORE REWARDING YOUR PLACEMENT WILL BE.

 

Page | 7 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Attendance It is obligatory to attend the Language Course and your Work Placement during the specified hours. Failure to do so may result in the dismissal from the programme. Should illness occur, then the participant must produce a medical certificate to validate absence. Illness must always be reported to the receiving organisation immediately. Should you be required to change your work placement, you are still obliged to attend your current work placement until another placement has been arranged.

Failure to do so may result in the

stoppage of allowances or expulsion from the programme in extreme cases.

Insurance The necessary insurance is provided for participants by Intercambio Training. Claims made must be carried out directly by the participant immediately after the incident has taken place. The insurance taken out covers the following: 

Personal Accident (including work related)

Emergency Medical Repatriation

Emergency Medical Expenses

Personal Liability

Baggage and Personal Effects.

The Leonardo grant fully covers this cost.

Professional Experience & Placement The work placement will be organised for and on your behalf. You will be notified of your work placement by the host organisation during the weeks of the Language Course and it will depend on your past experience, skills and linguistic ability. Relocation to your place of work is likely to be encountered, but we will make every effort to keep your journey time to a minimum.

Participants will be expected to work the same hours as

permanent staff; such as a minimum of 20 hours per week and a maximum of 40 hours per week, depending on the placement. In the catering sector shift work will inevitably be encountered.

Those working in an office-based environment are required to dress smartly. Those dealing with bar or restaurant work should bring black and whites, and black shoes.

It is important to be realistic about what can be achieved, particularly during the first few weeks as you are using a foreign language and experiencing new working practices.

Therefore, an open mind and a willing

disposition are paramount in order for the work placement to be successful for both the placement provider and the participant. Those with limited language skills cannot expect to be placed in positions of responsibility, until they have shown themselves willing, and motivated to work.

Page | 8 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


 

The host organisation will not authorise a change of work placement for a participant, unless sufficient time has been spent in the company to allow for a settling in period. It takes time before an objective judgement can be made on the suitability of a placement. However, should it be necessary to alter a work placement, this must be discussed with the host organisation prior to any action being taken by the trainee.

Leaving a

placement without the prior consent of the host organization may be considered as unjustified abandonment and lead to dismissal from the programme.

Embassies & Consulates in Germany Should you require the services of your Embassy whilst you are in Augsburg, contact details for foreign embassies can be found on the Embassies Abroad website.

Health It is essential to take your European Health Insurance Card (EHIC), or apply for one prior to departure. Should you need to be admitted to hospital in the foreign EU country, the authorities will request this card so that the majority of medical costs can be waived. The process for obtaining this card differs depending on your country of residence; please see the EHIC website for or contact the health / medical authority for your country.

 

Page | 9 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Intercambio Training WHO WE ARE Intercambio Training is an experienced and young company seated in Augsburg (Germany). We are convinced of the importance of “lifelong learning” projects and according to this opinion we try to improve professional and personal qualification, especially for students and entrants.

The team of Intercambio Training is specialised in working for projects supportes by the EU project “Leonardo da Vinci” and in organising holidays for learning a new language. For the “Leonardo da Vinci” projects we take charge of the whole hosting part (offering an appartment, language course and intership). For realizing the projects we work with a lot of transnational partners and national companies.

MISSION AND VALUES Our mission is to offer to everybody the possibility to become more successful in working while taking professional experience from other countries and to earn success by talking various languages. We believe that everyone is able to be successful if he is offered the right support. We offer our professional knowledge and our empathy to those who are interested in development.

OBJECTIVES Our main objectives are: 

according to recent studies young professionals are more successful in achieving good jobs if they have passed some time working abroad, not only because of knowing more languages, but also because of getting acquainted with foreign attitudes and different ways of living and working;

intercultural trainings are being offered and well paid by many successful enterprises to their employees, because they are aware of the fact, that international contacts are of great importance in the actual development of globalised enterprise, which longs for mobility and cosmopolism,so promote integration and cultural interaction through transnational mobility;

To promote European cohesion and communitarian active citizenship keeping the particularities and traditions of each country/culture.

HOW European mobility projects like the “Leonardo da Vinci Programme” offer you a unique possibility to obtain those intercultural competences by being part of those, who live and work abroad for some time.

One great advantage in participating in this programme is the fact, that everything desirable and necessary is being organised for you by competent people, who know very well the actual working situation and who are

Page | 10 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


 

able to introduce to the right enterprises and partners. Besides, everything that includes hosting, like housing and getting acquainted with the environmental offers, is being offered to you.

These projects promote transnational mobility experiences based on cooperation between various players in vocational training as training bodies, vocational schools, universities, enterprises, chambers of commerce and public bodies. )

WHY WORK WITH US Intercambio Training is specialised in organising everything necessary for you to pass an interesting and enriching time of work in other European countries, like Germany

By cooperating with competent trainers, with language schools, public facilities und many interested economies we are able to offer to you a variety of interesting jobs and an optimum of language training.

Our intention is also to offer to all the participants an individual support, depending on profession, status and interests, so that your time abroad is what you need in the future, to optimise you professional development. For those already with experience in European Projects management, we can offer you many innovative Projects possibilities and solutions, addressing new thematic.

For all our partners, we offer a strong partnership supporting you from the beginning to the end of the project always trying to give you the best solution.)

Page | 11 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Federal Republic of Germany: Geography, Politics & History, In Brief Germany officially the Federal Republic of Germany (German:

Bundesrepublik Deutschland) is a country in

Central Europe. It is bordered to the north by the North Sea, Denmark, and the Baltic Sea; to the east by Poland and the Czech Republic; to the south by Austria and Switzerland; and to the west by France, Luxembourg, Belgium, and the Netherlands. The territory of Germany covers 357,021 square kilometres and is influenced by a temperate seasonal climate. With 82 million inhabitants, it accounts for the largest population among the member states of the European Union and is home to the third-largest number of international migrants worldwide.

A region named Germania inhabited by several Germanic peoples has been known and documented before AD 100. Beginning in the 10th century, German territories formed a central part of the Holy Roman Empire that lasted until 1806. During the 16th century, northern Germany became the centre of the Protestant Reformation. As a modern nationstate, the country was first unified amidst the Franco-Prussian War in 1871. In 1949, after World War II, Germany was divided into two separate states—East Germany and West Germany—along the lines of Allied occupation. The two states were unified in 1990. West Germany was a founding member of the European Community (EC) in 1957, which became the European Union in 1993. It is part of the Schengen zone and adopted the European currency, the euro, in 1999. Germany is a federal parliamentary republic of sixteen states (Länder). The capital and largest city is Berlin. Germany is a member of the United Nations, NATO, G8, OECD, and WTO. It is a major economic power with the world's third largest economy by nominal GDP and the fifth largest in purchasing power parity. It is the largest exporter and second largest importer of goods. In absolute terms, Germany allocates the second biggest annual budget of development aid in the world, while its military expenditure ranked sixth. The country has developed a high standard of living and established a comprehensive system of social security. It holds a key position in European affairs and maintains a multitude of close partnerships on a global level. Germany is recognised as a scientific and technological leader in several fields. Source: Wikipedia, Germany.

Augsburg a city of culture, industry & living Page | 12 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


One of the oldest cities in Germany, Augsburg has been shaped by Romans, bankers, traders and medieval artisans. It was founded by the stepchildren of Roman emperor Augustus over 2000 years ago, and during the Middle Ages it became an economic powerhouse. Europe’s most influential merchant families, the Fuggers and the Welsers, lent money to kings and countries from Augsburg.

Reminders of this golden era can be seen in the Renaissance and baroque façades of the palaces and patrician houses dotted around town. Bavaria’s third-largest city has a relaxed attitude and strolling the leafy streets is a real pleasure. An easy day trip from Munich, it’s a good accommodation option during Oktoberfest and an ideal base for exploring the Romantic Road. Source: http://www.lonelyplanet.com/germany/bavaria/augsburg

Augsburg is an independent city in the south-west of Bavaria. The College town is home of the Regierungsbezirk Schwaben and also of the Bezirk Schwaben and the Landkreis Augsburg. In 1906 Augsburg became a Großstadt (city), and is currently the third-largest city in Bavaria with more than 264,000 citizens. Only Munich and Nuremberg are larger.

The name of the city dated from the Roman settlement Augusta Vindelicorum. The city was founded by the Roman emperor Augustus 15 BC as a castra. Therefore the "Fuggerstadt" is the second oldest city in Germany after Trier.

Geographical Facts The city of Augsburg lies in the southern part of the Federal Republic of Germany – in the Free State of Bavaria – at the confluence of the alpine rivers Lech and Wertach. After Munich and Nuremberg, Augsburg is the thirdlargest city in Bavaria and is the seat of the Schwabian regional government.

The municipal area of Augsburg covers 147 km² (57 mi²) and the city border is 78 km (48.4 mi) long. The widest point north to south is 23 km (14.3 mi) and east to west is 15.5 km (9 mi). Residential and traffic areas make up only 36% of the city’s land use; one-third is devoted to agriculture and nearly 24% is forestland. In the city centre there are circa 500 acres of public- and railroad-owned property available for development.

Owing to its national importance and capacity as a major regional centre, Augsburg is the seat of several institutes of higher education including a polytechnic college and a university. Augsburg, with its Central Clinic and numerous hospitals, also offers the highest level of available medical care. Conventions and trade shows; comprehensive cultural offerings including a three-division theatre with spoken theatre, opera and dance; firstrate shopping opportunities and excellent transportation links are all commensurate to the city’s position as centre of the third largest urban area in Bavaria.

Economy and tourism in Augsburg

Page | 13 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


There are many important industries in Augsburg, small and media-sized, as well as big international important industries like MAN, EADS, Siemens and Weltbild. But also the cultural side of Augsburg is very important. There are many local magazines like Augsburger Allgemeine, Augsburg Journal, Neue Szene Augsburg and many more which shows the big interest in cultural happenings. Furthermore the university of Augsburg with more than 20000 students shows the big value of education in Augsburg. The university is characterised by manifold study opportunities and outstanding working conditions. The high percentage of students from outside of Bavaria is proof of the attraction of the University of Augsburg extending well beyond the region.

The history of Augsburg and attracts also many tourists to visit the city. Because of Brecht, Mozart and Fugger, Augsburg is known by people all over the world. Today you can vistit for example the “Brecht-Haus” (www.augsburg.de) or “die Fuggerei”(www.fuggerei.de).

But the main attraction is probably the “Augsburger Puppenkiste”. The only place where puppets are making theatre. (www.augsburger-puppenkiste.de).

History The city was founded in 15 BC in the reign of Roman emperor Augustus as a garrison called Augusta Vindelicorum. Around 120 AD Augsburg became the capital of the Roman province Raetia. It was laid to waste by the Huns in the fifth century, by Charlemagne in the eighth, and by Welf of Bavaria in the eleventh; it rose each time only to greater prosperity.

It became an Imperial Free City on March 9, 1276. Given its strategic location on the trade routes to Italy, it became a major trading centre. It produced large quantities of woven goods, cloth and textiles, and was the base for the Fugger banking empire. The Fuggerei, part of the city devoted to housing for the needy citizens of Augsburg, was founded in 1516 and is still in use today.

Coat of Arms of  Augsburg

In 1530 the Augsburg Confession was presented to the Holy Roman Emperor at the Diet of Augsburg. Following the Peace of Augsburg in 1555, after which the rights of religious minorities in imperial cities were to be protected, a mixed Catholic–Protestant city council presided over a majority Protestant population; see Paritätische Reichsstadt (German). Until the Thirty Years' War (1618–1648), religious peace in the city was largely maintained despite increasing confessional tensions. In 1629, Ferdinand II issued the Edict of Restitution resulting in the installation of an entirely Catholic city government that radically curtailed the rights of local Protestants. This persisted until April 1632, when the Swedish army of Gustavus Adolphus took the city without resistance. Just over two years later, the Swedish army was routed at nearby Nördlingen, and by October 1634 Catholic troops had surrounded Augsburg. The Swedish garrison refused to surrender and a disastrous siege ensued through the winter of 1634–5, during which thousands died of hunger and disease. Page | 14 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


These difficulties, together with the discovery of America, and of the route to India by the Cape, conspired to destroy the town's prosperity. In 1806, when the Holy Roman Empire was dissolved, Augsburg lost its independence to become part of the kingdom of Bavaria. It increased considerably in industrial importance in the 19th century. It contained large cotton and woollen mills, machine shops, and manufacturers of acetylene gas, paper, chemicals, jewellery, and leather. Out of one acetylene gas plant the company KUKA was founded (1898) as Keller und Knappich Augsburg, today one of the leading companies for industrial robots. Also it gave birth to the Maschinenfabrik Augsburg (Later to merge with Maschinenfabrik Nürnberg and become Maschinenfabrik Augsburg Nürnberg or MAN AG)—a machine factory where Rudolf Diesel pioneered commercial production of his Diesel engine.

In the Nazi-era, Augsburg became the capital of the Gau Schwaben, one of 42 administrative regions of Nazi Germany.

During World War II, various sub-camps of the Dachau concentration camp were located in the city. They supplied slave labour to local industry.

In 1941 Rudolf Hess took off from a local airport and flew to Scotland to meet the Duke of Hamilton and attempt to mediate the end of the European front of World War II and join sides for the upcoming Russian Campaign.

In 1945 elements of the U.S. Army occupied the heavily damaged city. An American Military presence in the city started with the 11th Airborne Division, moving to the 24th Infantry Division, US Army Seventh Corps Artillery, and, ending with the 66th Military Intelligence Brigade, which left the area in 1998. Source: Wikipedia, Augsburg

 

 

Page | 15 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Augsburg: Sightseeing Architectural Sites Altes Stadtbad - Even if you don't plan to get wet, it's worth a peek inside the Altes Stadtbad, a stunning Art Nouveau covered swimming pool with ornamental tiles and stained-glass windows. Checks with the tourist office as opening hours vary; it's generally closed during summer.

Augustusbrunnen - The Rathausplatz (town hall square) is anchored by the Augustusbrunnen, a fountain honouring the Roman emperor; its four figures represent the Lech River and the Wertach, Singold and Brunnenbach Brooks.

Basilika of St Ulrich & Afra - Another onion-domed tower, belonging to the late-Gothic Basilika of St Ulrich and Afra, crowns the southern end of Maximilianstrasse.

Dom Mariä Heimsuchung - Augsburg's cathedral, the Dom Mariä Heimsuchung, has its origins in the 10th century but was 'Gothicised' and enlarged in the 14th and 15th centuries. The star treasures here are the socalled 'Prophets' Windows'. Depicting David, Daniel, Jonah, Hosea and Moses, they are among the oldest figurative stained-glass windows in Germany, dating from the 12th century. Look out for four paintings by Hans Holbein the Elder, including one of Jesus' circumcisions.

Fugger Stadtpalast - In between the two fountains on the Maximilianstrasse, at No 36-38, is the restored Fugger Stadtpalast (1515), the palatial town house and 'corporate' headquarters of Jakob Fugger. It embraces the Damenhof (Ladies' Court), a gorgeous inner courtyard arcaded in Italian Renaissance style. Outside is the spot where Luther famously stood his ground in 1518.

Fuggerei - The legacy of Jakob Fugger 'The Rich' lives on at Augsburg's Catholic welfare settlement, the Fuggerei, which is the oldest of its kind in existence. Around 200 people live here today and their rent remains frozen at 1 Rhenish guilder (now around €1 .88) per year, plus utilities and three daily prayers. Bemused residents wave to you as you wander through the car-free lanes of this gated community flanked by its 52 pin-neat houses (containing 140 apartments) and little gardens.

Maximilianstrasse - Rathausplatz marks the northern end of Maximilianstrasse, a grand boulevard named for Kaiser Maximilian (1459-1519), which is lined by patrician mansions and graced with two impressive fountains. The Merkurbrunnen (1599), at the intersection with Bürgermeister-Fischer-Strasse, is by Dutch artist Adriaen

Page | 16 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


de Vries and features the god Mercury as a symbol of trade. Further south, near Hallstrasse, is the Herkulesbrunnen (1602), also by de Vries, which shows Hercules fighting the seven-headed Hydra, representing Augsburg's commercial importance.

Perlachturm - For panoramic views over Rathausplatz and the city, climb to the top of the Perlachturm, a former guard tower, and also an Elias Holl creation.

Perlachturm (left) & Rathaus (right) Rathaus - Rising above the Rathausplatz are the twin onion-domed spires of the Renaissance Rathaus, built by Elias Holl from 1615 to 1620 and crowned by a 4m-tall pinecone, the city's emblem (also an ancient fertility symbol). Upstairs is the Goldener Saal (Golden Hall), a huge banquet hall with an amazing gilded and frescoed coffered ceiling.

Rathausplatz - The heart of Augsburg's Altstadt is the Rathausplatz, a large, pedestrianised square.

TIP: Sightseeing in Augsburg - Do not underestimate walking distances The old town of Augsburg can be walked. You can reach all main sights and the train station on foot. Do not, however, underestimate the distances.

Wealthy and powerful Augsburg covered quite a lot of ground even centuries ago. The old town is large. If you want to visit, for example, the cathedral, the Fuggerei and St Ulrich and Afra and return to the train station, you'll walk a considerable distance. Wear comfortable shoes. Allow enough time.

People who have difficulties walking are advised to get a day ticket and use public transport as hop-on-hop-off to save themselves some kilometres. Source: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Germany/Bavaria/Augsburg-77435/Warnings_or_Dangers-Augsburg-BR1.html

Attractions Augsburger

Puppenkiste

-

Modern

and

classic

fairy

tales

-

Aladdin

to

Rumpelstiltsken to The Little Prince - play at the Augsburger Puppenkiste . The stars on strings are so endearing and the sets so elaborate that even non-German speakers (and non-kids) will enjoy a show. It's often sold out; make advance reservations or check with the tourist office for remaining tickets.

Zoo - Heading 3km southeast of town on Friedberger Strasse brings you to Augsburg's Zoo. Take bus 32 (marked 'Zoo') from Königsplatz.

Page | 17 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Historic & Heritage Sites Bertolt-Brecht-Gedenkstätte - The Bertolt-Brecht-Gedenkstätte is a converted former tile factory where playwright and poet Bertolt Brecht (1898-1956) lived for the first two years of his life before moving across town. Among the displays are old theatre posters, and a great series of life-size chronological photos, as well as the bedroom of his mother (about whom he said 'I loved her in my way but she wanted to be loved in her own'). Information panels are in German, but you can buy a detailed English guide to its permanent exhibits.

Mozarthaus - Allow an hour to take in an audio-guided tour (in English) of the Mozarthaus, the house where Leopold Mozart - Wolfgang Amadeus' father, who was also his music teacher and creator of the acclaimed 'violin technique' - was born in 1719.

Museums & Galleries Deutsche Barockgalerie - The Deutsche Barockgalerie offers an exhaustive survey of German 17th- and 18th-century artists, very few of whom are household names.

Die Kiste - Kids will adore Die Kiste, a museum adjacent to the Augsburger Puppenkiste, which takes you on a journey through the marionettes' 50-plus-year career on stage, TV and film, and also has a painting corner and little movie 'cabins'.

GlasPalast - The GlasPalast is an industrial monument made of iron, concrete and glass that houses two new art galleries. The Centre of Contemporary Art is cutting-edge while the State Gallery of Modern Art shows post50s American highlights of the genre. Its public art library is open during visiting hours. Also look out for guided tours, concerts and films.

Jüdisches Kulturmuseum- Augsburg's beautiful Art Nouveau synagogue (1914-17) was devastated in 1938, but reopened in 1985 and now contains the Jüdisches Kulturmuseum . The permanent exhibit documents Jewish life in the region and explains traditions, rituals and customs from the 17th to the 19th centuries.

Lechviertel district - Rushing canals stemming from the Lech River traverse the mostly pedestrianised Lechviertel district (sometimes referred to as Jakobviertel). Playwright and poet Bertolt Brecht was born here, and his house has been turned into a memorial museum.

Maximilianmuseum - One block west of Rathhausplatz is the spectacularly renovated Maximilianmuseum, occupying two patrician town houses joined by a statue-studded courtyard covered by a glass-and-steel roof. Highlights include a fabulous collection of Elias Holl's original wooden models for his architectural creations, and a collection of gold and silver coins that can be viewed through sliding magnifying glass panels. Page | 18 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Naturmuseum - The Naturmuseum, in central Augsburg, has animal skeletons and exhibits on apes and butterflies; great for kids!

Planetarium - Budding astronomers can star-gaze at the Planetarium, adjacent to the Naturmuseum. Read more about Planetarium

Römisches Museum - Military weapons, sarcophagi, gold coins and tombstones are among the relics of Roman Augsburg at the Römisches Museum, housed inside a former 16th-century monastery church.

Schaezlerpalais - In 1765 local banker Liebert von Liebenhofen commissioned an ebullient rococo palace, the Schaezlerpalais . Designed by Carl Albert von Lespilliez, today the palace houses two museums (covered by a single admission fee): the Deutsche Barockgalerie and the Staatsgalerie.

St-Anna-Kirche - Founded as a Carmelite monastery in 1321, St-Anna-Kirche hosted Martin Luther during his stay in 1518. His rooms have been turned into the Lutherstiege, a small museum about the Reformation. There's a portrait of Luther by Lucas Cranach the Elder in the eastern choir, while at the opposite end is the Fuggerkapelle, the chapel where Jakob Fugger and his brothers are buried. Also pop into the lavishly frescoed Goldschmiedekapelle (Goldsmiths' Chapel; 1420).

Staatsgalerie - In a deconsecrated church attached to the Schaezlerpalais is the Staatsgalerie, which has mostly Augsburg-related works by Old Masters, including a portrait of Jakob Fugger by Albrecht Dürer, and a couple more works by Hans Holbein.

Religious Sites Fronhof - The building west of the Dom Mariä Heimsuchung is the Fronhof, the former bishop's palace. In the predecessor of the current 1743 building, the Confessio Augustana was proclaimed in 1530. It's a superb setting for its annual classical concert series in July.

St Ulrich Kirche - The St-Ulrich-Kirche was a preaching hall of the basilica's Benedictine abbey and has been a Lutheran church since 1524. Its peaceful coexistence with its Catholic neighbour has long symbolised Augsburg's religious tolerance.

Maps & Guides Page | 19 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


The Augsburg Toursim website contains a lot of good information about sightseeing and other interests for tourists, and also provides a free travel guide.

Tours Following are some of the tours offered by the Augsburg tourism website, for options and group tours go here. 

City Walkabout beginning at City Hall – 7€ - “In search of the Fuggers through golden Augsburg,” includes Goldener Saal inside City Hall, Fuggerei, “Kaisermeile” with Fugger City Palace and Fugger monument. Begins at City Hall.

City excursion departing from City Hall - 9€ - Experience “2000 years of history in 2 hours” – with City Hall, Goldener Saal, Fuggerei, Kurhaus Theater, St. Ulrich and Afra.

Jakob Fugger “in person” - 10€ (min) - Escorted by an actor “In search of the wealthy Fuggers through Augsburg:” includes City Hall, Fugger City Palace, “Kaisermeile,” Fuggerei, Fugger monument and Fugger chapel in the Anna church.

City tour by taxi - 20€ - A drive to the most significant sites in downtown Augsburg – in about a half hour to City Hall, Maximilian Street, Fuggerei and the cathedral.

For more information see http://www.regio-augsburg.de/wwweng/indexpages/frameset.html.

Augsburg: Arts & Culture The Augsburg Culture Office is responsible for the conception, organisation and implementation of innovative cultural events in Augsburg. It focuses on the support of Mozart and Brecht events. Apart from numerous concerts which take place all year round and thrive on the city’s rich Mozart tradition, the Augsburg Mozart Festival in May is one of the year’s highlights. The German Mozart Society asked the Augsburg Culture Office to organise this festival in 2004, 2006 and 2009. This year it is also again cooperating with the annual International Violin Competition Leopold Mozart.

Apart from holding its own events, the Culture Office financially supports a wide variety of cultural projects and initiatives involving musical ensembles and individual artists from Augsburg. The Culture Office also administrates the Kleiner Goldener Saal (Small Golden Hall) in Jesuitengasse, which is one of the most authentic venues of the Mozart Festival. Another venue is the Kulturhaus abraxas (Culture House abraxas) which is equipped with an arena stage and mainly acts as a drama centre for young people but also hosts the annual Art Laboratory Lab 30.

For more information see the Augsburg Culture Office Website.

  Page | 20 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Leisure and entertainment Cinemas An "Augschburger" (person from Augsburg) finds out about world events and gets the town ”lowdown" from the only local newspaper in the entire region, the "Augsburger Allgemeine." Of course, people can listen to local radio stations and watch local broadcasters on television for more information. Source: http://www.study-in-germany.de/english/4.22.3.1271.html

Two cinemas in Augsburg – Cinemaxx, by City Galerie and Cinestar, by the train station – frequently show movies in English. Source: http://www.jura.uni-augsburg.de/en/curriculum/summer_program/faq/living/

Sport Football - FC Augsburg After a long period of problems the Augsburg professional football team is back on form. Discover the individual charm of the traditional Rosen Stadium at a home match and soak up the tradition of football among 10,000 soccer-crazed fans.

The FCA fans will impress you with their dedication and enthusiasm. Enjoy soccer at its best removed from the commercialism and convention of so many other football clubs. Source: http://www.augsburgtravelguide.com/events-and-happenings/fc-augsburg.html

Ice Hockey – Augsburg Panthers Laid back Augsburg is in at least one respect a German metropolis, and this would be in ice hockey. The Augsburg Panthers have been an important team in the German ice hockey league for years.

Experience premiere league sport in Curt- Frenzel Ice Stadium along with the loud, enthusiastic and devoted Augsburg fans, who are probably the most musical fans in the whole league. Source: http://www.augsburgtravelguide.com/events-and-happenings/augsburg-panthers.html

List of major annual events in Augsburg Plärrer Folk / Beer Festival - April, August & September Similar to Oktoberfest, though, the Plärrer festival offers rides, beer, traditional German food, and fun folk music on a smaller scale, with lower prices, and just as much fun as the more famous party that happens in nearby Munich less than a week later. A huge fireworks display every Friday night of the festival is a favourite event for the locals and they often arrive for the fest in lederhosen and dirndls, traditional clothing in Germany. Source: http://www.bootsnall.com/articles/09-04/germanys-other-beer-festivals-2009.html

Page | 21 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


May Day ‐ May  Many local communities run up a maypole as part of traditional festivities on the May Day. Mid June The Tollwood Festival at the Olympiapark focuses on food, music and local crafts (www.tollwood.de). Souce: http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg

Mediaeval jousting - July Mediaeval jousting is re-enacted at the Kaltenberg castle to the west of Munich. Souce: http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg

Musical Theatre - June & July Musical Theatre is held in the courtyard of the Fugger Palace. Tickets run 12€ to 35€. Information and reservations are available by calling the tourist office. Source: http://www.frommers.com/destinations/augsburg/0837010030.html

Augsburg International Summer of Jazz - July & August Augsburg International Summer of Jazz in July and August has some real musical treats in store. There are five concerts in the Botanic Garden, five in various venues around the city and (back again this year) five matinées in the armoury courtyard (Brunnenhof). 2 Source: http://www.germany-tourism.de/ENG/culture_and_events/museums_tlmuseum-id1003fstadt_eventsxxwhileinxxstadt_museum_main.htm

Jakoberkirchweih - July The Jakoberkirchweih (church consecration) is the oldest and most traditional festival in Augsburg. Enjoy the joyful carnival spirit among thousands of other onlookers wanting to accompany the splendidly colourful procession through the suburbs. Historical uniforms, firing gun powder, actors and craftspeople make up the scene of this extravagant festival. Source: http://www.augsburgtravelguide.com/events-and-happenings/jakoberkirchweih.html

Peace Festival – 8 August (official bank holiday in Augsburg) This festival celebrates independence from the brace of the historical 30 Year War. Podiums, events and presentations to do with the policy of peace and inter- religious communication make up the festival. Everyone is welcome to attend, particularily those who value freedom. Source: http://www.augsburgtravelguide.com/events-and-happenings/peace-festival.html

Oktoberfest - September Part of the cultural heritage of Bavaria, the Oktoberfest is worth experiencing, even if only once.

See

www.oktoberfest.de for details. Souce: http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg

  Page | 22 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Mozart Festival - September The annual German Mozart Festival in the Mozart city of Augsburg offers a varied programme of chamber music, church concerts, musical performances, art exhibitions and children's shows. For more information go to the website for ‘Augsburg, Germany’s City of Mozart’. Source: http://www.worldeventsguide.com/event/1055/Augsburg-Germany/German-Mozart-Festival.html

Wittelsbacher Oxen Festival – September Every year in September a very traditional event takes place just outside Freidberg with the hearty Oxen Festival. Ox racing is accompanied by beer, hearty cuisine and cheerful German folk music. An exciting day awaits which you can enjoy with body and soul. Source: http://www.augsburgtravelguide.com/events-and-happenings/wittelsbacher-oxen-festival.html

Christkindlmarkt - December For Christmas novelties, tree decorations and anything and everything covered or made from chocolate, visit the Christkindlmarkt (Christmas market). Most neighbourhoods have their own but the most popular is the one in Marienplatz in front of the city hall. Warm yourself with a gluwein as you wander. Souce: http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg

To find out about many more events and happenings in Augsburg, go to www.augsburgtravelguide.com/eventsand-happenings.

Night life Maximilianstrasse, the main shopping street, continues to be the focus of nightlife after the shops close, with its many cafes. Brauereigasthaus Drei Königinnen, Meister-Veits-Gässchen 32 (tel. 0821/158405; tram: 2 or 4), doubles as an art gallery, has a pleasant beer garden that's open 1:30 to 10pm, and has a main restaurant/bar that closes at 8pm. Another garden/bar combo

that

keeps

the

same

hours

is

Thorbräu,

Wertachbrucker-Tor-Strasse 9 (tel. 0821/36561; tram: 2 or 4). Liliom, Unterer Graben 1 (tel. 0821/33724; tram: 2 or 4), is equipped with a good stereo system to go with drinks and conversation; here, too, local artwork is often available for purchase. The bar is open Monday to Thursday 7pm to 3am and Friday to Sunday 6pm to 1am. Source: http://www.frommers.com/destinations/augsburg/0837010030.html

  Page | 23 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Those taking a stroll through the night can also get their fill of pub-life in Augsburg. Clubs and discos abound, and DJs from other countries occasionally make a stop in Augsburg. Those wanting still more can travel 45 minutes by train to Munich, the capital of Bavaria. Source: http://www.study-in-germany.de/english/4.22.3.1271.html

The Nightclubs and Bars section of the Augsburg Travel Guide has a list of different bars and clubs in and around Augsburg.

Out late? [Transport]

It is always a good idea to think about how you are going to get home, before

you head out, and figure out what your options are in case you miss the last train/bus/tram. On Saturday and Sunday evenings a "Night Bus" runs from 12PM-3AM making limited stops along all Augsburg stations.

See

the Transport sectiong for more information.

Augsburg Pub Guide This website contains information about Bars, Beerhalls and Beer Gardens in Augsburg, including address and contact details, websites, opening hours and the types of beers sold. Go to: http://www.xs4all.nl/~patto1ro/augspubs.htm.

Food & Drink From regional delicacies such as spätzle (noodles) to international cuisine, from a hearty medieval-style feast in a vaulted cellar to Japanese sukiyaki, from stylish gourmet restaurant to rustic inn, the range of opportunities to eat and drink in Augsburg is endless. And in summer, there are also lively pavement cafés and friendly Bavarian beer gardens to add to the mix.

König von Bayern At König von Bayern, not far from the cathedral, speciality beers from the Andechs abbey brewery can be sampled along with typical Bavarian fare.

Maximiliansklause A restaurant housed within a 600 year old building that serves Swabian and seasonal fish specialities and 140 different varieties of wine from Germany and other countries.

Die Ecke Die Ecke delivers a fusion of rustic and modern cooking in a historical town house. The cuisine is rooted in Swabian/Bavarian tradition but has Mediterranean influences. Source: http://www.germany-tourism.de/ENG/destination_germany/master_tlstadt-id1003-fstadt_essentrinken.htm

Page | 24 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Additional recommendations can be found on the web, including http://www.gemut.com/germany-travelguide-germany-travel-germany-hotels/germany-destinations/augsburg.html.

Coffee & Snacks Stadtmarkt Augsburg Augsburg's market, is one of southern Germanys finest, with all the gourmet offerings of a big-city market but without the bustle, pushiness and cost. It’s a wonderful place to local-watch and a perfect inexpensive, delicious lunch stop. Try the Viktualien Halle for a picnic fit for royalty. Here are at least half a dozen cheese stands, several Greek and Mediterranean vegetable and specialty stands, and a stunning array of salads, pickled vegetables, smoked fish and a variety of cold meats. Against the back wall you'll find Mexican, Thai, Vietnamese and Greek specialties, plus a wine bar. www.augsburg.de, Mon-Fri: 8am - 6pm, Sat: 8am-1 pm. Sources: http://www.gemut.com/germany-travel-guide-germany-travel-germany-hotels/germany-destinations/augsburg.html & http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg/question/best-local-market-or-shopping#answer_2465

Tipping Service is included in restaurant bills so tipping is not expected, particularly in the more traditional places. Most Muncheners just round things up to the nearest euro, but a more generous ten per cent is suggested as the norm for good service. Source: http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg

Shopping & Groceries Augsburg has two big shopping areas. The inner city and “City Galerie”. City Galerie is a mall, much like you know it from home. It hosts a wide variety of stores including a supermarket and hairdressers. You can find almost everything you need here. It is within 10 minutes walking distance from city hall and served by bus lines 22, 31 and 36.

Most stores downtown are between the train station and city hall. A grocery store downtown is inside “Karstadt” in the basement. Downtown, off of Annastraße, you can also find a big market place. From 07:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. during the week and from 07:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Saturdays you can always get fresh vegetables, flowers, meat and much more here. Usually stores are closed on Sundays. Due to the Soccer World Cup there might be exceptions though.

When you go shopping, be advised, that most stores in Germany do not accept credit cards. Some big stores do, as do most gas stations and restaurants, but you should always check before hand and bring enough cash. Source: http://www.jura.uni-augsburg.de/en/curriculum/summer_program/faq/living/

Munich has its very own 'Prada Street', otherwise known as Maximilianstrasse. In Glockenbachviertel find oneoff, hand-made men's and women's fashions by Clara Niggl or Michael Wagner and a great line in handbags by Page | 25 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Florence Mucret. For everything from home wares to food stuffs and toiletries, Manufactum in the Fünf Höfe shopping centre sells top quality kit in modern surroundings (www.manufactum.com). Schumann's Bar Am Hofgarten in the same complex is a stylish place for a shopping pit stop. Source: http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg

Transport Getting there & away: Airports Augsburg is most easily reached via bus or private transfer from Munich Airport (German: München Flughafen). 

Munich Aiport - http://www.munich-airport.de/en/ - The trip is approximately 90km and takes (approximately, depending on means of transport) 1 hour.

Augsburg Airport - Flughafenstraße, D-86169 Augsburg, T: +49 (0)821 270 81-0 - The official website for the Augsburg website can be found at http://www.augsburg-airport.com/ and is written completely in German. The airport is located 9km from the city centre, approximately a 15 minute drive.

Airport Transfers Private Transport A private transfer service (like Supershuttle in the U.S.) is also a good alternative. Costs are about 25 Euro per person per way. The main advantage is they pick you up at the time you want and drop you off in the Augsburg area where you want. Examples: http://www.bavaria-schoenegger.de/

Train If you arrive in Munich at the airport then you will need to take the S-Bahn S1 or S8 to the Hauptbahnhof (main train station), an almost 45 minute ride, before you can catch a train bound for Augsburg. At least once per hour a Regional Bahn train leaves from Munich's Hauptbahnhof (Main Train Station) towards Augsburg. The ride last about forty-five to fifty minutes. Plan at least two hours in total from Munich Airport to Augsburg (as you can see taking a bus or private transfer will be much faster). The best bet is to purchase a Bayern-Ticket (Bavaria Ticket) from one of the ticket machines located in the train station. A Bayern-Ticket allows one (along with up to four other friends) to travel within Bavaria using all regional trains (no InterCity Express) and city transportations (for example, trams, buses, etc.) from the time of purchase until 3AM the following day. The Bayern-Ticket costs 27 Euro when purchased from the ticket machines and 29 Euro when bought from the counter. Source: http://wikitravel.org/en/Augsburg

 

Page | 26 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Getting to Augsburg by Train It is easy to get to Augsburg by train, thanks to the several direct connections to München (more than thirty trains in weekdays), but also to Nürnberg and Stuttgart.

Augsburg lies on the Paris-Strasbourg-Stuttgart-München-Wien-Bratislava/Budapest line (also known as Magistrale für Europa), which will become in the coming years one of the main axes of the Trans-European Network (TEN), as well as on the München-Nürnberg-Berlin line. This means that all kind of trains, from the local Regionalbahn to high-speed ICEs stop at Augsburg Hauptbahnhof.

However, a new high-speed line between München and Nürnberg via Ingolstadt went into service from 2007, meaning that Augsburg was left out of the connection between München and the North (Berlin, Hamburg, Hannover).

To travel on local trains within the area managed by AVV (Augsburger Verkehrsverbund), you can buy a ticket at a bus stop. This ticket entitles you to travel also on AVV buses and trams.

If you go to Augsburg by train, you have two options for getting to the city centre. You can walk straight out of the station directly east on Bahnhofstrasse; this will lead you eventually to the centre, if you cross AdenauerAllee to Burgermeister-Fischer Strasse, followed by a left at Maxmillianstrasse. However, this is a good 15-20 minute walk. A sometimes faster option is to exit the train station and head to the right following the road which curves around the bend there. You'll see the streetcar stop, basically kitty-corner from the post office there. Streetcar lines 2 and 3 both stop there. Be aware, both 2 and 3 will take you one stop ahead to Koenigsplatz, the main transit centre of Augsburg; Line 3 then breaks south, while if you remain on line 2, you will reach Rathausplatz and the main centre of the city in a couple more stops. Source: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Germany/Bavaria/Augsburg-77435/Transportation-Augsburg-BR-1.html

Around Augsburg The AVV (Augsburger Verkehrsverbund) is the public transport operator in Augsburg and its region. The AVV-network consists of four tram lines (German: Straßenbahn), dozens of bus lines (urban and regional), as well as six regional train lines. Source: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Germany/Bavaria/Augsburg77435/Transportation-Augsburg-BR-1.html

A small but efficient transportation system, these lines run Monday through Sunday from around 5AM until 11:30 p.m. On Saturday and Sunday evenings a "Night Bus" runs from 12PM-3AM making limited stops along all Augsburg stations.

Page | 27 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


If you purchase a Bayern-Ticket (Bavaria Ticket) then you will be covered during your stay in Augsburg and will not be required to purchase additional tickets for using the Augsburg transportation system. However, if you did not purchase a Bayern-Ticket then you must purchase a ticket (1 Euro) and stamp it each time you enter a streetcar or bus. Riding without a ticket (German: schwarzfahren, "black driving") will get you a 40 Euro fee and a visit with the police.

The Bayern Ticket is only valid after 9 am to the airport from Augsburg Hbf if you are travelling to the Airport. Also, if travelling from Munich Airport to Augsburg, it may be possible to use a Bayern-Ticket Nacht (BavariaNight-Ticket) which is valid Monday to Thursday from 6 p.m. until 6 a.m. the next day, Monday and Friday from 6pm until 7am if you book online for 20 EUR, at the ticket machine or at the Reisezentrum it is 22 EUR. Source: http://wikitravel.org/en/Augsburg

Fare wise, Augsburg is divided into two zones: Inner city and outer city. A one-way tram ticket within one zone is 1.05 € and 2.10 € for both zones. Month and week tickets are available at a service centre at Königsplatz, where you can also get a tram map. Source: http://www.jura.uni-augsburg.de/en/curriculum/summer_program/faq/living/

Taxis The best place to find a cab is at one of the many taxi ranks but if you do see one for hire, just hail it down; they should stop unless they're a stone's throw from a rank. There is an extra charge for luggage but prices are reasonable. Source: http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg

Driving Driving in Germany can be a delight: the scenery is beautiful and the roads are well maintained. But there are many rules and regulations to observe. It's true: there are no speed limits on the German autobahns. But there are plenty of other regulations you should be aware of.

Your own driver's license is valid in Germany, at least at the outset. If it was issued by a European Union country, you will never need to exchange it for a German one. If it was issued by a country outside the EU, you can only use it for six months from your date of arrival. If you will be residing in Germany for longer than six months but less than one year, you can obtain a six-month extension to use your existing license.

A national of a non-EU country who will be living in Germany longer than a year will need a German driver's license (Führerschein). In many cases this is a simple matter of exchanging the license for a German one. In other cases it will be necessary to take a written exam, a driving test, or both.

See the source for more information: http://www.howtogermany.com/pages/driving.html

Page | 28 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Parking You find a lot of parking spaces in Augsburg town, but all of them are not for free. Also see the article Parking – make sure you do it “right”.

Roadside Assistance 

Central Information ADAC (0180) 5 10 11 12

Road Assistance ADAC (01802) 22 22 22

Road Assistance ACE (01802) 34 35 36

Road Assistance AVD (0691) 66060

Don't drink and drive! This tip should be as clear as daylight! Never drink and drive, because the German Police is really strict about that and they control it a lot!

In case of causing an accident under the influence of alcohol you will be fined, lose your driver's license and in most cases you go to jail for several years!!!

To avoid that, hands off of the alcohol!!! Take public transport or a taxi. Source: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Germany/Tourist_Traps-Germany-BR-1.html

Cycling Augsburg is so full of bikes and of cycle tracks that bikers also have their own traffic lights.

General German Bicycle Club (ADFC) Like any other self-respecting German city, Augsburg has an active chapter of the General German Bicycle Club (ADFC). This is a service and lobbying organization to promote cycling as a healthy, safe and sensible means of transportation.

The Augsburg chapter is particularly interested in establishing well-marked cycling lanes on the streets, not on the sidewalks, so as to increase safety and avoid infringing on the rights of pedestrians. They are also lobbying for the establishment of a full-service guarded bicycle station at the main Augsburg railway station.

As the name implies, the ADFC is intended to counteract the nefarious machinations of the infamous General German Automobile Club ADAC. Source: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Germany/Bavaria/Augsburg-77435/Transportation-Augsburg-BR-1.html

Page | 29 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Television & Radio Free view TV Terrestrial reception had lost most of its users by the 1990’s due to extensive cable and satellite coverage. In a two step process in 2003 analogue terrestrial TV broadcasting in the states of Berlin and Brandenburg was switched off and replaced by DVB-T, until 2005 about two-third of Germany's states at least started to replace analogue transmission, too. By 2006, all metropolitan and most of the rural areas have moved to digital transmission. DVB-T coverage is planned to be around 90% of Germany by end of 2007, analogue television broadcasting is to be completely terminated by 2010.

While the public broadcasters ARD and ZDF transmit throughout Germany, commercial stations are only available within metropolitan areas, so the number of available channels varies between about 10 and 30. All channels are free-to-air and the broadcasters rent transmissions services directly from a transmitter operator, which is usually the Deutsche Telekom. ARD stations additionally use their own transmitters, too.

Cable TV By 2006, there are three major cable operators, Unity Media in the states of Hesse and North RhineWestphalia, Kabel BW in Baden-Württemberg and the by far largest, Kabel Deutschland in the 13 other states. Today, all companies offer about 200 TV channels by DVB-C, which includes some 70 channels at no extra charge as well as a number of pay-per-view offers and subscription-based packages. In addition to that pay TV broadcasters Premiere (various genres) and, in some networks, Arena (offering Germany's premiere soccer league) are available. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_television

Radio The radio stations servicing Augsburg include the following: 

Fantasy Aktuell (DAB)

Fantasy Bayern (DAB)

hitradio.rt1 (FM)

Radio Augsburg (DAB)

Radio Fantasy (FM)

Radio Kö (DAB)

Smart Radio (DAB)

Kaug-Augsburg College Radio (KAUG)

Klassik Radio AG

Telephone & Internet For more details generally, see http://germany.angloinfo.com/countries/germany/telecoms.asp. Page | 30 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Public telephones The cheapest way to call other countries is by using a calling card. Pre-paid calling cards are available at many little stores. Prices and systems vary. From house phones you can switch between providers. Several providers offer cheap rates for international calls. To choose one you simply dial a pre-selection number in front of the country code. Rates should be between 2 to 4 cents per minute. Source:

http://www.jura.uni-augsburg.de/en/curriculum/summer_program/faq/living/

Mobile phones (Handys) T-Mobile is the biggest mobile telephone provider in Germany. It is part of Deutsche Telekom (T-Com) and now an internationally recognised name. However, there are many mobile phone service providers to choose from offering a range of packages from fixed contract to pre-paid. In order to take out a mobile phone contract, proof of identity and proof of address are usually required.

Some of the other main mobile telephone providers are: 

E-Plus

Vodafone

O2

There are also many websites offering cheap deals or comparisons between mobile companies: 

Handytarife-Rechner

Bestpreishandys

Calls from mobile telephones are comparatively expensive (call costs can be checked beforehand). To save costs it is recommended to use a pre-paid phone for international calls. Source: http://germany.angloinfo.com/countries/germany/telecoms.asp

Your cell phone from Spain should in Germany. Pre-paid cards for cell phones are very common in Germany and available from many different providers. If your cell phone does not work in Germany you can also get a cheap cell phone bundled with a pre-paid card at most electronic stores. You are not charged for incoming calls. Source:

http://www.jura.uni-augsburg.de/en/curriculum/summer_program/faq/living/

Internet Most towns and cities have Internet cafes and Internet "hotspots" providing access via laptop (assuming it has Page | 31 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


a wireless network adapter) or short-range wireless LAN. See WiFI Internet Access in Germany. Source: http://germany.angloinfo.com/countries/germany/telecoms.asp

Where can you get a free internet connection? Café & Club Pow Wow in Maximilianstreet. There are two - one at the place at the town hall (Rathausplatz / Steingasse 1-3 ), the other at Maximilianstraße 9. Source: http://www.dopplr.com/place/de/augsburg/question/free-internet-connection#answer_2463

Emergencies Who to contact in an emergency Germany Emergency Numbers are greatly useful to the tourists. You can get the help of the police or get access to ambulance in case of any medical help through these numbers. You dial 110 and that will get you to the police emergency operator. For fire, you must call 112 and that will get you through to the fire-fighters. In case of medical emergency you have two choices and this will depend on your location and personal circumstances.

You can always ring the fire number on 112 and that will get you an ambulance but there is a catch. In some places, there are private ambulance schemes that are tied in to various insurance schemes. Given below is the list of Germany Emergency Phone Numbers: 

Police 110

Fire brigade 112

Rescue service / ambulance service 1 92 22

Ambulance 115

Operator (0180) 2001033 .....continued...

 

Page | 32 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


National Directory Enquiries 11833

National Directory Enquiries (in English) 11837

International Directory Enquiries 11834

Air Ambulance (Deutsche Rettungsflugwacht) + 49 711 - 70 10 70

Poisoning + 49 551 - 19 240, + 49 551 - 38 31 80

Car breakdown 0180 - 2 22 22 22

ACE: 0180 - 2 34 35 36

Airborne Rescue Club (0711) 70 10 70

Emergency Poison Help Line (0761) 192 40

Medical Services The German health care system has the reputation of being one of the best in the world. There is an extensive network of hospitals and doctors covering even the remotest areas of Germany.

Waiting lists for treatments are rare. Medical facilities are equipped with the latest technology and the statutory health insurance scheme provides nearly full cover for most medical treatments and medicines. Almost everybody in Germany has access to this system, irrespective of income or social status.

The downside is that medical costs are high. Health care costs - for doctors, hospital stays and even medicines - are among the most expensive in the world. There is no such thing as "free" treatment in Germany, not even in state hospitals. All care, including emergencies, has to be paid for by you or your health insurance!

When going to Germany, it is therefore extremely important to have a full health care insurance, as a serious illness could cause a financial disaster. In most cases, you will even be obliged to prove you have adequate cover.

For good general information see the source http://www.justlanded.com/english/Germany/Health.

Note: your travel insurance will cover most costs – check the details of your insurance cover for more information.

Finding and Visiting a Doctor or Dentist Most people have a Hausarzt as their family doctor, who will make referrals to a specialist if necessary. Only in certain cases can you visit a specialist without first consulting your family doctor.

It is always recommendable to make an appointment (Termin) as waiting times can be long. If you need urgent

Page | 33 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


help, you go without an appointment during office hours, but expect to wait. Otherwise you may have to wait several days or even weeks, especially to consult a dentist or specialist. Even with an appointment, you will find you probably have to spend some time waiting. Normal surgery hours and appointment times can differ considerably but are usually every morning, but not every afternoon. Few surgeries open on Saturdays and on Sunday. During holiday times most doctors have a locum in to cover for them.

Names and addresses of doctors can be found in the local telephone directory, specialists are listed in the yellow Pages (Gelbe Seiten) under Ärzte. You are free to choose which doctor you wish to go to. Note that German doctors are not particularly open to discussions and questions about your treatment, but expect you to follow their recommendations.

Most doctors will speak some basic English, but you can also contact your embassy or consulate for a list of doctors who speak English or your native language.

If you have German health insurance, your insurance company will give you a plastic ID card which you need with you when you visit a doctor. This card contains a chip with your personal data which the doctor's secretary will screen on your first visit.

If you are state insured, the doctor will send his bill directly to your insurance company. You will also be charged a fee of €10 for your first visit every quarter, payable in cash. If you have a private insurance, you pay and are then reimbursed by your insurance company.

Note that some doctors only treat privately insured clients. If you have state insurance, make sure you check this when making an appointment. Source: http://www.justlanded.com/english/Germany/Germany-Guide/Health/Doctors-Dentists

Claiming medical care with your EHIC (European Healthcare Insurance Card) Claiming in Germany with a card issued elsewhere. A card cannot be used within Germany unless it has been issued elsewhere in the EU. 

Doctors and dentists: Patients will pay a small amount towards the cost of the consultation

Prescriptions: Patients pay approximately ten percent towards the cost of the medicines

Hospital treatment: Patients pay approximately ten percent towards the cost of hospital treatment

 

Page | 34 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Pharmacies Pharmacies or Apotheke are easy to locate by the red letter A. They are usually open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Some, however, close during lunch break.

Note that most

pharmacies close Wednesday afternoon, in accordance with medical doctors’ practices, which close at the same time.

Pharmacies do offer emergency service for evenings, nights and weekends. This is usually done in rotation. You can find the pharmacy, which has emergency service usually on a notice board in the windows of each pharmacy.

Foreign prescriptions may be accepted; however it would help if your doctor also writes down the active agent’s (main ingredient’s) name, as some trade names available in Spain might not be available in Germany. Source: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/80c21/b/1/#1487595

Post & Financial Services Sending mail If you need to send postcards or letters, you can either go to the post office, or out of business hours, draw your stamps from a machine. Luckily, the German postal service has realized that not only Germans do this, so the machine offers all European languages to choose.

The first picture (right) shows one of these typical stamp machines, working with cash or any kind of credit card.

The second picture (left) is one of the mailboxes, typical post colour yellow – either standing (as this one) or mounted on a wall. Check the signs when they will empty it (left side), even if it is written in German, you’ll find out easily when it is done.

Receiving mail Mail must include the correct 5 digit postal code, otherwise may be returned as "the addressee was unable to be located", "addressee rejects acceptance" or take many months to be delivered. Source: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/80c21/b/1/#1487595

 

Page | 35 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


  Banks & Money In order to get money or withdraw cash, you may like to consider getting an EC or credit card for your stay in Germany. Fees vary considerably for different types of transactions and cards, so it is worthwhile to shop around.

After opening a bank account, you will receive an EC (EuroCheque) card with a corresponding PIN (a secret 4digit number). This card allows you to withdraw cash from the majority of cash machines in Germany and Europe. Withdrawals from machines from your own bank or associated institutions are free, while cash machines from other institutions will charge you a fee (normally around 1% within Germany, but this can be a as high as 2.5% in other countries), so make sure you find out from your bank how much this will cost.

To avoid misunderstandings: apart from the normal EC-card, still sometimes known as a chequecard, there is also a Eurocard, which is a credit card connected to the Mastercard System and are valid world-wide.

Many shops and petrol stations also allow you to pay for goods and services using the EC card in conjunction with your PIN or signature. Just look for the EC/Maestro sign on the cash register.

You can also print bank account statements at machines in branches of your bank using the EC card. All transactions are listed on these statements. Money transferred into the account has the symbol "H" (Haben). Money transferred from the account has the symbol "S" (Soll).

If you have a card from your home country, check with your bank to see if it works in EC machines (most European banks are compatible with this system) as this is an efficient way to get cash. If you intend to stay for a while in Germany, you should probably still opt for a German account and EC card as well, as this will reduce your transaction costs.

If you lose your EC card, notify your bank as quickly as possible. You should never give out your PIN number, as this could allow anybody to withdraw money from your account.

Credit cards Germany is unusual in that it has a relatively low level of credit card usage compared to other European countries, with many people preferring to pay in cash. As elsewhere, the most common cards in Germany are Eurocard/Mastercard and Visa, however credit cards are not accepted everywhere. Check a shop's door for a sticker showing which credit cards are accepted or ask. If you have a PIN for your credit card, you can use it to withdraw money from ATMs, but watch out for the charges as these can be high.

Page | 36 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Most credit card companies charge a yearly fee. When choosing, look at several banks or Sparkassen to find out which credit card is best suited to you. Some banks do not readily issue credit cards for to recently arrived foreigners, so if you need one, it might be worth checking if your current bank has a branch in Germany.

If you get a credit card in Germany, you will need to specify a bank account from which your monthly balance will be paid. The contract will include a standing order payment to allow the card company to debit payments automatically from your account. Source: http://www.justlanded.com/english/Germany/Germany-Guide/Money/Cards

Community Business Hours (including museums) Generally Shops and department stores are open Monday to Saturday only. German laws forbid any kind of trade on Sundays and public holidays. However, there is one exception – the "Open Sunday", held once a year in some cities, allows to shop on Sunday afternoons.

Official allowed opening hours are Monday – Friday from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. It still depends on regional regulations, how long the shops are open.

Banks and Public Services: They are open Monday – Thursday from 8:30 a.m. to 16:30 p.m., usually with lunch break between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. Friday, they are open from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. without lunch break. Closed on Saturdays (and of course Sundays)

However, gas stations, railway stations and airports do open all day long, depending on their regulations and on the region. In bigger cities, the probability to find open shops in railway stations or gas stations of course is higher.

Museums are usually open Tuesday to Sunday between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. (or shorter, depending on regional regulations). Monday, museums are usually closed!

Some museums do extend their opening hours at one fixed day per week, usually Wednesday or Thursday. This should allow all people who work until late afternoon to visit museums also during the week. Source: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/80c21/b/1/#1487595

 

Page | 37 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Public Holidays In order to make trip planning easier for you, I will list public holidays here. Keep in mind that shops are closed on these days and traffic jams, over-bookings and higher prices for accommodation are most probable then. The following public holidays are held German-wide: 

January 1 (New Year's Day),

Good Friday, Easter Monday,

May 1 (Labour Day),

Ascension Day (Thursday, Easter Sunday + 39 days),

Pentecost Monday (Easter Sunday + 50 days),

October 3 (German Union Day),

December 25 and 26 (Christmas).

Local customs: Most companies do close on Fridays after Ascension Day and Corpus Christi. Consequently, a lot of Germans do use these days for long weekends.

In addition, several holidays are only held in some states: 

January 6 (Epiphany): only in Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg;

Corpus Christi (Easter Sunday + 60 days): (see photos) only in Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, Hesse, North Rhine Westphalia, Rhineland Palatine and Saarland;

August 15 (Assumption): only in catholic communities of Bavaria and in Saarland;

November 1 (All Saints): only in Bavaria, Baden-Württemberg, North Rhine Westphalia, Rhineland Palatine and Saarland;

Wednesday before November 23 (Penance Day): Bavaria and Saxony.

Special regional days: 

Shrovetide, Mardi Gras is most public along the Rhine, so be prepared for festivities and closed shops on the Monday (and increased prices and shortage in accommodation might happen). This is 40 days before Easter.

December 24, Christmas Eve, is already celebrated as beginning of Christmas. This means that shops and public services are open only until noon. In Germany, on the evening of December 24 gifts are exchanged and the holiday is celebrated among the close family.

New Year's Eve is also celebrated; shops and public services close down at noon.

 

Page | 38 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


School holidays in Germany German school holidays mostly vary from state to state. Some states even have more holidays for school kids than others; well, lucky kids :-) Mainly during summer holidays, traffic jams on weekends are guaranteed, so be prepared.

For school year 2008/2009 the holidays are: (!! I use the German notation for days here!!) 

Autumn 2008: 2 weeks, between September 29 and November 5 - 03.11.-05.11.2008;

Christmas 2008: 2 weeks, between December 19 and January 10: 22.12.2008-05.01.2009;

Winter 2009: 1 day to 1 week, between January 30 and February 28: 23.02.-28.02.2009;

Easter 2009: 2 weeks between March 30 and April 21: 06.04.-18.04.2009;

Pentecost 2009: 1 or 2 weeks between May 13 and June 13: 02.06.-13.06.2009;

Summer 2009: 6 weeks between June 25 and September 14: 34.08.-14.09.2009;

Source: http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/80c21/b/1/#1487595

Weather Average temperatures are: 

Spring: max.: 8 ? 18?C ( 47 - 64?F ); min: 0 - 7?C ( 32 - 45?F )

Summer: max.: 20 ? 23?C ( 68 - 73?F ); min: 10 - 12?C ( 50 - 53?F )

Autumn: max.: 6 - 18?C ( 63 - 64?F); min: 0 - 8?C ( 32 - 47?F )

Winter: max.: 2 - 4?C ( 36 - 39?F); min: -3 - -1?C ( 27 - 30?F )

Source: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Germany/Bavaria/Augsburg-77435/Packing_Lists-Augsburg-BR-1.html

Recycling System Germany has been the country with world's strictest environmental protection programs. Sooner or later you will see colored garbage container. If you throw your waste into the wrong container you'll be strictly fined by the "Ordnungsamt" (at least if they catch you in the act).

What's the right container: 

brown container: brown bottles only

dark green container: green bottles only

white container: achromatic bottles only

yellow container: plastic, synthetic meterials only

blue container: paper and paperboard only

light green container: food and biodegradable material only (no cooked food!)

grey container: metalic products only

under no circumstances throw batteries, cooked food, and liquid substances in such containers, take batteries to drugstores or supermarkets! Page | 39 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Litter boxes at the market squares or at tram stations are for mixed garbage. You can throw in your cans, bottles, food and paper. Source: http://www.virtualtourist.com/travel/Europe/Germany/Tourist_Traps-Germany-BR-1.html

Language Exchange As part of your placement you will be provided with language classes to study and improve your German. Additional ways to help you practise your German can include participating in some type of language exchange.

Meet ups www.meetup.com – is one website for people wishing to join groups of people to talk about or take part in certain activities.

On the home page is a facility to find the meet-up group you are looking for, search for

“German” in Augsburg. Once you have joined you will receive emails about upcoming events informing you of the dates, times and venues.

Community / Announcement websites www.kijiji.de – is the equivalent of loquo.es and www.gumtree.com, a community website for free announcements. Try searching the Skills and Language Swap, in the Community section or post your own “My Spanish for your German” announcement.

Other similar website include: http://augsburg.olx.de/ www.craigslist.org Otherwise, you can search for websites for people with common interests, such as “expats in Bavaria”.

Useful Resources www.live-like-a-german.com www.howtogermany.com www.german-way.com http://www.expats.com/site/index.php?fuseaction=links.view_country&rnd=1234200540&id=3 http://www2.augsburg.de/

Page | 40 | Intercambio Training UG | Schmiedgasse 11 - 86150 Augsburg - Germany | Phone/Fax: +49 (0) 821 5085629 | | Verena Kuchenbaur: vkuchenbaur@web.de or Salvatore Lascala: salvatore.lascala@yahoo.it |


Ausgburg