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ROYAL AIR FORCE BATTLE of BRITAIN COMMEMORATIVE DINNER Marking the 70th Anniversary of D-Day Wednesday, October 8th, 2014 The Willard Hotel, Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D.C.


Contents 4

Foreword Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford KCB CBE ADC RAF, Chief of the Air Staff

6

Welcome and introduction Major General (Ret) Frederick F Roggero USAF; President, RAFMAF

8

Special relationship General Mark A Welsh III, Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force

10

The “Great Crusade”: the Air War and D-Day Ross Mahoney, Aviation Historian, RAF Museum

14

Our guests of honor A look at the lives and careers of our two guests of honor, both of whom made vital contributions on D-Day – Leading Aircraftwoman Rose Davies WAAF and Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Robert “Bob” Hansen USAF

16

Apprentices With RAFMAF’s support, this year’s apprentice exchange has been a huge success, writes Mick Shepherd, Training Manager at the Michael Beetham Conservation Centre, RAF Museum Cosford

22

The RAF Museum 2014 Behind the scenes of the RAF Museum’s ‘First World War in the Air’ Exhibition

24

The Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation Swords of Honor The background to tonight’s presentations recognizing the most outstanding RAF and USAF officers on exchange over the past year

26

Sword of Honor 2014 citations This year’s recipients of the RAF and USAF awards: Flight Lieutenant Drew Buxton, RAF and Major Timothy A Kipp, USAF

30

A Veteran’s Prayer Richard Morris

Cover image: Reproduced with the kind permission of RADAR Magazine, a quarterly publication of the RAF Museum

RAF Museum American Foundation

3


Contents 4

Foreword Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford KCB CBE ADC RAF, Chief of the Air Staff

6

 elcome and introduction W Major General (Ret) Frederick F Roggero USAF; President, RAFMAF

8

Special relationship General Mark A Welsh III, Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force

10

 he “Great Crusade”: the Air War T and D-Day Ross Mahoney, Aviation Historian, RAF Museum

16 Apprentices With RAFMAF’s support, this year’s apprentice exchange has been a huge success, writes Mick Shepherd, Training Manager at the Michael Beetham Conservation Centre, RAF Museum Cosford 22 The RAF Museum 2014 Behind the scenes of the RAF Museum’s ‘First World War in the Air’ Exhibition 24

 he Royal Air Force Museum American T Foundation Swords of Honor The background to tonight’s presentations recognizing the most outstanding RAF and USAF officers on exchange over the past year

26  Sword of Honor 2014 citations This year’s recipients of the RAF and USAF awards: Flight Lieutenant Drew Buxton, RAF and Major Timothy A Kipp, USAF

14 Our guests of honor A look at the lives and careers of our two guests of honor, both of whom made vital contributions on D-Day – Leading Aircraftwoman Rose Davies WAAF and Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Robert “Bob” Hansen USAF

30  A Veteran’s Prayer Richard Morris

Cover image: Reproduced with the kind permission of RADAR Magazine, a quarterly publication of the RAF Museum

RAF Museum American Foundation

3


Foreword Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford KCB CBE ADC RAF, Chief of the Air Staff

I

am delighted to attend the 2014 dinner of the Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation. A vital component of the enduring friendship between Great Britain and the United States is the partnership between our two air forces, and tonight’s event celebrates both the mutual respect and close personal ties that have developed by training, flying and fighting together. The Royal Air Force was the world’s first independent Air Force, formed in 1918 from the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service as the First World War drove forward the development of aviation and established the importance of air power in securing national defence. The partnership between the Royal Air Force and the United States dates back to this period, and the stories of those who worked together during this important time in the development of air power illustrate vividly that the history of the RAF is a truly global one, built on collaboration and shared values. The success of the RAF relies on partnership with our allied nations, industry and the individuals who serve in its ranks. I am therefore deeply grateful to the RAF Museum American Foundation for their efforts in helping to celebrate this collaboration and in demonstrating that our achievements are only possible thanks to the dedication and professionalism of individuals. This dedication is exemplified in the work of the exchange officers recognized in the award presentations tonight. These awards celebrate the continuing success of the exchange programme. It is one that the Royal Air Force values greatly and is determined to maintain. As we approach the centenary of the RAF in 2018, the wider work of the RAF Museum American Foundation

will continue to be essential in ensuring that these stories of transatlantic cooperation are preserved and shared. Through the hard work of its Directors, the Foundation supports a wide range of activities within the RAF Museum – apprentice exchange programmes with partners within the United States, professional exchanges between the RAF Museum and the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum here in Washington, and helping to secure important artefacts that illustrate the story of the RAF and its people. This work will become more important as the RAF Museum undergoes a major programme of transformation as we celebrate the centenary of the Royal Air Force’s formation. Tonight’s event also allows us to commemorate and celebrate one of the key stories of our partnership: the joint support provided by the Royal Air Force and the US Air Force as part of the D-Day landings in June 1944. The scale of the joint air forces operations remains difficult to grasp. Every conceivable type of Allied aircraft was involved in a huge operation that met successfully the challenge posed by the massed forces of the Nazi Luftwaffe based in northern France, in the air and on the ground. In marking this important event in our shared history, we honour the stories of all those who took part, either flying above the skies of Europe, supporting the operation on the ground or working in the industries that provided the tools for success. In commemorating the spirit and values of those people, we honour their sacrifice and courage. The work of the RAF Museum helps to ensure that their stories can be told for future generations. Thank you for your support.

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

4

5


Foreword Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford KCB CBE ADC RAF, Chief of the Air Staff

I

am delighted to attend the 2014 dinner of the Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation. A vital component of the enduring friendship between Great Britain and the United States is the partnership between our two air forces, and tonight’s event celebrates both the mutual respect and close personal ties that have developed by training, flying and fighting together. The Royal Air Force was the world’s first independent Air Force, formed in 1918 from the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service as the First World War drove forward the development of aviation and established the importance of air power in securing national defence. The partnership between the Royal Air Force and the United States dates back to this period, and the stories of those who worked together during this important time in the development of air power illustrate vividly that the history of the RAF is a truly global one, built on collaboration and shared values. The success of the RAF relies on partnership with our allied nations, industry and the individuals who serve in its ranks. I am therefore deeply grateful to the RAF Museum American Foundation for their efforts in helping to celebrate this collaboration and in demonstrating that our achievements are only possible thanks to the dedication and professionalism of individuals. This dedication is exemplified in the work of the exchange officers recognized in the award presentations tonight. These awards celebrate the continuing success of the exchange programme. It is one that the Royal Air Force values greatly and is determined to maintain. As we approach the centenary of the RAF in 2018, the wider work of the RAF Museum American Foundation

will continue to be essential in ensuring that these stories of transatlantic cooperation are preserved and shared. Through the hard work of its Directors, the Foundation supports a wide range of activities within the RAF Museum – apprentice exchange programmes with partners within the United States, professional exchanges between the RAF Museum and the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum here in Washington, and helping to secure important artefacts that illustrate the story of the RAF and its people. This work will become more important as the RAF Museum undergoes a major programme of transformation as we celebrate the centenary of the Royal Air Force’s formation. Tonight’s event also allows us to commemorate and celebrate one of the key stories of our partnership: the joint support provided by the Royal Air Force and the US Air Force as part of the D-Day landings in June 1944. The scale of the joint air forces operations remains difficult to grasp. Every conceivable type of Allied aircraft was involved in a huge operation that met successfully the challenge posed by the massed forces of the Nazi Luftwaffe based in northern France, in the air and on the ground. In marking this important event in our shared history, we honour the stories of all those who took part, either flying above the skies of Europe, supporting the operation on the ground or working in the industries that provided the tools for success. In commemorating the spirit and values of those people, we honour their sacrifice and courage. The work of the RAF Museum helps to ensure that their stories can be told for future generations. Thank you for your support.

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

4

5


Welcome and introduction Major General (Ret) Frederick F Roggero, USAF; President, RAFMAF

T

he Royal Air Force Museum American friendship and common values between two great Foundation (RAFMAF) is again honored nations and their air forces. and proud to host the Battle of Britain Each year at this annual Battle of Britain banquet, Commemorative Dinner, and would like to RAFMAF presents its ceremonial Swords of Honor thank the Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir to the RAF and USAF Exchange Officers whose Andrew Pulford, KCB, CBE, ADC – who has traveled contributions have most reflected the values that the over especially for this event – for his and the RAF’s RAF, the USAF and the Foundation share – duty, continued support. We are also delighted to welcome sacrifice, discipline and courage. It is these values that General Larry O Spencer of the United States Air Force we wish to honor in our young men and women of today, to help us honor the top RAF and USAF exchange officers and to encourage in the young people of tomorrow. who both will be awarded the prestigious Swords of This year, it is our great privilege to, once again, Honor in recognition of their outstanding service. present two Swords of Honor to exchange officers from It is also a great privilege this year to recognize the both countries, in recognition of the roles they play 70th anniversary of D-Day in promoting relations and, in particular, the 171 between the RAF and the squadrons of British and RAFMAF promotes the ties of friendship USAF, in keeping with the Allied Air Force fighters principles and values we and common values between two who undertook a variety endorse. The first Sword of tasks in support of will be presented to Flight great nations and their air forces the invasion. From the Lieutenant Drew Buxton, beginning of planning an aircraft commander and for Operation OVERLORD, it was recognized that the Assistant Director Operations with 343 Reconnaissance air component to the invasion was going to be critical Squadron at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The and that the support to the land battle was of prime second Sword will be presented to Major Timothy Kipp, importance. Fifteen squadrons provided shipping a test pilot for the RAF’s No 206(R) Squadron at MoD cover, 54 provided beach cover, 33 undertook bomber Boscombe Down. The directors of the Foundation escort and offensive fighter sweeps, 33 struck at targets convey their heartiest congratulations to this current inland from the landing area, and 36 provided direct generation of “brothers and sisters in arms”, and wish air support to invading forces. them every success in their future careers. In pursuing its mission, RAFMAF is also focused on education, as shown by its creation and support of an RAF MUSEUM AMERICAN FOUNDATION exchange program for young technicians on both sides RAFMAF supports and enhances the work of the UK’s of the Atlantic. The RAF Museum supports an internal premier aviation museum, and promotes the ties of

apprentice program at its Michael Beetham Conservation Centre, and a professional exchange between the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum and the RAF Museum, with the aim of sharing best practice and ideas to enhance their respective collections and missions.

ABOVE: Short Stirlings lined up at Tarrant Rushton, ready to transport troops during Operation OVERLORD

Lindbergh and eventually requisitioned by the RAF in the UK while he was on tour, is a prize exhibit in the Milestones of Flight gallery at Hendon. The aircraft was acquired in the US, and was painstakingly restored by the craftsmen conservators at the Michael Beetham Conservation Centre. Moreover, the Hendon site has benefited from the addition of the Boeing Chinook exhibit – a custom-made recreation of the RAF Chinook Bravo November, the sterling service of which has included Distinguished Flying Cross awards to its pilots in both the Falklands campaign and Operation DESERT STORM.

SUPPORT AND DONATIONS

The Foundation has supported a number of key exhibits at the RAF Museum, from the magnificent P-51 Mustang Donald Duck – generously donated by Bob Tullius, a RAFMAF director emeritus – through to a recent acquisition for the National Cold War Exhibition – the Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low. The iconic Miles Mohawk, owned by RAFMAF, and once owned by Charles

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

6

7


Welcome and introduction Major General (Ret) Frederick F Roggero, USAF; President, RAFMAF

T

he Royal Air Force Museum American friendship and common values between two great Foundation (RAFMAF) is again honored nations and their air forces. and proud to host the Battle of Britain Each year at this annual Battle of Britain banquet, Commemorative Dinner, and would like to RAFMAF presents its ceremonial Swords of Honor thank the Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir to the RAF and USAF Exchange Officers whose Andrew Pulford, KCB, CBE, ADC – who has traveled contributions have most reflected the values that the over especially for this event – for his and the RAF’s RAF, the USAF and the Foundation share – duty, continued support. We are also delighted to welcome sacrifice, discipline and courage. It is these values that General Larry O Spencer of the United States Air Force we wish to honor in our young men and women of today, to help us honor the top RAF and USAF exchange officers and to encourage in the young people of tomorrow. who both will be awarded the prestigious Swords of This year, it is our great privilege to, once again, Honor in recognition of their outstanding service. present two Swords of Honor to exchange officers from It is also a great privilege this year to recognize the both countries, in recognition of the roles they play 70th anniversary of D-Day in promoting relations and, in particular, the 171 between the RAF and the squadrons of British and RAFMAF promotes the ties of friendship USAF, in keeping with the Allied Air Force fighters principles and values we and common values between two who undertook a variety endorse. The first Sword of tasks in support of will be presented to Flight great nations and their air forces the invasion. From the Lieutenant Drew Buxton, beginning of planning an aircraft commander and for Operation OVERLORD, it was recognized that the Assistant Director Operations with 343 Reconnaissance air component to the invasion was going to be critical Squadron at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. The and that the support to the land battle was of prime second Sword will be presented to Major Timothy Kipp, importance. Fifteen squadrons provided shipping a test pilot for the RAF’s No 206(R) Squadron at MoD cover, 54 provided beach cover, 33 undertook bomber Boscombe Down. The directors of the Foundation escort and offensive fighter sweeps, 33 struck at targets convey their heartiest congratulations to this current inland from the landing area, and 36 provided direct generation of “brothers and sisters in arms”, and wish air support to invading forces. them every success in their future careers. In pursuing its mission, RAFMAF is also focused on education, as shown by its creation and support of an RAF MUSEUM AMERICAN FOUNDATION exchange program for young technicians on both sides RAFMAF supports and enhances the work of the UK’s of the Atlantic. The RAF Museum supports an internal premier aviation museum, and promotes the ties of

apprentice program at its Michael Beetham Conservation Centre, and a professional exchange between the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum and the RAF Museum, with the aim of sharing best practice and ideas to enhance their respective collections and missions.

ABOVE: Short Stirlings lined up at Tarrant Rushton, ready to transport troops during Operation OVERLORD

Lindbergh and eventually requisitioned by the RAF in the UK while he was on tour, is a prize exhibit in the Milestones of Flight gallery at Hendon. The aircraft was acquired in the US, and was painstakingly restored by the craftsmen conservators at the Michael Beetham Conservation Centre. Moreover, the Hendon site has benefited from the addition of the Boeing Chinook exhibit – a custom-made recreation of the RAF Chinook Bravo November, the sterling service of which has included Distinguished Flying Cross awards to its pilots in both the Falklands campaign and Operation DESERT STORM.

SUPPORT AND DONATIONS

The Foundation has supported a number of key exhibits at the RAF Museum, from the magnificent P-51 Mustang Donald Duck – generously donated by Bob Tullius, a RAFMAF director emeritus – through to a recent acquisition for the National Cold War Exhibition – the Sikorsky MH-53 Pave Low. The iconic Miles Mohawk, owned by RAFMAF, and once owned by Charles

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

6

7


Special relationship General Mark A Welsh III, Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force

I

am humbled to join the Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation in preserving the “special relationship” between the Royal and United States Air Forces and celebrating the legacy of D-Day participants such as Mrs Rose Davies, who tracked ships and aircraft as a master radar operator, and now retired USAF Lt Col Bob Hansen, who flew double B-24 combat sorties to pave the way for Allied forces wading ashore.

three Eagle Squadrons that later formed the cadre of experience for American Army Air Force airmen who shared the skies with the RAF in the long ramp-up to D-Day. Looking back, we owe deep gratitude to the villagers and farmers who risked jettisoned bombs and aerial combat debris, but never wavered in their support of the RAF. We also owe a debt of thanks to countless radar operators and controllers such as Mrs Davies, who continued to serve despite being the targets of deliberate attack, and private citizens such DOING THEIR DUTY as newspaper publisher William Maxwell Aitken, who The combination of the RAF controller and the dedicated himself to overseeing desperately needed courageous aviator is itself a “special relationship” Spitfire and Hurricane production. that began long before D-Day. In fact, we can trace it Seventy years ago, Mrs Davies and Lt Col Hansen back to radar operators such as Mrs Davies guiding stood shoulder to shoulder to control the skies of courageous pilots during the Battle of Britain. Europe. They are living proof that, no matter the era Among those pilots was a young man named Vernon or generation, our shared “Shorty” Keogh, an aerial values of integrity, service, performer from Brooklyn, No matter the era or generation, excellence, and love of New York, who enlisted freedom will never change. in the RAF after the our shared values of integrity, It is recognition of that fall of France. service, excellence, and love of same spirit that leads us Shorty Keogh was a to celebrate this year’s spirited stunt pilot and freedom will never change recipients of the Sword of parachutist with more than Honor. To the top exchange 500 jumps under his belt. officers from our respective nations, thank you for going That’s a big reputation for the RAF’s shortest pilot, who above and beyond to preserve a “special relationship” that stood a full 4ft 10in tall and needed two seat cushions provides leadership and hope to the world. Our aircraft to see over the Spitfire instrument panel. In September are cool, but organizations like the Foundation and 1940, Shorty and other Americans transferred from airmen like you continue to make the biggest difference. No 609 Squadron to No 71 Squadron – the first of RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

8

9


Special relationship General Mark A Welsh III, Chief of Staff of the United States Air Force

I

am humbled to join the Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation in preserving the “special relationship” between the Royal and United States Air Forces and celebrating the legacy of D-Day participants such as Mrs Rose Davies, who tracked ships and aircraft as a master radar operator, and now retired USAF Lt Col Bob Hansen, who flew double B-24 combat sorties to pave the way for Allied forces wading ashore.

three Eagle Squadrons that later formed the cadre of experience for American Army Air Force airmen who shared the skies with the RAF in the long ramp-up to D-Day. Looking back, we owe deep gratitude to the villagers and farmers who risked jettisoned bombs and aerial combat debris, but never wavered in their support of the RAF. We also owe a debt of thanks to countless radar operators and controllers such as Mrs Davies, who continued to serve despite being the targets of deliberate attack, and private citizens such DOING THEIR DUTY as newspaper publisher William Maxwell Aitken, who The combination of the RAF controller and the dedicated himself to overseeing desperately needed courageous aviator is itself a “special relationship” Spitfire and Hurricane production. that began long before D-Day. In fact, we can trace it Seventy years ago, Mrs Davies and Lt Col Hansen back to radar operators such as Mrs Davies guiding stood shoulder to shoulder to control the skies of courageous pilots during the Battle of Britain. Europe. They are living proof that, no matter the era Among those pilots was a young man named Vernon or generation, our shared “Shorty” Keogh, an aerial values of integrity, service, performer from Brooklyn, No matter the era or generation, excellence, and love of New York, who enlisted freedom will never change. in the RAF after the our shared values of integrity, It is recognition of that fall of France. service, excellence, and love of same spirit that leads us Shorty Keogh was a to celebrate this year’s spirited stunt pilot and freedom will never change recipients of the Sword of parachutist with more than Honor. To the top exchange 500 jumps under his belt. officers from our respective nations, thank you for going That’s a big reputation for the RAF’s shortest pilot, who above and beyond to preserve a “special relationship” that stood a full 4ft 10in tall and needed two seat cushions provides leadership and hope to the world. Our aircraft to see over the Spitfire instrument panel. In September are cool, but organizations like the Foundation and 1940, Shorty and other Americans transferred from airmen like you continue to make the biggest difference. No 609 Squadron to No 71 Squadron – the first of RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

8

9


The “Great Crusade”: the Air War and D-Day Ross Mahoney, Aviation Historian, RAF Museum

T

he Supreme Allied Commander (SAC) for Operation OVERLORD, General Dwight D Eisenhower, described the invasion and the subsequent campaign in Europe as the “Great Crusade”. Indeed, D-Day, 6 June 1944, marked the start of the irrevocable defeat of Nazi Germany in Europe and coincided with Operation BAGRATION, launched on 22 June, by the Red Army on the Eastern Front that destroyed the German Army on this front. The day before D-Day, American troops had entered Rome.

The entire war effort was a joint affair between the major Allies: Great Britain, the United States of America and the Soviet Union. A key aspect of this was the role that air power played in ensuring Allied success on 6 June. Without the support provided by the Allied Expeditionary Air Force (AEAF), the United States Strategic Air Forces in Europe and RAF Bomber and Coastal Commands, D-Day would have been a much more difficult proposition and may even have been a failure. BEFORE D-DAY

Even prior to D-Day, Allied air power had played a vital role in ensuring that the invasion was a success. The forces of the RAF’s Coastal Command, the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Eastern Air Command and the US Navy and Army Air Force (USAAF) were vital in defeating the U-boat menace in the Battle of the Atlantic. This allowed for the build-up US forces, Operation BOLERO, in the UK in preparation for OVERLORD. Similarly, from 1943 onwards, the Combined Bomber Offensive was vital to the defeat of Germany, and the POINTBLANK directive of 14 June 1943 specifically listed German fighter factories as targets for RAF Bomber Command and the US Eighth Army Air Force to help ensure air superiority, which would aid the invasion. From the perspectives of the RAF and USAAF, preparations for D-Day began long before Eisenhower took over as SAC in January 1944. Air power, especially control of the air, was recognized as a key requirement for OVERLORD. Indeed, out of the three force commanders for OVERLORD, Air Chief Marshal Sir

ABOVE: Air Chief Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory, Air Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Expeditionary Air Force

ABOVE: Air Chief Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory Trafford Leigh-Mallory was the first to be appointed, addresses a large gathering of American servicemen from which illustrates the important role that air power a balcony, prior to Operation OVERLORD would play in the forthcoming invasion. Discussions took place between the RAF’s Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Charles Portal, and the THE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Commanding General of USAAF, General Henry “Hap” From late 1943 onwards, Leigh-Mallory began planning Arnold in August 1943, at which point it was agreed air operations in support of OVERLORD. A key element that the air commander would be an RAF officer. of this was the Transportation Plan, which saw Allied Portal selected Leigh-Mallory based on his extensive air forces isolate German forces in Normandy from their operational experience, and lines of communications. the latter formally became The Transportation Plan Even before D-Day, Allied air power Air Commander-in-Chief was the brainchild of had played a vital role in ensuring AEAF on 15 November Professor Solly Zuckerman, 1943. The coalition nature who was Leigh-Mallory’s that the invasion was a success of the command set-up Scientific Advisor. It was furthered by the also had the support of appointment of an American officer as Leigh-Mallory’s Eisenhower and Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder, deputy. From April 1944, this officer was Major the Deputy Supreme Allied Commander. General Hoyt Vandenberg. Under their command, Key targets included the disruption of road and rail AEAF deployed more than 10,000 aircraft in support traffic, attacks against key bridges, railway yards and of OVERLORD. These primarily came from the three crossroads. However, targets were also attacked in principal western Allies – Britain, the US and Canada other parts of France in order to deceive the Germans – but also included contributions from the various as to the invasion’s location. This formed part of occupied nations of Europe. Operation FORTITUDE, the deception plan in support

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

10

11


The “Great Crusade”: the Air War and D-Day Ross Mahoney, Aviation Historian, RAF Museum

T

he Supreme Allied Commander (SAC) for Operation OVERLORD, General Dwight D Eisenhower, described the invasion and the subsequent campaign in Europe as the “Great Crusade”. Indeed, D-Day, 6 June 1944, marked the start of the irrevocable defeat of Nazi Germany in Europe and coincided with Operation BAGRATION, launched on 22 June, by the Red Army on the Eastern Front that destroyed the German Army on this front. The day before D-Day, American troops had entered Rome.

The entire war effort was a joint affair between the major Allies: Great Britain, the United States of America and the Soviet Union. A key aspect of this was the role that air power played in ensuring Allied success on 6 June. Without the support provided by the Allied Expeditionary Air Force (AEAF), the United States Strategic Air Forces in Europe and RAF Bomber and Coastal Commands, D-Day would have been a much more difficult proposition and may even have been a failure. BEFORE D-DAY

Even prior to D-Day, Allied air power had played a vital role in ensuring that the invasion was a success. The forces of the RAF’s Coastal Command, the Royal Canadian Air Force’s Eastern Air Command and the US Navy and Army Air Force (USAAF) were vital in defeating the U-boat menace in the Battle of the Atlantic. This allowed for the build-up US forces, Operation BOLERO, in the UK in preparation for OVERLORD. Similarly, from 1943 onwards, the Combined Bomber Offensive was vital to the defeat of Germany, and the POINTBLANK directive of 14 June 1943 specifically listed German fighter factories as targets for RAF Bomber Command and the US Eighth Army Air Force to help ensure air superiority, which would aid the invasion. From the perspectives of the RAF and USAAF, preparations for D-Day began long before Eisenhower took over as SAC in January 1944. Air power, especially control of the air, was recognized as a key requirement for OVERLORD. Indeed, out of the three force commanders for OVERLORD, Air Chief Marshal Sir

ABOVE: Air Chief Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory, Air Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Expeditionary Air Force

ABOVE: Air Chief Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory Trafford Leigh-Mallory was the first to be appointed, addresses a large gathering of American servicemen from which illustrates the important role that air power a balcony, prior to Operation OVERLORD would play in the forthcoming invasion. Discussions took place between the RAF’s Chief of the Air Staff, Air Chief Marshal Sir Charles Portal, and the THE TRANSPORTATION PLAN Commanding General of USAAF, General Henry “Hap” From late 1943 onwards, Leigh-Mallory began planning Arnold in August 1943, at which point it was agreed air operations in support of OVERLORD. A key element that the air commander would be an RAF officer. of this was the Transportation Plan, which saw Allied Portal selected Leigh-Mallory based on his extensive air forces isolate German forces in Normandy from their operational experience, and lines of communications. the latter formally became The Transportation Plan Even before D-Day, Allied air power Air Commander-in-Chief was the brainchild of had played a vital role in ensuring AEAF on 15 November Professor Solly Zuckerman, 1943. The coalition nature who was Leigh-Mallory’s that the invasion was a success of the command set-up Scientific Advisor. It was furthered by the also had the support of appointment of an American officer as Leigh-Mallory’s Eisenhower and Air Chief Marshal Sir Arthur Tedder, deputy. From April 1944, this officer was Major the Deputy Supreme Allied Commander. General Hoyt Vandenberg. Under their command, Key targets included the disruption of road and rail AEAF deployed more than 10,000 aircraft in support traffic, attacks against key bridges, railway yards and of OVERLORD. These primarily came from the three crossroads. However, targets were also attacked in principal western Allies – Britain, the US and Canada other parts of France in order to deceive the Germans – but also included contributions from the various as to the invasion’s location. This formed part of occupied nations of Europe. Operation FORTITUDE, the deception plan in support

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

10

11


and, most importantly, fighter cover. The final key element was the role of air transport assets to deliver the three airborne divisions to their targets in Normandy. Leigh-Mallory described Operation TONGA, the capture of the bridges over the Caen canal and River Orne, as the finest flying he had ever seen. Modern pilots have recognized this panoply of operations to this day. Aircraft involved included the key types produced by the British and American aviation industry, such as the Avro Lancaster, Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses, Supermarine Spitfires, North American P-51 Mustangs, and the venerable Douglas C-47 Dakota. The air plan’s success, and that of the operations before D-Day, was so complete that it was not until around 15:00 that the first operations by the Luftwaffe were conducted. The Allies, through cooperation, had achieved control of the air. EXPERIENCING D-DAY

Deploying air power is not just about the pilots and aircrew and, as such, a wide range of personnel, both men and women, experienced D-Day in different ways. In addition to aircrew, roles ranged from armourers and the variety of support roles in squadrons that are vital in getting aircraft airborne, to radar operators, who plotted aircraft movements and provided warning of any enemy

ABOVE: Major General Hoyt S Vandenberg, Deputy Air Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Expeditionary Air Force, June 1944

of OVERLORD. In total, 21,949 sorties were flown in this phase, with 66,517 tons of bombs dropped on key targets. The Transportation Plan was a great success and formed the key element of the preliminary phase of Allied air operations in support of D-Day. THE AIR PLAN FOR D-DAY

Apart from the Transportation Plan, the plan for air operations for OVERLORD consisted of further preliminary air operations in the days prior to D-Day, such as reconnaissance sorties and fighter sweeps. On D-Day itself, more than 14,000 sorties were flown by the Allied air forces. The sorties flown consisted of a wide variety of missions, all of which were vital for OVERLORD’s success. They consisted of night bomber operations against key coastal targets on the night of 5/6 June; smoke-laying as naval forces crossed the channel; anti-submarine and surface vessel patrols; continued reconnaissance operations to provide realtime intelligence of German movements towards the beachhead; attacks against lines of communications;

ABOVE: A USAAF Douglas C-47 Dakota landing in Normandy after D-Day. This was the first transport aircraft to land there

air and naval activity. These differing experiences were linked by various feelings, such as fear and a desire to do their jobs effectively. A couple of examples here will highlight the differing experiences of D-Day. Rose Davies was one such woman who experienced D-Day as a Radar Operator. As a Leading Aircraftwoman, she was stationed at RAF Ventnor and

on duty on the morning of 6 June when she saw the vast armada cross the channel on her screen. Radar operators worked in shifts of eight hours plotting movements. The work was intense and required a great deal of concentration. Most interesting is the fact that, on 6 June, Rose and her fellow plotters did not know that what they saw on their screens was the start of the Allied invasion of Europe. Such was the secrecy required to ensure the invasion’s success. For Bob Hansen, D-Day was a very different experience. Bob, then a Captain in command of a Consolidated B-24 Liberator named “Elmer”/“Lady Luck” of the 754th Squadron, 458th Bomb Group assigned to the US Eighth Army Air Force, flew two missions on D-Day. The first was against a V-1 launch site in the Calais area. The second was an operation to Pontaubault in southern Normandy to attack a railway junction. Poor results were achieved on this second mission, as the Group’s main concentration fell between two highways two-and-a-half miles south-west of the target. However, Bob’s mission illustrates the dominance achieved by Allied air forces prior to D-Day, as no fighters were encountered during the mission. The Group was later awarded the Bronze Star in the Theater ribbon for

ABOVE: Hawker Tempest Mk. V of No 3 Squadron in Normandy, June 1944

their participation on D-Day. In total, Bob flew 13 hours and 45 minutes that day. He recalls that he and his fellow airmen were given ‘pep’ pills to stay alert and awake during these missions. COMPLETE CONTROL

D-Day was a major undertaking – the largest amphibious operation conducted in the war to this date. Its success was dependent on the successful cooperation of the all the nations and services involved, and nowhere was this truer than in the sphere of air operations. Control of the air was vital to OVERLORD’s success, and close cooperation was needed to achieve this. Despite occasional friction, the key British and US commanders achieved their aim and, by D-Day, the Allies had complete control of the skies over the Normandy beachhead. This undoubtedly helped Allied ground forces get ashore as they were unhindered by German air activities. Allied dominance of the skies continued to support ground operations during the Normandy campaign and was a key element in the defeat of Germany in 1945.

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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and, most importantly, fighter cover. The final key element was the role of air transport assets to deliver the three airborne divisions to their targets in Normandy. Leigh-Mallory described Operation TONGA, the capture of the bridges over the Caen canal and River Orne, as the finest flying he had ever seen. Modern pilots have recognized this panoply of operations to this day. Aircraft involved included the key types produced by the British and American aviation industry, such as the Avro Lancaster, Boeing B-17 Flying Fortresses, Supermarine Spitfires, North American P-51 Mustangs, and the venerable Douglas C-47 Dakota. The air plan’s success, and that of the operations before D-Day, was so complete that it was not until around 15:00 that the first operations by the Luftwaffe were conducted. The Allies, through cooperation, had achieved control of the air. EXPERIENCING D-DAY

Deploying air power is not just about the pilots and aircrew and, as such, a wide range of personnel, both men and women, experienced D-Day in different ways. In addition to aircrew, roles ranged from armourers and the variety of support roles in squadrons that are vital in getting aircraft airborne, to radar operators, who plotted aircraft movements and provided warning of any enemy

ABOVE: Major General Hoyt S Vandenberg, Deputy Air Commander-in-Chief of the Allied Expeditionary Air Force, June 1944

of OVERLORD. In total, 21,949 sorties were flown in this phase, with 66,517 tons of bombs dropped on key targets. The Transportation Plan was a great success and formed the key element of the preliminary phase of Allied air operations in support of D-Day. THE AIR PLAN FOR D-DAY

Apart from the Transportation Plan, the plan for air operations for OVERLORD consisted of further preliminary air operations in the days prior to D-Day, such as reconnaissance sorties and fighter sweeps. On D-Day itself, more than 14,000 sorties were flown by the Allied air forces. The sorties flown consisted of a wide variety of missions, all of which were vital for OVERLORD’s success. They consisted of night bomber operations against key coastal targets on the night of 5/6 June; smoke-laying as naval forces crossed the channel; anti-submarine and surface vessel patrols; continued reconnaissance operations to provide realtime intelligence of German movements towards the beachhead; attacks against lines of communications;

ABOVE: A USAAF Douglas C-47 Dakota landing in Normandy after D-Day. This was the first transport aircraft to land there

air and naval activity. These differing experiences were linked by various feelings, such as fear and a desire to do their jobs effectively. A couple of examples here will highlight the differing experiences of D-Day. Rose Davies was one such woman who experienced D-Day as a Radar Operator. As a Leading Aircraftwoman, she was stationed at RAF Ventnor and

on duty on the morning of 6 June when she saw the vast armada cross the channel on her screen. Radar operators worked in shifts of eight hours plotting movements. The work was intense and required a great deal of concentration. Most interesting is the fact that, on 6 June, Rose and her fellow plotters did not know that what they saw on their screens was the start of the Allied invasion of Europe. Such was the secrecy required to ensure the invasion’s success. For Bob Hansen, D-Day was a very different experience. Bob, then a Captain in command of a Consolidated B-24 Liberator named “Elmer”/“Lady Luck” of the 754th Squadron, 458th Bomb Group assigned to the US Eighth Army Air Force, flew two missions on D-Day. The first was against a V-1 launch site in the Calais area. The second was an operation to Pontaubault in southern Normandy to attack a railway junction. Poor results were achieved on this second mission, as the Group’s main concentration fell between two highways two-and-a-half miles south-west of the target. However, Bob’s mission illustrates the dominance achieved by Allied air forces prior to D-Day, as no fighters were encountered during the mission. The Group was later awarded the Bronze Star in the Theater ribbon for

ABOVE: Hawker Tempest Mk. V of No 3 Squadron in Normandy, June 1944

their participation on D-Day. In total, Bob flew 13 hours and 45 minutes that day. He recalls that he and his fellow airmen were given ‘pep’ pills to stay alert and awake during these missions. COMPLETE CONTROL

D-Day was a major undertaking – the largest amphibious operation conducted in the war to this date. Its success was dependent on the successful cooperation of the all the nations and services involved, and nowhere was this truer than in the sphere of air operations. Control of the air was vital to OVERLORD’s success, and close cooperation was needed to achieve this. Despite occasional friction, the key British and US commanders achieved their aim and, by D-Day, the Allies had complete control of the skies over the Normandy beachhead. This undoubtedly helped Allied ground forces get ashore as they were unhindered by German air activities. Allied dominance of the skies continued to support ground operations during the Normandy campaign and was a key element in the defeat of Germany in 1945.

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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Our guests of honor A look at the careers of our two guests of honor, both of whom made vital contributions on D-Day – Leading Aircraftwoman Rose Davies WAAF and Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Robert “Bob” Hansen USAF

ROSE DAVIES

Rose was eventually successful in obtaining a transfer to become a Radar Operator – and she loved it. Rose trained at the Radio School at RAF Yatesbury in the new equipment designed to read shipping movements, a task that required excellent vision and high levels of concentration. Rose graduated after six weeks of intense training and was posted to RAF Ventnor on the Isle of Wight. Arriving in July 1943, Rose was appointed to a Watch and settled into the routine. Watches of six to eight airwomen worked a shift pattern to ensure 24-hour coverage of the English Channel south of the Isle of Wight. Shifts changed: sometimes 0600-1400 hrs, then 1400-2200 hrs, then 2200-0600 hrs. There was no way of knowing what each period on watch, gazing at the HPT, would bring. Returns were recorded on paper, and these were then taken to those who knew whether the return was friend or foe. Rose

Rose Davies was born Rose Colley in Shrewsbury in 1916, one of four children of George and Rose. George, a stonemason from a Shropshire family, saw service in France during the First World War with the Royal Engineers from 1916 to ABOVE: Rose Davies joined 1918. Attending St George’s the WAAF in 1941 School, Shrewsbury, until the age of 14, Rose was keen to learn all she could and liked school, and her favourite subject was English. On leaving school in 1930, Rose started work as a shop assistant in a local department store. With her love of English, Rose found an appointment in the local library in 1934, and subsequently was transferred to the Stafford Library, where she stayed until 1938. On returning to Shrewsbury to nurse her ailing mother, Rose found employment in the Shrewsbury Army Records Office as a clerk. Because her job was classified as a reserved occupation, Rose was exempt from call-up at the start of the Second World War. However, in 1941, Rose sought the permission of the Colonel commanding the Records Office to volunteer to join the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF). The Recruiting Office advised Rose that she had a choice of becoming a Driver, Cook or Balloon Operator. Too short to be a driver and not keen to be a cook, Rose elected to become a Balloon Operator – and she hated it. The system allowed WAAF members to apply once a month to remuster. So, after 14 attempts in 14 months,

ABOVE: One of many WAAF radar operators plots aircraft at an RAF receiving station during the Second World War

never knew which ship she had seen, where it was going, what it was doing or why it was there. On 6 June 1944, LACW Rose Colley was on watch when D-Day shipping movements reached their peak. The HPT screen lit up with returns, all of which required recording. The pressure was intense and the concentration levels enormous. Those on shift were the ones with the “picture” in their heads, and so it was decided that those on watch should not be relieved until things stabilized. As a result, Rose watched D-Day movements on her screen for many hours. She was not aware of the reason for all of the returns on her screen, and it was not until the end of her shift that Rose and her colleagues were advised of the great events that had taken place. A month later, as the war moved on, Rose was posted to RAF Beachy Head, where she was responsible for viewing a different section of the English Channel; reinforcement and supply shipping created many radar returns, but nowhere near as many as on 6 June. Three fgurther postings followed before, in November 1945, Rose was demobbed from RAF Bard Hill in Norfolk and returned home to Shrewsbury. Before the year was out, Rose married her long-term fiancé, who had served as a Captain in the Royal Signals in the Middle East. Rose then settled down to family life in Shrewsbury. A mother of two, grandmother to three, great grandmother to one, Rose remains an active, fascinating and dynamic lady with many interests and a fantastic memory that enables her to recall with clarity the important events that took place 70 years ago in the sea south of the Isle of Wight.

ABOVE: As Captain, Bob commanded a Consolidated B-24 Liberator named “Elmer”/“Lady Luck” at the time of D-Day

aged just 20. He began his military service with basic training at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, followed by flight training at what was then the San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center in Texas. After completing primary and advanced flying schools, he prepared for overseas combat duty in the European theater. Colonel Hansen was eventually ordered to Horsham St Faith Airfield, Norwich, England, where he flew the B-24 Liberator with the 754th Bombardment Squadron. He executed more than 80 sorties, achieving 30 combat bombing missions from 1 May 1944 to 1 July 1945. In addition to numerous bombing missions over Germany, Colonel Hansen flew two combat missions supporting the Allied D-Day operation in France and he also supported the halting of the German advance during the Battle of the Bulge. Hansen returned home to Rochester after completing his required number of combat sorties as the war in Europe came to an end. During his 30 years of service, Colonel Hansen piloted various LT COL ROBERT ABOVE: Bob, who flew two missions on D-Day, had a 30-year military career aircraft, including the B-24 Liberator, “BOB” HANSEN the C-97 Stratocruiser, and the C-141 Lt Col Robert “Bob” Hansen, USAF Starlifter. He saw service during the Korean War and the retired, is a career aviator and served as a combat pilot Vietnam conflict and was awarded the Distinguished in both the Second World War and the Korean War. He Flying Cross with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Meritorious concluded a 30-year storied military career in 1977 with Service Medal and numerous Air Medals. After his over 10,000 flight hours as an Aircraft Commander at active duty military service, he volunteered to assist US McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. veterans and has served at the McGuire Air Force Base Originally from Rochester, New York, the young Bob Retiree Affairs Office from 1977 to this day. Hansen joined the Army Air Corps on 15 January 1942,

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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Our guests of honor A look at the careers of our two guests of honor, both of whom made vital contributions on D-Day – Leading Aircraftwoman Rose Davies WAAF and Lieutenant Colonel (Ret) Robert “Bob” Hansen USAF

ROSE DAVIES

Rose was eventually successful in obtaining a transfer to become a Radar Operator – and she loved it. Rose trained at the Radio School at RAF Yatesbury in the new equipment designed to read shipping movements, a task that required excellent vision and high levels of concentration. Rose graduated after six weeks of intense training and was posted to RAF Ventnor on the Isle of Wight. Arriving in July 1943, Rose was appointed to a Watch and settled into the routine. Watches of six to eight airwomen worked a shift pattern to ensure 24-hour coverage of the English Channel south of the Isle of Wight. Shifts changed: sometimes 0600-1400 hrs, then 1400-2200 hrs, then 2200-0600 hrs. There was no way of knowing what each period on watch, gazing at the HPT, would bring. Returns were recorded on paper, and these were then taken to those who knew whether the return was friend or foe. Rose

Rose Davies was born Rose Colley in Shrewsbury in 1916, one of four children of George and Rose. George, a stonemason from a Shropshire family, saw service in France during the First World War with the Royal Engineers from 1916 to ABOVE: Rose Davies joined 1918. Attending St George’s the WAAF in 1941 School, Shrewsbury, until the age of 14, Rose was keen to learn all she could and liked school, and her favourite subject was English. On leaving school in 1930, Rose started work as a shop assistant in a local department store. With her love of English, Rose found an appointment in the local library in 1934, and subsequently was transferred to the Stafford Library, where she stayed until 1938. On returning to Shrewsbury to nurse her ailing mother, Rose found employment in the Shrewsbury Army Records Office as a clerk. Because her job was classified as a reserved occupation, Rose was exempt from call-up at the start of the Second World War. However, in 1941, Rose sought the permission of the Colonel commanding the Records Office to volunteer to join the Women’s Auxiliary Air Force (WAAF). The Recruiting Office advised Rose that she had a choice of becoming a Driver, Cook or Balloon Operator. Too short to be a driver and not keen to be a cook, Rose elected to become a Balloon Operator – and she hated it. The system allowed WAAF members to apply once a month to remuster. So, after 14 attempts in 14 months,

ABOVE: One of many WAAF radar operators plots aircraft at an RAF receiving station during the Second World War

never knew which ship she had seen, where it was going, what it was doing or why it was there. On 6 June 1944, LACW Rose Colley was on watch when D-Day shipping movements reached their peak. The HPT screen lit up with returns, all of which required recording. The pressure was intense and the concentration levels enormous. Those on shift were the ones with the “picture” in their heads, and so it was decided that those on watch should not be relieved until things stabilized. As a result, Rose watched D-Day movements on her screen for many hours. She was not aware of the reason for all of the returns on her screen, and it was not until the end of her shift that Rose and her colleagues were advised of the great events that had taken place. A month later, as the war moved on, Rose was posted to RAF Beachy Head, where she was responsible for viewing a different section of the English Channel; reinforcement and supply shipping created many radar returns, but nowhere near as many as on 6 June. Three fgurther postings followed before, in November 1945, Rose was demobbed from RAF Bard Hill in Norfolk and returned home to Shrewsbury. Before the year was out, Rose married her long-term fiancé, who had served as a Captain in the Royal Signals in the Middle East. Rose then settled down to family life in Shrewsbury. A mother of two, grandmother to three, great grandmother to one, Rose remains an active, fascinating and dynamic lady with many interests and a fantastic memory that enables her to recall with clarity the important events that took place 70 years ago in the sea south of the Isle of Wight.

ABOVE: As Captain, Bob commanded a Consolidated B-24 Liberator named “Elmer”/“Lady Luck” at the time of D-Day

aged just 20. He began his military service with basic training at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, followed by flight training at what was then the San Antonio Aviation Cadet Center in Texas. After completing primary and advanced flying schools, he prepared for overseas combat duty in the European theater. Colonel Hansen was eventually ordered to Horsham St Faith Airfield, Norwich, England, where he flew the B-24 Liberator with the 754th Bombardment Squadron. He executed more than 80 sorties, achieving 30 combat bombing missions from 1 May 1944 to 1 July 1945. In addition to numerous bombing missions over Germany, Colonel Hansen flew two combat missions supporting the Allied D-Day operation in France and he also supported the halting of the German advance during the Battle of the Bulge. Hansen returned home to Rochester after completing his required number of combat sorties as the war in Europe came to an end. During his 30 years of service, Colonel Hansen piloted various LT COL ROBERT ABOVE: Bob, who flew two missions on D-Day, had a 30-year military career aircraft, including the B-24 Liberator, “BOB” HANSEN the C-97 Stratocruiser, and the C-141 Lt Col Robert “Bob” Hansen, USAF Starlifter. He saw service during the Korean War and the retired, is a career aviator and served as a combat pilot Vietnam conflict and was awarded the Distinguished in both the Second World War and the Korean War. He Flying Cross with Oak Leaf Cluster, the Meritorious concluded a 30-year storied military career in 1977 with Service Medal and numerous Air Medals. After his over 10,000 flight hours as an Aircraft Commander at active duty military service, he volunteered to assist US McGuire Air Force Base in New Jersey. veterans and has served at the McGuire Air Force Base Originally from Rochester, New York, the young Bob Retiree Affairs Office from 1977 to this day. Hansen joined the Army Air Corps on 15 January 1942,

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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Apprentices With RAFMAF’s support, this year’s apprentice exchange has been a huge success, says Mick Shepherd, Training Manager at the Michael Beetham Conservation Centre, RAF Museum Cosford

A

fter two years of detailed planning and RAF Museum would form the best combination and coordination, the Royal Air Force Museum achieve the goals of all of the organizations. American Foundation (RAFMAF) During previous exchanges, the RAF Museum announced its support of the 2014 Exchange apprentices had been so enthused by their visits to the program between the RAF Museum and the National NASM and, in particular, the restoration facilities at Air and Space Museum the Udvar-Hazy Center, (NASM) in Washington, that we investigated the The Board determined that an DC. For a number of possibility of focusing exchange between an American years, the Foundation future exchanges with supported an exchange the Smithsonian. This museum and the RAF Museum would of students from the coincided with an form the best combination Seattle, WA, area expression of interest by and RAF Museum Mr Rich Kowalczyk, the Apprentices from the Michael Beetham Conservation NASM’s restoration Chief, in establishing a similar Centre at RAF Museum Cosford. After evaluating the apprentice program, and this latest program was an results of that program, the Board determined that ideal opportunity for him to see first hand what can an exchange between an American museum and the be achieved. With the Foundation’s commitment of support, an agreement between Peter Jakab of NASM and the Director of the RAF Museum was approved and three apprentices, accompanied by an adult mentor, made the inaugural visit during the summer of 2014. Final arrangements were made between Mr Mick Shepherd, the apprentices’ Training Manager, and Mr Kowalczyk, and the group arrived in Washington, DC, for a three-week exchange program on 20 August 2014. In the UK, the three apprentices are currently working on various conservation tasks, including the whole range of activities associated with the Dornier Do17z, which was recovered from the English Channel (also with RAFMAF’s support) in 2014. Bethany Colburn is 20 years old and has completed ABOVE: One of the many fascinating tasks the apprentices her third year as an apprentice and is particularly adept worked on was helping to prepare the Horten Flying Wing at small artefact conservation and restoration. In for transfer to the Udvar-Hazy Center

addition to her aircraft work, she leads and directs a team of volunteer conservators responsible for items removed from the Dornier and for preparing them for display. Ella Middleton, who is 21 years old, has also completed her third year as an apprentice and is a firstrate sheet metal worker. She routinely works on the daily tasks in support of the Dornier fuselage. In addition, she has been project-managing the restoration and refit of the center fuselage of the Museum’s Hampden Bomber. Sam Evans is 22 years old and has completed year two of his apprenticeship. Sam’s speciality is sheet metal work and he has undertaken many battle-damage repairs on the rear fuselage of the Hampden Bomber, as well as working alongside Ella on the Dornier. His main project is using the English Wheel to roll complex curved

ABOVE: From left to right, exchange apprentices Sam Evans, Ella Middleton and Bethany Colburn pose alongside the Horten Flying Wing at the Garber Facility in Maryland

metal panels for fitment to the sole remaining Vickers Trans-sonic model. The apprentices initially orientated themselves with the Udvar-Hazy Center, as well as NASM on the Mall and the Garber Facility at Silver Hills, MD, where many artefacts are still in storage awaiting eventual shipment to Dulles. They also had some free time to experience Washington, DC, itself. At Udvar-Hazy, they were given a day’s tuition in the intricacies of both rotary and jet engines by former USN Master Chief Scott Wood. Scott’s words were all the

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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Apprentices With RAFMAF’s support, this year’s apprentice exchange has been a huge success, says Mick Shepherd, Training Manager at the Michael Beetham Conservation Centre, RAF Museum Cosford

A

fter two years of detailed planning and RAF Museum would form the best combination and coordination, the Royal Air Force Museum achieve the goals of all of the organizations. American Foundation (RAFMAF) During previous exchanges, the RAF Museum announced its support of the 2014 Exchange apprentices had been so enthused by their visits to the program between the RAF Museum and the National NASM and, in particular, the restoration facilities at Air and Space Museum the Udvar-Hazy Center, (NASM) in Washington, that we investigated the The Board determined that an DC. For a number of possibility of focusing exchange between an American years, the Foundation future exchanges with supported an exchange the Smithsonian. This museum and the RAF Museum would of students from the coincided with an form the best combination Seattle, WA, area expression of interest by and RAF Museum Mr Rich Kowalczyk, the Apprentices from the Michael Beetham Conservation NASM’s restoration Chief, in establishing a similar Centre at RAF Museum Cosford. After evaluating the apprentice program, and this latest program was an results of that program, the Board determined that ideal opportunity for him to see first hand what can an exchange between an American museum and the be achieved. With the Foundation’s commitment of support, an agreement between Peter Jakab of NASM and the Director of the RAF Museum was approved and three apprentices, accompanied by an adult mentor, made the inaugural visit during the summer of 2014. Final arrangements were made between Mr Mick Shepherd, the apprentices’ Training Manager, and Mr Kowalczyk, and the group arrived in Washington, DC, for a three-week exchange program on 20 August 2014. In the UK, the three apprentices are currently working on various conservation tasks, including the whole range of activities associated with the Dornier Do17z, which was recovered from the English Channel (also with RAFMAF’s support) in 2014. Bethany Colburn is 20 years old and has completed ABOVE: One of the many fascinating tasks the apprentices her third year as an apprentice and is particularly adept worked on was helping to prepare the Horten Flying Wing at small artefact conservation and restoration. In for transfer to the Udvar-Hazy Center

addition to her aircraft work, she leads and directs a team of volunteer conservators responsible for items removed from the Dornier and for preparing them for display. Ella Middleton, who is 21 years old, has also completed her third year as an apprentice and is a firstrate sheet metal worker. She routinely works on the daily tasks in support of the Dornier fuselage. In addition, she has been project-managing the restoration and refit of the center fuselage of the Museum’s Hampden Bomber. Sam Evans is 22 years old and has completed year two of his apprenticeship. Sam’s speciality is sheet metal work and he has undertaken many battle-damage repairs on the rear fuselage of the Hampden Bomber, as well as working alongside Ella on the Dornier. His main project is using the English Wheel to roll complex curved

ABOVE: From left to right, exchange apprentices Sam Evans, Ella Middleton and Bethany Colburn pose alongside the Horten Flying Wing at the Garber Facility in Maryland

metal panels for fitment to the sole remaining Vickers Trans-sonic model. The apprentices initially orientated themselves with the Udvar-Hazy Center, as well as NASM on the Mall and the Garber Facility at Silver Hills, MD, where many artefacts are still in storage awaiting eventual shipment to Dulles. They also had some free time to experience Washington, DC, itself. At Udvar-Hazy, they were given a day’s tuition in the intricacies of both rotary and jet engines by former USN Master Chief Scott Wood. Scott’s words were all the

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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ABOVE: The apprentices spent several days at the Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility (this page) and also worked at the Udvar-Hazy Center (opposite)

more impactful as none of the apprentices had had the opportunity to work with engines in the UK. Lessons were held in and around the F-4, F-8 and F-14, during which time the apprentices assisted Scott with various tasks. Scott also fell straight back into his Military Instructor role and gave them each a research assignment to complete in their own time. They all lived up to their reputations and their assignments exceeded Scott’s exacting standards. Their reward was a Labor Day barbeque, hosted by Scott at his house in the company of his family and neighbors. The apprentices spent two days in total at the Garber facility where, in addition to a full tour, they were able to help load the center fuselage of the Horten Flying Wing, as well as assisting with the movement of an Apollo Space Telescope in preparation for their eventual transfer to Udvar-Hazy. It soon became apparent to

all the apprentices that the methods and procedures employed back in the UK vary little from those used by their counterparts in the USA. What they were jealous of, however, was the amount of specialist equipment, transportation systems, vehicles and lifting gear available to the NASM staff. After a Labor Day weekend that included socializing with Sir Stewart and Lady Kaye Matthews, Gary Halbert and the Foundation President Fred Roggero and his wife Kathy, the apprentices returned to the Restoration Hangar. There, each of them was given a sheet metal repair to undertake as part of the work that has just begun on the restoration of the cowling of “The Langley Fan”, a massive four-bladed propeller

removed by contractors from the NASA Langley Wind Tunnels many years ago. Much of the work was well within the apprentices’ capabilities and it was anticipated that some of the restoration would be completed before their return to the UK.

although a number of minor defects were pointed out, it was felt that, all in all, the unit was in pretty good shape. The second day involved a similar exercise on the Gondola Assembly (Capsule), where signs of its landing in the desert were evident, including a fair amount of sand. All dirt and debris were carefully removed from inside and outside the unit – it should be noted that it still has the original linen and bedding on the unmade bed. There is a small piece of graffiti (illegible signature and heart motif in ballpoint pen) on the Large Logo on the starboard side of the Gondola, but it’s impossible to know if this was added before or after its epic journey! It is essential to remember that this exchange is not solely about restoration or conservation. That element simply facilitates the “real” reason for the exchange

The “real” reason for the exchange is about the youngsters meeting other people in similar situations During their time at Udvar-Hazy, the apprentices spent two full days working on the Breitling Orbiter. The first day involved a detailed inspection and survey of the gas bottle cradle and burner units looking for any signs of corrosion or other damage in order to create an initial condition report. This is standard museum practice and,

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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ABOVE: The apprentices spent several days at the Garber Preservation, Restoration, and Storage Facility (this page) and also worked at the Udvar-Hazy Center (opposite)

more impactful as none of the apprentices had had the opportunity to work with engines in the UK. Lessons were held in and around the F-4, F-8 and F-14, during which time the apprentices assisted Scott with various tasks. Scott also fell straight back into his Military Instructor role and gave them each a research assignment to complete in their own time. They all lived up to their reputations and their assignments exceeded Scott’s exacting standards. Their reward was a Labor Day barbeque, hosted by Scott at his house in the company of his family and neighbors. The apprentices spent two days in total at the Garber facility where, in addition to a full tour, they were able to help load the center fuselage of the Horten Flying Wing, as well as assisting with the movement of an Apollo Space Telescope in preparation for their eventual transfer to Udvar-Hazy. It soon became apparent to

all the apprentices that the methods and procedures employed back in the UK vary little from those used by their counterparts in the USA. What they were jealous of, however, was the amount of specialist equipment, transportation systems, vehicles and lifting gear available to the NASM staff. After a Labor Day weekend that included socializing with Sir Stewart and Lady Kaye Matthews, Gary Halbert and the Foundation President Fred Roggero and his wife Kathy, the apprentices returned to the Restoration Hangar. There, each of them was given a sheet metal repair to undertake as part of the work that has just begun on the restoration of the cowling of “The Langley Fan”, a massive four-bladed propeller

removed by contractors from the NASA Langley Wind Tunnels many years ago. Much of the work was well within the apprentices’ capabilities and it was anticipated that some of the restoration would be completed before their return to the UK.

although a number of minor defects were pointed out, it was felt that, all in all, the unit was in pretty good shape. The second day involved a similar exercise on the Gondola Assembly (Capsule), where signs of its landing in the desert were evident, including a fair amount of sand. All dirt and debris were carefully removed from inside and outside the unit – it should be noted that it still has the original linen and bedding on the unmade bed. There is a small piece of graffiti (illegible signature and heart motif in ballpoint pen) on the Large Logo on the starboard side of the Gondola, but it’s impossible to know if this was added before or after its epic journey! It is essential to remember that this exchange is not solely about restoration or conservation. That element simply facilitates the “real” reason for the exchange

The “real” reason for the exchange is about the youngsters meeting other people in similar situations During their time at Udvar-Hazy, the apprentices spent two full days working on the Breitling Orbiter. The first day involved a detailed inspection and survey of the gas bottle cradle and burner units looking for any signs of corrosion or other damage in order to create an initial condition report. This is standard museum practice and,

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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AN ICON JUST GOT LARGER

Apprentices cont.

which is about the youngsters meeting other people in similar situations, facing similar challenges and learning that there is more than one way to deal with the issues we all face. In addition, it provides the apprentices with an opportunity to meet people who have worked in industry and academia and gives them the opportunity to make a more informed career choice. Previous participants in this program have all done well. Two of them have been awarded the title of UK Apprentice of the Year. RAF Museum Cosford was awarded National Employer of the Year and this year the Royal Air Force Museum has made it into the final three of the London Region Employer of the Year Awards with the final results announced by the Mayor of London at the end of September. On behalf of us all, please accept our thanks to our hosts, the generous industry sponsors, and every member of the Foundation who has generously given their time and welcomed us so warmly.

THE NEW NAVITIMER 46 mm

ABOVE: While at the Udvar-Hazy Center, the three apprentices had the opportunity to work on the Breitling Orbiter 3 project

RAF Museum American Foundation

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AN ICON JUST GOT LARGER

Apprentices cont.

which is about the youngsters meeting other people in similar situations, facing similar challenges and learning that there is more than one way to deal with the issues we all face. In addition, it provides the apprentices with an opportunity to meet people who have worked in industry and academia and gives them the opportunity to make a more informed career choice. Previous participants in this program have all done well. Two of them have been awarded the title of UK Apprentice of the Year. RAF Museum Cosford was awarded National Employer of the Year and this year the Royal Air Force Museum has made it into the final three of the London Region Employer of the Year Awards with the final results announced by the Mayor of London at the end of September. On behalf of us all, please accept our thanks to our hosts, the generous industry sponsors, and every member of the Foundation who has generously given their time and welcomed us so warmly.

THE NEW NAVITIMER 46 mm

ABOVE: While at the Udvar-Hazy Center, the three apprentices had the opportunity to work on the Breitling Orbiter 3 project

RAF Museum American Foundation

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The RAF Museum 2014

‘First World War in the Air’ Exhibition

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ith the support of the RAF Museum American Foundation, a new permanent First World War Gallery Exhibition will open in the 1917 Hangar and Watch Office buildings at the London site. The First World War in the Air opens on 2 December 2014. We interview three key people involved in its development to check on progress.

ABOVE: RAF Museum staff rallied to help move the Sopwith Camel to the new Exhibition space

in order that visitors are aware of the change in content. The final design is uncluttered and geared towards how the brain works and how visitors take in information. Our biggest challenge was the aircraft. We were given a list of all the First World War aircraft in the Museum’s collection at the start, and these are the biggest items in the Exhibition. We are suspending some from the ceiling, which allows us to show movement and action, rather than static aircraft in rows. We wanted to make sure that we didn’t just make an exhibition about pilots, so we have three characters that you follow through the story – we have over 150 people stories in total. We also look at the technical and operational stories.

PATRICK SWINDELL Responsible for: Designing the Exhibition (Ralph Applebaum Associates)

I’m not a fan of having the spaces in a museum all looking the same, so we needed to define each space RIGHT: This RFC dog jacket came top of the Museum’s online exhibits poll

My favourite part of the Exhibition will be the digital battle table. It will unfold like a real map and show the two sides moving in flight. If you stand one side, you will hear English voices and, on the other, German voices. The Exhibition is certainly not about who won the war – it’s about showing things from the German viewpoint, too. JOANNA DICKINSON One of the many staff contributors, responsible for: Writing and editing the Exhibition  I’ve been involved with script-

writing and editing the Exhibition alongside other staff at ABOVE: The Exhibition includes examples of reconnaissance the Museum. Our job is to research and write the panels, equipment developed during the First World War ensuring that we tell the right stories in the right way to excite and interest people using the right language. Conservation: A good example illustrating that it is The primary panels give a basic overview of the area sometimes desirable not to carry out restoration or rectify of interest; the secondary panels provide more in-depth damage, as this can be part of the story of the object and information. The aim is that a visitor could read only makes it significant. It might sound obvious but it shows the primary panels and still come out with a basic that it is essential to know the history of an object before understanding of the entire subject area. We have created making decisions about how it is dealt with. This object a layered approach – if a is still very fragile, however, visitor just wanted to read so will have to be lit carefully The key message for the exhibition and regularly inspected about the people stories, they could do that, too. The visitor while on display. is “He who controls the air gets to decide how much controls the battlefield” depth they want to get into. Teddy Bear Mascot Description: I was working on the Scotch Jock (pictured below) technical stories, which I enjoyed, explaining the was the mascot of Lieutenant William MacLanachan, technology behind the war. There are so many forgotten aka “McScotch”, pilot with 40 Squadron and a stories: think about what the First World War aircraft contemporary of Mick Mannock and George McElroy. were made from – where did we get those materials Conservation: A great example of a damaged and dogwhen trade routes were blocked? Innovation is always eared object whose condition is essential to its story. created at these times in our history. The overall objective is to preserve it in its current state and keep it stable with minimum intervention. The only problem that needs addressing for display is the fact that MARC MILLER the head is very loose and Responsible for: Conserving the items in the Exhibition only barely attached to My role is to look at the physical objects that we would the body. This will need like to put into the Exhibition and assess them for any to be stabilized and will conservation work needed. Below are two examples of require a suitable support key items that we have assessed already: when mounted in the Exhibition. Another item RFC Map and Case Description: Leather-bound RFC map for ongoing monitoring case with top carrying handle and map of Neuville St and inspection as the Vaast area, Western Front, 1917. These were used by wool it is made from is Lt HE Bagot (later 7th Baron Bagot) of No 16 Squadron vulnerable to insects and RFC and bear bullet holes sustained in combat with a will also deteriorate if the Halberstadt on 26 February 1917. Both officers were light levels are too high. wounded and their aircraft crashed in the British Line.

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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The RAF Museum 2014

‘First World War in the Air’ Exhibition

W

ith the support of the RAF Museum American Foundation, a new permanent First World War Gallery Exhibition will open in the 1917 Hangar and Watch Office buildings at the London site. The First World War in the Air opens on 2 December 2014. We interview three key people involved in its development to check on progress.

ABOVE: RAF Museum staff rallied to help move the Sopwith Camel to the new Exhibition space

in order that visitors are aware of the change in content. The final design is uncluttered and geared towards how the brain works and how visitors take in information. Our biggest challenge was the aircraft. We were given a list of all the First World War aircraft in the Museum’s collection at the start, and these are the biggest items in the Exhibition. We are suspending some from the ceiling, which allows us to show movement and action, rather than static aircraft in rows. We wanted to make sure that we didn’t just make an exhibition about pilots, so we have three characters that you follow through the story – we have over 150 people stories in total. We also look at the technical and operational stories.

PATRICK SWINDELL Responsible for: Designing the Exhibition (Ralph Applebaum Associates)

I’m not a fan of having the spaces in a museum all looking the same, so we needed to define each space RIGHT: This RFC dog jacket came top of the Museum’s online exhibits poll

My favourite part of the Exhibition will be the digital battle table. It will unfold like a real map and show the two sides moving in flight. If you stand one side, you will hear English voices and, on the other, German voices. The Exhibition is certainly not about who won the war – it’s about showing things from the German viewpoint, too. JOANNA DICKINSON One of the many staff contributors, responsible for: Writing and editing the Exhibition  I’ve been involved with script-

writing and editing the Exhibition alongside other staff at ABOVE: The Exhibition includes examples of reconnaissance the Museum. Our job is to research and write the panels, equipment developed during the First World War ensuring that we tell the right stories in the right way to excite and interest people using the right language. Conservation: A good example illustrating that it is The primary panels give a basic overview of the area sometimes desirable not to carry out restoration or rectify of interest; the secondary panels provide more in-depth damage, as this can be part of the story of the object and information. The aim is that a visitor could read only makes it significant. It might sound obvious but it shows the primary panels and still come out with a basic that it is essential to know the history of an object before understanding of the entire subject area. We have created making decisions about how it is dealt with. This object a layered approach – if a is still very fragile, however, visitor just wanted to read so will have to be lit carefully The key message for the exhibition and regularly inspected about the people stories, they could do that, too. The visitor while on display. is “He who controls the air gets to decide how much controls the battlefield” depth they want to get into. Teddy Bear Mascot Description: I was working on the Scotch Jock (pictured below) technical stories, which I enjoyed, explaining the was the mascot of Lieutenant William MacLanachan, technology behind the war. There are so many forgotten aka “McScotch”, pilot with 40 Squadron and a stories: think about what the First World War aircraft contemporary of Mick Mannock and George McElroy. were made from – where did we get those materials Conservation: A great example of a damaged and dogwhen trade routes were blocked? Innovation is always eared object whose condition is essential to its story. created at these times in our history. The overall objective is to preserve it in its current state and keep it stable with minimum intervention. The only problem that needs addressing for display is the fact that MARC MILLER the head is very loose and Responsible for: Conserving the items in the Exhibition only barely attached to My role is to look at the physical objects that we would the body. This will need like to put into the Exhibition and assess them for any to be stabilized and will conservation work needed. Below are two examples of require a suitable support key items that we have assessed already: when mounted in the Exhibition. Another item RFC Map and Case Description: Leather-bound RFC map for ongoing monitoring case with top carrying handle and map of Neuville St and inspection as the Vaast area, Western Front, 1917. These were used by wool it is made from is Lt HE Bagot (later 7th Baron Bagot) of No 16 Squadron vulnerable to insects and RFC and bear bullet holes sustained in combat with a will also deteriorate if the Halberstadt on 26 February 1917. Both officers were light levels are too high. wounded and their aircraft crashed in the British Line.

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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The Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation

Swords of Honor

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n 2009, the Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation (RAFMAF) instituted the Sword of Honor, to be presented annually to the RAF Officer on exchange with the USAF who has contributed most in the previous year to relations between our two great nations and their air forces. In 2012, another Sword was added to recognize the most outstanding USAF officer on exchange with the RAF. The Swords, dedicated by RAFMAF Board member Tim Manna, a US citizen residing in the UK, are an embodiment of the Foundation’s mission to strengthen and educate present and future generations about the importance of the special UK/US relationship within the field of aviation. They recognize the excellent work of exchange officers on both sides of the Atlantic. The original Sword is the same as that of an RAF officer, made by British specialist Pooley’s Swords. It has a singleedged straight blade with a gold-plated brass hilt, white fish-skin grip and a ABOVE: 2013 Sword of Honor recipients Ft Lt Guy Butler (second left) and brass pommel in the form of an eagle. Major Heather Fox (second right), pictured with General Larry O Spencer, A stamped, gold-plated brass cartouche USAF (left) and Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford, RAF (right) bears the bird emblem of the RAF. from the inscription from Winston Churchill regarding The Sword also bears the inscription: “Oh, thus be it the RAF pilots, who came from many nations including ever when freemen shall stand” – a line from Francis the United States, to fly in the Battle of Britain. It reads: Scott Key’s 1814 poem, The Star-Spangled Banner. It “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed was flown from England to Everett, WA, by RAFMAF by so many to so few.” Each winner of the Sword receives Board member John Sessions in his Consolidated a miniature replica. B-25 Mitchell Grumpy. This sword now hangs in the Last year’s recipients were Flight Lieutenant Guy British Embassy in Washington, DC. The second Sword, Butler RAF and Major Heather Fox USAF. displayed in the Pentagon, is an exact duplicate, apart RAF Museum American Foundation

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Swords of Honor 2014 Flight Lieutenant Drew Buxton, RAF Major Timothy A Kipp, USAF

Sponsored by


The Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation

Swords of Honor

I

n 2009, the Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation (RAFMAF) instituted the Sword of Honor, to be presented annually to the RAF Officer on exchange with the USAF who has contributed most in the previous year to relations between our two great nations and their air forces. In 2012, another Sword was added to recognize the most outstanding USAF officer on exchange with the RAF. The Swords, dedicated by RAFMAF Board member Tim Manna, a US citizen residing in the UK, are an embodiment of the Foundation’s mission to strengthen and educate present and future generations about the importance of the special UK/US relationship within the field of aviation. They recognize the excellent work of exchange officers on both sides of the Atlantic. The original Sword is the same as that of an RAF officer, made by British specialist Pooley’s Swords. It has a singleedged straight blade with a gold-plated brass hilt, white fish-skin grip and a ABOVE: 2013 Sword of Honor recipients Ft Lt Guy Butler (second left) and brass pommel in the form of an eagle. Major Heather Fox (second right), pictured with General Larry O Spencer, A stamped, gold-plated brass cartouche USAF (left) and Air Chief Marshal Sir Andrew Pulford, RAF (right) bears the bird emblem of the RAF. from the inscription from Winston Churchill regarding The Sword also bears the inscription: “Oh, thus be it the RAF pilots, who came from many nations including ever when freemen shall stand” – a line from Francis the United States, to fly in the Battle of Britain. It reads: Scott Key’s 1814 poem, The Star-Spangled Banner. It “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed was flown from England to Everett, WA, by RAFMAF by so many to so few.” Each winner of the Sword receives Board member John Sessions in his Consolidated a miniature replica. B-25 Mitchell Grumpy. This sword now hangs in the Last year’s recipients were Flight Lieutenant Guy British Embassy in Washington, DC. The second Sword, Butler RAF and Major Heather Fox USAF. displayed in the Pentagon, is an exact duplicate, apart RAF Museum American Foundation

24

Swords of Honor 2014 Flight Lieutenant Drew Buxton, RAF Major Timothy A Kipp, USAF

Sponsored by


Swords of Honor 2014

Swords of Honor 2014

Flight Lieutenant Drew Buxton, RAF 2014 Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation RAF Sword of Honor Recipient

F

Moreover, Ft Lt Buxton has been the local linchpin for the US/UK Rivet Joint co-manning arrangement. With the UK Rivet Joint programme still maturing, the Royal Air Force continues to deploy personnel to Offutt Air Force Base for continuation training. He has overseen and coordinated this training, which has involved over 110 personnel from No 51 Squadron, each completing 80 separate currency requirements. Furthermore, he has co-authored, alongside the 55th Wing Rivet Joint Program Manager, a detailed overarching co-manning Memorandum of Understanding between the USAF and RAF to cover these activities. Away from work, Ft Lt Buxton coaches youth rugby and is an active supporter of the Nebraska Aids Project. In sum, Ft Lt Buxton is an exceptional aviator and leader who has continued to deliver at the highest level. A highly respected aircraft captain and mentor to junior aircrew, he would already have been upgraded to formal instructor status if he could have been spared from his key role in Squadron Operations. On the ground his outstanding commitment to the mission, appetite for hard work and capacity to think strategically have enabled him to deliver critical support to both the 55th Wing’s operational output and to the UK’s nascent Rivet Joint programme. He is an outstanding Ambassador for both the RAF and wider UK Defence. In recognition of his efforts over the past 12 months, Ft Lt Buxton has been selected as this year’s winner of the Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation RAF Sword of Honor.

light Lieutenant Drew Frederic Buxton was posted to the United States in September 2011. He is employed as an aircraft commander on the Rivet Joint aircraft and as Assistant Director Operations with 343 Reconnaissance Squadron, which is part of the “Fighting” 55th Wing at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. From the outset of his exchange tour, Ft Lt Buxton has demonstrated exceptional qualities. With his previous experience on the RAF Nimrod MR2 Maritime Patrol Aircraft and outstanding airmanship abilities, he swiftly completed the aircraft commander upgrade programme, speeding through the syllabus in a remarkably short period. Moreover, despite having no previous experience in boom air-to-air refuelling he quickly mastered this new skill and is now acknowledged as a de facto instructor in the discipline. Throughout his time on 343 RS, Ft Lt Buxton has continued to excel in the air. As aircraft commander he has completed a number of challenging deployments to the Middle East in support of operations over Afghanistan, during which he showed outstanding leadership and mentorship to his personnel. On the ground, Ft Lt Buxton has played a critical management role in the Squadron. Nominated to serve as an Assistant Director Operations, he was subsequently selected, ahead of senior USAF majors, to assume command of this key department. The Squadron Operations Department manages the flying, training, exercise and deployment requirements of over 240 personnel. Over the course of the past year, despite a frenetic operational tempo, severe manning and sequestration related financial constraints, Ft Lt Buxton has managed to deliver all required outputs without any impact on Squadron operations.

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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Swords of Honor 2014

Swords of Honor 2014

Flight Lieutenant Drew Buxton, RAF 2014 Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation RAF Sword of Honor Recipient

F

Moreover, Ft Lt Buxton has been the local linchpin for the US/UK Rivet Joint co-manning arrangement. With the UK Rivet Joint programme still maturing, the Royal Air Force continues to deploy personnel to Offutt Air Force Base for continuation training. He has overseen and coordinated this training, which has involved over 110 personnel from No 51 Squadron, each completing 80 separate currency requirements. Furthermore, he has co-authored, alongside the 55th Wing Rivet Joint Program Manager, a detailed overarching co-manning Memorandum of Understanding between the USAF and RAF to cover these activities. Away from work, Ft Lt Buxton coaches youth rugby and is an active supporter of the Nebraska Aids Project. In sum, Ft Lt Buxton is an exceptional aviator and leader who has continued to deliver at the highest level. A highly respected aircraft captain and mentor to junior aircrew, he would already have been upgraded to formal instructor status if he could have been spared from his key role in Squadron Operations. On the ground his outstanding commitment to the mission, appetite for hard work and capacity to think strategically have enabled him to deliver critical support to both the 55th Wing’s operational output and to the UK’s nascent Rivet Joint programme. He is an outstanding Ambassador for both the RAF and wider UK Defence. In recognition of his efforts over the past 12 months, Ft Lt Buxton has been selected as this year’s winner of the Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation RAF Sword of Honor.

light Lieutenant Drew Frederic Buxton was posted to the United States in September 2011. He is employed as an aircraft commander on the Rivet Joint aircraft and as Assistant Director Operations with 343 Reconnaissance Squadron, which is part of the “Fighting” 55th Wing at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. From the outset of his exchange tour, Ft Lt Buxton has demonstrated exceptional qualities. With his previous experience on the RAF Nimrod MR2 Maritime Patrol Aircraft and outstanding airmanship abilities, he swiftly completed the aircraft commander upgrade programme, speeding through the syllabus in a remarkably short period. Moreover, despite having no previous experience in boom air-to-air refuelling he quickly mastered this new skill and is now acknowledged as a de facto instructor in the discipline. Throughout his time on 343 RS, Ft Lt Buxton has continued to excel in the air. As aircraft commander he has completed a number of challenging deployments to the Middle East in support of operations over Afghanistan, during which he showed outstanding leadership and mentorship to his personnel. On the ground, Ft Lt Buxton has played a critical management role in the Squadron. Nominated to serve as an Assistant Director Operations, he was subsequently selected, ahead of senior USAF majors, to assume command of this key department. The Squadron Operations Department manages the flying, training, exercise and deployment requirements of over 240 personnel. Over the course of the past year, despite a frenetic operational tempo, severe manning and sequestration related financial constraints, Ft Lt Buxton has managed to deliver all required outputs without any impact on Squadron operations.

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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Swords of Honor 2014

Swords of Honor 2014

Major Timothy A Kipp, USAF 2014 Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation USAF Sword of Honor Recipient

M

and flight test engineers, safety consultants from Spain’s National Institute of Aerospace Technology (INTA), program managers from AirTanker responsible for the RAF’s Voyager tanker support, program managers from various MoD project teams, engineers from Dowty Propellers, and RAF and QinetiQ personnel to develop and execute the first air-to-air refueling assessments behind the Voyager aircraft, a complicated and challenging task not without risk. During this campaign various limitations were identified, including unsafe system performance characteristics requiring rapid combined team efforts to field a suitable solution. Despite these challenges, Major Kipp continued to direct and provide expert developmental test support to the program, and the team was able to field an air-to-air refueling clearance ensuring all UK national capabilities were available prior to the impending retirement of the Tristar tanker. Recognized for his grasp of the UK’s test and evaluation strategies and tactical airlift capabilities, Major Kipp was assigned to lead 206(R) Squadron’s support to the UK’s tactical airlift developmental and operational flight test programs. In this capacity, he has provided technical assurance to A-400M Atlas introduction into service, but, moreover, he has been responsible for all aspects of the C-130J test programs. With the impending retirement of another aging aircraft, the C-130K, a transition of Special Forces capabilities to the C-130J was essential to ensure UK operational capabilities remained intact. Major Kipp coordinated parachuting trials to implement new and expanded capabilities for paratroopers, as well as developing new methods for aerial delivery of various Special Forces equipment. During one of these trials, an unsafe load extraction condition was experienced, which required an immediate cessation of the trial. Under his direction, the engineering and test teams were able to identify the causes, redesign the system and techniques,

ajor Timothy Kipp was posted to the United Kingdom in June 2012 as a test pilot for the Royal Air Force’s No 206(R) Squadron at MoD Boscombe Down. In this capacity, he integrated into the Aircraft Test and Evaluation Centre to lead or conduct developmental and operational flight tests on nearly all of the multi-engine aircraft in the RAF inventory. In this selectively manned position, Major Kipp is an integral leader in the UK’s only military multi-engine flight test organization. Ready to take on the most complex challenges, Major Kipp immediately supervised flight testing on all major RAF platforms excluding the C-130J, which meant fielding two new RAF aircraft, Airbus’s Voyager tanker and Boeing’s Airseeker, an Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) aircraft. While directing the RAF’s developmental support for these programs, Major Kipp faced numerous programmatic and developmental issues with wide-ranging impacts throughout both the MoD and DoD. However, his leadership ensured military test and evaluation support on both programs and the successful acquisition and fielding. Major Kipp subsequently demonstrated his leadership and technical expertise as a lead test pilot on multiple air-to-air refueling campaigns. With the impending retirement of both of the RAF’s existing tanker aircraft, a massive capability gap would have been experienced if the Voyager refueling capability was not fielded promptly. An experienced test pilot, Major Kipp conducted some of the first multi-engine refueling flights in a C-130J Hercules behind both the Tristar and Voyager tankers. The Tristar flight test campaign enabled retirement of the aging VC-10 fleet while maintaining critical operational air refueling capabilities in the Falkland Islands. During the Voyager flight test program, Major Kipp integrated with Airbus Military test pilots

the synergy created by close cooperation between our two nations, our shared heritage, and our shared commitment to defending freedom. In recognition of his efforts over the past 12 months, Major Kipp has been selected as this year’s winner of the RAF Museum American Foundation Sword of Honor.

and successfully retest the new system within the timescales of the original test program thus fielding the capability on time and keeping the UK Special Forces at the leading edge. The sword represents the “eternal brotherhood of our RAF and USAF officers who stand in the defence of freedom”. Major Kipp has continuously worked to strengthen this brotherhood by seamlessly integrating into the MoD’s Joint Test and Evaluation Group and Royal Air Force. His outstanding efforts personify

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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Swords of Honor 2014

Swords of Honor 2014

Major Timothy A Kipp, USAF 2014 Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation USAF Sword of Honor Recipient

M

and flight test engineers, safety consultants from Spain’s National Institute of Aerospace Technology (INTA), program managers from AirTanker responsible for the RAF’s Voyager tanker support, program managers from various MoD project teams, engineers from Dowty Propellers, and RAF and QinetiQ personnel to develop and execute the first air-to-air refueling assessments behind the Voyager aircraft, a complicated and challenging task not without risk. During this campaign various limitations were identified, including unsafe system performance characteristics requiring rapid combined team efforts to field a suitable solution. Despite these challenges, Major Kipp continued to direct and provide expert developmental test support to the program, and the team was able to field an air-to-air refueling clearance ensuring all UK national capabilities were available prior to the impending retirement of the Tristar tanker. Recognized for his grasp of the UK’s test and evaluation strategies and tactical airlift capabilities, Major Kipp was assigned to lead 206(R) Squadron’s support to the UK’s tactical airlift developmental and operational flight test programs. In this capacity, he has provided technical assurance to A-400M Atlas introduction into service, but, moreover, he has been responsible for all aspects of the C-130J test programs. With the impending retirement of another aging aircraft, the C-130K, a transition of Special Forces capabilities to the C-130J was essential to ensure UK operational capabilities remained intact. Major Kipp coordinated parachuting trials to implement new and expanded capabilities for paratroopers, as well as developing new methods for aerial delivery of various Special Forces equipment. During one of these trials, an unsafe load extraction condition was experienced, which required an immediate cessation of the trial. Under his direction, the engineering and test teams were able to identify the causes, redesign the system and techniques,

ajor Timothy Kipp was posted to the United Kingdom in June 2012 as a test pilot for the Royal Air Force’s No 206(R) Squadron at MoD Boscombe Down. In this capacity, he integrated into the Aircraft Test and Evaluation Centre to lead or conduct developmental and operational flight tests on nearly all of the multi-engine aircraft in the RAF inventory. In this selectively manned position, Major Kipp is an integral leader in the UK’s only military multi-engine flight test organization. Ready to take on the most complex challenges, Major Kipp immediately supervised flight testing on all major RAF platforms excluding the C-130J, which meant fielding two new RAF aircraft, Airbus’s Voyager tanker and Boeing’s Airseeker, an Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) aircraft. While directing the RAF’s developmental support for these programs, Major Kipp faced numerous programmatic and developmental issues with wide-ranging impacts throughout both the MoD and DoD. However, his leadership ensured military test and evaluation support on both programs and the successful acquisition and fielding. Major Kipp subsequently demonstrated his leadership and technical expertise as a lead test pilot on multiple air-to-air refueling campaigns. With the impending retirement of both of the RAF’s existing tanker aircraft, a massive capability gap would have been experienced if the Voyager refueling capability was not fielded promptly. An experienced test pilot, Major Kipp conducted some of the first multi-engine refueling flights in a C-130J Hercules behind both the Tristar and Voyager tankers. The Tristar flight test campaign enabled retirement of the aging VC-10 fleet while maintaining critical operational air refueling capabilities in the Falkland Islands. During the Voyager flight test program, Major Kipp integrated with Airbus Military test pilots

the synergy created by close cooperation between our two nations, our shared heritage, and our shared commitment to defending freedom. In recognition of his efforts over the past 12 months, Major Kipp has been selected as this year’s winner of the RAF Museum American Foundation Sword of Honor.

and successfully retest the new system within the timescales of the original test program thus fielding the capability on time and keeping the UK Special Forces at the leading edge. The sword represents the “eternal brotherhood of our RAF and USAF officers who stand in the defence of freedom”. Major Kipp has continuously worked to strengthen this brotherhood by seamlessly integrating into the MoD’s Joint Test and Evaluation Group and Royal Air Force. His outstanding efforts personify

RAF Museum American Foundation

RAF Museum American Foundation

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A Veteran’s Prayer By Richard Morris

Good day, bad day, D-Day, glad day, think of me. Birthday, Mayday, mad day, pay day, dance for me. First day, last day, Doomsday, fast day, pray for me. One day, some day, Monday, any day, remember me.

RAF Museum American Foundation

30


A Veteran’s Prayer By Richard Morris

Good day, bad day, D-Day, glad day, think of me. Birthday, Mayday, mad day, pay day, dance for me. First day, last day, Doomsday, fast day, pray for me. One day, some day, Monday, any day, remember me.

RAF Museum American Foundation

30


The Royal Air Force Museum American Foundation One Metro Center, 700 12th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20005 Tel: +1 (202) 558 5121 Email: usfoundation@rafmuseum.org Web: www.rafmaf.org

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RAFMAF Banquet 2014  

RAFMAF Banquet 2014