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Hydration Resources

www.camelbak.com www.pureglassbottle.com www.thewatergeeks.com

Complete puzzle on page 82

bottles for versatility and variety in look, size and design. Most you’ll find today will be free of the carcinogen BPA: check the labeling to be sure. Pros: inexpensive, available in a variety of sizes and styles. Cons: may retain odor, not suitable for hot drinks, probably not microwavable nor dishwasher safe. Pedal to the Metal. Metal bottles – aluminum or stainless steel – are a good option if you’re concerned about the possibility of leeching toxins, and if you’re pursuing rugged activities. Stainless bottles are preferable to aluminum ones, which can react with acidic drinks so are generally lined with other materials. Pros: durable yet lightweight; odor-free. Cons: contents will warm up if exposed to sunlight. Flashback. Glass bottles are making a comeback thanks to new shatterproof designs, and health concerns about plastics. Look to models with foam or plastic sleeves or shrink-wrapping that will deter breakage. Pros: easy to clean, won’t leech chemicals nor absorb odors. Cons: fragile, may break during rugged sports. More advanced products include the AQUAMIRACLE bottles and packs, which have a filtering top that allows you to safely drink from a stream or other freshwater sources, without concern about parasites or bacteria. And a Swedish engineer has developed a method to transform perspiration into potable water. But why ‘sweat it?’ Bring an ample supply of water with you wherever you go with a reusable bottle. And keep in mind: good hydration is an individual issue. Excessive thirst, a decrease in urine, and dark, amber-colored urine are all signs you might need to drink more water. Bottoms up!

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

HARBORS |

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HARBORS Fall/Winter 2013  

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

HARBORS Fall/Winter 2013  

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

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