Page 18

Eagle Nook Resort one of Vancouver Islands most popular fishing and seaplane destinations. It was an eye-opening start to one of the most diverse, well-conceived and spoil-me-rotten adventures Natalie and I have been on. The two-story lodge at Eagle Nook Resort and Spa is on a narrow isthmus of rock and lawn between Jane and Vernon bays. It’s a remote setting with wilderness and saltwater views front and back. Managing resort partner Dick Beselin proudly points out, “No roads lead to Eagle Nook. Float plane or boat, that’s how we get here. This is where wilderness and comfort meet.” Comfort, in this instance, is defined as 23 big, airy guest rooms, two separate log cottages with all the artistic trimmings plus privacy, vaulted ceilings, library, fireplaces, wildlife and nature art, sculptures, four-star kitchen, an energetic staff that handles our questions and totes our bags before we 18

| HARBORS

even know we need help. And then we discover the massage center, Jacuzzi, outdoor hot tub, patio dining and smooth benches around the fire pit at the edge of Vernon Bay where oysters pop, shrimp sauté and the outside world disappears. If this sounds like idolatry then perhaps I should leave out the part about the humpback whale. It appeared in Vernon Bay in the purple light of late evening, following a school of panicking anchovies, spy-hopping and feeding. A fledgling bald eagle watched from a stick nest, a seal broke the surface and we watched it all from a white linen-topped table where Natalie and I are enjoying our salmon in dill sauce with a “smoky” white wine. On the Jane Bay side of Eagle Nook is a tidal lagoon, a natural aquarium of sea stars, crabs, oysters and poggies darting through kelp fronds. Attached

www.harborsmagazine.com

is the wharf where float-planes, kayaks and boats are moored. A trailhead is marked by the wooden sculpture of a life-size hiker and a cluster of convenient hiking staffs. The resort is one of three dozen remote destination fishing lodges directly serviced by Kenmore Air’s fleet of float planes. On our last morning Captain Dan and guide Kylan Buameler point the twin 225 outboards toward “Phantom Reef ” where we’ve been nailing chinook. Phantom Reef is Dan’s private joke—“It exists on the charts but not in the water. There’s no reef. That’s why we call it the Phantom.” This morning Phantom Reef has attracted whales, sea lions, couple of colorful harlequin ducks, and a few hundred (thousand?) chinook. A pink and white Coho Killer spoon is on the left rod, an Okie Kinetic Ti-

HARBORS Fall/Winter 2013  

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

HARBORS Fall/Winter 2013  

The Seaplane and Boating Destination Magazine

Profile for harbors
Advertisement