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HARBORS Connecting People, Places, Adventure and Lifestyle.

HARBORS www.harborsmagazine.com Fall 2011

Sakinaw Lake Lodge

Sunshine Coast, BC

Wine & Cider Harvest

Olympic Peninsula, WA

A Victorian Holiday

Victoria, BC

Historic Roche Harbor

San Juan Island, WA

Salmon Fishing It’s Time to Think Pink

Holiday Gift Ideas SLU: Chef Recipes


Seen in All

the BeSt PlAceS

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We must be the change we wish to see in the world. Mahatma Gandhi

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he most appealing destinations often aren’t just around the corner. That’s why we’ve built Ranger Tugs® in the Pacific Northwest since 1958.

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For a Ranger Tugs® dealer near you call 253.839.5213 or visit www.RangerTugs.com

Cascadia is a non-profit whose mission is to promote the design, construction and operation of buildings in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy places to live, work and learn. www.cascadiagbc.org


The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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EXPERIENCE HANDS-ON H I S TO RY. The Center for Wooden Boats is a hands-on maritime museum located on Seattle’s Lake Union, a stone’s throw away from Kenmore Air. Rent a boat, learn to sail, or just marvel at the forces that make planes fly and sailboats sail.

Both adults and youth can learn to sail in historic wooden sailboats. Non-sailors can rent a rowboat and enjoy a floating picnic in the middle of the city. Do-it-yourselfers can build a wooden boat, cast a bronze oarlock, or learn classical navigation. A short walk through Lake Union Park will take you from Kenmore Air’s Lake Union Terminal to Wooden Boat Paradise. Admission is FREE! The Center for Wooden Boats | 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 | www.cwb.org

0 HARBORS MAGAZINE SPECIAL! 0 20% OFF A CWB HOUSEHOLD MEMBERSHIP Makes a great gift for the boater or craft-person in your life! Members receive discounts on CWB workshops, 10% off merchandise and facility rentals, discounts at local retailers such as marine and woodworking supply stores, and many other great benefits! Call for more information. This offer must be redeemed in person or by phone. Mention HARBORS Magazine to receive this discount.

0 V IHARBORS S I T U S www.harborsmagazine.com O N L I N E a t W W W. C W B . O R G o r c a l l 2 0 6 - 3 8 2 - 2 6 2 8 0 | 2


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FALL 2011

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Features Victoria Sparkles for the Holidays BC’s most historic city brims with holiday spirit.

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Sakinaw Lake Lodge

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Historic Roche Harbor Village

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It’s Time to Think Pink

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Kenmore Air Destination Maps

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Classy Working Girls

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Olympic Peninsula Wine & Cider Harvest

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South Lake Union - Seattle

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The Broughton Archipelago

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Healthy Travel Tips

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Northwest Author Spotlight

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2011 Holiday Flyaways

One of the Sunshine Coast’s best getaways.

From company town to affluent boating resort.

Pacific Northwest salmon fishing.

Cover Photograph Victoria, BC Anne McKinnell www.annemckinnell.com

South Zone / North Zone

Vintage service vehicles from Kirkland’s 2011 Concours d’ Elegance.

Touring and tasting across the Olympic Peninsula.

Holiday recipe favorites from 3 SLU chefs.

A boater’s paradise found, Broughton Islands, BC.

Feeling fit in flight.

Featuring author Eric Lucas.

George Washington Inn, Outlook Inn and Sooke Harbour House.

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HA R B OR S The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine CONTACT P.O. Box 1393 Port Townsend, WA 98368

E: info@harborsmagazine.com W: www.harborsmagazine.com

PUBLISHER / EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Katherine S. McKelvey GRAPHIC DESIGN Danny McEnerney EDITOR Allen Cox query@harborsmagazine.com CONTRIBUTORS Allen Cox Anne Norup Annika S. Hipple John Beatty Katherine McIntyre

Richard Walker Robyn Roehm Cannon Roger Ward Roy Stevenson Terry W. Sheely

ADVERTISING SALES ads@harborsmagazine.com WEB DESIGN workin’ man creative PHOTO CREDITS Courtesy of:

Tourism Victoria, Tourism BC, & Deddeda Stemler, pgs. 10-15 The Butchart Gardens (bottom), pg. 14 Terrance Lam (bottom), pg. 15 Sakinaw Lake Lodge, pgs. 16-19 Roche Harbor, Richard Walker, pgs 20-24 Terry W. Sheely, pgs. 25-28 Kirkland Concours d’ Elegance, pgs. 34-39 Bob Gassen. Pg. 37 Finnriver Winery, pgs. 41 (bottom), 42 (top right, bottom right), 44 (bottom left & right) Camaraderie Winery (top), pg. 43

Travis Scheidegger (bottom), pg. 43 Philippe Bishop, pgs. 41 (top), 42 (top left) Eaglemont (middle), pg. 42 Alpenfire, pgs. 42 (bottom left), 43 (bottom) John Beatty, pgs. 48-51 Heath Moffatt Photography, pg. 52 (top) Leslie Forsberg, pg. 54 Alan Bauer, pg. 55 George Washington Inn, pg. 58 Outlook Inn, pgs. 59, 60 (top) Roger Ward, pgs. 60 (bottom), 61

HARBORS magazine is printed by Mitchell Press, Vancouver, BC.

HARBORS magazine is printed on recycled paper. DISTRIBUTED BY

PUBLISHED BY

SUBSCRIPTIONS AVAILABLE www.harborsmagazine.com © 2011 by All Ports Media Group

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All rights reserved. Partial or whole reproduction is prohibited. The publisher will not be held responsible for errors in advertising beyond the cost of the space of the ad. No changes may be made or cancellation accepted after the publication deadline date. Opinions expressed in signed articles are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of this magazine or Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc.

HAR B O R S

volume 2 issue 4


HAR B O R S

Welcome to our holiday issue of HARBORS magazine.

Harbor Lights A Note from the Publisher

This issue is special because it marks the end of our first year publishing HARBORS. It is the last issue of 2011 and a special holiday issue for October, November and December. Fall is my favorite time of year in the Northwest, mainly because some of our best weather comes in the fall, sometimes bringing an Indian summer all the way to November. The fall air is fresh and crisp and cries for the unveiling of wool socks and sweaters. As quickly as the spring buds bloom, the fall leaves turn, bringing a few weeks of brilliant colors. I guess that is why our best holidays arrive just in time to cheer us up as the cold winter hits. Holidays are supposed to be happy times full of cheer and thankfulness, but sometimes we lose that meaning in the commercialism that can often cause more stress than joy. Don’t allow the season of gift giving and gatherings with friends and relatives become a stressful time. After all, we each have the ability to create our own experience, so let’s make this season a special time of wonderful holiday memories. One great way to spend the holidays is to get away someplace special or give the gift of adventure or leisure travel instead of buying and giving more stuff. This issue will give you some great ideas, whether at home or away, guaranteed to create happy memories you can share with family and friends that will last forever. With this issue I want to wish all of our readers and advertisers a very happy holiday season! Thank you for a great year of recognition and support. Enjoy the magazine, the view and your destination.

Katherine S. McKelvey Publisher

The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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It’s all right to look down on Seattle . We do every day.

City Explorer flightseeing excursions offer the uniquely Northwest thrill of flying off the water in the heart of one of the world’s most beautiful cities. Offered daily, $89 per person.

866.435.9524 KenmoreAir.com 950 Westlake Ave. N., Seattle

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Welcome to Kenmore Air Where did the summer go? It’s always a short, sweet season in the Pacific Northwest—a time when we draw heavily on the karma we bank during the long winters. Folks from elsewhere can’t understand how we deal with those dreary months. But that’s because they’ve never plunged into the crystalline waters of Desolation Sound on a hot July afternoon. Or seen the sun glittering on a breaching orca in the San Juans. Or strolled through Victoria’s Bastion Square on a warm August evening. We earn our summers here, which makes them that much more priceless. At Kenmore Air, summer is naturally a very busy time. We fly almost as many passengers in July and August as we do the rest of the year. Our pilots, mechanics, reservationists and others work long, intense hours during the summer to get our customers quickly and safely to their vacation destinations I won’t say that a slight relaxation in the pace as we ease into autumn isn’t welcome! But in the Pacific Northwest fall is also a fantastic season to get away, and Kenmore Air remains your escape from the workaday world. How else can you leave the office on a Friday afternoon and be relaxing on the balcony of your suite overlooking Friday Harbor just an hour later? How else can you enjoy a day trip to Victoria that actually fits in a day? How else can you come into the heart of Seattle for all the dining, shopping and culture with none of the ferry lines, traffic or hassles? So get the kids back in school. Settle into your post-summer routines. But don’t put yourself under house arrest. And don’t forget to celebrate the important things in life—birthdays and anniversaries, family and friends. The Pacific Northwest is beckoning all fall, and we still know the way!

Todd Banks President

Kenmore Air’s lowest fares are always available online at KenmoreAir.com

The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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The holiday spirit in Victoria reminds us of an old-time Charles Dickens novel.

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Victoria Sparkles For the Holidays By Katherine McIntyre

British Columbia’s most historic city brims with holiday spirit. It is no mystery why the winterweary flock to Victoria for the holiday season. Twinkling lights and festive events transform this historic city into a magical wonderland. As an added bonus, it is snow free, there’s plenty to do, wonderful places to see and, with the temperate climate, you can hike and even play golf. To put you in the holiday spirit, take a look at what’s going on in some of the city’s most historic places. Make your first stop at the majestic Fairmont Empress Hotel overlooking Victoria’s scenic Inner Harbour. During

December, more than seventy deckedout trees transform this hotel’s stately halls into a lush, colorful forest. You can vote for best-trimmed tree, whether whimsical, classical or offbeat. Fruitcake, mince tarts, seasonal cookies and live music complement the traditional tea of scones, strawberry jam and clotted cream. From the Empress, hop on a ferry at nearby Inner Harbour for a short ride to another historic spot, Point Ellice House and Gardens. Peter O’Reilly, a prosperous 19th century businessman, built this rambling Italianate house

on the shores of the Gorge Waterway. Then, in 1976, his grandson donated his family house and all its contents, which included everything from armoires to kitchen utensils, to the Province of British Columbia. Now, it is one of the largest collections of Victoriana in North America. Volunteer Gail Simpson commented: “We decorate for Christmas in authentic Victorian style. They used fruit, feathers and lots of holly swags, but no flowers.” The house is open from the fourth week of November until the week before Christmas on Fridays and

Inside the Empress Hotel decorated for Christmas in authentic Victorian style. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Saturdays only. Naturally, tea is served. It wasn’t a house that Robert Dunsmuir, a Scottish coal baron, built in the late 1880s—it was Craigdarroch, his own thirty-nine-room castle with its own dramatic history. Dunsmuir died before it was finished. His wife Joan lived in it, but family squabbles marred her enjoyment. Nearly abandoned, it was taken over and restored by the Historical Museum Society. It takes a month for staff and volunteers to decorate their castle in Edwardian style. Nineteenth century toys peak out from under its Christmas trees. The dining room is set for an upperclass family Christmas dinner, with silver and china borrowed from the British Columbia lieutenant governor’s nearby mansion. Evenings are sold-out events, when castle tour guides, dressed as house servants, gossip with guests about their former owners. Look out for three French hens wearing berets or the hard-to-find twelve drummers tucked away at the exit of historic Butchart Gardens. Hens and drummers are scenes from Twelve Days of Christmas hidden in some of Butchart’s many separate gardens. And, in keeping with Christmas, enjoy carols and live music under the stars in the Piazza or go skating on their open-air rink. For small children, a ride on a hand-painted, hand-carved animal on the Rose Carousel makes their day. Butchart Gardens is open every day of the year including Christmas. Hungry? Fine dining is offered late afternoon to early evening and snacks are available in the coffee shop. Back in Victoria, head to the Royal B.C. Museum’s Helmcken House, which puts on an old-fashioned Victorian Christmas every afternoon from December 17 to 31 (except the 25th). Helmcken House is one of the oldest homes in British Columbia still standing in it’s original location. At this pioneer-home-turned-museum, authentic Victorian traditions, activities, crafts and trivia come alive, such

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Each year the 39-room Craigdarroch Castle is decorated for the holidays in Edwardian style.

as the fact that in 1884 a Japanese merchant in Victoria was one of the first to sell the mandarin oranges that became the traditional item (otherwise, coal) in the toes of Christmas stockings. For dinner, mingle with the locals at Stage Small Plates Wine Bar in Victoria’s historic Fernwood Village. Chef George Szasz has a chic new menu in his stylishly renovated 100-year-old red brick building. His is a tapas menu and, in the Christmas spirit, it is made for sharing. He matches five themed small plates with wines from his extensive cellar. Stage is a hub for casual diners, or for a quick bite before

or after a play at neighboring Belfry Theatre. To catch the spirit of Christmas, take a stroll around the square and see how local businesses have prepared for the holidays. If you are lucky enough to be in Victoria for a December weekend, the Royal Theatre has Christmas performances in its magnificently restored, 1917 award-winning theatre. Or, on a Friday or Saturday night during December, materialize at Victoria’s Visitors Centre to hunt for Christmas spirits in haunted alleys on a Ghosts of Christmas Past Walking Tour. For a less mysterious expedition, a walk

Butchart Gardens by daylight.

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(Top) Point Ellice House - A time capsule of household Victoriana, built in 1861. (Bottom) Helmcken House is currently claimed to be the oldest house in British Columbia that is open to the public, built in 1852.

through Chinatown or Old Victoria reveals the city’s hidden past. On any evening of the week, snuggle up under a warm blanket and step back in time. Black Beauty Carriage tours will take you for a leisurely ride past thousands of lights twinkling on every lamppost in the city’s downtown. Then, your horse drawn carriage will turn into the James Bay area for a carriage eye-view of extrava-

Butchart Gardens by night with holiday lighting.


The ivy covered Empress Hotel on Victoria’s spectacular waterfront with a Victoria Harbour Ferry in route.

gantly decorated heritage homes and gardens. There are plenty of renovated mansions where visitors can stay for a night, a week or a month in historic Victoria. They provide upscale inn accommodations and gourmet breakfasts. Some come with special seasonal packages and have earned prestigious international awards. Others feature gardens, afternoon tea or a cocktail hour; all have comfortable sitting areas, and provide parking. Innkeepers are usually a fund of information about the best restaurants in the neighborhood, local excursions, golf courses, bus schedules, parks, music, art exhibitions and where to find a doctor, a car mechanic or a taxi. And, if it snows, which is seldom, a little sprinkle just adds to the festive spirit.

Royal Theatre: www.rmts.bc.ca Butchart Gardens: www.butchartgardens.com Fairmont Empress Hotel: www.fairmont.com/empress Point Ellice House and Gardens: www.pointellicehouse.ca Craigdarroch Castle: www.craigdarrochcastle.com Royal B.C. Museum: www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca Stage Small Plates Wine Bar: www.stagewinebar.com Christmas Past Walking Tours: www.discoverthepast.com Black Beauty Carriage Tours: www.blackbeautycarriage.com Victoria’s Historic Inns: www.victoriashistoricinns.com

Kenmore Air flies year round to Victoria on regularly scheduled flights from South Lake Union.

The Royal Theater. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Owners Garrett & Liza Gabriel and Garrett’s mother Donna.

Sakinaw Lake Lodge By Annika S. Hipple

How a family’s leap of faith created one of the Sunshine Coast’s best getaways

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It takes a load of courage to move from the bright lights of a major city to a tiny cabin that’s completely off the public utilities grid and can only be reached by boat or seaplane. Now imagine sharing that space with two other people, a cat and two dogs. Sound crazy? On the face of it, perhaps, but not if you’re a family with a vision, like the Gabriels of Sakinaw Lake Lodge. It’s been roughly three-and-a-half years since husband-and-wife team Garrett and Liza Gabriel, together with Garrett’s mother Donna, left their busy urban lives and purchased the small lodge on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast, about two hours north of Vancouver by ferry and road. Garrett was a physiotherapist at Vancouver General Hospital, Liza worked in real estate, and Donna was a retired psychiatric nurse with a second career in retail and customer service. None of them had ever dreamed about running a hotel—until fate dropped an

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intriguing opportunity into their laps. Donna came across Sakinaw Lake Lodge while visiting a friend further down the coast in Sechelt. When she learned it was for sale an idea began to germinate that soon captured the imagination of Garrett and Liza as well. Less than six months later, the Gabriels packed up all their belongings, sold their homes in Vancouver, and embarked on a quest to transform Sakinaw Lake Lodge from a somewhat run-down property into the comfortable retreat it is today. The challenges were numerous. The lodge must supply its own energy, water, and sewage treatment, so Garrett learned to do electrical wiring, plumbing, and woodworking. Donna developed her knowledge of gardening, while Liza took her cooking skills to a whole new level in preparation for hosting guests. Arriving in the middle of winter, the trio suffered through storms, including a blizzard that


nearly stranded the women on the far side of the lake and a windstorm so powerful it blew a refrigerator and stove right off the deck. The family had to learn how to drive a boat, tow a barge loaded with fuel and handle all sorts of day-to-day challenges they’d never imagined. Sharing a cramped cabin, they learned to do without many things they’d taken for granted. Even now, 90 percent of their personal belongings remain in storage. All that perseverance, creativity, and sacrifice paid off with impressive results. Sakinaw Lake Lodge may be an off-grid experience, but guests need not fear any lack of comfort or (Top) Sakinaw Lake Lodge deck view. (Bottom) Cozy lake side patio promises a romantic evening of relaxation.

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amenities. Arriving at the lodge after the short trip across the lake from the access road—the Gabriels gladly ferry guests back and forth as needed—it takes no more than a moment to realize this is a very special place. The lodge is charming and intimate, housing a maximum of 10 guests in two waterfront suites and a luxury safari tent. The largest unit, the Cedar Suite, invites relaxation with woodand-stone construction and earthtoned furnishings. The main room has a king bed and a well-furnished living area, as well as a full kitchen. There’s also a separate bedroom with queen bed and private bath. Picture windows and a deck with sliding doors command a view of the lake. Downstairs, the Pine Suite has a cozy bedroom with a queen bed and French doors opening directly onto the dock, so guests can step outside and dive straight into the water. The suite also includes a private bath and a living room with a foldout couch. Behind the main lodge building, the luxury safari tent has a queen bed, a private freestanding bathroom, and a deck with lake views. All units have access to an outdoor kitchen and seating areas, and all stays except full lodge rentals include breakfast. The Gabriels delight in getting to know their guests. “It’s the fact that we get to share this place that makes it so rewarding and enjoyable,” Garrett says. Visitors often stay for a week or more, particularly during the summer when the clear waters of Sakinaw Lake warm to temperatures approaching 80 degrees Fahrenheit. In addition to swimming and canoeing off the lodge decks, Sakinaw Lake Lodge offers boat tours of the entire lake, the largest on the Sunshine Coast. The lodge makes a great base for exploring the rest of the central Sunshine Coast region, a place rich in opportunities for outdoor recreation, including hiking, kayaking, fishing, mountain biking, snowshoeing, skiing and more. A short distance from

the Sakinaw Lake access road is the Iris Griffith Interpretive Center, where visitors can learn about the natural history of the Sunshine Coast. A few miles farther north, Skookumchuk Rapids is popular with whitewater kayakers, and the Egmont Heritage Center has eclectic displays on local history and life. South of Sakinaw Lake, the Pender Harbour area boasts art galleries, restaurants, boating, and a variety of annual festivals. As for the Gabriels, they’ve become enthusiastic members of the local community and are putting down roots in more ways than one with the arrival of Garrett and Liza’s first child, Sofina, in April. The family hopes to build a larger house soon, but for now, they all continue to share their tiny cabin on the lodge property. Despite the challenges of living and working in such close quarters, the Gabriels share a willingness to communicate and a sincere enjoyment of each others’ company. And while experience has

taught them things they could have done differently, not one of the Gabriels has any regrets about their gigantic leap of faith. “Most people never get to live their dreams,” Donna says. “And this was never even our dream.” “It kind of found us more than us finding it,” Garrett adds. Now that the Sakinaw Lake Lodge dream has found them, the Gabriels are giving it all they’ve got. For guests, sharing even a piece of that dream, however briefly, makes visiting this part of the Sunshine Coast all the more special. Getting There: Kenmore Air flies to Pender Harbour, about 15 minutes from the lodge; transfers to and from the lodge are available upon request.

The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Historic Roche Harbor Village By Richard Walker

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From company town to boating resort to vibrant year-round community

McMillin home 1927


Roche Harbor’s natural beauty and wealth of resources have always attracted boaters and builders, farmers and fishermen, dreamers and romantics. Even when this place on San Juan Island was the largest lime producer west of the Mississippi, a poet wrote, “A rock-bound coast hems in a wealth of verdant pastures sweet / Deep forests cover vale and hill where fresh and salt waters meet.”

What we call Roche Harbor today was already a thriving place when the Hudson’s Bay Co. staked a claim on the island in 1845. This place was Whelaalk, believed by the Lummi and Songhees to have been the original home of their first ancestor, Sweh-tuhn. On Speiden Channel, one and a half miles northeast, was a Lummi village described as having 10 longhouses in the mid- and late-1800s.

Directly north of Whelaalk was Kwuh-nuhs, a Saanich village on Stuart Island, occupied year-round as late as the 1880s. “(T)here was nothing but Indian camps,” Caroline Chevalier Mills (1908-2004) told the Seattle PostIntelligencer in an Aug. 13, 2002 story. “Saanich, from Canada, used to come up in big long canoes; you could hear them singing on the water.”

Reef-net fishing originated in the San Juan Islands and is practiced today by descendants of Whelaalk’s First People (left). Modern day Salish canoers (right). The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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In 1845, the Hudson’s Bay Co. was drawn to the island’s expansive prairies and protected harbors and established a claim here; a salmoncuring station and a sheep ranch followed. The British built San Juan Island’s first roads using Cowichan and Songhees laborers. Shortly after arriving, Royal Navy Lt. Richard Roche (1831-1888) discovered white gold—limestone—at Whelaalk. Limestone was prized for its myriad uses: In stone form, it was used for the construction of buildings, bridges and tunnels. Crushed, it was used in cement, paint, paper manufacture, as a flux in steel making, and to mellow acidic soil intended for planting. The U.S. and Great Britain both believed the San Juan Islands were

theirs. Complicating matters, the 1846 Oregon Treaty drew the international boundary down “the middle of the channel which separates the continent from Vancouver’s Island,” neglecting the archipelago altogether. Both nations attemped to assert their authority, so a joint occupation ensued until the territory dispute could be resolved. In 1872, a German arbitration panel settled the territory dispute in favor of the U.S., and the British flag was lowered on San Juan Island—the last place in the continental U.S. where the British flag flew. Ownership of Roche Harbor flipped between three parties from 1877 to 1886, when John S. McMillin of the Tacoma Lime Co. bought Roche Harbor for a total of

$37,500—quite an investment since it sat on the largest and purest deposit of lime in the Northwest. McMillin, a lawyer who grew up in Indiana limestone country, was an industrial visionary. Backed by capital from his Tacoma partners, McMillin expanded the limeworks into a highly efficient gravity-based operation. The quarries were 350 feet above sea level. Rock was blasted in the quarries, broken by hand into small pieces and loaded into rail cars that rolled to a trestle above the kilns. The rocks were dropped into the kilns and burned for four hours at 2,000 degrees, releasing carbon dioxide from the rock. The resulting quicklime was dropped down into a compartment to cool. At the right time, a lever was pulled and the quick-

McMillin home, present day

John S. McMillin on the pier of his company town, July 23, 1923

John McMillin stands at left with guests on a Hotel de Haro balcony, circa 1890.

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Modern day Hotel de Haro.


lime dropped down a chute into the barreling room and was then transported to the adjacent warehouse to await loading onto a ship. McMillin built the 20-room Hotel de Haro for his employees and guests and, by 1889, a company town emerged: barns, a barrel works, church, company store, docks, homes, offices, school, ships and warehouse.

Roche Harbor school circa 1933.

Roche Harbor ultimately comprised the town, 12 miles of shoreline, and 4,000 forested acres that helped provide wood for the kilns. As Roche Harbor became an economic powerhouse on the islands, McMillin became politically and socially influential. He entertained elegantly and lavishly. He ran for the U.S. Senate, served as a delegate to three Republican National Conventions, served on the state railroad commission and was Sigma Chi’s first international president. His wife, Louella, who served as Roche Harbor’s postmaster from 1892-1940,was referred to in a 1910 Bellingham Herald article as “coadjutor in the promotion of the educational, moral and civic conditions which have made Roche Harbor the ideal industrial center it is today.” The Great Depression slowed the

market. Paul McMillin, who succeeded his father as president in 1936, led the company during the ensuing period of economic recovery and recession, changing markets and labor unrest. In 1956, the McMillins sold Roche Harbor to another visionary: Reuben J. Tarte and his family, who transformed the lime company town into a premier boating resort. They restored the old buildings, built the marina and added recreational amenities (actor John Wayne made Roche Harbor the summer homeport for his converted minesweeper, the Wild Goose). The Tartes started traditions which continue today. Every sunset during summer, Roche Harbor hosts a colors ceremony that includes the lowering of the national flags and the playing of the national anthems of Canada, Great Britain and the United States. In 1988, the Tartes sold Roche Harbor to grocer Verne Howard and restaurateur Rich Komen. Howard later sold out so he could concentrate on his other business interests. Komen now owns Roche Harbor in partnership with Saltchuk Resources, a Seattle-based maritime company. In 2001, Komen’s vision began to take shape: that of a village with permanent, year-round residents. New commercial buildings and homes have been developed, all in the architectural style of the early 1900s. The Roche Harbor Amphitheater is a venue for live entertainment. Westcott Bay Sculpture Park is located at the entrance to the village, on what was once McMillin’s Bellevue Farm. Roche Harbor’s cemetery and the McMillin family mausoleum are silent reminders of people who contributed to local life during the lime company era. Residents and visitors can hike Roche Harbor’s old quarries and visit heritage buildings that bring its past to life. Whelaalk’s descendants visit the islands regularly to care for cultural resources, and in The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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2004 and 2008 Coast Salish canoes visited here as part of the Canoe Journey, a gathering of Salish Sea First Nations. History has come full circle: Roche Harbor has been a company town and a boating resort. But for the

people who have lived here over the centuries, it has been, and continues to be, “home.” Richard Walker is a journalist living in Poulsbo, Wash. He is the author of “Roche Harbor” (Arcadia, 2009).

Aerial view of Roche Harbor marina from Kenmore Air flight.

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Male spawners, like this Green River pink are called “gators” for good reason.

It’s Time to Think Pink The odd-year salmon du jour

By Terry W. Sheely

There was an era when pink salmon were publicly dissed and secretly smoked, but that was back in the summers when Puget Sound and the Straits of Juan de Fuca, Georgia, Haro and Rosario were wedged tight with staggering runs of prime chinook and coho salmon and good fishing was easy. Today those celebrity runs are a whole lot thinner, and hours, sometimes days drone past between hookups. It’s an empty niche that is allowing the Northwest’s low-rung salmon to swim up, get some well-deserved

recognition and earn a tasty place on the salmon grill. Pinks (aka humpies, because of the camel-like bulge on males) swarm this region’s saltwater and rivers by the millions in odd-number years, and 2011 is certainly an odd year. Huge schools are headed toward spawning destinies in the Fraser, Skagit, Stillaguamish, Snohomish, Green, Puyallup, and dozens of other salmon rivers in British Columbia and northern Washington. Adaptable Northwest salmon addicts, it turns out, would rather

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Pink salmon slurps a pink and purple streamer fly--perfect freshwater humpie fodder.

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hoot and holler and enjoy a few million aggressive five- to 10-pound pink salmon on light tackle than fish hard and catch nothing from skinny pods of bigger cohos and kings. Like it or not, for many anglers pinks have become the odd-year salmon du jour, and what they lack in size they make up for in numbers—millions of numbers, six million headed into Puget Sound and twice, maybe triple that up the lower B.C. coast. The odd-year return is explained by the two-year life cycle of pinks. Unlike coho and chinook and chum that spend from two to five years feeding in the ocean, pinks rush out, feed and return to spawn as smallish two year olds. Sometime back in the eons, that cycle was started on an oddnumbered year and it continues. There are exceptions—a few even-year runs return to Washington and even more to B.C., but even-year returns are lightweights compared to the overwhelming odd-year runs. Pinks are shallow swimmers, sometimes visible on or just below the surface, other times down to 70 feet, and most often around 30. The shallow fishing depths, when combined with an average weight of around six pounds and a nasty predilection for whacking diminutive artificial lures (in pink colors of course), make these little salmon the perfect target for ultra-light salmon tackle or, better yet, medium-weight trout rods. These little salmon have got some big fight in their souls and when not overwhelmed by chinook-size rods they’ll give you an adrenalin shot. It’s a wonderful combination for kids, families and salmon-starved old hands hungry to put a little Omega 3 on the grill. Pinks swarm into local saltwater in late July and August, and then some time in September they follow the first freshet rains into freshwater spawning rivers, giving anglers a double crack at catching them. In saltwater, it’s a trolling show.


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Saltwater pinks love pink hoochies fished on light tackle reels and rods.

Puget Sound salmon addict Jim Brauch says he puts “30 to 40 pinks a trip” in his boat by trolling a white Hot Spot flasher with 16 inches of leader and an F-15 pink squid. Gary Krein the venerable Everettbased charter operator/owner of All Star Charters (www.allstarfishing. com) has another variation of pink poison. He rigs an 11-inch Hot Spot flasher, silver-nickel enhanced, with either pink or green Mylar strips. To that he attaches a 24-inch leader connected to a pink mini-squid and a size 2/0 red barbless hook. Fishing instructor Terry Weist recommends a white eight-inch flasher, 16 inches of leader and a small hotpink hoochie (squid). He trolls the

combo 15 feet behind the downrigger ball and, as he says, “it’s fish on!” Pink fanatics gain an edge by cramming Berkeley PowerBait into the squid head, or smearing the flasher with Pautzke Gel Krill. Krill eat plankton, pinks eat krill and we eat pinks. Plankton move vertically through the water in response to water temperature and light penetration. Work the surface in low light, and the depths (to 70 feet) in direct light. It’s a predator-prey waltz that takes the speed out of the storied chase-and-eat circle. A pink’s world moves in slow motion until the hook goes home. Multiple hookups are the name of the game,” Krein says, and “when you hook-up don’t pull the other rods. Keep ‘em fishing and you’ll get mul-

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tiples; doubles, triples, that’s when it gets to be fun.” “And never set the hook,” he warns, “pinks have soft mouths and hooks jerk out. User laser-sharpened hooks and they’ll set on the strike.” Troll at about 1.5 mph always moving down tide, with roughly 10 degrees of angle between the downrigger wire and the water. In freshwater, pinks still prefer pink but they want it served to them on a cast-and-retrieve rig. Finding pinks to fish in rivers is absurdly easy. They roll, splash, leap and dig up spawning gravel like a rototiller on steroids. They’ll eat anything as long as it’s pink and small— streamer flies, Dick Nite Spoons, an inch of pink yarn with small pink corkie floats, ¼-ounce jigs with pink marabou skirts, pink plastic worms, pink, pink, and pink. And deep. Don’t let the churning surface activity fool you. In rivers, pinks, like all salmon, are bottom huggers and you’ll need a rig that will hold a lure just off bottom, drifting smack into salmon faces. Pinks are a hoot on light trout rods with eight-pound test line and on six-weight fly rods. Use an intermediate or full-sink line (depending on depth), short leader (three feet), and a garish pink fly. Simple as that. Pinks from saltwater or early into freshwater are delicious, despite the prejudice you may have picked up. The trick is how they’re handled. Bad fish handlers produce bad-tasting fish, good fish handlers...well, (Clockwise from top left) Nearing spawn, male pinks develop camellike humps and earn the nickname Humpy. Young angler Cody Dreslin with a big pink salmon from the prolific Green River near Seattle. Dave Underwood caught this nice pink trolling near the Mukilteo Ferry dock. Saltwater pink headed toward the smoker. An angler nets a pink caught in freshwater.

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you get the idea. Typically pinks are caught during the heat of the year, and if you want to eat your catch you’ll need to temporarily stop fishing and care for your catch the instant it hits the bank or the boat. Immediately cut the gills, bleed out, remove intestines and put on ice—preferably not in slush water. It’s silly to go pink fishing for dinner without a chest of ice. Pinks have

delicate meat and mild flavor that when handled with care is excellent table fare. It accepts seasonings and rubs well, and is a delight to eat when marinated, slathered in butter and grilled. And when it’s lightly smoked with alder or mesquite, some call it memorable. Pinks are an odd little salmon but this is an odd year and it’s not at all odd that a lot of salmon fishermen are starting to think pink.

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Topographical data by True North GIS. Map Š2009 Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc. All rights reserved.

Olympia to Nanaimo

South Zone Kenmore Air Destination Map

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For Reservations Call (866) 435-9524 • www.KenmoreAir.com


Topographical data by True North GIS. Map Š2009 Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc. All rights reserved.

Nanaimo to Port Hardy

North Zone

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Classy Working Girls Timeless classics with real star power dominate the scene at any Concours d’Elegance across the country. These are the Clara Bows, Jean Harlows and Marilyn Monroes of the automobile world. But, for the first time this year, the Kirkland Concours d’Elegance at Carillon Point in Kirkland, Washington turned a spotlight on the Rosie the Riveters—those hard-working, lightduty commercial vehicles produced between 1925 and 1950. These were the work force of the automobile world

By Allen Cox

that kept the wheels of commerce turning by delivering mail, bread, pop, telephones and more. Some pristine models of these “Working Girls” competed in their own class in Kirkland, providing a colorful contrast to the elegance and style of other classes. Proud “working girl” owners each have his or her own motivation for acquiring and restoring a vehicle of service. Sometimes, it’s rooted in a lifelong career in the same industry or even the company in which the vehicle served, such as AT&T retiree Barbara

1931 Twin Coach Helms Bakery Van Helms Bakery of Los Angeles bought this Twin Coach delivery vehicle when she was new in 1931, and today she still has her original 4-cylinder Hercules engine. Delivery drivers who operated the vehicle had to drive standing up and no faster than 30mph. This working girl didn’t retire until 1967 and somehow was spared a sad fate in a salvage yard, unlike many of her co-workers. When present owner Sandy Olson bought her in 2000, his newly acquired Twin Coach was worn out and broken down. Olson admittedly has a soft spot for oddities, so restoration of this unusual vehicle of service became a priority. Today, she’s back to her original 30mph glory. 34

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Birt and her 1931 Ford Telephone Truck or Postal Service retiree Glorrian Nau and the 1929 Ford Postal Truck she owns with her husband Leroy. In some cases, collectors are inspired by an attraction to a more eccentric collectible, such Sandy Olson and his carefully restored 1931 Twin Coach Helms Bakery delivery van. Whatever their collectors’ motivations, these working girls bring back memories for many and offer a nostalgic glimpse into a very industrious history.


Collector “Work Trucks” from eras gone by 1931 Ford Telephone Truck Barbara Birt, owner of this 1931 Ford Telephone Truck, has a personal interest in this vehicle of service. She once worked for the Bell System and spent much of her career driving a telephone truck. In 1931, Ford brought many innovations to service vehicles, such as a wide bed and a steel top. This working girl has both. A stickler for authenticity, Birt not only restored the vehicle to original condition and color, but did some meticulous homework and has assembled documented proof of the vehicle’s provenance.

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1929 Ford Postal Truck Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night keeps this 1929 Ford Postal Truck from purring like a kitten. Leroy and Glorrian Nau have been the proud owners of this working girl for 20 years. She is one of an estimated 100 remaining in existence. As a retiree from the Postal Service, like her co-owner Glorrian, she still competes with the best and makes occasional appearances at special U.S Postal Service events.

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1940 Ford Delux Sedan Coca-Cola Delivery Bill and Wendy Jabs have what the Coca-Cola Museum doesn’t: a beautifully restored 1940 Ford Sedan CocaCola delivery vehicle. In fact, to the Jabs’ knowledge, theirs is the only restored model in existence. For a working girl, this Ford Sedan sports some very elegant lines and turns heads wherever she goes. 38

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Olympic Peninsula Wine & Cider Harvest By Anne Norup

Olympic Cellars creates a festive harvest setting with their Vineyard Angel during crush on the scenic Olympic Peninsula.

Touring and tasting across the Olympic Peninsula

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My favorite time of year is crush. Crisp air and sun-gold leaves scattering across the ground signal harvest, when Mother Nature’s bounty hits its zenith. And news of the grapes achieving the correct balance of brix and pH brings me to the nearest winery in a flash. The northern shore of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula is home to 10 family-owned wineries and cideries,

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from Port Angeles to Port Townsend. In the fall, if you time it right, you can visit during crush and watch high-tech machines pull stems from the clusters and shoot out crushed grape skins into bins. The aroma is intoxicating. This region is part of the Puget Sound AVA (American Viticultural Area), along with the San Juan Islands and areas from Olympia to Bellingham. Less than 100 acres of this AVA are


Alpenfire freshly picked organic apples ready to be pressed.

Finnriver’s organic family cider farm in Chimacum, WA.

planted in wine grapes, a few coolclimate white varietals. Some Olympic Peninsula wineries and cideries grow their own fruit, such as Black Diamond Winery near Port Angeles, which produces an estategrown Pinot Noir and other wines, but most source fruit from Eastern Washington. This begs the question common to most wineries in the Puget Sound

AVA: Why have these winemakers chosen this cooler, damper climate over establishing themselves in the hotter climes of Eastern Washington where most of the grapes are grown? For Olympic Peninsula winemakers, it’s all about quality of life in a spectacular setting. Olympic Cellars, with its historic 121-year-old barn, located on Highway 101 between Port Angeles and

Sequim, was the first winery to open on the North Olympic Peninsula, in 1979, and the 15th winery in Washington State. Now there are nearly 800 wineries in Washington. Don Corson, winemaker and co-owner of Camaraderie Cellars in Port Angeles, views his winery as much more than just a place to taste and purchase wine. “I think we have the whole package,” he says. “The

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(clockwise from top left) Alpenfire Organic Cider Press. Finnriver’s hands on process of harvesting their fruit. Eaglemount Farm proudly displays their wine and cider near Discovery Bay, WA. Finnriver Cidery stainless steel tanks. Alpenfire Cider Farm’s organic orchard.

grounds are beautiful. We offer great wine, hospitality, a gorgeous, unpretentious Northwest garden setting, all in a region unlike anywhere else in the Pacific Northwest.” Like Olympic Cellars, many of the Olympic Peninsula’s tasting rooms occupy barns, such as the barn at FairWinds Winery in Port Townsend, creating a rural, farm-like wine touring experience. But it’s usually not just the barns that draw visitors—it’s what the winemakers are pouring inside. FairWinds is known for working with some more unusual varietals, such as Aligote, a white Burgundy grape, with award-winning results. Christina James Winery, near

Patio garden for wine tasting at Camaraderie Winery, Port Angeles, WA.

Port Townsend, acquires Pinot Noir grapes from Oregon’s Willamette Valley and works with other varietals as well. “We make our wines to complement the various talented chefs in our region,” says Jim Pivarnik, winemaker for Christina James Winery. “We don’t have a tasting room open to the public, but instead let the restaurants in the area be our tasting room, pairing their local foods with

our wines. That’s exciting for us and is at the heart of why we make wine.” Pairing wines with the local culinary bounty is a motivator for many peninsula winemakers and was the reason many launched their ventures. Don Corson from Camaraderie Cellars started his winery in 1992 following a decade of making wine non-commercially, just for the love of it. “Now we are following our passion

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OLYMPIC CELLARS WINERY

for food and wine,” Corson says, “and we love sharing that passion with others.” Finnriver Farm & Cidery coowner Crystie Kisler not only grows fruit for their excellent cider and fruit wines, but also food. “We are a working, diversified organic farm,” says Kisler, who sells their products at the local farmers market and food co-op. “We are striving to grow good food and craft excellent cider and wines to help strengthen our local food economy and to celebrate the bounty and beauty of the land.” The folks at Finnriver welcome visitors who want to check out life on a working farm.

FAIRWINDS WINERY

Finnriver Cidery barn tasting room.

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Alpenfire Orchards & Cider produces the only certified organic estate cider on the Peninsula. According to Nancy Bishop, co-owner of Alpenfire, “The real challenge is getting the juice from tree to bottle without the use of sulfites as a sanitizing agent or as a preservative.” Bishop believes that because cider is a drink meant to drink young, within a year or two of bottling, the cider can do without the aid of preservatives. The region’s natural beauty, the passion of doing something well and pride in their products are what the Olympic Peninsula wine and cider scene is all about. Besides, who can resist the delightful adventure of driving down a winding, tree-lined gravel road and arriving at a farm, knowing delicious wines and ciders await amid a nostalgic countryside with the Olympic Mountains as a backdrop.


Harvest Wine Tour November 12 & 13, 2011 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $30 per person and include tasting fees. Eight of the peninsula’s wineries and cideries host an annual Harvest Wine Tour every November. Usually, crush has ended by then and some of the winemakers may let you taste their recently pressed vintage—don’t pass on this delectable treat. New releases are featured, along with harvest-inspired appetizers often partnered with local cheese artisans, bakers and others for food pairings that celebrate local coastal cuisine. Since the tour is November 12 and 13, with Veterans Day on Friday, November 11, make it a long weekend and enjoy all the Olympic Peninsula has to offer. Fly Kenmore Air into Port Angeles and rent a car. A variety of accommodations are available, including cozy B&Bs. Restaurants in Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend offer delicious dinner options featuring locally produced foods and wines from the region. For more info, go to www.olympicpeninsulawineries.org.

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Harvest Wine Tour 1) Finnriver Farm, Chimacum 2) FairWinds Winery, Port Townsend 3) Sorenson Cellars, Port Townsend 4) Eaglemount Wine & Cider, Port Townsend

5) Olympic Cellars, Port Angeles 6) Camaraderie Cellars, Port Angeles 7) Harbinger Winery, Port Angeles

Olympic Peninsula Wineries and Cideries at a Glance: Traveling from Port Angeles to Port Townsend

Alpenfire Orchards & Cider 220 Pocket Lane Port Townsend, WA 98368 360.379.8915 www.alpenfirecider.com

Camaraderie Cellars 334 Benson Rd. Port Angeles, WA 98363 360.417.3564 www.camaraderiecellars.com

Olympic Cellars 255410 Highway 101 East Port Angeles, WA 98362 360.452.0160 www.olympiccellars.com

Sorensen Cellars 274 S. Otto St. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360.379.6416 www.sorensencellars.com

Harbinger Winery 2358 Highway 101 West Port Angeles, WA 98363 360.452.4262 www.harbingerwinery.com

Eaglemount Wine & Cider 2350 Eaglemount Rd. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360.732.4084 www.eaglemountwinery.com

FairWinds Winery 1984 Hastings Ave. W. Port Townsend, WA 98368 360.385.6899 www.fairwindswinery.com

Black Diamond Winery 2976 Black Diamond Rd. Port Angeles, WA 98363 360.457.0748 www.blackdiamondwinery.com

Finnriver Farm & Cidery 62 Barnswallow Rd. Chimacum, WA 98325 360.732.6822 www.finnriverfarm.com

Christina James Winery 205 St. James Place Port Townsend, WA 98368 360.531.0127 www.cjwinery.com

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SLU:

Neighborhood Happenings

Seattle’s South Lake Union Neighborhood, home of Kenmore Air’s Seaplane Terminal.

Holiday Recipe Favorites from Three SLU Chefs By Robyn Roehm Cannon

Holiday magic comes wrapped in many packages: a gift from a loved one, traditions handed down from generations long gone, and those special foods whose very aromas announce the holiday season is here. HARBORS magazine asked three of Seattle’s favorite chefs in the South Lake Union neighborhood for holiday season recipes that are special to them, ones that you can easily recreate to inspire some new and delicious flavor traditions in your holiday kitchen.

Foie Gras Creme Brulee with Aged Balsamic Macerated Cherries dinner or it’s perfect with just a salad for a lighter meal,” says Woods. “The point is to hit on all the senses with crunchy caramelized sugar, a bite of cherry and a smooth, savory custard finish. Every mouthful should have a bit of all of it.” Chef Martin Woods, re:public

www.republicseattle.com

Chef Woods dazzles holiday dinner parties with his simple yet elegant adaptation of an old French classic. “It makes a wonderful first course for an elaborate holiday 46

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- 2 Cups heavy cream - 5 Egg yolks - 8 Ounces cleaned and diced foie gras - Salt and white pepper to taste - Pinch coriander Bring cream and all seasonings to a simmer. Turn off heat and add foie gras. Let

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sit 4 minutes. Add mixture to a blender and blend adding yolks one at a time. Pour batter into 4 oz. ramekins and bake in a water bath for 2530 minutes or until custard is set. Cool completely. To macerate the cherries, bring 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar, 3 sprigs of thyme, and 1/2 cup brown sugar to a boil. Turn off heat and cool, then pour over pitted and halved cherries. To assemble, dust the top of the custard with some fine grain sugar and, using a torch, caramelize the sugar. Add cherries and a little of the liquid to the top of each ramekin and serve.


Grandma’s Slow Cooked Sugo from Italy slow-cooked Sugo, a hearty, tomato-based meat sauce spooned over long noodles.

Chef Avalon Zanoni, Portage Bay Cafe

www.portagebaycafe.com

Chef Zanoni’s holiday memories hail from the Lake Como region of Italy. Her grandmother was also a professional chef, and in her family the holiday season cannot pass without a big pot of her grandma’s

- 4 Ounces pork lard - 2 Yellow onions, small dice - 10 Garlic cloves, crushed - 3 TBSP basil, minced - 3 TBSP oregano, minced - 1/2 Cup red wine - 50 Roma tomatoes, peeled, seeded and roughly chopped - 3 LBS ground pork - 1 LB ground veal - 1 Whole egg - 3 TBSP parsley, minced - 4 LBS favorite local italian sausage - 4 LBS pork shoulder, 2” cubes - 3 Bay leaves

Mix the pork, veal, egg and parsley into a smooth meatball mixture, seasoning to taste with salt and pepper. Form the meatballs into 4 ounce portions. Heat the lard in a large stock pot. Sear the pork shoulder cubes and meatballs, then remove and reserve. Sweat the onion and garlic in the lard. Add the tomatoes, red wine, basil and oregano, season to taste with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Simmer for 15 minutes, then puree with a hand mixer. Add the pork shoulder, meatballs, sausage and bay leaves. Allow to simmer below 190F for at least 8 hours. Adjust seasoning as necessary before ladling over long noodles and serving.

Chef Christine’s Oatmeal Walnut Cookies with Bacon Grease With that, we present Keff’s favorite oatmeal walnut cookie with its secret ingredient: bacon grease. Where’s the bacon grease come from? “You serve everyone BLT’s for dinner the night before!” Keff explains.

Chef Christine Keff, Flying Fish

www.flyingfishrestaurant.com

Chef Keff, who built her culinary reputation on preparing the perfect fish, offered up a favorite holiday recipe that has neither fin nor scale.

- 1/2 Cup granulated sugar - 1/3 Cup packed dark brown sugar - 1/4 Cup bacon grease - 1 Teaspoon vanilla extract - 1 Large egg - 3/4 Cup all-purpose flour - 1 Cup regular oats - 1/4 Teaspoon salt - 1/4 Cup chopped toasted walnuts - Cooking spray

Preheat oven to 350F. Place first 5 ingredients in a large bowl. Beat with a mixer at medium speed until well blended. Lightly spoon flour into a dry measuring cup; level with a knife. Add flour, oats, and salt to egg mixture; beat well. Stir in walnuts. Drop by level tablespoons, 1 1/2 inches apart, onto a baking sheet coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350º for 12 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove from oven; let stand 2 minutes. Remove cookies from baking sheet; serve warm.

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The Broughton Archipelago By John Beatty

A Boater’s Paradise Found

As a Kenmore Air pilot flying passengers to the Broughton Islands, I had seen an aerial view of the serenelooking archipelago for the first time from a de Havilland Beaver. It took me 35 years to finally visit this tranquil cruiser’s paradise by boat. Flying is easy. Making the trip on the water is much more complicated. It exposed our boat and crew to the risks of rapids, whirlpools and gale warnings. Was the trip worth the effort? In a word, yes! Navigating through these dangers is a matter of good timing and better advice. My wife Linda and I did some research and talked to people who had already made the trip. Finally, after a dozen summers of lovely cruises in the southern part of British Columbia, we were ready for the challenge the northern waters would bring. We cruised from Seattle in our Krogen 42 called Fluke (think of a whale’s tail) to the north end of the Georgia Strait via a familiar route—across the Strait 48

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Sullivan Bay sign post. You are here.

of Juan de Fuca, through the Gulf Islands to Nanaimo. Then we crossed the Georgia Strait and went up the Sunshine Coast to Desolation Sound, a large British Columbia marine park served by Kenmore Air. We would log 600 miles round trip before we were done. The route from Desolation Sound to the Broughton Islands took us through an intimidating series of rapids in the area of Stuart Island. Charts have several names for narrow bodies of water, such as channel, passage and narrows. The designation of rapids is a descrip-

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tion of water where the current is running at its strongest and truly looks and behaves like rapids in a river. One might think that an 8 knot boat could handle a 7 knot current; it would just take a long time. This might work in a man-made channel with smooth uniform banks and an even bottom, but not in the natural world. Back eddies and whirlpools add spice to the mix. Sailing directions and cruising guides strongly suggest that no matter what type boat you are operating, calculate slack water and go through the rapids close to that time. Passing


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Crabs drill team. Very trainable just after being prepared to be cooked.

through one rapid is pretty straight forward; just arrive on time and go through. Three rapids in succession is much more challenging. For our first passage we decided to pass through the first two rapids and stop for the night at Blind Channel Resort, where we enjoyed a fine restaurant and a de-stressing walk in the woods. The next morning the wind stayed calm but was forecast to reach a strong wind warning (20 to 33 knots) in the afternoon. We decided to head west on Mayne Passage for an early join-up with Johnstone Strait. We cruised along the strait and turned northeast onto Havannah Channel and into the Broughton Islands, where we were able to forget about timing tidal rapids and avoiding the afternoon winds on Johnstone Strait. As we traveled farther up these inlets and channels, we realized that if there were a dictionary definition of “tranquil destination,” it would include a photograph of a Broughton anchorage. Our first stop in the Broughtons was Lagoon Cove, where the anchorage is quite sheltered and inviting. But we were looking for the “Lagoon Cove Marina experience” we’d heard about, so we called for a spot on the dock. We were shoehorned into the dock

Local Owners Acquire Crow’s Nest Yachts Seattle on South Lake Union. Pictured left to right: Dale Partna, Vic Parcells, and Dan Wood.

SEATTLE (206) 625-1580

WWW.CROWSNESTYACHTS.COM

The “Crow’s Nest Yachts” brand, a property of Grander, Inc., is licensed for use by Crow’s Nest Yachts Seattle.

Jennis Bay, a small friendly place on Drury Inlet just north of Sullivan Bay.

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Lagoon Cove Marina with shrimp happy hour going on in the clubhouse. All marina guests are welcome.

of this large and very popular marina with lots of help from people on shore. Our host, Bill, said he quit taking reservations some time ago because of no shows. He emphasized that he always finds a place on the dock for anyone who wants one. Lagoon Cove has earned a reputation as a mandatory stop for fun in the Broughtons. Every afternoon at 5 o’clock, the folks in the marina are invited to bring some appetizers up to the club house and an ample quantity of prawns appear. In conversations around the campfire we mentioned this was our first trip to the Broughtons. Several fellow cruisers talked about Jennis Bay, which is in the Sullivan Bay vicinity. This resort was started a few years ago by a young couple and their two kids who live in this remote area all year. We charted a course to Jennis Bay 50

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through Stuart Narrows and into Drury Inlet. From there The Jennis Bay resort was easy to find. Tom, the proprietor, helped us into a slip and his young son, Orion, gave us a welcome briefing. As we walked the dock, it was impossible not to notice a lovely 85-foot classic fantail motor yacht, the M/V Deerleap. During the course of conversation with the owner, we learned of a novel way to keep Dungeness crab alive until you are ready to cook and eat them. They made a crab holding pen from two plastic milk crates arranged in clam shell fashion. You simply catch the crabs, put them in this device and hang them over the side. As a result of their ingenuity, Deerleap had accumulated a feast of crab and invited everyone from the six other boats in the marina to an allyou-can-eat crab feed.

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We found the places we visited by talking with other boaters about their first visits to the area. The Broughtons hold dozens of wonderful anchorages and fuel is readily available. Many marinas have free drinking water, but buying fuel or overnight moorage is always good etiquette if you wish to use water. A bit south of Jennis Bay is Port McNeill on Vancouver Island, our last stop in the Broughtons. Port McNeill is a friendly place with all the services a cruiser might need. If a crew change is in order or you wish to head home for a few days to cut the grass, there is seaplane service to Seattle via Kenmore Air, “the boater’s airline.” Arran Rapids near Stuart Island BC. If you see this ahead of you, you have made a wrong turn at the wrong time.


We were in no hurry to cut the grass, so we traveled home at our modest seven knots. Only one trip to the Broughtons in no way satisfied our desire for tranquil destinations; to paraphrase a famous actor and governor: “We’ll be back.”

Johnstone Strait, near Port Neville. The morning fog is just lifting.

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Healthy Travel Tips

Feeling fit in-flight

By Allen Cox

Many people who live to fly have learned that flying can be tough on the body. Being confined in a small seat in a cabin packed with people potentially carrying any number of illnesses can take a physical toll. Travelers who are aware of the risks and equipped to counter them will deplane healthier and with more energy. Fortunately, on regional carriers that fly smaller planes shorter distances, you’re exposed to fewer people for fewer hours in tight quarters. The largest cabin in Kenmore Air’s fleet holds 10 passengers at full capacity, hardly an overbooked jumbo jet. Just the same, taking control of your well-being is crucial for an enjoyable journey. Arm your body with the basics Before your trip, maintaining 52

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your daily vitamin regimen, eating a nutritious diet, getting adequate sleep, staying hydrated and minimizing caffeine and alcohol intake will give your body a head start right out of the gate. But those basics may not be enough. Pack your superfoods Even on short-haul, small-plane flights, do your body a favor with the right superfoods that you can easily carry along. A snack packed with immune-boosting zinc, protein, vitamin C and antioxidants takes the edge off hunger and boosts your defenses and energy until you have time to relax and enjoy a healthy meal at your destination. You can make a tasty and nutritious raw foods travel snack with equal parts nuts (particularly cashews, Brazil nuts,

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peanuts and almonds), pumpkin and sunflower seeds, flaked raw coconut, dried goji berries and mulberries, and raw cacao beans. Packaged or bulk versions can be found in health food stores or buy the raw ingredients and prepare your own.


Your Journey Begins

with King County International Airport

“13R” photo used by permission of Long Bach Nguyen

Proud Partner of Kenmore Air Express Since 2004 With flights to Port Angeles, Eastsound (Orcas Island), and Friday Harbor

Serving the Aviation Community Since 1928 206 -296 -7380 • www.kingcounty.gov/airport Keep moving Not only the size of the cabin, but the confining dimensions of your personal space in your seating area affect your comfort level and circulation. And, on a Kenmore flight, as relatively short as they are, regulations keep you in your seat. That’s why it’s crucial that you sit in a relaxing position with good posture, feet in front of you. Stretch your legs beneath the seat in front of you if possible. Flex and stretch your ankles and feet. Rotate your feet at the ankle one way, then the other. Keep your legs moving throughout the flight. Not only will this keep the blood flowing, but avoid dangerous clots—a risk of sitting in one place without moving your legs. Watch this column for more health tips to make your travel experience on Kenmore Air as enjoyable as possible.

MarQueen Hotel 600 Queen Anne Ave N • Seattle, WA 98109 (888)445-3076 • www.marqueen.com Located just one mile from Kenmore Air’s Lake Union Terminal

Historic Charm Romantic Ambiance Distinct Personality 58 spacious guestrooms and suites featuring kitchenettes• first class hospitality meeting space • European inspired spa • onsite espresso bar and bakery MENTION “HARBORS MAGAZINE” WHEN MAKING RESERVATIONS AND RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY BOTTLE OF NORTHWEST WINE TO ENJOY WITH YOUR STAY!

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Northwest Author Spotlight: Eric Lucas By Allen Cox

Author Eric Lucas enjoys the beaches of Vancouver Island.

“...until recently, [mom] would occasionally resurrect her offer that, should I wish to go to law school, she’d pay for it. Never mind I have no interest in law school and I’ve enjoyed a 30-year career writing everything from hotheaded newspaper columns to, well, hotheaded internet columns.” – from “There’s a Whole World Out There,” essay by Eric Lucas (www. yourlifeisatrip.com)

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Self-described hothead Eric Lucas has passed that desirable milestone in his journey as a storyteller where he chooses to confine his writing to what interests him. If you’re asking yourself Why would a person write about anything else? you’ve never forged a career as a freelance writer or paid the mortgage by writing copy for sleeping pill ads. As a travel writer, Lucas has visited all 50 states and more than two dozen countries. Along the way, he has written for publications of international stature—National Geographic Traveler, Los Angeles Times and Boston Globe, among many others—and has penned several books, including Michelin Guide to British Columbia, Michelin Must-See/Vancouver, Hidden

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British Columbia and Seattle Survival Guide. He is the coauthor of numerous other titles, including No Excuses: Be the Hero of Your Own Life. His latest book is Explorer’s Guide Victoria & Vancouver Island: A Great Destination. For Lucas, the privilege of writing about that which interests him means writing about the destinations that inspire him and about preserving those places for future generations. People often ask him which destination tops his favorites list. “I can’t pick just one place.” Lucas says, pondering his global travels. “Vancouver Island sits at the top of my list with a bunch of other places. That’s why I chose it as the topic for my latest book.” Lucas’ specialties as a travel writer


Aerial view of Victoria’s Inner Harbour from a Kenmore Air flight.

focus on sustainability and on Western North American destinations. His writing tends to concentrate on the meaning and purpose of contemporary travel, a topic that manifests on the page in phrases punched with laugh-out-loud jocularity to moments of prose-inspired introspection. One thing is certain, he’s never short on opinion, and those of us who read his work are thankful for thoughts his words provoke. Watch for his articles in this and future issues of HARBORS. You can learn more about this Seattle-based writer, his work, and his passion for cultivating organic garlic at www.TrailNot4Sissies.com.

Explorer’s Guide Victoria & Vancouver Island: A Great Destination A good guidebook is not only practical but informative. A great guidebook inspires us as well. Veteran guidebook author Eric Lucas’ 2011 Explorer’s Guide Victoria & Vancouver Island: A Great Destination, published by The Countryman Press, sits squarely in the latter category. Lucas brings the Vancouver Island region alive with narratives of its rich history, diverse cultures, abundant recreational opportunities and, of course, the most current scoop on where to stay and dine and how to get around. This indispensable book is like having your own local guide with an insider’s perspective sharing your travels on the island. “For me, Vancouver Island is among the world’s top destinations,” says Lucas. “It’s an amazing place where you can ski in the morning and golf by noon. It has open ocean, warm, lovely

agricultural valleys and towns, and a fabulous, cosmopolitan city that’s at once historic and modern.” Explorer’s Guide Victoria & Vancouver Island: A Great Destination is made even greater with a liberal sprinkling of color photos illustrating every chapter, by travel photographer Leslie Forsberg (who happens to be Lucas’ wife). You can order a copy at www.harborsmagazine.com/ books

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Holiday Gift Ideas Kenmore Air Gift Certificate

Beaconsfield Inn Gift Certificate

Help a friend or loved one grow their business with an ad in Harbors Magazine.

Give a travel experience.

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HARBORS Travel Club Membership HARBORS Travel Club Card

Ad in HARBORS Magazine

A gift of luxury in beautiful Victoria, BC.

www.beaconsfieldinn.com

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Flightseeing with Kenmore Air

Urban Hardwoods

2011

Valid thru 12/31/2011

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Discounts at over 50 lodging & dining establishments at destinations in WA & BC.

Natural wood tables.

Experience Seattle from the air.

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Tucker House B&B Gift Certificate

“please be good humans.� T-Shirt

Lego Toy Seaplane

The premier Friday Harbor B&B.

American-made apparel for the social good.

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2011

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Books from HARBORS Website

Poet’s Cove

Nanook Lodge

Premier luxury resort & spa, Gulf Islands, BC.

www.poetscove.com Choose from a variety of books about the Pacfic Northwest.

www.harborsmagazine.com/books

Sakinaw Lake Lodge Romantic Escape

www.abigailshotel.com

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Kenmore Air Suede Fleece Pullover

Abigail’s Hotel Gift Certificate

Victoria’s finest boutique hotel.

A guided fishing trip - perfect gift for the avid fisherman.

A romantic holiday getaway on the Sunshine Coast, BC.

www.sakinawlakelodge.com

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Waterworks Gallery

Dent Island

Northwest art selections.

www.waterworksgallery.com Premier boating destination, Desolation Sound, BC.

Friday Harbor’s new state-of-the-art contemporary accommodations.

www.123west.com

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San Juan Vinyards

HARBORS Treasures Gift Basket

Local NW wine, the perfect festive gift.

Book early for New Years Eve at Seattle Center.

A gift basket of products made in the Northwest.

www.sanjuanvineyards.com

www.marqueen.com

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2011

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Holiday Flyaways George Washington Inn, Port Angeles, WA

If you enjoy luxury accommodations with a strong historical connection, the George Washington Inn at Port Angeles offers the perfect combination. The inn is located approximately 14 miles from Port Angeles’ William R. Fairchild International Airport, Kenmore Air’s gateway to the Olympic Peninsula. As you approach the George Washington Inn along its impressive 1,200-foot driveway, lined with white ranch style fences, it’s like being transported to a post-revolutionary era time warp. Proprietors Dan and Janet Abbott decided to build an exterior replica of Washington’s Virginia home to convey a strong sense of American history to their guests, even requesting the dimensions of Washington’s home from the Mount Vernon Ladies Association. They succeeded in their quest magnificently. Situated atop a 125-foot cliff, overlooking the Strait of Juan de Fuca (on

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By Roy Stevenson

a broad scale, somewhat paralleling the banks of the Potomac River), the white painted inn offers five guest rooms, immaculately decorated with replica early American colonial furnishings and fixtures, even lavish four-poster beds. The sumptuous rooms, all with polished oak floors, reflect important eras in George Washington’s life: the Presidential Suite, the General’s Suite, the

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Mount Vernon Retreat, and the Surveyor’s Retreat, with Martha’s Suite tucked downstairs behind the grand sweeping staircase in the center of the house. The mansion is no less than a shrine to our first president. The inn’s library is solely dedicated to Washington, packed with books old and new, telling of the life and times of this extraordinary leader. Reproductions of historic


Nine passenger wheeled Caravan

Ten passenger turbo Otter seaplane

paintings featuring Washington adorn the walls—the most famous being the widely recognized portrait of the Washington family painted by Edward Savage in 1796. The original hangs in the National Gallery of Art. Deer stroll across the expansive 10acre lavender fields lining the driveway, eagles soar overhead, often perching on

the cliff-top trees to watch for salmon below, and, in season, gray whales and orcas frequently surface and frolic close to shore. Since opening in 2008, people from all over the world have stayed at the inn, all leaving in awe of their experience. Janet serves a different breakfast every morning and tries to main-

Outlook Inn, Orcas Island, WA

The first impression of Eastsound on Orcas Island is unforgettable: the winding sound lined with rocky bluffs and heavily forested hills, the tiny barren island just off shore, the sea-salt scent in the air, and the lovingly preserved clapboard buildings along Main Street. A 19th century islander constructed one of Eastsound’s Main Street buildings as a multipurpose facility. In 1888, one could purchase provisions, mail a letter, do the waltz, and get locked up all in the same building, which served as general store, post office, dance hall and jail. Today, that same structure serves

tain some similarities to colonial era food, when possible, often referring to Martha Washington’s cookbook. For luxury surroundings in a house with a strong sense of history, you can do no better than this inn that proudly bears the state’s name— short of staying at the White House. www.GeorgeWashingtonInn.com

By Allen Cox

guests as the main building for the Outlook Inn, one of Orcas Island’s premier hotels and historic sites. Of course, history has changed and expanded the inn significantly. But the Farish family, who acquired the inn in the 1970s, have worked hard over the years to retain the

period character of the original building. As a guest of the inn, you’ll select from three types of accommodations, something for every budget: sharedbath rooms in the historic and charming main building, larger private-bath rooms in the east wing, or contemporary

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luxury view suites where you can cozy up to your fireplace or enjoy a soak in your jetted tub. The inn’s on-site restaurant, New Leaf Cafe, is the perfect spot to settle in at a window-side table with a dramatic view of the sound for some fresh, seasonal,

local fare at the hands of some exceptional culinary talent. An expertly designed global wine selection ensures the right pairings, and an informed and friendly dining room staff is always on hand to help you make the best choices from the menu and wine list.

Eastsound connects east and west on this horseshoe-shaped island and is its largest village. If you can tear yourself away from Outlook Inn’s ambiance and legendary hospitality, you’ll discover that Eastsound is a delightful indulgence in the form of a very walkable village, especially for those who live to browse— and shop. Bounded by East Sound and North Beach, you can walk from shore to shore in 30 minutes, but you’ll undoubtedly want to linger at a number of spots that catch your eye along the way. You’ll discover galleries featuring the works of island artists, a variety of small specialty shops, bookstores and cafes. Kenmore Air operates daily wheeled-plane service from Seattle’s Boeing Field to Orcas Island/Eastsound Airport, making this destination an easy and scenic holiday flyaway. www.outlookinn.com.

Sooke Harbour House, Sooke, B.C.

By Roger Ward

In the small fishing village of Sooke, on Vancouver Island’s southern coast, travelers find tranquility in the form of a welcoming white wood-framed inn and drama in its bay, ocean and mountain vistas. Sooke Harbour House owners Frédérique and Sinclair Philip have transformed and expanded a small clapboard structure with five guest rooms into a boutique resort masterpiece. The inn perches on a cliff above Whiffen Spit, directly facing the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Washington’s Olympic Mountains. A Kenmore Air flight to Victoria provides an inspiring preview of the coastal and mountain views along the strait. In the inn’s intimate and dramatic setting, guests can contemplate the canvas of changing light on mountains and water, savor the salt breeze and luxuriate in the sounds of nature from spacious private decks. Each of the inn’s 28 rooms is an individually designed marriage

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R

E S O R T

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P A

PENDER ISLAND, BC, CANADA

of whimsy and luxury, providing comfort with the highest quality bedding, first-rate amenities, enormous jetted or soaking tubs in the rooms or on decks, and blissful breakfasts delivered to guests’ rooms. Frédérique, the inn’s Creative Director, recounts that the couple’s vision when starting was “to develop a nice place to stay with as much art as possible, a good local restaurant, and making it work to benefit the local community.” The numerous and prestigious awards the inn and its creators have received confirms that they have succeeded well beyond their initial aspirations. Frédérique found a lively local art community when she arrived in Sooke from her native France. She showcases and elevates the best of local artists’ works in the galleried hallways, public rooms and guest suites. She also discovered the art of the First Nations cultures. Large masterworks abound, including a family totem that docu-

ments the history of the Philip tribe and welcomes strangers to sharePoets inCove Harbor Magazine Fall outlines.indd their culture and bounty. Sinclair modestly calls himself Innkeeper and Wine Director. Under his direction and insistence, the vision of a “good local restaurant” developed into an internationally renowned homage to locally grown and foraged ingredients. All of the plants growing on the grounds are edible in some aspect, and the restaurant uses each in season. The inn’s works of perfected food art create their own culinary journeys resplendent with botanical delights in such openings as pumpkin soup with red begonia crème fraiche, or oxeye daisy, radish and sage-flower salad. The kitchen features locally-caught, sustainable seafood and the best of local farmers’ rabbits, pork, lamb and beef. Even the sorbets are transcendent creations using mints, lemon verbena, salmonberry, grand fir needles, sages, berries or other freshly picked herbs and fruits. www.sookeharbourhouse.com The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Flying with Kenmore Air

Things you need to know... Baggage Allowances

At Kenmore Air we have big hearts but little airplanes! Our baggage limits and penalties for overweight bags are dictated solely by safety of flight concerns, which are more acute on our size aircraft than on the big jets. Seaplane passengers are permitted up to 24 pounds of baggage per person. All items are weighed and count toward the limit, including purses, laptops, backpacks, and so on. Additionally, no single baggage item can exceed 10 x 16 x 24 inches. On Kenmore Air Express wheeled-plane flights, passengers may check baggage totaling up to 50 pounds and may hand-carry one personal item (purse, backpack, etc.) of up to 20 pounds. The checked item may not exceed 62 linear inches, and the personal item may not exceed 36 linear inches. Overweight baggage will be carried on either service if capacity is available for $1 per pound, and oversized baggage will be accommodated, if possible, for a $10 per piece penalty. However, overweight/oversized baggage is always at risk of being bumped unless extra baggage space has been reserved and pre-paid in advance.

Sea-Tac Shuttles

Kenmore Air operates ground shuttles between SeattleTacoma International Airport and its three Seattlearea terminals. These shuttles are complimentary for connections to year-round routes and available at a nominal charge for connections to seasonal routes. Shuttles must be reserved in advance. When booking flights online, select “Seattle-Tacoma International” as your origin or destination, and our system will automatically book the correct combination of shuttle and flight for you. Shuttles pick up from Sea-Tac at Door 00 in the Scheduled Airporter waiting area at the far south end of Baggage Claim. Please be at Door 00 with your claimed baggage at least 10 minutes before the scheduled shuttle departure time. The shuttle driver will always make a departure announcement over the PA system, but passengers are ultimately responsible for getting on the shuttle by departure time. When connecting to another airline from Sea-Tac, be sure to schedule your Kenmore Air flight and shuttle to arrive at Sea-Tac with sufficient time (per your major airline’s recommendation) to check in, check baggage and clear security. A minimum of 90 minutes is generally recommended.

Customs & Immigration

Charter Service

Kenmore Air offers a lot of scheduled flights to a lot of places, but sometimes, you really need to travel on your schedule, not ours. Or perhaps you need to go somewhere we don’t fly everyday. That’s what charters are for. With our large and diverse fleet of seaplanes and wheeled-aircraft, we’re able to offer customized flying throughout the Pacific Northwest. For a quote, call 866.435.9524 and ask for a charter specialist or send an e-mail to charters@KenmoreAir.com.

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With a handful of extremely limited exceptions, everyone flying internationally — regardless of citizenship or age — is required to have a current, valid passport book. Passport cards, NEXUS cards and so-called “enhanced driver licenses” are not valid for travel aboard Kenmore Air. Travelers should also be aware that some criminal offenses that are misdemeanors in the United States are considered felonies in Canada and can result in denial of entry. Driving under the influence of alcohol is a common example. Every traveler is responsible for making sure that they meet the requirements of international travel. Kenmore Air will accept no liability for cost or inconvenience arising from denial of entry into either the United States or Canada.


Check-in Times

Kenmore Air passengers enjoy a generally more relaxed traveling experience than the typical airline affords. Nevertheless, we do require check-in for all domestic flights 30 minutes prior to scheduled departure. Due to certain requirements of U.S. Customs & Border Protection, check-in for international flights is required 45 minutes prior to departure. Flights close for boarding 15 minutes prior to scheduled departure, which means that seats for passengers who haven’t checked in at that time may be released to stand-by passengers. Also, the flight may depart anytime after closing, even if it’s prior to scheduled departure. We like arriving early! For flights departing from unstaffed locations, like seaplane docks in the San Juan Islands or British Columbia, passengers should be ready to go at least 15 minutes prior to scheduled departure time to accommodate unforeseeable variations in flight time.

Reservations & Customer Service Reservations can be made online 24 hours a day, seven days a week at KenmoreAir.com, or call us tollfree seven days a week from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Pacific Time at 866.435.9524. For customer-service inquiries of an urgent nature, call our reservations line at 866.435.9524. For less timesensitive concerns, kudos or complaints, please e-mail us at feedback@KenmoreAir.com.

Alaska Airlines Partnership

Since April 2010, Kenmore Air has been a proud partner in the award-winning Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan. Passengers who are participants in the Alaska plan earn 250 miles each way on qualifying Kenmore Air flights, and miles can also be redeemed for free flights on either airline. For details on the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan, visit AlaskaAir.com/MileagePlan. In addition to the Mileage Plan partnership, Kenmore Air and Alaska Airlines (as well as Alaska’s regional affiliate, Horizon Air) have an interline ticketing agreement. This means that you can purchase singleticket itineraries between Kenmore Air destinations and more than 90 Alaska Airlines and Horizon Air cities across North America, including Hawaii. Besides the simplicity and convenience of making a single phone call or online booking, such joint itineraries also offer much more coordinated and accommodating customer service in the event of weather delays, misrouted baggage or other issues.

Terminal Locations Seattle Boeing Field 7277 Perimeter Road Seattle, WA 98108 Seattle Lake Union 950 Westlake Avenue N. Seattle, WA 98109 Kenmore Lake Washington 6321 NE 175th Street Kenmore, WA 98028 Port Angeles/Fairchild Airport 1404 West Airport Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Local tel.: 360.452.6371

Friday Harbor Airport 800 Franklin Drive Friday Harbor, WA 98250 Local tel.: 360.378.1067 Eastsound/Orcas Island Airport 847 Schoen Lane Eastsound, WA 98245 Local tel.: 360.376.1407 Victoria Inner Harbour 1234 Wharf Street Victoria, BC V8W 3H9 Local tel.: 250.384.2411

Interline bookings can be made only through Alaska Airlines. If your travel plans include an Alaska Airlines or Horizon Air city, we strongly encourage you to book an interline ticket by visiting AlaskaAir.com or calling 800.ALASKAAIR.

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HARBORS Travel Club Card

Particpating Businesses

HARBORS Travel Club Members receive a 10% or greater rewards discount at the following participating businesses. The rewards vary by business and are restricted to regular priced merchandise and services. Contact the individual businesses for restrictions and details or go to: www.harborsmagazine.com/travel-club Victoria/Vancouver Island, BC Abigail’s Hotel Bear Mountain Westin Bear Mountain Golf Resort Brentwood Bay Lodge Delta Victoria Ocean Pointe Resort and Spa Hotel Grand Pacific Fairholme Manor Parkside Victoria Resort & Spa Prestige Oceanfront Resort Prime Steakhouse & Lounge Royal BC Museum Sauce Restaurant & Lounge Sooke Harbour House Victoria Regent Waterfront Hotel Waters Edge Resort at Pacific Rim

San Juan Islands Orcas Island: Doe Bay Resort & Retreats Orcas Island Golf Course San Juan Island: Afterglow Spa Roche Harbor Bird Rock Hotel Coho Restaurant Crystal Seas Kayaking Day Tours Earthbox Motel & Spa Friday Harbor Marine Harrison House Suites Horseshu Guest Ranch Island Inn 123 West Island Wine Company Joe Friday’s Shirt Company Kings Marine Center States Inn & Ranch San Juan Classic Day Sailing San Juan Excursions, Whale Watching San Juan Vineyards Trumpeter Inn Bed and Breakfast Tucker House Bed and Breakfast Waterworks Art Gallery

Olympic Peninsula George Washington Inn Gift Shop, Port Angeles Clam Cannery, Port Townsend Port Ludlow Resort Quilecute Oceanside Resort T’s Restaurant, Port Townsend

Northern BC Islands Dent Island Lodge Nanook Lodge Poet’s Cove Resort & Spa Rendezvous Lodge

Seattle Center for Wooden Boats DiStefano Winery (Woodinville) Holiday Inn Seattle Jillian’s Billiards Kenmore Air Flightseeing Tours Kenmore Air Gift Shop Lake Washington Terminal MarQueen Hotel

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See www.harborsmagazine.com for additional listings and restrictions.


Seen in All

the BeSt PlAceS

R-25 Sc

We must be the change we wish to see in the world. Mahatma Gandhi

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T

he most appealing destinations often aren’t just around the corner. That’s why we’ve built Ranger Tugs® in the Pacific Northwest since 1958.

Each Ranger Tug features standard bow and stern thrusters for effortless handling, coupled with fuel-efficient Yanmar® diesel power to bring even remote anchorages within easy reach. A comfortable ride, generous interior and standard equipment make the trip worthwhile. And, Ranger Tugs are designed for easy trailering, to extend your horizons even further. No wonder Ranger Tugs has emerged as a leading builder of family cruisers, and the favored choice of experienced owners across North America and worldwide.

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For a Ranger Tugs® dealer near you call 253.839.5213 or visit www.RangerTugs.com

Cascadia is a non-profit whose mission is to promote the design, construction and operation of buildings in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia that are environmentally responsible, profitable and healthy places to live, work and learn. www.cascadiagbc.org


HARBORS Connecting People, Places, Adventure and Lifestyle.

HARBORS www.harborsmagazine.com Fall 2011

Sakinaw Lake Lodge

Sunshine Coast, BC

Wine & Cider Harvest

Olympic Peninsula, WA

A Victorian Holiday

Victoria, BC

Historic Roche Harbor

San Juan Island, WA

Salmon Fishing It’s Time to Think Pink

Holiday Gift Ideas SLU: Chef Recipes

HARBORS Fall 2011  

The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine.

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