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HARBORS Connecting People, Places, Adventure and Lifestyle.

HARBORS www.harborsmagazine.com

Nanook Lodge

Spring 2011

Sport Fishing Discovery Islands

Salmon Jigging

Olympic National Park Kayaking

Southern Gulf Islands, BC

Lakedale Resort San Juan Islands, WA


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On the Olympic Peninsula The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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EXPERIENCE HANDS-ON H I S TO RY. The Center for Wooden Boats is a hands-on maritime museum located on Seattle’s Lake Union, a stone’s throw away from Kenmore Air. Rent a boat, learn to sail, or just marvel at the forces that make planes fly and sailboats sail.

Learn to sail in historic wooden sailboats, rent a rowboat and enjoy a floating picnic, cast a bronze oarlock, learn celestial navigation, go for a free boat ride on Sunday afternoon or just stroll the docks and admire the wood and the water before your Kenmore Air flight.

2011 Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival 0

4th of July Weekend ∙ July 2 - 4 0

The theme of the annual Lake Union Wooden Boat Festival is heritage wooden boats. The ambiance is that of an old-fashioned, down-home waterfront festival where everything is fun, almost everything is free and nothing much is fancy. It’s as authentically grassroots American as you can get and has been for the last 34 years. VISITING VESSELS ∙ KIDS’ ACTIVITIES ∙ BOAT RIDES ∙ FOOD & CRAFTS ∙ EXHIBITS ∙ LIVE MUSIC ∙ FREE!

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The Center for Wooden Boats | 1010 Valley Street, Seattle, WA 98109 | www.cwb.org

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SPRING 2011

Features

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Nanook Lodge

20

Olympic National Park

28

Washington Stealth

32

Kenmore Air Destination Maps

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Dancin’ the Salmon Jig

40

Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes

47

Pampered Oysters

51

South Lake Union - Seattle

54

Kayaking the Southern Gulf Islands

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2011 Spring Flyaway Destinations

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Flying with Kenmore Air

A Premier Sport Fishing Lodge on Stuart Island, BC

Nature Nurturing the Human Spirit

Seattle’s Newest Pro Sports Team

South Zone / North Zone

Cover Photograph A.J. Hunt View of San Juan Islands from seaplane dock.

Fishing Tips for Anglers

A Resort for All Seasons on San Juan Island

Learn More from a Seasoned Oyster Farmer

What’s New in SLU?

A Paddler’s Paradise

Clam Cannery, Jupiter Ranch and the Fairholme Inn

What You Need to Know Before You Go

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HA R B OR S The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine CONTACT P.O. Box 1393 Port Townsend, WA 98368

E: info@harborsmagazine.com W: harborsmagazine.com

PUBLISHER / EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Katherine S. McKelvey GRAPHIC DESIGN Danny McEnerney EDITING Allen Cox CONTRIBUTORS A.J. Hunt Allen Cox Bill McMillan Dan Leach

Michael Fagin Michael Kennett Rebecca Agiewich Terry W. Sheely

ADVERTISING SALES ads@harborsmagazine.com

WEB DESIGN

workin’ man creative

PHOTO CREDITS Courtesy of:

Sam Anderson, Nanook Lodge, pgs. 10-18 Sean Bagshaw, pg. 20 Bill McMillan, pgs. 21, 22, 24, 25, 26 Michael Kennett, pgs. 28-31 Terry Sheely & Rock D’Acquisto, pgs. 36-38 Jim Goerg, pg. 37 (top) Columbia Hospitality, pgs. 40-44 Allen Cox, pgs. 47-49 Todd Carnahan, Gabriola Sea Kayaking, pgs. 54-57 Matt Bowes, pg. 56 (top) Clam Cannery Hotel, pg. 58 Silvie Milman, Jupiter Ranch, pgs. 59, 60 (top) Silvia Main, Fairholme Inn, pgs. 60 (bottom), 61 Heath Moffatt Photography, pg. 63

HARBORS magazine is printed by Mitchell Press, Vancouver, BC

HARBORS magazine is printed on recycled paper.

DISTRIBUTED BY

PUBLISHED BY

To have HARBORS Magazine sent directly to your home send name and address with a check for $12 postage in US and $16 USD for Canadian postage to All Ports Media, PO Box 1393, Port Townsend, WA 98368. © 2011 by All Ports Media Group All rights reserved. Partial or whole reproduction is prohibited. The publisher will not be held responsible for errors in advertising beyond the cost of the space of the ad. No changes may be made or cancellation accepted after the publication deadline date. Opinions expressed in signed articles are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of this magazine or Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc.

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HAR B O R S

volume 2 issue 2


HAR B O R S

Welcome to Spring 2011

Harbor Lights A Note from the Publisher

Welcome to HARBORS magazine and happy Spring 2011. It is so great to have spring arrive and take the chill off a long winter season. Now is the time to get outdoors and experience everything the Northwest has to offer. HARBORS Spring 2011 issue will introduce you to some of the most spectacular destinations in western Washington and British Columbia. Our main feature is a conversation with Larry Anderson, owner and guide of one of British Columbia’s premier fishing lodges on Stuart Island in Desolation Sound. We are also taking you to the west coast of Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula for an impressive look at the Olympic National Park, a truly unique destination for anyone seeking a historic and cultural experience in one of the largest and most lush rainforests in America. Don’t miss the energetic article on the new Washington Stealth professional lacrosse team, one of Kenmore Air’s sponsorships bringing new light to a very exciting indoor sport full of physical intensity as seen in the awesome photographs. This is just a glimpse of what the 2011 season has to offer the new lacrosse fans of Washington and British Columbia. Avid kayak adventure seekers will enjoy our article on kayaking in the Southern Gulf Islands of British Columbia. We also have a profile on a lake resort tucked away in the natural setting of San Juan Island, a culinary experience at the now “faved” restaurant of Chef Rachael Ray, and a great article that will educate you on the culture of oyster farming along Puget Sound. Seattle South Lake Union fans will enjoy the “Serious Pie” article about Chef Tony Catini and his approach to making a unique style pizza, and an update on the Center for Wooden Boats. With the warmer weather approaching, what better way to enjoy it than to take a quick Kenmore Air flight and be at one of our featured spring “flyaways” for a weekend of hiking, boating, fishing, unique and artful shopping and new dining experiences. And be sure to read the “Things You Need to Know” when flying with Kenmore Air at the back of the magazine. We want to welcome our new advertisers and thank all of our advertisers for their support and for the exceptional and impressive advertising they bring to us. Please check out our new website and see the great specials advertisers are offering to our readers at www.harborsmagazine.com. Enjoy the magazine, the view and your destination!

Katherine S. McKelvey Publisher

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Welcome to Kenmore Air Spring is always a time of preparation here at Kenmore Air as we gear up for another summer of flying to our seasonal destinations in Canada. As I write this, summer schedules and fares are loaded in our system. Now it’s time to re-connect with our many partners at the BC lodges and marinas we serve. Our mechanics are busy readying the summer fleet. Soon it will be time to gather our large corps of seasonal pilots and customer service agents for their annual recurrent training. We look forward all winter to seeing our long-time customers again. Some of them have flown with us every summer for years, and we work hard to maintain their loyalty. We also look forward to starting new relationships with folks we’re taking up north for the first time—our repeat customers of the future. In the past, most of our seasonal BC passengers were going fishing, and our planes still bring plenty of fresh salmon and halibut back to Kenmore, just like in the old days. We’re fortunate to work with a number of fine lodges whose experienced guides know where the big ones are. But the Inside Passage today offers much more than just fishing. Folks might be flying up to meet friends on a yacht in Desolation Sound or to kayak the famous Broughton Archipelago. Perhaps they’re off to watch grizzlies or orcas, or to take advantage of some of the world’s best diving. Or maybe they’re traveling to one of the outstanding resorts we serve to be wined, dined and pampered at the highest international standards. Whatever your pleasure, there’s a world of recreational opportunities among the forty or so seasonal destinations we serve. We look forward to welcoming you on board for an unforgettable flight experience on the way to your favorites! As always, thanks for flying Kenmore Air.

Todd Banks President

Flights to 40 seasonal destinations in BC are available for booking now at kenmoreair.com.

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A Conversation with Larry Anderson... Owner of Nanook Fishing Lodge on Stuart Island, British Columbia By A.J. Hunt

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“It’s said you should find a career where you can do what you love and get paid for it,” says Larry Anderson. For this 4th generation Nordic fisherman,

the decision to pursue his life’s passion has led him to where he is today, owner of a premier fishing and exploration lodge in the middle of British Columbia’s sport fishing Mecca. For any adventurer seeking exhilarating fishing and wildlife experiences combined with relaxing gourmet meals, fine wines and meaningful camaraderie among friends, Nanook Lodge is the ultimate destination. “It’s all about the experience and soaking up the magnificent scenery and nature this area has to offer,” says Anderson. After meeting Larry Anderson and hearing him talk about Nanook Lodge, we decided to let him tell you about the Nanook Fishing Lodge experience in his own words… HARBORS: Larry, what made you pick Stuart Island for a fishing lodge? ANDERSON: Having fished all my life it was easy to immediately see the total package Stuart Island had to offer. The longest salmon fishing calendar on the west coast with consistent angling

Kenmore Air de Havilland Turbine Otter seaplane docked in front of Nanook Lodge. This is one of the most versatile and dependable seaplanes bringing guests to the lodge every season. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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opportunities in a wilderness setting, yet only a short seaplane ride away from civilization is the total package. If there was an equation to calculate time, distance, beauty, fish, wildlife, lodge and friendship, our lodge on Stuart Island would top the list. HARBORS: What distinguishes you from other fishing lodges in the area? ANDERSON: We are very lucky to have several professional lodges as neighbors in the BC Inland Passage. Each has something to offer everyone. Nanook specializes in hosting selective families and groups seeking upscale accommodations, excellent fishing and eco-tours in an intimate setting. With a maximum occupancy of 20, our lodge is the “remote clubhouse” for many companies that entertain their best customers and employees. As owners, we are available for guests around the clock, providing excellent service, prime fishing times and local

knowledge for maximum wildlife enjoyment. Even hosting a board meeting with all the necessities can be accomplished before or after the “bite!” HARBORS: What do you have to do to prepare the lodge for the season? ANDERSON: Imagine running one of the hospitality endeavors near Palm Beach, Cabo or Hatteras without municipal water, power or fuel? It was a pretty big learning curve for me, that’s for sure, moving from Cherry Hills, Colorado to Stuart Island. Our learning curve of dealing with island life went off the chart. Remote island resorts have their own utilities that run everything and dependability is the keyword. Nanook Lodge is closed to the public from November to April. Our year begins in March with projects started, buildings opened, supplies stocked and boats floated. There is one thing that does interfere with the work: fishing! Using a flimsy ex-

cuse to test the boat or see a neighbor generally means a foray into Bute Inlet behind the lodge. Bute has an annual herring spawn in early spring with thousands of schooling salmon not far behind eating as much as possible. With almost 80 miles of shoreline to cover, our boats have unlimited fishing opportunities besides watching the bears hit the beaches after a long winter nap. It’s easy to see why some work days are shorter than others at the lodge. We like to fish. HARBORS: How does Kenmore Air play a part in the Nanook Lodge experience? ANDERSON: Since inception Nanook Lodge has worked with Kenmore Air for transporting almost all of our guests. Simply the fastest, most convenient, friendliest, adventure flight a person will ever take ushers our anglers to the lodge. From Seattle

The “Anderson-Ferguson Fishing Challenge,” Started by Joe Anderson and Dave Ferguson of American Baptist Homes of the West, is a “who’s who” of the senior retirement living developers in America.

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to Stuart Island direct provides more fishing time. Thanks Kenmore! HARBORS: What kind of experience can your guests expect to have at Nanook? ANDERSON: What I’ve observed over the years is that some of the simplest things can be life’s most memorable moments. Catching a first salmon, sighting an orca or bear, downing an oyster on the beach, pulling a crab trap or having an eagle land above you on the deck are everyday happenings. These events aren’t taken for granted and we encourage our guests to explore everything this coastal environment has to offer. Nanook guide boats are the first to leave the bay every day to give our guests as much time as possible on the water. In my opinion, the best time to fish Stuart Island is at first light. After a breakfast of choice and plenty of coffee, the Nanook guides urge guests to hop in the boats for the brief ride to the fishing grounds. A few people may hang back for other activities including sleep, but the majority are keen to fish and enjoy spectacular sunrises. The best bites of the day usually come within the first few hours. HARBORS: What makes the salmon fishing at Nanook so legendary? ANDERSON: Stuart Island sits on the crossroads of several major channels of the BC Inland Passage. Millions of salmon travel by the lodge headed in every direction to find their home rivers and the spawning ritual that awaits them there. We are fortunate in this capacity to have two salmon sources, “locals” coming home and “travelers” headed for rivers possibly hundreds of miles away. Each day is a new batch of Top: Richard Noseworthy, from Montreal, with Larry Anderson. Richard’s 32 lb Tyee caught in Denham Bay. Middle: Dr. Marcus Hopkins of Germantown, TN with Sam Anderson at the Phillips River capturing brood stock for the local Hatchery. Bottom: Nicole Anderson with 20 lb Chinook salmon caught in Denham Bay.

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fish, all with their own temperament, hunger and spirit. Speaking for myself, having fished this area since 1978, I still learn something new every day about the salmon and their ways. Nanook anglers share these experiences and, for some, become part of a live “Discovery Channel” experience. The Nanook

in any fishing situation is to be where the fish are under the best conditions. Nanook’s professional guides average over 25 years experience in the Johnstone Strait vicinity. Using their large cruiser boats they weave through the three rapids surrounding Stuart Island on the way to specific spots where they know the fish will be.

guides become personal friends with all of our guests and have become one of the primary reasons so many anglers return each season. HARBORS: What is a typical day at Nanook Lodge? ANDERSON: There’s one common theme each day at the lodge: creating a multi-experience adventure with fish,

“The Anderson-Ferguson Fishing Challenge,” 19 years in a row, dining in late May on the deck overlooking the Nanook boats and Big Bay. Their largest fish in May is a 44 lb Chinook caught by Dr. Bob Baily of Phoenix.

experience isn’t just fishing; it’s understanding the fish, their habits and migration. HARBORS: Are all of your guests experienced fisherman? ANDERSON: Nanook anglers come in all ages, sizes and abilities. We enjoy the camaraderie from a rookie to an expert. Our guides can size up ability in seconds and then match the technique to that. Rookie Nicholas, age 9, can attest to that after landing a 41 lb Chinook last spring! HARBORS: Who are your fishing guides and how valuable are they to the guest experience? ANDERSON: An important factor

Prepared with good tackle and having fished daily through the season, each has an excellent vision of what’s in store for the day. With several boats in the area, Nanook guides continually communicate to share what’s working and where. There is a team spirit found in our guides. They are close friends as well as co-workers. Our families have grown up together. Besides fishing, each Nanook guide has his own personality and wit, enhancing the experience. It’s like fishing with a buddy except they let you play every fish. There are times for a joke, times for education and sometimes just moments of silence. The Nanook

wildlife and people. Nearly everyone gets up for the early lodge departure to capture as many events possible. Fishing and wildlife viewing happens every moment, sunrise to sunset. All of our boats are prepared to stay out all day with nonstop activity. Any guest however may return for lunch, nap or both to better serve their trip. Each guest can make their own schedule with whatever suits them that day. We’re very flexible. Typically, we fish the first three or four hours, intermingled with wildlife viewing as we go. If the tide is low we might pull over and dig clams and oysters. Crabbing for Dungeness, setting

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out prawn traps and bottom fishing is an option too. Giant Lingcod are abundant and provide tasty meals. Most boats return in late afternoon with dockside fanfare celebrating the day’s catch. Fish are weighed, pictures taken and the guides start cleaning. Kept fish are filleted, vacuum sealed and frozen for the trip home. Smoking options are available too. After dockside appetizers and cocktails, dinner is served either in the dining room or on the deck. Sunsets down Cordero Channel are priceless shared with friends, desserts and wine. We’ve been praised plenty about our fabulous beds but I think what we’ve really done is worn the guests out! Providing sound sleep is a Nanook specialty. HARBORS: What kind of adventure do you offer besides fishing? ANDERSON: My son Sam manages the lodge, and provides an array of adventure options for any age or

ability. Besides fishing, guests can hike, view wildlife, kayak, bike, and explore the Stuart Island area. The variety of coastal plants and animals is huge and provides a platform for discussion and education. As a proud father, I will say that there isn’t anyone who can explain this ecosystem better than Sam. His dedication is shown by being a board member at the Stuart Island Community Association, as a Stuart Island trail builder and stalwart member of the Gillard Pass Hatchery. Sam and his wife Stephanie spend most of their free time hiking, kayaking and fishing. Steph leads most of the hikes to climb Mt. Muehle right behind the lodge. HARBORS: Who cooks the meals and what is the dining experience at the lodge? ANDERSON: We have been lucky to have had only two chefs in the lodge’s history. Luc, who is beginning his sixth year after culinary school in

Vancouver, favors seafood. The daily menu is a combination of Luc’s creations and guest requests. Having lots of returning guests and groups, Luc will arrange menus to meet everyone’s expectations. Allergies, diets and nonseafood eaters are easily satisfied too. Nanook Lodge dining provides variety and quality with an on-the-water experience. HARBORS: I notice you have some large groups that visit the lodge every year. Who are these groups and where do they come from? ANDERSON: Our maximum capacity of 20 developed from input that came from some of our original customers. These corporate groups wanted a trip that was personal for them, allowing face to face communication with their best clients. As stated by a Nanook regular, “when we used to take customers golfing I was all over the course without much contact with

Larry Anderson, Nanook owner/guide, Eric Heitman - Center SF 49ers football team, Erwin Dow - President of Everguard Insurance, Kuame Harris - Tackle SF 49ers football team. Both fish are Chinook salmon caught in May.

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my client, but when we were in the boat all day together at Nanook it became much more personal.” Our longest running group (ABHOW) has actually fished with me for 19 years! This is a consortium of the largest Senior Living developers in North America. They have reserved, in perpetuity, the week after Memorial Day, filling the lodge every year. Their preference is the spring Bute Inlet fishing when most other lodges haven’t opened. For this trip we might send out 8-10 boats and never see anyone else all day. They enjoy great Chinook fishing, prawning, crabbing, and watching the bears who have just emerged from hibernation. The ABHOW trophy sits on the Nanook bar bearing the annual winners name and fish size. Dr. Bob’s 44 lb. Tyee is the largest so far! Another annual trip we host at Nanook is for a Fortune 500 Real Estate company from Texas. They like to visit in August when things are sizzling down south. Fishing in 70 degree weather suits them just fine compared to 100. It’s also a great time to see the resident orca whales that visit us daily in the summer. Multiple pods call Johnstone Strait their home. We select menus, wine lists, and non-fishing adventures in advance with their travel planner, so that the entire trip is well-orchestrated. There are quite a few travel planners that get the task to select a venue like this without much knowledge of where to go. Nanook Lodge provides a full service concierge approach to ensure each trip is unique, rewarding and serves the purpose of the host. Many of our repeat customers visit several times a season calling Nanook their “northern retreat.” These companies have first option on the same dates the following year and selection of more if needed. From our corporate trips there are many splinter groups made up of spouses, families and reunions. It isn’t uncommon for one of the guys to visit with his business group and then

return with his wife for one of our couples retreats. These have become very popular gatherings for husbands and wives in a soft adventure-type getaway. We intend on having at least three in 2011 featuring guest chefs, wildlife photography excursions and helping net salmon on the Phillips River for our hatchery. The Phillips River experience in late August and all of September is the experience many groups like for the team-building it creates. Besides salmon fishing, guests help net brood stock for our local community hatchery. In addition to the salmon capture, we ac-

Sam, Stephanie and Larry Anderson

tually mix the eggs and milt creating Chinooks that will return to the Phillips in 5-6 years. Some of these salmon can reach up to 70+ lbs! If a corporation is looking to be viewed as “green,” this is a sure way. HARBORS: What group experience stands out as one of your best since you started with the Lodge? ANDERSON: There are so many to choose from it would be unfair to pick just one, but one of the favorites happened a few years ago when the San Francisco 49ers visited the lodge. We had the offensive line, QB and kicker up for four days, complete with the team flag they brought from their training facility. What a great group of young men, and big! They also gave us a signed helmet that was auctioned off for our hatchery at the Stuart Island dinner/auction held every August at the community dock. Anyway, one morning the center and left tackle, with a combined weight just

shy of 700 pounds, were on my boat. Eric, the center, gets a huge fish on the line and he’s holding the rod just like it was balsa wood with a minnow on the other end. As he’s watching the line fly out of the reel, Kuame, the tackle, is filming the event and starts jumping up and down in excitement for his teammate. The boat was rocking like a Tsunami had just hit! After the initial euphoria we landed the Chinook just under 30 pounds and the second wave of Tsunamis hit with both guys leaping about. My boat never went so high off the water! During the season Larry and his son Sam run the lodge. Larry focuses on marketing, reservations and guest relations, and Sam manages the operations and outdoor activities. Larry, Sam, Stephanie and Nicole Anderson, plus their guides and staff serve their guests’ every need while at Nanook Lodge. Whether you are there for the fishing, adventure or just to enjoy the B.C. outdoors, the Andersons will make you feel like one of the family. From the time you arrive you’ll enjoy the service and amenities that make this special place an unforgettable adventure travel destination.

Kenmore Air flights to Nanook Lodge are booked as part of all-inclusive packages by the lodge. For more information go to: www.nanooklodge.com or email Larry at nanook@island.net (see ad on page 3)

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Sam Anderson: Professional Adventure Travel Guide

Sam Anderson and Cindy Cevedra of Colorado with Cindy’s 34 lb Chinook commonly referred to as a “Tyee.” (Chinooks over 30 lbs are called Tyees). The fish was caught in Nodales Channel at “Tween” Point. Sam’s aluminum hulled boat is custom built for the ocean with all the latest navigation and safety equipment. Sam Anderson has been a local Stuart Island resident for the past fifteen years. After completing his degree in biology at the University of Northern British Columbia, at Prince George, BC, Sam left for the coast to pursue another education in adventure tourism. His passion for the coastal marine environment started during his childhood, and while attending North Island College on Vancouver Island, he further developed this passion. Stuart Island is nestled next to the mainland inside the Discovery Island chain of British Columbia’s inland passage. Whether Sam is guiding customers through the rainforest on an educational trek or paddling with them through the temperate waterways, he is always finding adventure in this coastal wilderness destination. Sam’s father, Larry, was a coastal adventurer himself with a strong love for sport fishing. Sam grew up as the

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“deckhand” and young guide for his father’s charter business, which in time evolved into Nanook Lodge, a growing adventure-influenced sport fishing lodge. Sam and his wife Stephanie are dedicated to making the lodge the ultimate destination for adventureseeking fishing enthusiasts. With several certifications in adventure tourism, Sam is privileged to provide an exciting and safe eco-adventure for individuals and groups of various sizes and experience levels. “Stuart Island is a rare gem on the coast of BC,” Sam says. Never have I been to a place of such exceptional beauty. Strong tidal currents drive tons of micro-organisms through the local island chain to create a very nutritional water column capable of supporting a diverse array of life.” The waterways around Stuart Island are rich with an abundance of marine life and temperate fishes.

These include 32 species of bottom fish, porpoise, dolphins, whales, and salmon. All five species of Pacific salmon migrate through the area. The local hatchery is located across the channel from Nanook Lodge. Guides focus mainly on the Chinook (king salmon) and then Coho (silver salmon) during seasonal fishing expeditions. A day on the Phillips River may include bear sightings, fly fishing, kayaking, wildlife viewing, hiking, and a chance to explore the lush Great Bear Rainforest where humans are only visitors in this majestic wilderness setting. All guides are certified for the activities offered and safety always comes first at Nanook Lodge. Dream up an adventure on the coast and Sam and his fellow guides will make it happen. Having Sam Anderson as a personal guide raises the bar for providing the ultimate adventure travel experience.


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The Olympic Park Runs Through It By Bill McMillan

Nature Nurturing the Human Spirit “There is nothing so American as our national parks. The scenery and wild life are native. The fundamental idea behind the parks is native. It is, in brief, that the country belongs to the people, that it is in the process of making for the enrichment of the lives of all of us. The parks stand as the outward symbol of this great human principle. “…the development of our national park system…has been a long and fierce fight against many private interests which were entrenched in political and economic power.” “I…hope that each and every one of you…will visit our national parks… They are not for the rich alone. Camping is free…You will find them in every part of the Union. You will find glorious scenery of every character; you will find every climate; you will perform the double function of enjoying much and learning much.” -Franklin D. Roosevelt, 1934 Fireside Chat

Quinault Mercantile circa 1940.

In 1961 and 1962, I explored alone from our Boy Scout camp at the headwaters of the Sol Duc River to follow elk trails meandering across snowfields, slopes of heather and huckleberry and around tangled groves of alpine fir. They led to ridge top views of Mt. Olympus and lakes tucked away in lobes of an ancient glacial cirque where trout glided in water clear as air. Using the scoutmaster’s map for bearings to any one of eight lakes within a three-mile radius, I would stuff pilot biscuits and dried fruit in one shirt pocket, a box of fish-

Quinault Mercantile today.

ing flies in the other and, with fly rod in hand, found solitude, silence, and wilderness–the trinity of my coming of age those summers. Nights were spent beneath meteor showers from the black immensity, the only sound marmot whistles echoing across the lake we camped beside. I remain forever sixteen to seventeen in those memories. In 1971 and 1972–by then married with an infant son at home–I returned with a friend from high school days to reclaim what seemed the lost magic of youth left in the Olympic

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Trail to Kalaloch beach, on the Pacific Coast of Washington’s Olympic Peninsula.

Mountains. We found changes, not so much in the land, but in the use of the land and who used the land. From ten-day stints without seeing another hiker in the early 1960s, the early 1970s brought the backpacking phase of the Baby Boomers with its continual parties of hikers. In 1972, as we fished one of the alpine lakes, three college-aged girls with immense packs bounded past with a cheery Bronx greeting from one, “How ah ya?” Dropping their packs on a protruding point into the lake 50 yards

away, they quickly doffed shorts, panties, and t-shirts and splashed about in our bay that had previously held only cruising trout–not naked nymphs. Both of us, only married a couple of years, had immediate and unspeakable longings that could only be expressed with a mutual lift of eyebrows to one another and eyes as big as saucers. I have never chosen to return to the Olympic mountain interior–the experiences like bookends too perfect to alter in their containment of transition from youth to manhood. But I have repeatedly returned to the Olympic Peninsula coastal lowlands– a landscape of dark forests, pervasive mists, glacial rivers and the invisible whisper of raven wing-beats. And now and then a valley opens up to the distant view of white peaks where my youth is secretly harbored, forever protected in that cirque of alpine isolation amidst marmot whistles, heather and eventual silence. Middle Two: (Left) Kalaloch tide pool mosaic (Right) Quinault bunchberry bloom. Bottom Two: (Left) Rainforest sword fern (Right) Quinault tributary creek.

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Olympic National Park Timeline Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt understood the importance of wilderness to human spirit. Although the two were physical opposites, one perhaps the most robust of any U.S. president, the other perhaps the least with legs infamously hidden from the public due to contracting polio, they were equally driven to protect the Olympic Peninsula–a remote place on the opposite side of the continent from their New York heritage. While the quest for wealth had already denuded the East Coast, the Olympics represented one of the last remaining symbols of the original landscape that once stirred the imaginations of immigrants who left worn-out homelands and hopelessness to find something better in America. Chris Morgenroth, an 1890 homesteader in the Olympic Peninsula’s Bogachiel Valley and park lobbyist, proved faithful to his homesteading neighbors. The cost of his lobbying actions was the most accessible old growth rain forests in the river valleys. It has ultimately resulted in landslides down virtually every tributary of the lower Hoh and Bogachiel rivers from logging, with devastating consequences on lands managed primarily by Washington State’s Department of Natural Resources, pockets of U.S. Forest Service land and privately owned timber land. Nevertheless, Morgenroth championed a national park from the beginning, and the park remains a monument of conservation foresight ultimately protected as large as it is through the political skills of both Roosevelts. It has subsequently been enlarged to 922,651 acres with 3 million visitors annually. For 70 years Olympic National Park has remained a vast reserve meant to be protected from human alteration,

Olympic Peninsula elk carry Teddy Roosevelt’s name for his 1909 protection.

Franklin Roosevelt signed into law Olympic National Park (1938).

1897

President Cleveland creates the 2,188,800-acre Olympic Forest Reserve.

1900 - 1901

President McKinley cuts it by 700,000 acres under timber company and development pressure.

1907

The reserve becomes Olympic National Forest under the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

1909

Teddy Roosevelt establishes the 633,600-acre Mount Olympus National Monument within the forest to protect the native elk population that carries his name.

1915

Woodrow Wilson reduces the monument to 298,751 acres for mining and logging and subsequent upper Quinault River channel destabilization.

1933-1936

Franklin Roosevelt puts the monument under temporary management of the Mt. Rainier National Park Superintendent – a result of public sentiments to protect the Olympic Peninsula 1936: A congressional bill is introduced for a 1,017,000-acre Olympic National Park.

1936-1938

Chris Morgenroth, retired Deputy Supervisor of Olympic Forest, Olympic National Park lobbyist for Port Angeles, and homesteader on the Bogachiel River, fights to exclude the lower Hoh and Bogachiel valleys and add a coastal strip of land1937: Franklin Roosevelt tours from Lake Crescent to Lake Quinault and recommends the Hoh and Bogachiel valleys be included in park legislation.

1938

Franklin Roosevelt signs into law an Olympic National Park of 899,292 acres, including a coastal strip and excluding the lower Hoh and Bogachiel valleys.

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Evening calm at Lake Crescent, west of Port Angeles, WA.

Middle: (left) Elwha River dam removal will give salmon access to Olympic Park. (Upper left) Hoh rainforest native cutthroat trout. (Lower left) Old shelter near Sol Duc Falls built in 1939. Bottom: Rainforest ground cover of sorrel.

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Your Journey Begins

with King County International Airport

“13R” photo used by permission of Long Bach Nguyen

Proud Partner of Kenmore Air Express Since 2004 With flights to Port Angeles, Eastsound (Orcas Island), and Friday Harbor

Serving the Aviation Community Since 1928 206 -296 -7380 • www.kingcounty.gov/airport

The joy of communion with ancient Quinault spruce.

but it has not altogether succeeded. Even a large block of land has borders beyond which human uses may be a comparative free-for-all. Nevertheless, it provides a remaining face of Nature from which to watch and learn. In essence this is the national park opportunity Franklin Roosevelt described in his 1934 Fireside Chat as comfort to a people reeling from the Great Depression. Olympic Park runs through my life like water falling from pool to pool: from memory of the great trees of the Quinault in my childhood, to the roaming freedom of its mountains provided by my scoutmaster father in 1961, to the lone breaking of the first trail through snow to the Enchanted Valley in 1972, to a wedding gift provided for my wife and me at Kalaloch

Lodge in 1997. My son has worked at the park perimeter for the Forest Service, Hoh Tribe, Wild Salmon Center, and now Elwha dam removal monitoring. My daughter wanders its shorelines in anticipation of starfish and seals, and for the expanse of the sea where she and her brother released their mother’s ashes off the mouth of the Hoh. Through the differing eras, and for changing reasons, the park has remained a faithful refuge to our needs of spirit – Nature’s doorway gaping wide and beckoning. Kenmore Air Express offers daily flights to Port Angeles, gateway to Olympic National Park.

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The Changing Face of Olympic National Park

North Fork Quinault blowdown: Olympic Park old growth forest is being diminished with elimination of the former forest buffer to the west. A notable failure in the preservation of Olympic National Park has been the inability to sustain historic numbers of wild salmon and steelhead in its waters. Lake Quinault, with waters controlled by the Quinault Nation just outside the park, produced runs as large as 1 million sockeye salmon as late as 1941, many spawning inside the park. Today those runs average about 20,000. Summer runs of steelhead that spawn in the Hoh, Quinault, Queets and Quileute systems number one hundred at most. Queets winter-run steelhead are about 8 percent of their 1923 population; the river’s wild coho are 5 to 10 percent lower than 1912 counts while chum, pink and sockeye salmon are virtually extinct. This has occurred despite the mainstem Queets being included in a National Park corridor all the way to the tribal land near its mouth, although a number of important tributaries are not.

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The declining salmon contrast with great herds of Roosevelt elk the park continues to effectively sustain. Olympic National Park, as with the rest of the planet, is in the process of altering due to climate change, a phenomenon particularly apparent in diminishing glaciers. Weather patterns predicted for Washington include more rainfall and flooding in winters, but less rainfall in summer with extended droughts. Winter storms of above average magnitude are already increasing in frequency. In the past ten years, the Queets, Hoh and Quinault rivers have repeatedly flooded with access roads eliminated for extended periods. Winds that accompany the storms whittle away at remaining old growth rainforests for which the park is famous. Ancient trees now fall like dominoes, exacerbated by two past events: the removal of old growth forest between the coast and the park’s inland bound-

ary following FDR’s failed attempts to include the Hoh and Bogachiel valleys under park protection and by the 1970s and 80s liquidation of the Quinault Nation’s extensive old growth forest. Although the narrow coastal forest at the park’s western edge remains intact due to centuries of testing by high winds, resulting in picturesque deformities, 10 to 15 miles of forest that historically buffered the inland giants of spruce, cedar and hemlock is no longer there. It has been heartbreaking to watch the 50 years of alterations. But part of Nature’s magnificence is that it rebuilds with what it has. The winds of change that are the future will determine the form Olympic National Park will take. Those winds are presently warmer as the glaciers recede. Inevitably, the winds will chill and glaciers will grow down the valleys again – whether 10,000 or 1 million years distant. Nature doesn’t really care how or when.


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Washington Stealth:

The Most Exciting Seattle Pro Sports Team You’ve Never Heard Of

Kenmore Air is in its second year sponsoring Washington Stealth professional indoor lacrosse team, which is based in Everett, WA. Kenmore got involved because many of the players and coaches live in Victoria, BC and fly Kenmore Air back and forth for games and practices. Lacrosse is still a relatively unknown sport, but it is growing rapidly. The indoor version (called “box lacrosse” in Canada) is as exciting as any spectator sport you can think of. The Stealth moved to the Seattle area last year after several seasons in San Jose. As proud sponsors, Kenmore Air is pleased to introduce Harbors readers to this exciting indoor sport. The Stealth’s season runs through April, with league playoffs in May. Check out the team’s website if you want to learn more: www.stealthlax.com.

Stealth forward and Victoria native Lewis Ratcliff takes a shot during a 2010 game. Ratcliff was named the Reebok NLL Championship Game MVP.

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The Northwest’s Own National Lacrosse Team A Memorable Moment in May By Michael Kennett Some things you never forget. Your first kiss. Your wedding day. Your child’s first steps. The most recent event in my life that will resonate in my mind forever happened less than a year ago, and in a place I never expected. I’ve spent the last two years working for the professional indoor lacrosse team, currently known as the Washington Stealth. I got my start with the team when they played in San Jose, California, a city the team called home for six years prior to its move to Everett, Washington. Despite being a rabid sports fan my entire life, I had very little knowledge of the National Lacrosse League (NLL), which began its 25th season this year. Upon watching my first professional indoor lacrosse game in person, I was hooked. It combined so many things that I love about so many other sports. The physicality and intensity of football. The finesse and strategy of basketball. The pace and skill of hockey. Watching these athletes is watching poetry in motion as they effortlessly pass and shoot through the smallest of windows, moving down the floor as a single unit and putting their bodies on the line with diving shots and brutal body checks that would send any normal human being to the emergency room. It is professional sports at its


Stealth player Paul Rabil scores a goal with an acrobatic diving shot during the West Division Finals vs. the Edmonton Rush.

finest. But the NLL is not your typical professional sports league with unapproachable, God-like athletes who make millions of dollars and routinely drive cars worth more than a house. Yes, the athletes of the NLL are at the pinnacle of their sport, but Mon-

day through Friday, they are just like you and me. There are no multimillion dollar contracts. No six-figure endorsement deals. They are weekend warriors in the truest sense of the phrase, working nine-to-five as teachers, salesman and police officers during the week before traveling around

The Stealth mascot, Bomber the Fox.

North America to put their bodies on the line for the love of lacrosse every weekend. It was one such weekend at the Comcast Arena in Everett that would serve as the setting for a moment I will never forget. In its first season in the Pacific

The Stealth poses with the Champion’s Cup following the victory on May 15, 2010.

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Left: Stealth Captain Jason Bloom hoists the Champion’s Cup for the first time following the Stealth’s victory over the Toronto Rock in the National Lacrosse League Championship Game. Right: The Washington Stealth Dance Team, the Bombshells, perform during a Stealth game.

Northwest, the Stealth was putting together one of the best campaigns in franchise history. The Stealth finished the 2010 regular season with a league-best 11-5 record, giving them home-field advantage throughout the playoffs. After a pair of hard-fought victories in the first two rounds of the postseason, the stage was set for the West Division Champion Washington Stealth to host the East Division Champion Toronto Rock—one of the sport’s most storied franchises—in the Super Bowl of lacrosse, the Champion’s Cup Final. There are very few feelings I enjoy

in life more than the rush of game day. Walking into the arena with the smell of popcorn in the air, the buzz of a crowd filing into their seats and the sounds of the ball bouncing off the wall as the teams begin their warm-ups send a chill up my spine. Leading up to game time, it’s hard not to be enthralled by the music blasting through the speakers like a rock concert, the dance team flawlessly performing their routines to the delight of the crowd and the pyrotechnic blasts introducing each player as if he were a superhero. Every night at a Stealth game is a perfect storm of sport and entertainment. But on May 15, 2010, during the

The Stealth players and the sold-out crowd at the Comcast Arena react to the Stealth’s go-ahead goal in the NLL Championship Game.

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Champion’s Cup Final between the Stealth and Rock at the Comcast Arena, there was an air around the city that extended for miles. The sun broke through the spring rain, shining on the Comcast Arena with a warm glow, a guiding light for travelers near and far entering the city for the evening’s event. For this game, there was a television crew preparing to broadcast the game throughout the United States and Canada. There was a line around the block full of people waiting in anticipation to enter the building for the first championship game in Stealth history. In the team’s first season in a new city, a sell-out crowd of over 8,600 packed the Comcast Arena in support of the Northwest’s newest professional sports team. Fans from Portland made the threehour drive north. A planeload flew in from California. Friends and family of the players, many of which live in British Columbia, crossed the border from Vancouver or flew via Kenmore Air from Victoria. Lacrosse and sports fanatics alike from many miles around traveled to Everett, making it the center of our collective sports world for one night. I had envisioned this night a million times, and not once did I see the


Stealth losing. That is until the third quarter of the most intense sporting event I had ever witnessed, when the Stealth trailed by four goals, a deficit no team had ever overcome in the history of the NLL Championship game. But with less than one second left in that third quarter, one moment changed everything. The Stealth capitalized on a Toronto mistake, scoring an empty net goal with two-tenths of a second remaining on the clock. The crowd at the Comcast Arena sprang to life with a thunderous roar, breathing life into a Stealth team that seemed all but defeated in the most important game it had ever played. That roar of the crowd would not cease for the remainder of the night, as they willed the Stealth to eight straight goals, a feat unmatched in the 24year history of the National Lacrosse League Championship game. As the final buzzer sounded, the Stealth was on top of the lacrosse world with a 15-11 victory and its first NLL Championship. The team piled on one another as red and black confetti fell from the ceiling, and each player hoisted the Champion’s Cup to the delight of the crowd. Not one person was sitting in their seat; 8,600 fans stood as one, in awe of the incredible athletic feat they had just witnessed. I ran to the turf, abandoning my role as an employee and soaking up the moment as a fan of the team and

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Following the NLL Championship game, the Washington Stealth took the Champion’s Cup on a tour of the Pacific Northwest and Southwestern Canada, including a trip to Victoria, BC and a visit to Kenmore Air.

a friend to its staff, coaches and players. I gazed around the arena at forty members of the Stealth organization on the floor and 8,600 of its biggest fans in the stands, everyone forever sharing a bond created by one special event. Now, a new season has begun. The 2011 season is underway, running

from January through May, but at every game a different fan approaches me with their memories of the 2010 Championship Game. The National Lacrosse League has that affect on people. I can’t wait to take my children to their first Stealth game, share my memories with them and watch as they create memories of their own.

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Topographical data by True North GIS. Map Š2009 Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc. All rights reserved.

Olympia to Nanaimo

South Zone Kenmore Air Destination Map

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For Reservations Call (866) 435-9524 • www.KenmoreAir.com


Topographical data by True North GIS. Map Š2009 Kenmore Air Harbor, Inc. All rights reserved.

Nanaimo to Port Hardy

North Zone

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Kenmore Air Destination Map


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For Reservations Call (866) 435-9524 • www.KenmoreAir.com


Colorful herring lures guaranteed to catch the eye of a hungry salmon.

Dancin’ the Salmon Jig By Terry W. Sheely

They’ll hit it on the fluttering drop, in the middle of the dance with the rod jigging one direction, lure the other, more subtle kiss than predatory strike. Then the craziness begins. Invariably, feeding king salmon duped into mouthing a flashy imposter react to the hook like suitors betrayed—angry, twisting, rolling, grinding into bottom gravel, and then the scorching runs that can blister careless thumbs, throw yards of slack into the play, and leave our jaws hanging, eyes wide and hearts booming in our ears. Dancing a salmon jig along the bottom of Northwest inland saltwater is akin to hunting for tigers—stealth and repetition interrupted by struggle and chaos. And still, despite the adrenaline, despite the hands-on, one-on-one tease and sweet talk to induce a strike, jigging brightly-colored, shiny, hard metal 36

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lures for salmon follows a distant third in popularity behind the productive but impersonal techniques of trolling flashy bling or motor-mooching fresh plug-cut herring baits. Jigging combines the simplicity and convenience of trolling’s artificials and mooching’s live-bait appeal of wounded vulnerable prey. As often happens with underdogs, the third-place distancing has cultivated a cult of unrepentant jiggers, spawned neighborhood manufacturers on both sides of Juan de Fuca Strait, and deepened the arsenal of tricks and tactics for fetching up firm red fillets for the dining table. Jigging for salmon with a lure deliberately molded to resemble baitfish was launched in 1981 when ex-jet fighter jock and consummate fisherman Rocky D’Aquisto molded a lure in his base-

ment. His invention perfectly matched the skinny candlefish that spawn and feed the salmon on the flats tapering off the waterfront between Point Wilson and Port Townsend and most importantly the salmon-concentrated water in nearby Midchannel Bank. His “Point Wilson Dart” won jigging converts in Puget Sound, on both sides of the Strait, past the Gulf and San Juan islands and north up the Inside Passage. Darts will take chinook, coho, chums and pinks, but were created for king salmon and seem to work best when the big chinook are prowling the bottom in 50 to 200 feet of water, which is most of the time. Darts remain the most popular salmon jigs in Washington. Before D’Aquisto’s epiphany, fishing minds were similarly at work on the north side of the Strait developing


Terry Sheely with chinook salmon caught off of Vancouver Island, BC.

an outrageously weird and revolutionary lure they called the Buzz Bomb. Intended to imitate the fall of a mortally crippled herring, Buzz Bombs are shaped like elongated diamonds with a line-size center hole running the length of the lure. Monofilament line is fed through the hole, a plastic bead which acts as a bearing is threaded on ahead of the hooks and, when the rig falls through the water column, the bomb rotates around the line creating flash and the sonic vibration of a wounded baitfish descending toward bottom. Jigging and Buzz Bombing will take salmon from surface to bottom. Buzz Bombs rotate, wobble and buzz on the free fall from surface to bottom, which makes them a favorite with coho anglers working feeding silvers in the top 70 feet of water, often hundreds of feet above the bottom. Both salmon lures are designed to be jigged and danced in the face of feeding fish and jig lines have been expanded to match the shapes, sizes, weights and colors of baitfish common to Washington and British Columbia. In addition to imitating candlefish, Darts now dupe anchovy and her-

Candlefish lures, a delicacy among the most sophisticated feeding silvers.

ring patterns. And on the Canadian side, Buzz Bomb & Zzinger Lures Inc. continues its whacky originality with Zzingers, Zeldas and Spinnows. Predictably, several other manufacturers have since imported their way into the salmon jig market. Darts, Zzingers, Buzz Bombs—all heavy-metal jigs weighing 1 to 8 ounces—are dancing, fluttering, tantalizing lures that scream vulnerability, beg to be bitten and, like all good techniques, require a degree of specialized tackle, technique and hard-headed persever-

ance along with decent electronics sophisticated enough to locate concentrations of salmon. The initial steps to dancing the salmon jig are: First, find salmon. To find feeder wads of salmon, find baitfish under attack which will be under the gulls, above the diving birds and in front of the seals. Next, park the boat over the school, deliver a chunk of deceitful metal that oozes edibility on a line that tingles with sensitivity, controlled by a fast-tapering rod with a faster tip and a long butt.

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Buzz Bomb rigged and ready on a stout pole.

Tools and Techniques Rods: Pick a stout stick. Good jigging rods are 7 to 8 feet long, with a backbone that quickly tapers from heavy butt to small light tip. Stiff is better than limp. Floppy, flexible rods that work wonders strapped into downriggers and trolled will fight against you if forced to double-duty as jigging tools. Stiff rods transfer energy from your arm movement to the jig with minimal movement and, after an hour or two of yin-yanging, minimal movement becomes important. An extra-long butt section provides leverage to work the jig, to stick the hook home and to handle large fish. Reels: Eighty percent of the time I use a baitcasting-style reel with a quick retrieve rate. A gear ratio of 5-to-1 is fast enough to haul in line when needed (before being slack-lined by a surface-charging chinook) yet slow enough to offer the serious cranking power needed to stop a big king from grinding into the bottom. You’ll hear a few arguments for spinning reels, especially among the Buzz Bombers casting to surface feeders, but if I have 38

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(Top) Single hook dart rig. (Bottom) Adjust the jig size to the size of dominant baitfish.

to pick one it’ll be the versatility and line control offered by a bait-caster. Lines: The second argument in favor of baitcasting reels is the necessity to spool with braided or Dacron lines. Braid works great on baitcasters, but not so great on spinning reels. Why braid and not the more popular monofilament? Stretch, or more accurately the lack of it. Nylon monofilaments in salmon weights have thick diameters that kite in the current and worse—they stretch up to 40 percent. Monos’ rubber-band-like elasticity dampers sensitivity, reduces hook-setting power, camouflages soft strikes and has a spool memory that develops loops and slack. Braid lines, especially the new super braids, have no stretch, no memory, are half the diameter of comparable monofilaments, and are sensitive enough to detect a tentative pickup a hundred feet down. Typically, salmon bite when the jig is free-falling on slack line, wounded and vulnerable. Beginners rarely feel the resistance of a strike until they jig up, if the salmon hasn’t already dropped the metal

imposter. Experts watch for a twitch in the line and react to the slightest telegraphed vibration. Taut, no stretch braid will telegraph the lightest touch. Technique: Short and fluttering rod tip action is better than long and sweeping. When pounding for bottom-hugging chinook, drop the jig to the bottom on a straight line, retrieve a foot or two, pop the rod up and let the lure fall down. Avoid those picturesque five-foot sweeping swings of the rod tip. They’ll wear you out and create slack that hides light bites. I pop the rod tip up two or three feet with a quick flip and then drop the rod tip to follow the jig as it flutters down. Twitch it a few times at the bottom of the drop, dancing seductively, flashing just off bottom, then pop it again and flutter back. The key is to keep the jig dancing, bouncing, fluttering, falling, struggling. A motionless jig is just another chunk of metal litter on the bottom. Remember, a dancing jig is dinner. (Terry W. Sheely is the author of Washington State Fishing Guide 9th edition. www.TNScommunications.net)


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See all of BC... in one afternoon British Columbia. From our interactive Ocean Station to the First Peoples Gallery, we’ll keep you enthralled and entertained. March 2, 2011 to October 10, 2011 The Other Emily Redefining Emily Carr She is known as Canada’s greatest woman artist, but how well do we know the real Emily Carr? This exhibition will shake off the stubborn stereotypes that have come to characterize the iconic artist.

Visit www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca or call 1-888-447-7977 Belleville and Government, on Victoria’s Inner Harbour

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Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes By Michael Fagin

A Resort For All Seasons

Lake view seating allow guests to enjoy this peaceful setting of Lake Neva on the scenic main lodge deck.

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The popular expression, “location, location, location,” could have been invented for Lakedale Resort, a gem with a four-star location no matter which season you choose to visit. Lakedale is located on San Juan Island, part of Washington’s San Juan archipelago. The first of four stars applies because of the intrinsic beauty of the San Juan Islands. These islands boast panoramic views of the Olympic Mountains and the ocean to the west and Mount Baker to the east. The Rain Shadow phenomenon on San Juan Island earns the second star. The moisture-laden air that blows over the ocean brings much of the rain to


Aerial view of Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes on San Juan Island near Roche Harbor, WA

the Olympics so by the time the air reaches the San Juan Islands it is relatively dry. The islands receive 72 percent less rainfall than the Washington coastal town of Forks and 24 percent less than Seattle. The third star is also related to the weather: a typical summer forecast is for sunny skies and highs in the 70s. Winter temperatures rarely fall below freezing and snow is unusual. The name of the resort gives away the final star: Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes. The three lakes are Neva Lake, Dream Lake and Fish Hook Lake.

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Classic Sailing Charters Enjoy the Scenic Beauty, Whales and Wildlife aboard our Traditional Sailing Craft from Friday Harbor in the San Juan Islands Aerial view of Lakedale Lodge and surrounding three lakes, Neva Lake, Dream Lake and Fish Hook Lake.

The lakes warm up quickly on summer days, making swimming one of the most popular sports. At Lakedale, guests can rent boats and try their luck at fishing. Neva Lake is stocked with Kamloops and Rainbow trout. Dream Lake and Fish Hook Lake have resident widemouth bass. I had never heard of Kamloops trout, so thought I would satisfy my curiosity with a little research. I discovered this innocent fish has caused much controversy in the scientific community. At one time, the Kamloops trout was thought to be a separate species from the Rainbow trout. Now that the controversy has

360.378.2224 www.sanjuanspike.com

View of Lakedale Lodge from the Canvas Cabin campground on the opposite side of Lake Neva. The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes offers a variety of overnight accommodations featuring luxurious, elegant rustic furnishings. Top left, Interior of Log Cabin sitting room; Top Right, Vintage Airstream campsite; Middle left, Canvas Cabin campsite; Middle right, Main lodge lobby; Bottom left, Spacious interior of Canvas Cabin; Bottom right, Interior main lodge guestroom.

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been settled, the Kamloops trout is included as part of the Rainbow trout family of fish. Because the Kamloops trout spawns in the cooler waters of British Columbia, it is considered to be stronger and to have more stamina than the Rainbow Trout – an interesting piece of fish trivia for sportsmen. Imagine catching a Kamloops trout in the heat of a summer day and then going inside and cooling off in an

your gateway to

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The resort is surrounded by 82 scenic acres, providing guests with a range of outdoor activities including hiking trails, nature-watching, playing horseshoes, barbecuing, making s’mores and more. Airstream trailer. The resort has two refurbished Airstreams, which are in vogue now. Airstreams first appeared in the 1930s, and 60 percent of them are still on the road. Back to our fantasy: Imagine cold drinks waiting for you after your shower. Maybe someone would be kind enough to clean and cook that trout for you. Imagine sitting outside enjoying your fresh trout with your own waterfront view. This fantasy becomes reality every summer day for some lucky fisherman at Lakedale. If, rather than the comfort of a classic trailer or a room in the main lodge, you’re looking for a real camping experience, you may want to “rough it.” You can choose to stay in the canvas cabin sites with a queen bed, comfortable sofas, tables and chairs. Did I say roughing it? Well, there isn’t any electricity in these sites nor is there running water. A one-minute walk is necessary to use these facilities. If you don’t have time to cook breakfast, hot drinks and a continental breakfast are a short walk away at the main lodge. Lakedale also has a general store to stock up on any items you forgot to bring.

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The 10-room lodge offers cozy and romantic single or double guestrooms with lake views.

The resort lodge features a spacious outdoor patio with a fireplace, perfect for enjoying morning coffee or a refreshing glass of wine from San Juan Vineyards at sunset.

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If you’re temped to call this experience camping, it’s time to learn a new term: glamping. As you might suspect, this hybrid word combines glamor and camping, and is thought to have originated in England. If you decide that glamping isn’t your cup of tea and you still want to do some old-fashioned camping, there are many “real” campsites spread among Lakedale’s eighty-two acres. Summer seems to come and go quickly in the Northwest, but autumn is a wonderful time to visit the island. There are fewer crowds then and you can enjoy the wine harvest as well as viewing the striking autumn foliage. We enjoyed the view of Neva Lake from our bedroom, relaxed next to the fireplace in the Lodge, and did some power walking outside in the crisp fall air. Winter has its own specialties on the Island. It is a perfect place for a family reunion or to get together with close friends. For larger gatherings the Lodge is available, or for smaller groups the 3-bedroom lake house makes a nice home away from home. There are many things to do on San Juan Island during winter: the Whale Museum in Friday Harbor is open or you can drive to the San Juan National Historical Park where the visitor center in American Camp is open year round. This park commemorates the 1859 British and United States Border dispute over the San Juan Islands, known as the Pig War because the only casualty was an unfortunate pig. Spring brings whale watching and beginning in May it’s in full swing. Also in May, the islands are abloom with wildflowers. With the weather warming up, it’s a perfect season to find out if glamping is for you. The beauty of Lakedale? You have many choices in this four-star locale and all of them are excellent. It’s simply a matter of deciding which one is best for you and your family.


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The rustic forest setting adds to the comfortable country ambiance of this secluded San Juan Island restaurant.

Inside and outside seating serving creative Northwest cuisine since 1975.

Duck Soup Inn

By Michael Fagin

The Duck Soup Inn stirred our curiosity, so my wife Elizabeth and I decided to do some internet research. We quickly discovered that the Duck Soup Inn was neither the Marx Brothers film nor the sitcom Duct Soup. Taking my internet search skills a step further, we hit the jackpot! Rachel Ray, media food celeb, had visited the Duck Soup Inn on San Juan Island to film a segment for her show on the Food Network. If it was good enough for Rachel, it was certainly good enough for us. Our appetites revved up, we went the short distance—about 500 yards—from the Lakedale Resort at Three Lakes. The full parking lot at Duck Soup Inn was another positive

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curry-rubbed roasted duck breast with sweet spice fig chutney, a very light choice. Elizabeth selected Lopez Island lamb. As we sampled each other’s food, picking a favorite was a tough task, but we finally agreed on the duck–no offense to the good folks of neighboring Lopez Island. Chef and owner, Gretchen Allison, joined us after dinner, insisting that we try her homemade sorbet duo. Unable to resist flavors and scents reminiscent sign that we’d made the right choice. of her childhood, Elizabeth indulged Seated at a table next to the cozy fireplace, in gingerbread with ginger ice cream, the inn’s romantic butterscotch sauce, ambiance immediately surrounded us. whipped cream and Seasonal menus of pecans. Our server delivered fresh Pacific seafood, homemade sourThe Duck Soup Inn island produce, closes its doors at dough bread spread homegrown herbs, and the end of October with a compound the best quality meats each year to allow butter of garlic, and poultry. Gretchen and Patthyme, and a touch of anchovies, followed by a delicious rick, her significant other and resident bread maker, to travel to countries green tomato soup made from local such as Viet Nam, Brazil, Chile, and ingredients. Costa Rica, where Gretchen collects The main course was an easy recipes to try at the Duck Soup Inn choice for us both. I decided on when she returns for another season. the inn’s patron bird and selected


Washington’s Pampered Oysters By Allen Cox

“Oysters are the most tender and delicate of all seafoods. They stay in bed all day and night. They never work or take exercise, are stupendous drinkers, and wait for their meals to come to them.” – The Pampered Oyster by Hector Bolitho, 1960 Matt Bulldis, third generation oyster farmer and co-owner of National Fish and Oyster Company, pulls on his rubber boots and hits the green, slime-covered beach with a bucket of Pacific seedlings, taking advantage of low tide to sow a new crop. From

Learn from a seasoned oyster farmer

Matt Bulldis owner of National Fish and Oyster

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Fresh Oysters at Olympia Farmer’s Market.

Samish Bay Pacifics Baked in Champagne Dressing.

Fresh Pacific Oysters with Cucumber-Jalapeno Salsa at Water Street Cafe.

Pacific Oysters on the half shell ready to be baked and served.

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the beach, Mt. Rainier stands in full view. “These are my half-shell oyster that I call Nisqually Sweets,” he says. He is farming a vast 300 acres of tidelands adjacent to Nisqually National Wildlife Refuge, hoping the Nisqually Sweet will be Washington’s new oyster bar star. The cold-waters from Alaska to Northern California yield some of the finest oysters in the world, and Washington in particular, endowed with numerous sheltered bays and inlets, dominates the U.S. farm-raised oyster market. Oyster farms pepper the state’s inland waters, which cleanly divide into five regions: Willapa Bay in the state’s southwestern corner, North Puget Sound, the San Juan Islands, South Puget Sound and Hood Canal. Within these regions, dozens of oyster-growing appellations, not unlike wine appellations with their unique terroirs, lend variations in size, physical appearance, and flavor profile to their resident oysters. Oysters take on the characteristics of the area where they are grown. Besides the method of cultivation—suspended culture, rack-grown, beach, or any combination of the three—many variables define the oysters in any given appellation. Those include water temperature, depth, salinity, minerals, and the availability of nutrients. Regardless of appellation or growing method, the result is a protein-packed, vitaminrich, 10-calorie powerhouse. Top of the Crop Washington oyster farms have been the dominant force in the shucked oyster market for more than 150 years, and the half-shell market for 30. Today, the half-shell market is where it’s at and Washington has become a major global competitor. There are five species cultivated in North America, and Washington farmers produce Protective Mesh at National Fish and Oyster.

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Oyster shell piles surrounding the Willapa Bay Interpretive Center.

them all. According to experts, such as Rowan Jacobsen, author of A Geography of Oysters, a handful of oysters rise to the top among Washington’s appellations for quality and taste. If you are nervous about slurping your first raw oyster, meet the gentle Kumamoto, a relative of the Pacific oyster and a transplant from Japan. It has no fishy or overpowering taste, but leaves a sweet melon-like pres-

ence on the palate. The Kumo, as it’s known among chefs, is a Kumo—one cultivated in Samish Bay will be similar to one from South Puget Sound with subtle variations, courtesy of its environment. Another star is the Penn Cove Select, a Pacific oyster grown in the North Sound appellations of Penn Cove on Whidbey Island and Samish Bay. Like the Kumo, it carries a light, fresh

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flavor, but one that is slightly salty with refreshing hints of cucumber. The only West Coast native, the tiny Olympia oyster, is persnickety and demanding. Besides cultivating Kumos and Pacifics, Lisa Bishop of Little Skookum Shellfish Growers carries on the tradition of cultivating the Olympia. “Olympias are hit or miss,” says Lisa. “It requires constant submersion and can’t be exposed to the air, a difficult demand in a bay that entirely empties of water twice a day.” On the palate, the Olympia dazzles with its complex flavor structure – buttery, coppery, and surprisingly earthy for a creature that spends its life submerged. Another notable is Eld Inlet’s Chelsea Gem. “It’s a small, deep-cupped Pacific that’s full of meat,” according to John Lentz, owner of the relatively small operation, Chelsea Farms. “We use a unique process to grow our oysters,” he says. That process begins with rack-growing, in which they place the young oysters in protective racks to

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keep them off the muck and hold predators at bay. To finish developing, they are transferred to bag suspension. This off-the-beach cultivation gives the oyster access to plenty of nutrients. With only four to six months from seed to oyster, the result is a small, meaty oyster that’s sweet and briny with low salinity and a coppery aftertaste. A transplant from the oyster beds of the east coast has found the conditions of Washington’s Totten Inlet ideal. In fact, this oyster, the Totten Inlet Virginica, won the distinction of best-tasting oyster at the East Coast Shellfish Growers Association competition in 2008. The state’s largest grower, Taylor Shellfish near Shelton, cultivates this champ, with its full, briny taste that leaves a hint of minerals on the tongue. Down on the Farm Environmental groups hail the oyster as one of the most sustainable seafoods on the planet, and oyster

growers typically embrace environmentally sound farming practices. A pristine environment yields a greater quality and number of oysters. Any runoff from uphill communities ends up downstream, and, although oysters are fierce filtering machines, even they can tolerate only so much. It’s no wonder oyster farmers cite upland development and land-use as one of their greatest worries. In oyster farming, both prosperity and peril have ridden in and out with the tide. The industry hails back to a generations-old tradition when a plate of Olympia Oysters exported from Willapa Bay to San Francisco during the gold rush would sell for $100 a plate. With a short Kenmore Air flight over Washington’s shorelines and inland bays, it’s easy to see why oyster farmers possess a fervent love of place and immense pride in their product. “Our bay is the best place on earth,” says Lisa Bishop of Little Skookum.


SLU:

Neighborhood Happenings

Seattle’s South Lake Union Neighborhood, home of Kenmore Air’s Seaplane Terminal.

A Serious Man... About Pie By Allen Cox

Chef Tony Catini, at Serious Pie.

Celebrated chef and Seattle restaurateur Tom Douglas has a keen knack for attracting creative chefs with star potential and letting them prove themselves in his restaurant kitchens. Chef Tony Catini heads up the culinary team at the newest Tom Douglas Restaurant, Serious Pie, in Seattle’s South Lake Union district (not to be confused with the original Serious Pie location, which is still in full swing). Who isn’t a pushover for an expertly crafted pizza with unexpected artisan ingredients coexisting as a happy family bubbling away atop a crispy crust in a woodfire oven? Being a true pizzaphile myself, I couldn’t resist the opportunity to catch up with Chef Catini to learn if he can actually toss a crust. I ended up learning so much more. This young chef hails from Chicago where he began his restaurant career at age 14 as a dishwasher in—what else? —a pizza restaurant. Fast forward to Le

Cordon Bleu in Minneapolis, where he learned about much more than pizza. Those classic culinary skills serve him well in the Tom Douglas restaurant kitchens, where, even in a restaurant that specializes in pizzas, the ingredients, quality and culinary technique are key. At points in his restaurant career, Chef Catini has had the benefit of working on both sides of the kitchen door—both in the kitchen and as a server—so he understands what wows diners, and he delivers. What distinguishes the pizza at Seri-

ous Pie from others? “We have a very unique dough that was developed by and made by bakers,” Catini says. “Our head baker, Gwen LeBlanc, developed our dough recipe in an effort to create a breadier, but still crispy pizza dough. It also doesn’t hurt to have a beautiful woodfire oven and use the best toppings we can find.” The seasonal menu at Serious Pie favors produce from local farms when available, and Chef Catini makes 90 percent of the charcuterie in-house, ingredients he is extremely proud to use

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Historic Charm Romantic Ambiance Distinct Personality 58 spacious guestrooms and suites featuring kitchenettes• first class hospitality meeting space • European inspired spa • onsite espresso bar and bakery MENTION “HARBORS MAGAZINE” WHEN MAKING RESERVATIONS AND RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY BOTTLE OF NORTHWEST WINE TO ENJOY WITH YOUR STAY!

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on his pizzas. The special-recipe crust, local produce, house-made charcuterie and a woodfire oven made locally in Bellingham are the four elements that make Serious Pie’s pies, well, serious. A well-designed list of seasonal starters and desserts frame the pizza menu to offer a three-course dining experience that competes with the city’s best casual dining spots. These include savory treats, such as a composition of local beets, caramelized anchovies and pistachios, and sweets, such as a plate featuring cannoli, passionfruit, satsumas and candied fennel. When customers are in a hurry for a quick bite or waiting for a table in the dining room, Chef Catini offers a great option for nibblers in his Prosciutto Bar. “At the moment we are doing handshaved Prosciutto d’Parma,” says Catini. “But we do have plans to eventually use our own prosciuttos. Other than that, you can get small bites that rotate daily from house cured olives to mini-Panini sandwiches. Not to mention beautiful Italian and local wines.” Serious Pie’s menu has some artfully imagined and crafted pies – from simple fixins’, such as fresh mozzerella and the chef-revered san marzano tomatoes, to sublime toppings found in yellowfoot chanterelles and truffle cheese. But you can’t go wrong with the Chef’s personal favorite. “Hands down, it’s the soft egg pizza with house made guanciale and local arugula,” says Catini. “I am rarely awake to eat breakfast, so this is the closest thing I can get to it.” For the uninitiated, guanciale is a salt and pepper cured, unsmoked Italian bacon made from pig’s jowls; it characteristically has a tender texture and a delightfully strong flavor. Besides valuing locally sourced, quality ingredients in his kitchen, Chef Catini sums up his food philosophy with one simple principle: “When in doubt, add pork.” When in the South Lake Union district, follow your nose to Serious Pie or find it at 401 Westlake N (at Harrison); (206) 436-0050; http://tomdouglas.com. 52

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Clean-up on CWB’s Waterway 4 By Dan Leach Recent visitors to The Center for Wooden Boats (CWB) at Seattle’s new Lake Union Park may have been a little confused when they walked up to Waterway 4 on the east side of the park. Instead of the CWB’s usually welcoming boathouse, boatshop, docks and

again. Juvenile salmon and other wildlife rejoiced in their improved Lake Union habitat. Private donations and grants from Seattle, King County and the State of Washington funded this important environmental and civic project. Companies such as PND Engineers of Seattle, Pile Contractors of Issaquah, Northern Marine Salvage and Development of Seattle, PN Best Company of Redmond, the Fife office of Skyline Steel and Van Dyke Heavy Hauling of

Waterfront dock renovation at the Center for Wooden Boats, on Seattle’s South Lake Union.

boats, visitors found a huge industrial barge with a towering crane. The crane crew pulled old creosote-soaked pilings out of the waterway one by one, and installed new steel piles. Visitors were witnessing more than a half-million dollars in improvements to the CWB’s facilities, docks and utilities. Students from the Divers Institute of Technology removed decades of trash and debris from the bottom of the waterway. Then, a crew of staff and volunteers moved the boathouse, boatshop, docks and boats back into position, ready to welcome visitors

Seattle donated the barge, crane, steel pilings and skilled engineers for the job. “Without the generosity and support of these companies it would have been hard to afford the high costs of doing construction in the environmentally sensitive waterway,” said Betsy Davis, Executive Director, CWB. “Over and over our friends and supporters have answered the call when we needed help to ensure that the CWB will be here for generations to come.” The improvements ensure that the CWB can continue to serve as a


gathering place where maritime history comes alive every time visitors walk the docks, rent a row or sailboat, take a class, board one of the classic boats for a Sunday free ride, and re-connect with the Northwest’s small craft heritage. “This is the place Seattle comes to get on the water,” said Davis, “the destination for school children and tourists looking to learn about the region’s maritime history. It’s the place you come to rent a rowboat to float away from your worries, the place for native people to celebrate their traditional home on the water’s edge. It’s a place that creates community in South Lake Union.” The CWB was founded in Seattle in 1977 by Dick Wagner, his wife Colleen and their friends to ensure that the small wooden boats, northwest maritime history and boat repair and building skills that shaped Northwest culture and industry are preserved and passed along to future generations. The CWB serves the public at its original home in South Lake Union and at a second campus at Cama Beach State Park 65 miles north of Seattle on Camano Island, giving handson experiences in a way few museums can. The CWB puts the boats, the oar and paddle, the sails, and the plane and chisel in the hands of people who walk down the ramp to visit. That experience is why more than two million visitors have come to the CWB since it moved to South Lake Union in 1983, why 2,000 people have joined as members, why more than 1,000 volunteers come to the CWB every year to offer their time and why more and more companies are signing up for business membership at the CWB. When you want to do something on the water here in the Northwest, whether it’s learning to sail, build a wooden boat, hold a wedding rehearsal dinner, or show a potential new employee why they should move to Seattle, the CWB is a great place to be.

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• Colorful sea life in award winning exhibits • Talks and demonstrations • Special programs & events

Open Daily • Downtown Waterfront — Pier 59 206.386.4300 seattleaquarium.org

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Kayaking the Southern Gulf Islands A Dream Destination for Novice and Experienced Paddlers By Rebecca Agiewich The late August sun warmed my shoulders as I kayaked alongside the towering sandstone cliffs on Valdes Island. Above me loomed swirling designs, jagged edges and overhangs carved by years of erosion and winter storms. My kayak bobbed gently in the still water. I alternated between admiring the natural sculpture above and the lustrous purple ochre starfish at the base of the cliffs below. Nearby, harbour seals splashed through the smooth surface of Pylades Channel. A blue heron bickered briefly with a Glaucous Gull before erupting into flight. “I will remember this moment in the depth of the gloomy Seattle winter,� I thought. Then I closed my eyes and committed the scene to memory: the balmy sun, the glassy green sea and the Vancouver Island Range gleaming in the distance. My paddling trip had started in much less idyllic conditions on a rainy 54

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Exploring out of this world sandstone rock formations along the shoreline of DeCourcey Island, BC.


Relaxing by the fire at the end of a fabulous day of paddling.

afternoon the day before. Six of us, on an expedition with outfitter Gabriola Sea Kayaking, launched from the shores of Gabriola Island into the False Narrows. The Narrows is a halfmile-wide channel that separates Gabriola Island from nearby Mudge Island (whose residents are known locally as “Mudgekins”). The first step in our journey was to cross the narrows, which on this blustery day, frothed with lively chop. I was particularly glad to be riding in a double kayak with our confidenceinspiring guide, Corey St. Luke, who’s been guiding trips with Gabriola Sea Kayaking since the mid-90s. “I love my job!” yelled Corey from the rear cockpit as rain slapped our faces and salty spray spritzed our boat. Thus began my three-day kayaking journey in the southern Gulf Islands. We would explore the nearby De Courcy Group, a set of beautiful islands sheltered by Gabriola on one

side and Valdes Island on the other. Its protected position makes the De Courcy Group an ideal location for novice paddlers. Among these islands, only Gabriola has ferry service; the others are accessible by boat, kayak or floatplane. Most islands in the De Courcy Group are sparsely populated, leaving lots of wild shoreline for kayakers to explore. Even Gabriola, the third most populous of the Gulf Islands, feels utterly pastoral and peaceful. As you drive Gabriola’s two main roads, you’re likely to see more sheep than cars. The nine-mile-long island nonetheless boasts a vibrant arts scene, a collection of top-notch restaurants, and natural beauty galore. Around every corner, it seems, you stumble upon another stunning marine park. Though only 20 minutes from Nanaimo Harbor by ferry, Gabriola—the northernmost of the southern Gulf Islands—is still off the beaten track for

tourists and paddlers alike. Which, of course, leaves all the more splendid solitude for those who do venture out this way.

A breakfast of blackberries, local lamb, and old fashioned sausage.

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Scenic day and protected paddling in Pylades Channel, the Gulf Islands, BC.

Spectacular paddling beneath sandstone cliffs on Valdez Island, BC.

A romantic setting for exploring the beach on Valdez Island, BC.

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“Whoa, that was a steepie!” exclaimed Corey, as a two-foot wave lifted us up and slapped us down on the slate-grey water. My clammy hands gripped the paddle tighter. To calm my beginner’s nerves, I asked Corey about the biggest waves he’d ever paddled in. “Ten feet,” he told me. “These are nothing,” he added in a teasing but kind way. My death grip on the paddle loosened. I believed him. Theoretically, at least. Behind us, the rest of the group paddled in single kayaks along the west side of De Courcy Island, about four miles from where we’d started. Fretted sandstone bluffs rose to our left, embellished with intricate patterns. An occasional house peered out from the top of the bluff. Though the rain had stopped, a stiff breeze still blew. About 45 minutes later, our damp crew came ashore at Pirate’s Cove Provincial Park on the south side of De Courcy Island. Like many of the neighboring islands, De Courcy has a rich history. An ancient midden (or shell refuse heap) underlies the present camping area, providing evidence that native people lived here more than 3,000 years ago. More recent history on De Courcy Island was particularly colorful. A cult leader calling himself “Brother XII” persuaded thousands of followers to come with him to De Courcy in the 1920s and 30s while surrendering to him all their worldly goods. He and


Experience a Higher Standard

his mistress, the evocatively named “Madame Zee,” eventually fled on the colony’s boat in 1933, never to be seen again. After a comfortable night spent camped on the park’s tent platforms, we woke to a sunny morning. At last the Gulf Islands were delivering on their famed Mediterranean climate! Fortified by strong coffee, a porridge breakfast, and a leisurely stroll around the scenic park bluffs, we were on our

Sea kayaker’s paradise.

way to Valdes Island for a day trip. On this calm day, I happily took the helm of a single kayak, so much sportier – and tippier – than the slow but stable double. Our route took us past Ruxton and Pylades Islands. The day grew

progressively warmer. An occasional osprey appeared in the trees, while oystercatchers gathered on the rocks, crimson beaks brilliant against their shiny black plumage. By lunchtime, we reached our destination: a gorgeous white shell beach on the west side of Valdes Island called Blackberry Point. This spot is also an ancient native site, and is adjacent to a First Nations reserve. We sunned ourselves and went for a dip. Corey – a trained chef – picked wild salal berries that he would later put into a delicious doughy appetizer called bannock. As I munched on my peanut butter and jelly sandwich, I was already daydreaming about what Corey would cook for dinner. Last night, we’d feasted on sockeye salmon in a cream, corn, fennel and caper sauce. A lemon-blueberry cake had capped off the meal. After two lazy hours on Blackberry Point, we hopped back into our kayaks. A summery stillness enveloped us as we headed to the sandstone cliffs. Except for the nearby seals, barely a ripple disturbed the waters of the Pylades Channel as we took snapshots of each other under the ornate rock faces. Now, when the Seattle weather gets gloomy, all I have to do is pull out those photos. In an instant, I’m transported to the salty world of the southern Gulf Islands, where sandstone reaches to the sunny sky and the fragments of ancient shells crunch beneath your feet on a serene white beach.

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Spring Flyaways Clam Cannery Hotel & Spa, Port Townsend, WA

The structure that houses Port Townsend’s new Clam Cannery Hotel & Spa has a distinct history in this old Victorian seaport. It was built in 1885 as a waterfront warehouse and later put to use as a clam cannery for Guilford Packing Company. From the 1920s to the 60s, Guilford was a major producer of canned clams and was an important seasonal employer for Port Townsend residents. Seattle’s Ivar Haglund, owner of Ivar’s Restaurants, purchased the cannery in the 1960s and, shortly after, moved his clam operation elsewhere. The old cannery sat empty and derelict for four decades, a relic of Port Townsend’s glory days as an important commercial seaport. When new owner Kevin Harris began the cannery’s renovation in 2004, his plans included a state-of-the-art all-suite, boutique hotel and event facility that represented the flavor of the Northwest and reflected the community of artists and craftsmen in the local area. In restoring this historic building, Harris contracted local artists, carpenters and craftsmen for every element of inte-

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By A.J. Hunt

rior and structural design. In each suite, guests are surrounded by brick, handforged steel, hammered copper, concrete floors and countertops, hand-blown glass fixtures, full gourmet kitchens with custom cabinets and top of the line appliances, all designed and created by local artists and craftsmen. This historic brick and mortar structure has always blended into Port Townsend’s

Victorian waterfront, but don’t let the rustic, washed brick exterior fool you. Today, this newly renovated building houses an exquisite interior design that can compete with any five-star property. Each suite comes equipped with a large flat screen HDTV, plush designer bed-

ding, cozy furniture for lounging and a full kitchen and dining area. And the free Wi-Fi comes in handy on those days when the Pt. Townsend weather is not so accommodating and you prefer to enjoy the comforts of your suite. The spacious suites sleep from two to five guests and have generous common areas for meals and socializing before venturing out to explore Port Townsend and the surrounding Olympic Peninsula. The hotel also has a 4000 sq. ft. event space, perfect for weddings and reunions. The entire hotel can be rented out for weddings and events with overnight accommodations for up to 16 guests, including the bride and groom suite. Suites offer unobstructed views of the Cascades and Olympic Mountains, Whidbey Island and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The exceptional water views sport distant cargo and cruise ships entering Puget Sound, sailboats and the new Chetzemoka Ferry which sails between Whidbey Island and Port Townsend. In town you’ll find easily accessible city parks to enjoy for picnics, recreation or quiet reflection. The new Northwest Maritime Center, the newly renovated Point Hudson Marina, which offers great moorage slips, restaurants and harbor tour services all within walking distance. Port Townsend shares the Olympic Peninsula with Olympic National Park, Hood Canal and Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary. Hiking, beachcombing, kayaking, sailing, art galleries and unique shopping are all part of the local scene. Harris’ next project is the restoration of the dock beside the hotel; he is presently working on permits to accommo-


Nine passenger wheeled Caravan

Ten passenger turbo Otter seaplane

date floatplanes to drop off visitors on the Port Townsend waterfront, but for now you can easily fly to the Port Townsend area on Kenmore Air, landing at docks in Port Ludlow and Port Hadlock, or you

can charter a flight to let you off right on the beach where access is permitted. For an easy alternative approach to your scenic Olympic Peninsula weekend flyaway, you can catch a Kenmore flight

out of Seattle’s Boeing Field directly to Port Angeles, rent a car to explore the entire Peninsula and end your day in Port Townsend in the luxurious comforts of the Clam Cannery Hotel & Spa.

Jupitor Ranch, Gabriola Island, BC

Sometimes you can judge a book by its cover: One look at Jupiter Ranch on Gabriola Island and you know it’s not your typical bed and breakfast. For starters, you’ll notice the startlingly contemporary design and architecture. Built in a style that proprietor Sylvie Milman calls “pastoral modern,” the low-slung, eco-friendly building features huge glass windows along its south-facing walls, and a striking red, white and

black color scheme. Light pours into the spacious interior, flooding the state-ofthe-art kitchen and the two sumptuous guest suites. No tacky tchotchkes sit around collecting dust; instead, bright, contemporary artwork decorates the space, much of it by Milman and other artists from Gabriola’s thriving arts community. Milman’s studio is only metres from the main building—walk by it and you’ll glimpse a raft of easels and explo-

By Rebecca Agiewich

sions of colour. Visiting artists take up residency there and teach classes. Milman even encourages guests to book time in the studio. On Gabriola, you can kayak the protected waters, bike its tranquil roads or visit one of its many beautiful marine parks. Didn’t bring your bike? Milman, who’s known for her hospitality, might even let you borrow hers. Take it for a quick spin to nearby Drumbeg

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Provincial Park with its expansive views of Gabriola Passage. If you want some beach time, a private trail leads right from Jupiter Ranch to the water’s edge. Only a 20-minute ferry ride from Nanaimo Harbour, Gabriola is still off the radar of most tourists. When you step off the ferry, what you notice first is the silence. But don’t let

that fool you. Gabriola might be peaceful but it’s not sleepy. The island is home to a high concentration of artists whose works can be found in delightful galleries such as Gabriola Artworks, which also serves deliciously strong espresso to enjoy as you browse. At mealtime—if you’re not too full

from one of Jupiter Ranch’s famous breakfasts­ —you have plenty of restaurant options. The Silva Bay Resort and Pub, on the south end of the island, serves handmade pasta dishes to die for (among many other mouthwatering selections), in a beautiful waterfront setting with a deck overlooking Silva Bay. Islanders also highly recommend The Old A Frame, Mad Rona’s and Robert’s Place. When it’s time to settle in back at Jupiter Ranch, Milman ensures that you won’t be wanting for anything. Heated hardwood floors, clawfoot tubs and gas fireplaces are just a few of the amenities you’ll find in your room (along with a welcoming plate of crudités when you arrive). Wi-fi and cable TV connect you to the outside world, while incredibly comfy king-size beds guarantee you won’t want to get out of bed in the morning. Undoubtedly though, the scent of fresh pastries and strong coffee will eventually lure you out, along with Gabriola Island’s many charms.

Fairholme Manor, Victoria, B.C. A short drive from the Kenmore Air terminal in Victoria’s Inner Harbour, you’ll find Fairholme Manor. This five-star boutique inn is located on its own acre of land a stone’s throw from Government House in the elegant, oldworld Rockland district. If Victoria were a cake, Fairholme Manor would be its delectably sweet icing. Innkeeper and cookbook author Sylvia Main acquired the 1885 Italianate mansion eleven years ago and successfully created one of the Northwest’s most acclaimed inns. “The mansion was a private residence,” Main says. “We updated everything and, in the process, uncovered many of the building’s original features, which we preserved and incorporated into our design.” Main wasn’t going for a Victorian

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B&B, but instead a European inn with clean lines and modern features. She has combined contemporary and period design elements and furnishings, resulting in uncluttered suites and common areas that offer a sophisticated yet comfortable luxury, a perfect base from which to explore this charming city. When asked which of the six suites her guests tend to prefer, Main replies: “Many people ask for the Olympic Room or the Grand Suite, but others who want to spend less love The French Country Garden Room. I have repeat guests who have stayed in every room.” No matter which suite you call home, one thing that draws guests to Fairholme manor is the quiet. With no busy street or traffic noise, and with the inn situated in an acre of gardens, birdsong is likely the most prevalent sound you’ll encounter. The Rockland district is perfect for strolling; the inn is only a five-minute walk to Craigdarroch Castle and Greater Victoria Art Gallery, two of the city’s best attractions.

While enjoying the garden sur- terminal, or if you prefer to exroundings and ocean and mountain ploreMagazine Inner Harbour1 and Downtown Poets Cove Harbor Fall outlines.indd 8/19/2010 3:43:08 PM views, Fairholme Manor’s guests are Victoria upon arrival, they will pick also lucky to have one of Canada’s best- up and transfer your luggage and welselling cookbook authors at the helm come you at the inn at your leisure. in the kitchen. Main’s book, Fabulous http://www.fairholmemanor.com. Fairholme Breakfasts and Brunches, available at the inn or at major outlets, is stuffed with a collection of the inn’s palate-pleasing recipes you can duplicate at home. In Fairholme Manor’s light-filled dining room, guests savor the true tastes of Vancouver Island. Main cultivates her own organic vegetable and herb garden on the inn’s grounds. Fresh organic eggs are delivered to the kitchen door, and all ingredients that make it into the kitchen’s celebrated recipes are locally sourced. “I’m working on a new book,” says Main. “It will be released in the Spring of 2012 and will include more recipes and sections about entertaining.” Your hosts at Fairholme Manor will pick you up at Kenmore Air’s The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine

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Flying with Kenmore Air

Things you need to know... Baggage Allowances

At Kenmore Air we have big hearts but little airplanes! Our baggage limits and penalties for overweight bags are dictated solely by safety of flight concerns, which are more acute on our size aircraft than on the big jets. Seaplane passengers are permitted up to 24 pounds of baggage per person. All items are weighed and count toward the limit, including purses, laptops, backpacks, and so on. Additionally, no single baggage item can exceed 10 x 16 x 24 inches. On Kenmore Air Express wheeled-plane flights, passengers may check baggage totaling up to 50 pounds and may hand-carry one personal item (purse, backpack, etc.) of up to 20 pounds. The checked item may not exceed 62 linear inches, and the personal item may not exceed 36 linear inches. Overweight baggage will be carried on either service if capacity is available for $1 per pound, and oversized baggage will be accommodated, if possible, for a $10 per piece penalty. However, overweight/oversized baggage is always at risk of being bumped unless extra baggage space has been reserved and pre-paid in advance.

Sea-Tac Shuttles

Kenmore Air operates ground shuttles between SeattleTacoma International Airport and its three Seattlearea terminals. These shuttles are complimentary for connections to year-round routes and available at a nominal charge for connections to seasonal routes. Shuttles must be reserved in advance. When booking flights online, select “Seattle-Tacoma International” as your origin or destination, and our system will automatically book the correct combination of shuttle and flight for you. Shuttles pick up from Sea-Tac at Door 00 in the Scheduled Airporter waiting area at the far south end of Baggage Claim. Please be at Door 00 with your claimed baggage at least 10 minutes before the scheduled shuttle departure time. The shuttle driver will always make a departure announcement over the PA system, but passengers are ultimately responsible for getting on the shuttle by departure time. When connecting to another airline from Sea-Tac, be sure to schedule your Kenmore Air flight and shuttle to arrive at Sea-Tac with sufficient time (per your major airline’s recommendation) to check in, check baggage and clear security. A minimum of 90 minutes is generally recommended.

Customs & Immigration

Charter Service

Kenmore Air offers a lot of scheduled flights to a lot of places, but sometimes, you really need to travel on your schedule, not ours. Or perhaps you need to go somewhere we don’t fly everyday. That’s what charters are for. With our large and diverse fleet of seaplanes and wheeled-aircraft, we’re able to offer customized flying throughout the Pacific Northwest. For a quote, call 866.435.9524 and ask for a charter specialist or send an e-mail to charters@KenmoreAir.com.

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With a handful of extremely limited exceptions, everyone flying internationally — regardless of citizenship or age — is required to have a current, valid passport book. Passport cards, NEXUS cards and so-called “enhanced driver licenses” are not valid for travel aboard Kenmore Air. Travelers should also be aware that some criminal offenses that are misdemeanors in the United States are considered felonies in Canada and can result in denial of entry. Driving under the influence of alcohol is a common example. Every traveler is responsible for making sure that they meet the requirements of international travel. Kenmore Air will accept no liability for cost or inconvenience arising from denial of entry into either the United States or Canada.


Check-in Times

Kenmore Air passengers enjoy a generally more relaxed traveling experience than the typical airline affords. Nevertheless, we do require check-in for all domestic flights 30 minutes prior to scheduled departure. Due to certain requirements of U.S. Customs & Border Protection, check-in for international flights is required 45 minutes prior to departure. Flights close for boarding 15 minutes prior to scheduled departure, which means that seats for passengers who haven’t checked in at that time may be released to stand-by passengers. Also, the flight may depart anytime after closing, even if it’s prior to scheduled departure. We like arriving early! For flights departing from unstaffed locations, like seaplane docks in the San Juan Islands or British Columbia, passengers should be ready to go at least 15 minutes prior to scheduled departure time to accommodate unforeseeable variations in flight time.

Reservations & Customer Service Reservations can be made online 24 hours a day, seven days a week at KenmoreAir.com, or call us tollfree seven days a week from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Pacific Time at 866.435.9524. For customer-service inquiries of an urgent nature, call our reservations line at 866.435.9524. For less timesensitive concerns, kudos or complaints, please e-mail us at feedback@KenmoreAir.com.

Alaska Airlines Partnership

Since April 2010, Kenmore Air has been a proud partner in the award-winning Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan. Passengers who are participants in the Alaska plan earn 250 miles each way on qualifying Kenmore Air flights, and miles can also be redeemed for free flights on either airline. For details on the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan, visit AlaskaAir.com/MileagePlan. In addition to the Mileage Plan partnership, Kenmore Air and Alaska Airlines (as well as Alaska’s regional affiliate, Horizon Air) have an interline ticketing agreement. This means that you can purchase singleticket itineraries between Kenmore Air destinations and more than 90 Alaska Airlines and Horizon Air cities across North America, including Hawaii. Besides the simplicity and convenience of making a single phone call or online booking, such joint itineraries also offer much more coordinated and accommodating customer service in the event of weather delays, misrouted baggage or other issues.

Terminal Locations Seattle Boeing Field 7277 Perimeter Road Seattle, WA 98108 Seattle Lake Union 950 Westlake Avenue N. Seattle, WA 98109 Kenmore Lake Washington 6321 NE 175th Street Kenmore, WA 98028 Port Angeles/Fairchild Airport 1404 West Airport Road Port Angeles, WA 98363 Local tel.: 360.452.6371

Friday Harbor Airport 800 Franklin Drive Friday Harbor, WA 98250 Local tel.: 360.378.1067 Eastsound/Orcas Island Airport 847 Schoen Lane Eastsound, WA 98245 Local tel.: 360.376.1407 Victoria Inner Harbour 1234 Wharf Street Victoria, BC V8W 3H9 Local tel.: 250.384.2411

Interline bookings can be made only through Alaska Airlines. If your travel plans include an Alaska Airlines or Horizon Air city, we strongly encourage you to book an interline ticket by visiting AlaskaAir.com or calling 800.ALASKAAIR.

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HARBORS Connecting People, Places, Adventure and Lifestyle.

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Nanook Lodge

Spring 2011

Sport Fishing Discovery Islands

Salmon Jigging

Olympic National Park Kayaking

Southern Gulf Islands, BC

Lakedale Resort San Juan Islands, WA

HARBORS Spring 2011  

The Kenmore Air Destination Magazine