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WHAT’S

DESIGN?

Lin Junhao 3302440

GRAP 2432

Susan Curtis Communication Design History & Theory B


Introduction

Climate .egnahC

We live in a world of different culture, from different background and understanding. However, there is factor that keeps us in unison, we are all visual creature. Consumerism culture is driven by sales advertisement and often we fall victim to purchasing a product that we don’t really need. How do they do it? Some magical powder? No. It is an intricate mixture of design and brand messages that constantly bombard us from the streets to our television screens at home. We will focus on the portion of Design, What is Design? How does it influence and change perspective?

Smoking.

As organised thematically in the book “Design Literacy” by Steven Heller and Karen Promeroy; Allworth Press, New York ISBN: 1-880559-76-5. 1. Persuasion 2. Language 3. Identity 4. Information 5. Iconography 6. Style 7. Media 8. Commerce Visual examples will be used from the two topics – Smoking and Climate Change will be used to illustrate each different point.


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We will first start off with,

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Persuasion

It triggers off a cause and effect that you can experience or see visually in terms of this poster. The intended message is cleverly hidden amongst the glow-in-the-dark ink, only visible when switched off. Audience will probably get a pleasant surprise, and who knows, they might even switch off the lights more often from then on.

Credits: NRDC (National Resources Defense Council): Turn off the lights, Nancy Jeng, Matt Crum -The University of Texas at Austin 3


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Language Only the ones who study or understand design knows the design language. The rule of thirds, negative spaces, colour theory, visual references and hierarchy – these are the principal of good design that every designer should know when crafting a piece of work. Usually in a grid system bounded by web codes, websites are adapting new forms of coding techniques to achieve designs that are extraordinary some being able to stimulate print effects.

Credits: http://www.thecriticalmass.de/ 5


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Identity

A leader and frontier of climate change. World economic leaders gather in a bid to counter climate change phenomenon. Identity gives life to a community and masses are able to recognise that certain colour, shape or text they see in a small square. Through the choice of colours, font, shape and style, a brand is defined.

Credits: COP15 COPENHAGEN, United Nations Climate Change Conference 2009. www.cop15.dk, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark 7


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Information When an article is text heavy, chances are an average reader will skimmed through the text and miss out certain important points. Infographics is an example used by designers to simplify things. It allows visual readers to follow through illustrated examples of a given topic like climate change, with millions of information transmitted at the same time, it’s always good to simplify things with a good graphic.

Credits: “The Big Questions of Climate Change.” © 2009 Adolfo Arranz, http://www.perdigallos.com/graphics/16.html 9


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Iconography We grew up with this image. Found usually in our coke cans to food packaging, this has become a universal sign for the 3 R(s) –reuse, recycle and reduce. A graphic icon serves the purpose of communicating an action or idea clearly with strong and easily understandable visuals. Great icons are hard to remove from our bank of visual memory.

Credits: Recycling Symbol, http://www.mandmrecycling.com/images-atlanta-recycling/Recycle-symbol.png 11


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Style

It has no definite answer or dummy guide book to creating it. It is derived through time by a certain individual or group of like-minded people who strongly believes that a certain way of using colours, lines, images and shapes best brings out the intended message. A style differentiates one from another, like how one prefers to be dressed in loose clothing and one who prefers to wear body hugging apparels.

Credits: Ferdi Rizkiyanto Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License 13


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Media Easily read and creating an instant relation to the viewers. Design in mass communication requires in-depth understanding of the culture and behavior of the society. The American flag raised by the soldiers at Iwo Jima is being replaced by a tree. Both subject at different eras paints a totally different story. Worried about war previously and now the worry is all around us – missing trees.

Credits: Time Magazine Cover 2008 April 28, Arthur Houchstein 15


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Commerce It’s like killing two birds with one stone. Indirectly, this advertisement promotes steps to counter climate change. Protecting the animals, trees and the entire ecosystem the car drives amongst. On the other hand, it is selling their latest hybrid vehicle that is just off the factory line. Design as a marketing tool, it has to be easily read by customers to achieve the best sales results and saving the environment while doing so is always a bonus that many can relate to.

Credits: Honda Civic Hybrid: Dummies, Fischer Portugal, Lisbon http://adsoftheworld.com/media/print/honda_civic_hybrid_dummies?size=_original 17


Smoking.

Smoking. Next,

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Smoking.

Persuasion

This is self-explanatory. The footer notes often seen at the bottom of print ads now become the centre of attention for this campaign. Asking someone to do the wrong thing, for the right reasons at the end of the day.

Credits: BC Lung Association. TBWA\Vancouver, Canada 21


Smoking.

Language Clever use of visual play and the use of appropriate white spaces along with wonderful art direction created this visually stunning image of a death bed – by cigarettes. Initiating a sense of fear and shock for the smokers.

Credits: The Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation: Deathbed CHI&Partners, London, UK 23


Smoking.

Identity “Uncle! Marlboro 1 packet!”. If you step inside any convenience stall in Singapore and happened to be at the cashier, you’ll most likely hear that phrase from a person next to you. Strong colours, distinctive shapes and typeface defines Marlboro, always prominent on the shelves amongst it’s competitors. Giving consumers that nicotine rush.

Credits: Marlbaro logo http://www.marlbaro.com 25


Smoking.

Information

We all know that cigarettes is unhealthy for us. It contains chemicals, poison, tar and lots of others junks that does not help the lungs at all. Encouraging someone to quit smoking is no easy task, but what if we try a visual approach to displaying the harmful substances in form of graphics and numbers? Again, simplifying things to achieve the desired effect on viewers.

Credits: Chemicals in Cigarettes http://www.chazrt.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/smoking_big.jpg 27


Smoking.

Iconography Like this prominent sign we see everywhere. It means “No Smoking”. We cannot shun away from it, it’s everywhere now, planes, trains, buildings and even clubs in Singapore. Even though smoking itself is an icon of status symbol for some, this icon still reigns over the former.

Credits: No Smoking Sign http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6b/No_Smoking.svg/220px-No_Smoking.svg.png 29


Smoking.

Style A beautifully crafted piece of stainless steel coupled with two transparent lung trash bins where avid smokers dump the cigarettes butt in. It aims to give a representation of junk and trash accumulating in a smoker’s lungs. A simplistic visual representation that clearly delivers the message across, no fuss and huge impact.

Credits: AOK: The Smoker’s lung www.i-will-become-a-non-smoker.de 31


Smoking.

Media Whoever invented cigarette in that long slender format wrapped with paper and a filter butt has to be the greatest designer of all. That product design has become a symbol of coolness, style and fashion symbol. The screens have celebrities endorsing smoking as a form of status symbol or fashion statement. That white cloud of smoke that fills the frame or the air around you, has essentially become a form of mass communication and branding on its own.

Credits: Smoker http://yourhealthupdate.net/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/smoking_large.jpg 33


Smoking.

Commerce Nicorette, company with a gum product that helps quitters to have a easier way of getting rid of the bad habit. This open letter addressed to all smokers, telling them that “2010 is going to suck.”. It encourages quitters to in fact, cut down on chewing onto their product. If you read on, you’ll eventually find that it’s a rather encouraging letter that gives that extra push to them to succeed. They still do not deny the fact that quitting sucks. Eventually, it will drive sales to those looking for an easy way out of smoking and getting their nicotine fix via a gum.

Credits: Nicorette Gum: Open letter TBWA/Chiat/Day, New York, USA 35


What's Design  

for Susan Curtis, RMIT