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Volume 51, No. 12

April 22, 2010

Times Ticker

Where we’ve been Looking back at our school’s history

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Nick Patrinos/Times

Student Senator, Vlad Shteyn (center) and Senate President, Angela Olson (R) attentively listen as Cathy Lechmaier helps student Senate members with their agenda at the recent meeting at Oak Creek. Lechmaier is well liked for her dedication as Student Life Coordinator.

Strong family roots and love of education produces a true leader by Nick Patrinos Times Photo Editor It’s March 1977, and Cathy Lechmaier was just getting started. Prior, she had finished working at Mutual of Omaha insurance as a dental claims specialist. Now, as a graduate from MATC, and student leader, like everyone else has in her family, she wanted to make a difference. Lechmaier chose coming to MATC as a means to obtain that goal. Love of education and student life propelled her into a lifelong mission of helping fellow students. Former Dean of Students, Al Vanderport, hired her as the first Student Life Coordinator at the Oak Creek Campus. Lechmaier has spent most of her time there

with only a short stint in the downtown location for training. Lechmaier also received a Bachelors degree from UWMilwaukee and a Masters from UW-Stout. All of Lechmaier’s children as well as her husband are MATC graduates.

the main building at 6th and State Streets a reality. Cooley convinced city leaders of

Well-groomed roots Lechmaier’s great uncle Robert L. Cooley (pictured right) was a founding director of MATC in 1912; at that time known as Milwaukee Continuation School. Cooley, like Lechmaier, took a leadership stand, always putting students first and helping them acquire their dreams and goals. As Cooley saw our school outgrow its original classrooms at Mason and Front Streets, he helped make the construction of

Courtesy of MATC archives.

the benefits of developing a “practical learning” approach, which led to MATC becoming a leader for education in the midwest.

This term still lives on in the mission of MATC today. Cooley’s accomplishments and reputation in education greatly influenced Lechmaier’s family, pushing her into attending evening school. “I’m hoping what he (Cooley) did enhances what I’m doing now at MATC,” according to Lechmaier. Lechmaier’s “practical learning” roots are evident in her own approach with students. She is straightforward and always concerned for their well-being. “(Lechmaier) treats all Senate members and students as if they were her own (family). … She is very unique and it is rare to find someone like this,” said Vlad Shteyn, Student Senator.

LECHMAIER

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New Direct Lending program offers many benefits by Alexis Scheel Times Editor-in-Chief Along with the healthcare plan, the recent bill signed by President Obama includes changes in financial aid. Some of these changes include easier FASFA forms and increased Pell grants and tax credits. Also, community colleges will now have their programs examined to ensure they are providing programs that match the needs of the private sector and making sure students are well qualified for those jobs. One important aspect is that all students must complete a new Direct Lending Master Promissory Note for the upcoming school year, even if you have filled out one before according to Camille Nicolai, Interim Director, Department of Student Financial and

Employment Services. Students can do this by going to studentloans.gov. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan said in a phone conference that because many students had difficulty with the FASFA form, which is the federal financial aid form, they added into the plan changes to the form, making it simpler to use. Nicolai said that when she filled out the FASFA, it took her five minutes. She added that she saw this recently when they helped new students fill out their FASFA and “there were less questions.” The White House estimates Pell grants to increase from $5,550 to $5,975 from 2013 through 2017, according to a press release. “You can literately go to (community colleges) for free,” Duncan said in the phone conference.

The White House also plans to triple the tax credit known as the American Opportunity Tax Credit, according to the press release. For students who will still have loans, the plan includes changing repayment. Once students graduate, new loan repayments won’t go above 10% of their income, Duncan said. He added, “After 10 years of public service work all of your debt will be forgiven.” Those who don’t work in public service will have their loans forgiven after 20 years. The White House is providing $2 billion to help community colleges and other institutions to “develop, improve and provide education and career training programs suitable for workers,” according to the press release. Next fall there are plans to have a Community College Sum-

mit at the White House to talk about the relationship between community colleges and the job market. The White House has made this money available by “ending government subsidies currently given to financial institutions that make guaranteed federal student loans,” according to the press release. “Starting July 1, all new federal student loans will be direct loans delivered and collected by private companies under performance contracts with the Department of Education.” The White House estimates that this will free up nearly $68 billion, and allow Wisconsin to receive “more than $444 million by academic year 2020-2021.” According to Nicolai, the Direct Lending part of this has been around for 17 years as some colleges were already

An upcoming band Folkswagan at bit of folk, country, rock and reggae sound

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Mequon book club Come and read the new book for the club

Page 8 part of that program. The only real difference now is that it’s being mandated. Nicolai said that to help prepare for the new program, MATC “will pilot the Direct Lending program this summer for firsttime loan borrowers.” The hope is that with such small numbers, only about 100 new loans, the financial aid office will have worked out any potential glitches in the new program. If students have any further questions concerning Direct Lending, they can contact Camille Nicolai at 414-297-6466 or by e-mail at nicolaic@matc.edu.


Campus calendar of events Green Vehicle Workshop/Display April 23 - 24 at the Oak Creek Campus ECAM

Lamp of Knowledge Banquet May 2 at the Marcus Center for the Performing Arts

Portfolio Night May 12 at Discovery World from 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Nurses Pinning Ceremony May 19 at the Cooley Theater at the Downtown Campus at 7 p.m.

MATC Spring Commencement May 21 at the U.S. Cellular Arena at 6 p.m.

Password protection tips to help prevent hacking

Q: What are the most important things to know about job hunting? — Cassandra Thornton, Culinary Arts Associate Degree Program Student A: Key elements to a successful job search involve understanding “where” to look for jobs and being fully prepared prior to contacting an organization about working for them. Use the Visible Job Market to identify job leads • These are the least effective job search methods. • Private employment agencies offer visual job market services. Keep in mind these individuals are not career counselors, and they earn commissions on fees and the number of individuals they place in different positions. • Viewing openings printed in a newspaper, magazine, online or another way. • Using the yellow pages or other telephone book to review lists of employers to determine which could use a person with your skills. Use the Hidden Job Market to identify job leads • These are the most effective job search methods. • Vacancies are not announced or not “officially” open; most jobs are filled without advertising, but by people who know others. • Direct contact with an employer is one method that provides good employment results with a success rate of approximately 30%. • Research and learn about organizations that you might be interested in working for; discover the type(s) of work they do to determine if you would be a good fit there. • Identify the organization hiring managers; prepare a well-planned presentation to make to them, even if an “official” job opening does not exist. • Networking (meeting and talking with others) is an even more effective method to learn about information that may lead to a job; it has a success rate of approximately 40%. • Prepare ahead of time and develop an effective “elevator speech” (2 minute speech about your skills, ambitions, qualifications and goals). Then use it whenever you meet new people, or friends or family members who might know about positions you are unaware of. There are many books, CDs, DVDs, and even Films on Demand (available through the MATC Library) that can help you prepare for employment and find a position that fits your goals and skills. Explore your options, remember many resources are free, and good luck!

The chart shown above is provided by lifehacker.com. The web pages listed below are provided by Denna Thompson from the MATC Help Desk. For 10 tips on password security go to: http://www.productivity501.com/10-tips-for-creating-securepasswords/253/ For additional tips go to: https://www.google.com/accounts/PasswordHelp.

STUDENT LEGAL CLINIC

Help for Social Security Disability denial by Mary O’Leary Legal Clinic Manager Dear Student Legal Clinic, My mother was injured in a car accident and she lost her job because she is physically unable to work. She applied for Social Security Disability once, but was denied. Where can she get help with this? Signed, Helena Dear Helena, There are several agencies in Milwaukee that may be able to help your mother with her disability issues. The first is Disability Rights Wisconsin. They are located at 6737 W. Washington Street, Suite 3230. You can speak to an intake specialist by calling 414-773-4646. Community Advocates provides representation to some individuals who have received a denial letter from Social Security. However, due to limited resources, they cannot take every case. You can reach Community Advocates at 414-449-4777. The Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee County also provides some advocacy and representation in Social Security Disability cases. You can walk in to the Legal Aid Society during their intake hours from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays at 521 N. 8th Street or call them at 414-727-5300. Legal Action of Wisconsin provides representation and advocacy for some Social Security Disability and SSI disability cases. Remember that all of these agencies have limited resources and cannot take every case. For questions about Social Security or SSI, call Legal Action on Tuesdays or Thursdays from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at 414-278-5932. If your mother is over 60 years of age, she might be able to get help from SeniorLaw. She can reach SeniorLaw at 414-278-1222. For more information and referrals on civil legal problems, call the Student Legal Clinic at 414-297-6630, stop in Room M326, or e-mail oleary-m@matc.edu.

For more information about this and other employment-related topics, contact Joanne JohnsonClauser, M.S., GCDF, Employment Development Specialist. • Visit: 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. daily in Room S203 at the Downtown Milwaukee Campus • Call: 414-297-7765 • E-Mail: johnsojv@matc.edu


Over the past two weeks, there has been an increased number of thefts at the Downtown Milwaukee Campus, 6th and Wells Street parking structure. The incidents involve vehicle registration decals being removed from vehicles parked in the structure. We have had no reports of theft from persons or entry into vehicles and do not believe these incidents pose an immediate threat to those who park in the structure. The Department of Public Safety is working closely with local law enforcement to both prevent the incidents and to apprehend a suspect. Police and Public Safety patrols have been increased in the structure and surrounding area. There has been one case at the Bradley Center parking center, too. We encourage all members of the MATC community to report any suspicious activity to the Department of Public Safety 414-297-6200 as soon as possible.

Show your school pride and become a Student Ambassador Have you ever found yourself giving directions to people on campus or describing some of the programs or classes we offer at MATC? Well, why not earn some money and capitalize on that knowledge by becoming a Student Ambassador. The Recruitment Department is looking for current students who will be enrolled for the summer session and are work-study eligible to serve as role models to prospective students. Duties include assisting in campus events such as SMART

Start, campus fairs, counselor program planning sessions, and office duties related to recruitment efforts. If you are outgoing, a good public speaker and enjoy working special events — this job is for you. Applications can be obtained on the 6th floor of Foundation Hall in the Recruitment office and need to be returned by Friday, May 7. If you have questions, please contact Marwill Santiago at 414-297-6713 or Christine Litwin at 414-297-7766.

Got something on your mind? Tell us about it! We value your opinion! The Times, 700 W. State St., Room S220, Milwaukee, WI 53233-1443 matctimes@gmail.com

Grant provides training for students A grant in the amount over $849,000 will be given to MATC to help train healthcare information technology workers, according to Ginny Gnadt, Senior Public Relations Specialist. This job is considered to be a fast growing field that “will keep patient health records and all health information and data accurate, available and properly protected,” Gnadt said in a press release. The grant was from the U.S.

Department of Health and Human Services and funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. Once students meet the prerequisites, they will be able to complete this program in “six months or less,” Gnadt said. The training will begin in fall 2010, and “may be offered through on-campus instructions, online, or both, and through employer partnerships and other outreach programs.”

Students can sign up for Job Readiness Conference MATC will hold its next free Job Readiness Conference on May 27. More than 70 employers will volunteer their time assisting students one-on-one or presenting workshops to help students with employment skills. This conference provides real-life situations and employment tools to help you meet employer expectations when seeking work. Some workshops include tips on what to wear, resumes, understanding qualifications employers seek, free business cards for networking and mock interviews. Students need to register soon. To register, current students can pick up a registration form at the Downtown Milwaukee Campus, Room S203, or complete the registration form sent to their student e-mail. For further information contact Joanne Johnson-Clauser at johnsojv@matc.edu.

Nick Patrinos/Times

Cathy Lechmaier has a good time helping students, such as here with the Oak Creek Student Senate. As a past president of the Student Senate herself, her experience helps her understand students’ issues.

Passion continues with students LECHMAIER From 1 Student group involvement As a former student and past President of the Student Senate, Lechmaier’s experience is well suited for her job. Her schedule is filled answering all sorts of “soup to nuts” questions, working with the Senate body and many other organizations, making sure they follow rules and regulations for these groups, including ASACC.

ASACC is the American Student Association of Community Colleges. This group helps produce student leaders. The association was born at MATC 26 years ago. Lechmaier is very involved with ASACC, which has over 245 member institutions. In late March, Lechmaier returned from participating at the National Student Advocacy and Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. along with MATC students. Students’ rights, political

issues and funding for students are among many topics discussed. Lechmaier is also a traveling advisor for WSG (Wisconsin Student Government). Lechmaier has been contacted by the MATC 100 Year Anniversary Committee because of her special roots and highly acquired “practical learning” approach, making her a living legend among the student body. There is no doubt Robert L. Cooley would be proud of his great niece.


From dressmaking to solar panels, our college strives for excellence

by Nick Patrinos Times Photo Editor To better understand our present and future, we as a college may have to first review our past. Rethinking the definition of a city for archaeologists may also apply to MATC. Demographics and functionality are the basic guidelines that apply to most regions (except places like ancient Mesoamerica and a few others). Cities change along with social complexities and social urbanization. Societies’ transformations are never-ending processes, which develop our social norms and skills. This also applies to our educational process. We enter our school as hunter-gatherers, grabbing courses to feed the brain and further our existence. The demographics and technology in our society seems to dictate what a school brings to the table for students. In considering the real quality and effects of core abilities, it may also be necessary to view the reverse effects. An overview of MATC’s 100year history and the impression it has made on industry and technology is living proof.

The early years In 1912 MATC, then Milwau-

kee Vocational School (MVS), in part became an institution as an answer to the oppression on children in the workplace. Employers were forced to release children to attend school or learn a vocation. MVS made a serious change in our society that year. Family life saw an educational answer to present social conditions which most likely irritated some unethical employers at the time. As time progressed, the view of a woman’s role in society also changed and so did our school courses. Women were finally given a chance to use new skills and explore their own hidden creativity besides dressmaking. Once again MVS made changes in curriculum to adapt to the needs in our society. Our school changed again, becoming a junior college during the Great Depression. Society in Milwaukee and surrounding areas also changed due to our programs being offered.

World War! The war years also brought a different kind of change. The Second World War became a gathering place for students and the general public at MVS. Our school became a massive training center, running programs day and night, Sunday through Saturday. Materials like silk stockings and aluminum were brought to MVS as a dropping point for the war effort. The late 1940s saw the trades falling victim to technology. Once again, now Milwaukee Vocational and Adult School (MVAS) made changes to programs catering to the needs of adult students. By 1951 we changed our name to Milwaukee Institute of

MATC archives photo

Baking Production students of the 1920s work on bread-making skills in a new addition of the Main Building at MVS (Milwaukee Vocational School), now MATC.

Technology (MIT) in order to adapt to new technical programs in demand. As a college we are very fortunate to have the first educational television station in Wisconsin. There was some fear and debate in Milwaukee society about letting Channels 10 & 36 operate. Some of this was due to the position the Hearst Corporation was taking since the death of Randolph Hearst on August 14, 1951. The Hearst Corp. even fought against Rock ’n’ Roll. After successfully getting the station license in 1952, MIT had another educational program to consider for students.

Protesting the War The late 1960s and 1970s invited many speakers and marchers to our college. Leonard Nimoy (Spock from Star Trek) spoke in the basement of the Main Building, which used to be the cafeteria, regarding his position on the Vietnam War. War protest broke extensively around MIT (MATC) with some crowds forming in the hallways, breaking doors and windows of the classrooms. Even some of the fraternity and sorority groups present at MIT fought back against

protesters. This put a big strain on MIT security. By this time, leading into the 1980s and beyond, the minority population had the biggest effect on our school courses. Black history courses developed and the Hispanic population brought new ideas for programs as well as public television programs. The ADA (American Disabilities Act) became reevaluated at our college.

Technology — Winds of change Technology changed many things. This is not only a challenge for our college in choosing curriculum, but also a major decision on how we affect our position in the work place. MATC is a leader in energy and environmentally-conscious educational instruction. We have many great instructors who are highly accredited and have expanded many new programs as ECAM, Natural Science, GIS technology and much more. Now that our 100-year anniversary is approaching, it’s time to look at what we were and have done in order to plan the future. Our past helps us learn the future. We as a college not only educate society, but also change it. MATC is a driving force in our society, giving many students a great start who may not ever have another opportunity. The sensitivity to providing to students is not only important, but also makes up who we are. There is no doubt MATC has changed society, not only in Wisconsin, but way beyond our borders. The next 100 years at our school will most likely open new doors not yet imagined. This is our challenge and best of all, an exciting time for MATC and all the eager minds knocking at our doors.

Established by Milwaukee Institute of Technology Student Council, March 1960

Editor-in-Chief Editorial Board Chair Alexis Scheel matctimes@gmail.com 414-297-6250 Business Manager Annette Farray 414-297-8243 Editorial Board Managing Editor Sarah Aguado Downtown Editor Open Mequon Editor Leanne Parshalle Oak Creek Editor Open West Allis Editor Open Photography Editors Nick Patrinos Jim Tavernese Scene Editor Dori Klitzka Sports Editor Open Graphic Designer Alison Fortney Staffers Aaron Anderson Sean Anderson Maria Avalos Jessica Burns Teresa Rae Butler Traveon K. Cook Cristina Cortes John Curran Bobby Figlesthaler Matthew Friedwald Christian Guerrero Casey Paynter Matt McMorrow Jhun Mosby Daniel Soto Joshua Taylor Daniel Villafuerte Trina Wainright Jerry Watkins Contributors Toby Baker Joanne Johnson-Clauser Mary O’Leary Victoria Marone Sandra Quadracci Duane Rodriguez David Wolfe Faculty Adviser Bob Hanson Honors 13-time winner ACP National Pacemaker Award Inducted into College Newspaper Hall of Fame May 15, 1989 Member Associated Collegiate Press, Community College Journalism Association, Student Press Law Center

MATC archives photo

Technology dictates expansion — School and city officials insert a time capsule within the cornerstone during dedication ceremonies for the T Building at the corner of 6th St. and Highland Ave. The popular socialist mayor, Carl Zeidler, is pictured in the center with a black overcoat and hat.

Printer MATC Printing Services Department

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

A student publication written and printed biweekly at Milwaukee Area Technical College, Room S220 of the Student Services Building, 700 W. State St., Milwaukee, WI 53233-1443; Editor’s Phone: 414-297-6250; Newsroom Fax: 414-2977925; E-Mail: thetimes@matc.edu. Faculty adviser: 414-297-7824. Adv. info. 414-297-8243.

The Times is dedicated to freedom of the press and encourages all viewpoints of issues to be submitted for publication. We hope to be a fair and balanced publication. Unsigned editorials represent majority Times Editorial Board opinion. Signed opinion articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the Editorial Board or the administration of the college.

Readers may submit letters via mail, fax or e-mail, and must contain the author’s name and telephone number for verification. Mass-distributed letters will not be considered for publication. The Editorial Board reserves the right of refusal and to edit any submission for length and clarity.

Volume 51, Issue 12

College Newspaper Hall of Fame May 15, 1989

April 22, 2010

Milwaukee Area Technical College

e-mail us: matctimes@gmail.com

Times Online: www.matctimes.com


Hidden gems at your video store by Dave Wolfe Times Contributor How many times have you gone to the video store and left with nothing because you feel like you’ve seen everything? Well I used to work at Blockbuster Video, and I had customers that would come in and ask for me by name because I could always recommend a movie that they have never heard of, and will not disappoint them. Well now I’m going to do the same thing for all of you, by telling you about a few films that were never really “main stream” movies, but still have big name actors, and well-written storylines. I’m sure some of you have heard of, and maybe even seen, some of the films I’m about to suggest, but if you haven’t, they are most definitely worth checking out. First is the film “Equilibrium,” written and directed by Kurt Wimmer. This film takes place in a future where a drug was created to completely take away any human emotions, and emotions are now outlawed. The reason for this is to take any type of crime, violence and even war out of the equation, but the real crime is to take away human beings’ right to feel. This movie stars Christian Bale (Terminator: Salvation, The Dark Knight) as an agent called a cleric, which is the highest rank in the police force. The clerics are dispatched to find and destroy the group of humans who refuse the drug and rebel. The people who do not take the drug are called “sense offenders,” and are sentenced to death

if caught. But when John Preston (Bale) accidentally misses a dose of the drug he begins to feel, and decides to seek out the underground, which is where the rebels are. He becomes one of them in order to stop the government headed by a leader known only as “Father,” played by Sean Pertwee (Mutant Chronicles, Doomsday). This is an action-packed movie with incredible fight scenes, and a great cast including Emily Watson (Red Dragon), William Fichtner (Prison Break), Taye Diggs (Go), and Sean Bean (Goldeneye, Ronin). The tagline for this movie was: “In a future where freedom is outlawed, outlaws will become heroes.” So if you haven’t seen this film yet, go out and rent it. Another movie you might not have heard of is “Truth or Consequences N.M.,” and this movie is actually one of my top seven favorite films. This movie was Kiefer Sutherland’s directing debut, and one of my favorite characters he ever played (with the exception of Jack Bauer obviously). It stars Vincent Gallo (Buffalo 66), Kiefer Sutherland, Mykelti Williamson (director of CTU New York on TV’s 24), Kevin Pollak (3000 Miles to Graceland), and a character named “Sir” played by veteran actor Martin Sheen (Spawn, Apocalypse Now). The tagline for this movie was “Life’s a Bitch. Why Behave.” It’s about a group of criminals led by the recently paroled Raymond Lembecke (Gallo) who decide to rob a drug dealer for a suitcase full of cocaine with the idea in mind to sell it for one lump sum, but things quickly go wrong, and

they end up on the run from not only the police, but the drug dealers that they stole from. On the way they take a couple hostages, and steal their RV in order to stay off the radar until the heat dies down, but it doesn’t all go according to plan. Things take a downward spiral from there until the climax, where it’s kill or be killed. Kiefer Sutherland gets two thumbs up from me for his debut as a director, and for his character as a ruthless, cold-blooded killer named Curtis Freley. So like I said, with “Equilibrium” if you have yet to see this flick, do what you have to do to change that, whether it’s renting it, ordering it on demand (it’s sometimes on Cinemax or HBO on demand), or getting it mailed to you through Netflix or Blockbuster online. The last movie on my list of hidden gems is the film “Felon,” which was written and directed by Ric Roman Waugh, and stars Stephen Dorff (Blade), Val Kilmer (The Saint, Spartan), Sam Shepard (Black Hawk Down), Harold Perrineau (TV’s Lost, and HBO’s Oz), and Nick Chinlund (Chronicles of Riddick). This film is about a good, decent family man named Wade Porter (Dorff) who is sent to a maximum security prison for accidentally killing a man who was trying to rob his house. Due to certain circumstances he could not say that it was self defense. From the holding cell to the bus transfer to prison things have already started out bad for Porter, and things go from bad to worse when he meets the sadistic head guard Lt. Jackson (Perrineau), and his second in

command Sgt. Roberts (Chinlund). Porter has to quickly learn how to defend himself, and how to get by in a prison for the worst of the worst before he ends up getting beaten or killed. Just when Porter’s learning how to make it he gets a cellmate named John Smith (Kilmer), who is a mass murderer transferred there, because other prisons couldn’t handle him. Smith is in there for killing more than 13 people. Porter soon grows on Smith, asks his help on how to survive, and the two wind up becoming somewhat friends. The tagline for the movie was, “No Rules. No Hope. No Way Out.” I recently saw this film for the first time, and instantly liked it, so I figured I had an obligation to let everyone know that there are very good movies out there that never had a massive theatrical release. Remember, just because a movie wasn’t in a lot of theaters, in theaters for only a little bit, or

made to go straight to DVD does not mean that they are not good movies. However, I would recommend seeing one of the first two movies on my list before seeing “Felon,” because in my opinion they were better films, but “Felon” was still a very good flick. I have many, many more movies on my list of hidden gems, but I don’t want to overwhelm you all with a list of 10, 15 or even 20 movies to see. Start with these three movies, and if you like them you should keep your eyes peeled for another installment of “Hidden Gems,” because I want to share my movie knowledge with as many people as possible. I already know what three movies I’m going to write about next, and I assure you that they are gems. If anyone has a question about a movie, any movie at all, don’t hesitate to find me and ask. I am Dave Wolfe: The Movie Guru.

MCT Campus


This isn’t your father’s Folkswagon by Sandra Quadracci Times Contributor The new up and coming band Folkswagon has people talking and dancing. Rachelle Laundrie, who plays guitar and is lead singer songwriter, fulfilled a longtime dream when she created the five-member band in 2008. Fans and other bands playing the local bar scene are saying this is the real thing, all original music and a sound that is unique and entertaining. They are about to release their first album. The name of the band is being reconsidered right now because their style doesn’t really fit into the “folk” image. The style is matchless and touches folk, country, rock ’n’ roll, reggae, spirituals and more. They have started a contest to find a new name, and the idea that they use to create the name on the first cover will receive the first signed CD. Go to folkswagonband@yahoo.com with any ideas. Laundrie was out camping with a friend in 2008 when her now fiancé and gifted fiddle player, Bill VanOfferen, rode up on his motorcycle with his fiddle strapped to his back. It was love at first sight and the band took flight. One of her songs is about the experience. It just all seemed to fall together for the talented artists that comprise the band, and there is definitely a great connection among all of them. Laundrie always has had a passion for music. As a young girl she loved piano and had lessons for 10 years. In college she had guitar classes and voice training that she said really gave her a step up in her singing. All her songs are about real life experiences. Laundrie said of her music, “What you’ll hear along with melodies and harmonies are stories about people’s lives. I love stories that have meaning and my music reflects

Sandra Quadracci photos

Local group Folkswagon has a folk, country, rock, reggae type sound.

that.” Listening to her lyrics can make you cry and laugh. Remarked Laundrie, “I write from what is going on in my life right now and want to share those experiences so that people can relate to them.” Some of her songs tell stories of falling in love, surviving a divorce, losing but still loving the stepchildren she raised and the feelings expressed by an acquaintance in prison. When listening to her music, the emotions of life are definitely touched. Laundrie’s voice is captivating and she has stage presence with her ’60s hippie attire, exceptional beauty and ability to keep the audience captivated. VanOfferen plays the fiddle and actually gives goose bumps with his performances. Many fans have commented on the experience of goose bumps. VanOfferen always has loved music also and started playing the fiddle as a child. His mother bragged, “I always knew he would be famous. His talent was always obvious.” VanOfferen also runs a business

as a disc jockey and graduated from college with a music teaching, violin performance and conducting degree. His great need for music composition perfection and music theory really show up in the band’s music sound. Laudrie said, “His great help in these areas assist a lot in the song writing.” Russ Weller, the drummer, joined the band after hearing Laundrie’s music on Facebook. He said he knew she was special when he heard her music, and it was a match made in heaven. Russ plays in another bar band also, and his flavor of hard rock ’70s and ’80s music and talent definitely add to the Folkswagon sound. Weller is working on a degree in radio and video which may well add to the success of the band. John Jacob, the bass player, has a style of his own. Wearing a reminiscent mullet haircut and large peace sign around his neck, he has rocked out with many bands over his music career. He comments about his experiences

while on stage, including a trip to the legendary concert of the ’60s Woodstock. Jacob had the tips of his fingers cut off in a work injury, which he said contributes to his unique sound. Jacob began playing bass in 1967 and has played for nine other rock bands over his career. Jacob said, “This is the most fun I ever had playing in a band.” That is evident in his carefree performance. Sue Laundrie, Rachelle’s sister, is the background singer and has had experience with the Racine Choral Art Society as a second soprano. The Laundrie sisters seem to have a special power between them when they sing. VanOfferen and Laundrie are planning a beach wedding in June; the closeness of their band really shows in the wedding party. The bass guitarist, Jacob, will be best man, and Weller, the drummer, a groomsman. Singer Sue Laundrie, will be a bridesmaid. This band reported that functions like a family and the closeness seems

to enhance their performances. VanOfferen and Laundrie’s love for playing is made obvious: they are playing a gig the day after their wedding, before they leave on their honeymoon. As the first CD is in the completion stage, the band is already practicing and playing new music. At their performance at the “Foods for Thoughts” benefit in Racine at the Eagles Club on Saturday March 13 the band members included a lot of new music and the audience seemed captivated and entertained. After the show the Folkswagon band was greeted by the audience with several positive comments and requests to be added to their mailing lists for future shows. The uniqueness of entertaining, original music and beautiful execution is why fans believe this band will go all the way to stardom. If you want to hear this unique sound, Folkswagon has a few gigs coming up. They are listed on the band’s website.


Star student satisfies his curiosity by being a triple major in engineering by Sarah Aguado Times Managing Editor Jarvis Dingle, President of MATC’s chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE), is triple majoring in our Biomedical Electronics Technology, Electronic Engineering Technology and Electronic Automation and Controls programs. This outstanding 21-year-old manages to stay a star student while balancing his duties as president, an employee, husband and father of a three-year-old daughter. Dingle says he’s always been “curious about everything (he) touches and sees,” but it was his high school teacher that got him particularly interested in engineering after having the opportunity to do work in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory at Illinois State University. Dingle graduated from a Chicago high school and moved to Milwaukee to attend MSOE when he saw MATC as a more affordable way to prepare for his career. Al Pinckney, Interim Vice President of Student Services, says of Mr. Dingle, “I got excited the first time I met him. He is a star that shines and has his eye on the prize.”

Sue Ruggles photo

Jarvis Dingle (L) recently worked with a marketing representative from Synergy and NSBE Secretary Tawanda Harrington (R) at the Energy Summit at the table for the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE). Dingle started the MATC Chapter of (NSBE) when he first started here at MATC. “NSBE is the largest student-run organization in the world,” Dingle said in a previous interview.

Mequon Book Club exposes students to a variety of books for 10 years and counting by Teresa Rae Butler Times Staff Reporter It has been over 10 years since the Mequon Campus Book Discussion Group was created by Terri Sutton, an English instructor now retired, who had started the first gathering as a community service. Since Sutton, who still works as an adjunct, retired as an English instructor, the position has been run by Marianne Szabo. Szabo took over as coordinator of the discussion group and has a special place for those who have never been to a book club discussion. No reservations are required, and it’s open to students and staff alike. “I hope that after their experience with our group at MATC, students may decide later in their lives, when they are busy with careers, to take time out and participate in a book club, either ours or others that are available to them,” said Szabo. She also said, “Our book discussion group is exposing students to a particular kind of cultural event; book clubs are opportunities for people to come together, share ideas and grow intellectually.” And according to Szabo, sometimes the meetings can and have offered even more. She told the MATC Times that back in February, for Black History Month, English instructor Myra George led the discussion on Douglass’ Women by Jewell Parker Rhodes. George had arranged with Linda Presberry, an adjunct English instructor, to have the MATC catering service bring AfricanAmerican food to the discussion.

With steaming crab cakes, corn, and blackened chicken on a cold, snowy night, the meeting felt cozy, as if friends were sitting around a table having a chat. One attendee drove an hour and a half during the snowstorm to get to the discussion, and she was well rewarded with good food and stimulating conversation. George and Presberry also organized a Black History Month contest at the Mequon Campus in conjunction with questions about Douglass’ Women, resulting in monetary and other prizes for students. Szabo admits that it is less formal than a class, and with no grades attached the book talk is enjoyed. Currently, they meet three times a semester: in September, October, November, February, March and April. Meeting times are always from 7-8:15 p.m. on Wednesday evenings. If you’re a book lover, you’re invited to join the discussion of William McDonough and Michael Braungart’s “Cradle to Cradle.” It is the last in the series of books to be featured in the spring discussion. Copies of the books can be checked out at the Mequon Campus Library, or you can purchase it. You will receive 15% off the price of these books at Next Chapter Bookshop in Mequon or Creekside Books in Cedarburg when you mention Mequon. The next meeting: Cradle to Cradle on Wednesday, April 21, 2010, 7:00-8:15 p.m. They meet at the MATC Mequon Campus, 5555 W. Highland Rd., Room A202. For more information, please contact Marianne Szabo: 262-238-2262, szabom@matc.edu.

The Times needs you! Join us for our summer edition and plan to join us next fall! The summer edition’s deadline is the end of June. For more information, contact Bob Hanson at 414-297-7824.


Green energy moving us into sustainable forefront by Daniel Torres Times Staff Reporter

Casey Paynter/Times

John Sekula has been working for MATC in the Printing Services Department since 1983.

EKG test aids prepress specialist by Alison Fortney Times Graphic Designer Ever watch one of those television shows about people discovering they had some sort of health problem that they never knew existed? Well, an event similar to this proved helpful to John Sekula when he eventually discovered he had a brain tumor. Sekula has been working in MATC’s prepress department for quite some time, and when he heard about a free EKG clinic at MATC, he decided to attend. He is an active person, and when he discovered he had a problem with his aorta valve, he was told to see the doctor.

A few years later he developed sleep apnea, his hands and feet began to grow, and he developed jaw problems. Sekula didn’t know it at the time until he found a website about something called acromegaly. Having done some research, Sekula discovered that he had all of the symptoms that matched the definition of acromegaly. In a nutshell, acromegaly is a hormonal disorder that results from too much growth hormone being produced in the body. In patients who have acromegaly, the pituitary produces excessive amounts of growth hormone, and the cause is usually related to a tumor on the pituitary gland. Not long after he had made

Since the start of the millennium, MATC has been paving the way for Wisconsin residents to become more involved in new energy technology. For the past several years MATC has taken part in the Green Energy Summit here in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. This year’s Green Energy Summit focused on the new green economy that has been emerging in Wisconsin. This year’s speakers included Michael Burke, President, MATC, Tom Barrett, Mayor of the City of Milwaukee, Mary Ann Wright, CEO, Johnson Controls-Saft and David Stinnett, Electronics/ Sustainable Energy instructor at MATC, just to name a few. Some of the plenary sessions touched on strategies to bringing green businesses to the midwest, job opportunities and training dealing with renewable energies and ways to educate the community on the benefits of going green.

This year’s Green Energy Summit allowed MATC to showcase the new energy programs offered here at the college. Sustainable Facilities Operations, an associate degree, and Sustainable Operations and Energy Engineering Technology, two new certificate programs, have been added to the college’s large degree and certificate programs. More programs for renewable energy are scheduled to be added within the next several semesters. The field of renewable energy is fairly new, and MATC plans to be involved in this ground-breaking industry as it begins to grow well into the future. From wind energy to solar heating, from industry to technology training, MATC will be there to provide the training for the high demand of new and improved energy sources. With the success of this year’s Green Energy Summit, I am sure next year’s will be even more successful.

this discovery, Sekula went to Froedtert Hospital to have the majority of the tumor removed, and if things go according to plan, the rest of the tumor will be treated using gamma knife radiation in either April or May. In the meantime, Sekula is taking a variety of medications to keep his body in good shape. “I’ve never had any kind of health problems, and now I don’t take things for granted so much anymore,” he said. Good health is something everybody can appreciate, and when things turn worse, it’s always a good thing to think about the good things in life. According to Sekula, “Count your blessings and appreciate things.”

Nick Patrinos/Times

Will Steger, noted polar adventurer, was one of many speakers at this year’s Energy Summit.


Men’s Baseball 2010 Schedule Date

Opponent

Location

Time

04/22

Morton College (DH)

Cicero, Ill.

2 p.m.

04/24

*Joliet Junior College (DH)

Joliet, Ill.

Noon

04/25

Sauk Valley Community College (DH) Home

Noon

04/28

Highland Community College (DH)

Home

2 p.m.

04/30

McHenry County College (DH)

Crystal Lake, Ill.

1 p.m.

05/01

South Suburban College (DH)

South Holland, Ill. 1 p.m.

05/05

Prairie State College (DH)

Home

2 p.m.

05/08

Olive-Harvey College

Home

Noon

All dates and times subject to change. Call 414-297-7872 for updates. All home dates (boldface) are played at MATC baseball field, 6665 S Howell Ave. Oak Creek, Wis. *Indicates N4C conference game.

The uniforms may be different, but the spirit and tradition continues Proudly posing in the picture above is the MATC 1920s baseball team, then known as Milwaukee Vocational School (MVS). A bat boy is shown in the front row center. The gloves appear to be of one size fits all. Today’s MATC 2010 baseball team is pictured below. A complete roster of all team members and coaches is listed to right.

(DH) Indicates a doubleheader.

Men’s Baseball 2010 Roster #

Name

Pos.

B/T

Ht.

Yr.

Hometown (High School)

1

Jimmy Kuras

INF

R/R

5990

1

Milwaukee, Wis. (St. Francis)

3

Tyler Dykema

INF/P

R/R

6900

1

Delafield, Wis. (Home School)

4

Dan Friefeld

OF

R/L

6910

1

Skokie, Ill. (Niles West)

7

Jake Meyer

1B/P

R/R

6900

2

Sussex, Wis. (Sussex Hamilton)

9

Nick Heppe

OF

R/R

59100

2

Sussex, Wis. (Sussex Hamilton)

11

Scott Rappl

UTL

R/R

59100

2

West Allis, Wis. (West Allis Hale)

13

Jamin Chilsen

UTL

R/R

6900

2

Milwaukee, Wis. (St. Francis)

14

Nick Paffhausen

INF

R/R

6910

1

New Berlin, Wis. (Catholic Memorial)

15

Joe LaRossa

OF/P

R/L

5990

1

Racine, Wis. (Racine Case)

16

Andrew Allen

P/C

R/R

6910

1

Bayside, Wis. (Nicolet)

18

Mike Schroeder

P

R/R

6930

1

Brookfield, Wis. (Milwaukee Lutheran)

19

Tyler Sadowske

OF

L/R

6930

2

Waukesha, Wis. (Mukwonago)

20

Tom Furru

C

R/R

59110

1

Wauwatosa, Wis. (Wauwatosa East)

23

Erik Martwick

OF

R/R

6910

2

New Berlin, Wis. (New Berlin West)

24

Brandon Bishop

OF

R/R

6930

1

Milwaukee, Wis. (Wauwatosa East)

25

Ron Koetteritz

UTL

R/R

6920

1

Munster, Ind. (Muskego)

26

Erik Petersen

P/1B

R/R

6940

1

Fox Point, Wis. (Nicolet)

29

Alex Rejniak

3B/P

R/R

6910

1

Cudahy, Wis. (Cudahy)

30

Jake Hansen

UTL

R/R

59110

1

Greenfield, Wis. (Greenfield)

33

Nick Osvatic

OF

R/R

6920

1

Oconomowoc, Wis. (Oconomowoc)

Head Coach: Frank Cimorelli

Assistant Coaches: Ted Brzenk, Ron Nedset, Jason Wenzel


Attention Artists:

Interested in contributing to the Times Toons page? Contact Bob Hanson, Times Adviser, at hansonjr@matc.edu or 414-297-7824.


First Annual Latin Dance Competition Photos and story by Jim Tavernese The Latino Student Organization sponsored the First Annual Latin Dance Competition in the MATC Conference Center. Students and members of the community were invited. Fifteen couples competed and were judged by MATC students, faculty and staff; first and second place awards were given. The funds raised at the dance will go to LSO Community Outreach program, “Going Green�; building urban gardens. The Second Annual Dance will be next year just prior to Spring Break.


Times issue 51-12