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Scope of Work

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Introduction

Clarke Street

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Location

This 12 block area at the core of the Sherman Park neighborhood on the West Side of Milwaukee, WI was determined by Common Ground to be in the most severe decline, yet an essential area of focus for the self-sustaining future of the district. The boundaries of the site are the historic Sherman Boulevard ( ), 46th Street ( ), and the commercial corridors of Center Street ( ) and North Avenue ( ).

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Scale | 1:10,000,000

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Milwaukee

City + Surroundings

Scale | 1:1,000,000

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street

This document is intended to support and advance the efforts of the Common Ground: MKE Rising initiative and the Sherman Park Community Association (SPCA). At present, these organizations are making great strides toward reviving the housing market in the Sherman Park neighborhood and providing necessary assistance to encourage home ownership and improve this historic district on the West Side of Milwaukee. The Urban Design Strategy outlined in this document was drafted in collaboration with Common Ground following a thorough assessment of the existing conditions in the area which are outlined in the following pages. This comprehensive demonstration project is intended to highlight specific improvement opportunities that will reinforce the community, draw attention to the neighborhood and establish opportunities for residents.

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47th

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48th Street

s al fa dy Rur Bel oorban +ersity,


clientS

coMMon grounD is a community organizing campaign led to identify creative solutions to pressing social problems facing the greater Milwaukee Area. Through the MKE Rising initiative, CG has set a goal to refurbish 100 homes over the next four years in the neighborhood by reclaiming derelict properties and raising funds from major banks, the City of Milwaukee, and the Federal Government to begin the process. Thus far over $35,000,000 has been devoted to the cause and the MKE Rising campaign has already begun to revive the housing market.

SherMan park coMMunity aSSociation (Spca) is a community-based

phySical analySiS

The neighborhood is surrounded by history and important commercial corridors. The North Sherman Boulevard historic district and the North 47th Street Bungalows district sandwich the 44th and 45th streets and a new historic district of bungalows on 46th street is currently under review for designation. In addition, longstanding Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) exist on each side of the study area along Center Street (#39) and North Avenue/Lisbon Avenue (#16), known as Uptown Crossing. The BIDs are funded by local business owners to encourage business through general improvements. At present, the Uptown Crossing BID (#16) has little representation east of 51st Street and the Center Street BID (#39) has been inactive for years.

organization that responds to the needs residents in the neighborhood. Their current projects include a Minor Home Repair Program and the Healthy Neighborhood Initiative.

ShermaN park lutheraN church

meINecke aveNue

athletIc FIeld

waShINgtoN h.S. 46th Street reSIdeNtIal core greater mt. ZIoN mISSIoNary church

uptowN croSSINg

commuNIty BaptISt church

North aveNue commercIal corrIdor

aerial photograph Scale | 1:5000


2

analySiS of exiSting

BuSINeSS ImprovemeNt dIStrIctS (BIdS)

North ShermaN Boulevard

North 47th Street BuNgalowS

BId #39 | ceNter Street

BId #16 | uptowN croSSINg local hIStorIc preServatIoN dIStrIctS

Map

of

Significant DeSignationS

Scale | 1:10,000

urban Structure reSiDential core

The Sherman Park neighborhood was developed nearly 50 years after the establishment of the city of Milwaukee in 1846. This expansion of the city was laid out in a strict grid form measuring approximately 700 feet long from north to south and 300 feet wide. The blocks were then sliced into narrow plots of land to allow for detached dwellings which met the needs of the buyers’ desire for a detached home with a yard. The general housing style in the area is two and a half stories with a steep gable roof facing the street. A detached garage faced a mid-block alley at the rear of the house.

meINecke aveNue

coMMercial corriDorS were located on every fourth block oriented east to west and along primary diagonal streets that cut through the regular grid pattern toward downtown. When originally established, these commercial corridors were lined with primarily mixed-use buildings with ground level retail and apartments on the upper levels.


Conditions 12.9% neighborhood

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The westward expansion of the city during the late 19th and early 20th century was spurred by rapid immigration during this period, and Sherman Park was quickly populated by a strong German majority. According to one source, ”55% of family heads were German-born, and 27.8% more were native-born of German parents” (Simon, 1978).

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The white pop rapidly, and in year, Milwauk of residential the rich cont increase. Thi the downtown northwest an ethnic divers African-Amer

As with many other Midwestern industrial cities following World War II, the demographics of Milwaukee changed dramatically as a manufacturing boom drew a large African American population from southern states seeking the new jobs. Throughout the following decades, the original inhabitants of these neighborhoods within the city limits would flee to the surrounding suburbs as the African-American residents of the city gained more freedom to live where they chose following the civil rights struggles of the 1960’s and 70’s. ‘White Flight’ from Sherman Park occurred rapidly during this period and working-class African American families filled in the proud neighbourhood. At the same time, the postwar industrial boom rapidly deteriorated as foreign products and outsourcing industrial jobs became more economically efficient resulting in a steep rise in the African-American unemployment rate which remains to this day. Milwaukee became a member of the American ‘Rust Belt’. Between 1920 and 1990, the make-up of the Sherman Park neighborhood shifted from over-75% German to over-75% African-American.

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Common Ground assessed the ses along 44th and 45th Streets. nt lots, 27 other properties were r condition that they would need rebuilt to provide proper living 26% of the properties were dition, many of which were single homes. Along North Avenue and a number of underused areas as urches, which are tax delinquent

in

poverty

rentaL

vs.

owner oCCUpied

According to Zillow.com, a real estate website that maps listed property values, there are currently 11 foreclosures for sale within the boundaries of the site, and the average values of homes on these 12 blocks is below $25,000. This neighborhood has made the surrounding real property market extremely volatile, including the historic districts nearby where most properties are valued well over $100,000. Additionally, census data suggests there was a considerable decline in population (-21.9%), households (-22.7%), and number of housing units (-20.9%) in the community between 1990 and 2000. This trend has continued to this day.

City Milwaukee City of of Milwaukee

persons

Hypersegregation

pulation in Milwaukee continues to decline while non-white populations continue to increase n 2000 the white population dropped below 50% of the nearly 600,000 residents. Year after kee is considered one of the most ‘Hypersegregated’ cities in the country with a high rate l segregation. Furthermore, Milwaukee is a classic example of the ‘Dual-speed city’ where tinue to gain wealth while the middle class remains stagnant and the number in poverty is trend has manifested itself physically throughout the Milwaukee metropolitan area as n and suburban centres continue to improve, while racially diverse neighborhoods in the nd south of the city continue to decline. Sherman Park is special for the many pockets of sity in the area (including white, Asian, Hispanic, Orthodox Jewish, Native American and rican populations), but residential integration remains limited.

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“In 1970, at the city’s industrial peak, the black poverty rate in Milwaukee was 22% lower than the U.S. black average. That turned around by 2000, when the black poverty rate was 34% higher than the national figure.”

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City Hypersegregation anaLysis

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An 30 min

20 min

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liBRaRies

PuBlic schools

Police stations

fiRehouses

Community Amenities AnAlysis scale | 1:20,000

employment

ManufactuRing

healthcaRe

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employment AnAlysis

scale | 1:80,000

20 min

30 min

21

10 min

22 30 57

Bicycle Routes

AlternAtive trAnsportAtion AnAlysis

scale | 1:80,000

Bus Routes

Milwaukee was a manufacturing city up to the 1970â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, wh automation and outsourcing became more economically efficie Since that time, healthcare providers and various other servi have opened facilities in the city that five Fortune 500 compan call home. However, the proud industrial tradition in the c lives on with three long-time employers located on the west s of the city in Masterlock, Harley-Davidson, and Miller Brew Company (now MillerCoors). With low levels of income a educational attainment in Sherman Park, access to employm at the nearby industrial corporations is an important aspect recover.

trAnsportAtion

Four primary bus routes run through and in all directions fr the neighborhood. The #21 and #22 buses connect the sho of Lake Michigan to the centre of nearby suburb Wauwat along North Avenue and Center Street. Additionally, the # and #57 buses connect the neighbourhood to the heart downtown and to the north side of the city. There are numero bus stops within this twelve block area and many opportunit for transfers to other bus lines along these four primary rout

Bicycle usage has also increased dramatically in Milwauk over the past decade and a recent survey suggests a 27 ridership increase in the past 5 years, yet cycling commu only account for 20% of all trips. 82% of the city still commu to work or school by personal vehicle; however, in lower inco communities like Sherman Park more than 30% of reside do not have access to vehicles. There are many recreatio opportunities for cycling, walking and running in large gre spaces throughout the city and along two major, interconnec trail systems. Nearby Sherman Park and Washington Park the largest open spaces in the city besides the lakefront, wh also marks the beginning of the extensive, 114 mile long O Leaf Trail. Additionally, the Hank Aaron State Trail along Menomonee River Valley provides a scenic route from downto to the suburbs. In recent years, the City striped 50 miles bike lanes and additional 100 miles are planned to prom commuter cycling usage.


4

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ApproximAte WAlking time

2 min Washington high school

plAnning poliCy AnAlysis

9 min

12 min hi-Mount PuBlic school

12 min Roundy’s suPeRMaRket

9 min

Two primary Local Area Plans from the City of Milwaukee Department of City Development are responsible for guiding development in Sherman Park. The Washington Park Plan includes the area south of Meinecke Avenue and the West Side Plan includes the area North of Meinecke Avenue, accounting for 15% of the city’s land mass. For the purposes of this document, the Washington Park Plan has been consulted on residential analysis and guidance while the West Side Plan has been used to guide commercial development along the primary corridors of North Avenue and Center Street.

West side Plan West side Plan

MilWaukee college PReP

Washington PaRk liBRaRy

10 min

Washington PaRk Plan

Washington PaRk

The permeable, gridded street pattern of Milwaukee’s west side provides close commuting distance to most basic community amenities in the area including education and open space. All levels of precollegiate education are available within at 12 minute walk of the neighborhood’s core, yet a ‘voucher driven’ education system and religious school choices allows most residents to leave the area in favor of better educational opportunities in more affluent areas of the City. Washington High School is a primary asset to the neighbourhood as the best high school in the city until the 1970’s, yet today many see it as a liability and one of the weakest high schools in the city. The weak property market has limited property tax income for the area which further depletes resources for the school. Numerous libraries and public parks are also within a short walk of the neighborhood, yet many residents refuse to walk it due to the threat of gang activity along certain routes. A major police station is located just a few blocks west of the neighbourhood, but vacant, overgrown spaces and poorly lit streets allow criminal activity to thrive n the area. There are numerous convenient stores throughout the area, but they offer little of nutritional value and focus primarily on making profit from alcohol and snacks. Additionally, the nearest grocery stores are poorly managed and at least a 12 minute walk away. Many middle-class residents will choose to drive to larger grocery stores in Wauwatosa, a nearby suburb, instead of waiting in long lines for a poor selection nearby.

WAshington pArk plAn • Preserve the overall neighborhood character as a compact, interconnected and walkable area • Build upon the traditional development patterns and existing assets • Increase owner-occupancy

West side plAn • Limit non-commercial commercial corridors

uses

on

• Support higher quality, walkable local shopping • Improve streetscape, organise and calm traffic, and improve transit stops near civic uses • Improve access to and quality of parks and open space • Enhance alternative transportation options (public transit, bicycle, walking)


overall analySiS ConCluSionS

Center Street elevation ScAle | 1:1250

aSSetS

+Community

Strong leadership through organizations and active social environment throughout the district

+CharaCter

Many architecturally significant properties and located between two designated historic districts

Poor connection

AuDitorium + gym

Poor AcceSS

to

for

to

neigHborHooD

Public uSe

fAcilitieS

+Proximity

Work and play opportunities available within reach by walking, cycling and public transportation

WaShington high SChool Bir

ArcHitecturAlly SignificAnt

liaBilitieS vAcAnt lotS

-Crime

Residents fear drug dealing, theft and violence in the evening hours of the neighborhood

-vaCanCy

Extremely high number of foreclosed and boarded up properties. Many landlords live out of state. Commercial Cooridors also lack consistent activity.

-underaChievement

nort

h

Extremely high rates of unemployment, public assistance, and low educational attainment

-inSaluBrity

Although open spaces are near, residents are forced to cross busy streets and, sometimes, territorial groups. Convenient stores in area sell mostly alcohol and snacks.

north avenue elevation ScAle | 1:1250

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“Kids raising kids is the basic family structure in this neighborhood.” -45th Street Resident

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“The home owners and people who do care in this area are trapped... Intimidated by outliers” -44th Street Resident

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“Community feel is high here. Feels very much like a connected neighborhood.” -46th Street Resident

vieW

“Teens have nothing to do but walk up and down the block... They need something to keep them occupied.” -North Avenue Business Owner


Vision Statement

spatial

Improve

social CONNECTIVITY in Sherman Park to en economic

Spatial Connectivity | Streetscape Improvements

Social Connectivity | Link

• • • • •

• • • •

Emphasize store-front economy Establish public seating and vegetation Promote alternative transportation use Organize parking and calm traffic Clean up alleys

and

Utilize vacant land and underused parking lots Establish social spaces at street corners Provide community facilities and pocket-parks Improve connections and interaction with nearby social institutions

+ Proposed Spatial Nodes Scale | 1:5000

Establish Assets

+ Proposed Social Nodes Scale | 1:5000


6

Primary Design Objectives

ncourage

The primary objective of this strategy is to install a series of connectivity cogs, or complimentary physical initiatives, which knit the neighborhood together and attract outside interest to propel the community forward. The proposal is split into near-term and long-term solutions to begin generating revenue in the community while also promoting Sherman Park as a convenient and healthy place to live. The near-term plan highlights public works initiatives as well as grassroots, entrepreneurial opportunities for residents in the area to grow, produce, buy and sell goods locally. The long-term plan retains urban agriculture in the neighbourhood while establishing viable and competitive commercial corridors with business complimentary to the wholesome lifestyle developed in Sherman Park during the previous phase of this plan.

community

OWNERSHIP +

city-wide

USERSHIP

$

commeRcial coRRidoR exiSting community Facility outdoooR activity Space

ecOnOmic cOnnectivity | Revive commeRcial engineS

pRopoSed community Facility

• Re-brand neighborhood as holistically sustainable • Develop near-term opportunities for residents in urban agriculture and street vending • Guide and encourage complimentary businesses and new infill buildings for long-term

+

= PrOPOseD cOmmercial nODes Scale | 1:5000

abstract cOncePt PrOPOsal Scale | 1:5000


urban design strategy neighbourhood masterPlan

ceNteR StReet commeRcial coRRidoR

waShiNgtoN h.S. tRack + Field

Relocated child caRe Facility

commuNity Pocket PaRk + leiSuRe ceNtRe

commuNity ReSouRce ceNtRe

waShiNgtoN h.S. auditoRium + gym


7

Social Node diagram

ProPosed residential refurbishment

Scale | 1:5000 co

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ex PR Ne ex oP iS i w td t. eN StiNg oo co oSed R tR eN al ac mm aN c om tR ce No ti uN aN vi mu it de ty ce y N S it Fa No y ci de F l ac it S y No ility de No S de S

Scale | 1:5000 Re

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PrinciPles

Plan overview

This neighborhood masterplan is intended to increase connectivity, safety and opportunity throughout, principally by weaving together essential community nodes. The Social Node Diagram above demonstrates the relationship between primary entrances to key community facilities, shops, vacant lots and street corners. By linking these nodal points together through an interactive streetscape plan, a stronger community identity will emerge to dissuade criminal activity and promote local businesses. In addition, important social facilities have been planned regularly throughout the neighborhood to meet the needs of this underserved community and open up space along the commercial corridors for economic opportunity. This plan is expected to operate in tandem with the housing refurbishment efforts of Common Ground. The drawing on the upper right of this page highlights a proposed plan to revive the housing market in the neighborhood through alterations to the existing housing stock as well as historically considerate infill. At present, 110 existing houses are in need of refurbishment while 17 single-family homes are proposed to fill in the gaps.

Phased aPProach

Quick recovery and sustainability

holistic

sustainability

Walk, work, play, buy, sell, produce locally

multi-generational

Provide accommodations for age-in-place community

crime Prevention through urban design

Design for communal ownership and natural surveillance (Defensible Space)


community Pocket PaRk + leiSuRe centRe

Relocated child caRe Facility

uRBan agRicultuRe ‘PRoduction PlotS’

noRth avenue commeRcial coRRidoR

2015 Masterplan Scale | 1:1250 ex

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proposed north avenue elevation | north side Scale | 1:500

local gRoceRy

caSe Study


Streetscape revitalization will open opportunities for commercial expansion along North Avenue and Center Street. Unfortunately, significant investment in the area by local businesses will only occur after continued growth is expected. This plan proposes a phased implementation strategy for near-term economic opportunities as well as long-term sustainability. With nearly three acres of vacant and underused land along these streets, the ‘commercial corridors’ provide a unique opportunity for large-scale urban agriculture. Agriculture provides immediate entrepreneurial opportunities for residents while also providing easy access to nutritional food. Over time, agricultural use will give way to complimentary businesses that pride themselves on being community-oriented and focused on the health and well-being of the neighborhood. During this time, the neighborhood will derive a unique identity in the city as ‘Holistically Sustainable Urban Living’ to generate notoriety and stability. As a primary arterial route between Downtown Milwaukee and the nearby suburbs, Sherman Park will establish a presence along this commuter corridor to reclaim business from big-box retailers.

2030 Masterplan Scale | 1:1250

Seattle, wa

ReStauRant tRaining

caSe Study

Case study

Meanwhile projeCt ‘Generating creativity and enterprise from empty spaces and places, the Meanwhile Project works with landlords, agents, potential occupiers and local authorities to enable uses that benefit the community while something else is waiting to happen.’ – Meanwhile projeCt vision stateMent Throughout the UK, vacancy rates in commercial districts have risen in recent years as the international economic crisis drags on. While many store fronts and offices continue to decay, the Meanwhile Project has established an opportunity for nonprofit and start up organizations to use these spaces and encourage activity.


spatial connectivity

The overall goal of the ‘Spatial Connectivity’ initiative in this plan is to reverse the hierarchy of transportation methods that currently exists on the West Side of Milwaukee. The heavy reliance on the personal vehicle has assisted the collapse of walkable commercial districts throughout the city, especially North Avenue and Center Street in favour of suburban big-box retailers. By limiting vehicular access and by establishing safe, attractive opportunities to move about by alternative means, pedestrian activity can once again flourish throughout these blocks.

alteRnative tRanspoRtation pRoposal scale | 1:50,000

Residential stReetscape

case study

violence pRevention thRu uRban upgRading (vJaa) khayelitsha, cape town, south afRica

In the largest and fastest growing township in South Africa, Residents of Khayelitsha suffer from violent crime, poverty, unemployment, and ‘undignified’ local public space. Following a long consultation process, VPUU developed a number of design “tools” to improve conditions throughout the township: • • • • •

Clear signage and wayfinding system Visual connections along walking routes Clear and short movement routes Clustered and integrated of public activities Active edges to increase passive surveillance

The infrastructure of VPUU’s urban design strategy was a comprehensive circulation system connecting residences to improved public space, employment opportunities and community facilities. Key features of the trail include well-lit, wide, clear pathways with a direct line of vision to ‘Safe Node Areas (SNAs)’. SNAs include a central resource facility that provides child care, counseling, learning development programs, physical fitness and business support as well as ‘Active Boxes’ (seen above). Active Boxes are 24-hour passive community security stations located no more than 500 meters apart throughout the length of the trail. The structures are designed to be visible from the surrounding landscape to act as a point of orientation and a beacon of safety during the evening.

A thorough streetscape improvement and maintenance plan for residential streets is an important first step to decreasing criminal activity in the area. Establishing a quality public realm will increase foot traffic throughout the neighborhood and will encourage outdoor socialization at previously mentioned nodal points. Insignificant street corners and derelict lots will be transformed into active social areas with quality lighting schemes and outdoor seating opportunities to extend social activity from the porch to the street.

commeRcial stReetscape

An improved, undulating streetscape is proposed in this plan to emphasize store-front economy, outdoor seating, and alternative transportation use. Parking is limited along commercial corridors to the rear of the buildings, the side streets or where limited activity is available at present along the street. At each intersection massive bump outs narrow the street to just over 22 ft. to calm traffic flow. Bicycle lanes, which are rarely observed at present will be raised slightly above the street and pedestrian level, moved outside of parked cars and painted green to encourage cycling for commuting and leisure.


8

significant changes • • • • •

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Organised parking + traffic calming Extended pedestrian realm Emphasised social nodal points at key community facilities Activated streetscape with outdoor furniture to encourage socialization Increased safety features such as clean alleys (see right image) and lighting scheme Improved bus stops

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4’walk 8’ bump-out 11’ tRaffic lane 8’ bump-out 4’walk + gRass + gRass

pRoposed Residential stReet section scale | 1:100

9’ - 15’ walk

5’ bike 11’ tRaffic lane

pRoposed commeRcial stReet section scale | 1:100

11’ tRaffic lane

8’ paRking

5’ bike 6’ walk


Social Connectivity

Although the high school and a number of churches co-exist in the neighborhood, the residents benefit very little from their presence. In order to meet the needs of the community, stronger connections must be made to the existing community assets, namely Washington High School, and new, multi-generational spaces must become available. The drawing below details a revitalized landscape plan surrounding one of the most historically significant schools in the city and the athletic facilities that are attached to it at the north and south ends. At the north end, an identifying gateway feature will highlight the track and field area and provide seating along the edges for events. In addition, five new community assets will be established within vacant lots throughout the residential core of the neighborhood. First, qualified child care facilities will be removed from the busy commercial districts and replaced witihn 44th and 45th streets with open space for children to play. Additionally, two pocket parts with open-air Leisure Centreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will combine the social culture of enjoying oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s porch with the open space of a comfortable public park. Finally, a centrally located Resource Centre will provide services ranging from child counselling to retirement planning with plentiful indoor and outdoor space for individual use or organizational gatherings.

Washington High School Improvement Scheme

Pocket Park + Leisure Centre


9 urban theory ‘Lowly, unpurposeful and random as they may appear, sidewalk contacts are the small change from which a city’s wealth of public life may grow.’

-J. Jacobs, 1961 | the death

and

liFe

oF

great american citieS

‘Street is the river of life in a city. We come to these spaces not to escape, but to partake’

-W.H. WHyte, 1980 | the Social liFe

oF

Small urban placeS’

“[Neighborhood parks] that are successful never serve as barriers or as interruptions to the intricate functioning of the city around them. Rather, they help to knit together diverse surrounding functions by giving them a pleasant joint facility; in the process they add another appreciated element to the diversity and give something back to their surroundings.”

-J. Jacobs, 1961

relocated child care Facility

‘Restructure the physical layout of communities to allow residents to control the areas around their homes… help people preserve those areas in which they can realize their commonly held values and lifestyles.’

-o. NeWmaN, 1996 | creating deFenSible Space

“Probably the most important element in intricacy is centering. Good small parks typically have a place somewhere within them commonly understood to be the center – at the very least a main crossroads and pausing point, a climax.”

-J. Jacobs, 1961

propoSed reSource centre


casE study

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victory GardEns During both World Wars, the ‘Victory Garden’ initiative encouraged home owners across the United States to support the war effort by growing and canning produce at home. Victory Gardens eased pressure on the public food supply and also acted as a morale booster to rally support for the war. In recent years, local organizations in Milwaukee have revived the cause and rebranded urban agriculture as sustainable and economically beneficial. The VicTory Gardens iniTiaTiVe provides guidance for individuals and carry out community gardening projects. In addition, GrowinG Power is a large-scale urban agriculture facility based in Milwaukee that provides nutritious food options to all communities in the city.

Economic connEctivity

PhasE i | Production Plots

The first phase of commercial development in the area will be to generate revenue on the three acres of vacant commercial space for economic viability by providing accessible nutritional needs for the community. In short, the proposed near-term solution for North Avenue and Center Street will be to establish for-profit gardens called ‘Production Plots’. In addition, display spaces will be provided along the street front to protect the crops and provide opportunities for local vendors to sell their goods. A farmer-elected garden organizer will manage a small shed of tools and any complaints his constituents may have. Agricultural opportunities along these streets provide immediate entrepreneurial opportunities for residents as well as a small amount of property tax income for the Business Improvement Districts on brownfield land that is currently tax delinquent. In addition, the neighbourhood will be truly holistically sustainable with opportunities to work, produce, buy and sell locally.

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ProPosEd north avEnuE ElEvation | south sidE scale | 1:500


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As optimism and notoriety in the community increase, entrepreneurs will be encouraged to move into the neighborhood. The first priority will be to fill tax delinquent properties with economically viable and community-oriented businesses that will support the needs of the neighborhood. Over time, infill buildings will complement the improved faรงades of the existing building stock to develop a continuous street wall of store fronts with offices above. This new marketplace will include a variety of businesses that promote sustainable urban living and local craft. Additionally, the window shopping and outdoor seating opportunities will promote high levels of pedestrian activity in the neighborhood at all hours of the day. All businesses must be locally owned and operated to ensure revenue remains within the community. Also, unique vendors with one-of-a-kind consumer experiences will be preferred to encourage regular visitors from other communities. Ideal shops recommended by local stakeholders include: Grocery co-oP coffee shoPs hardware sTore

MeaT MarkeT resTauranTs BooksTore

Bakery Bike shoP Toy sTore

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fruiT & VeGeTaBle MarkeT ice creaM Parlour crafT sTore

healThy sandwich shoP BoTanisT/florisT


Valuation analysis residential | 137 Homes

Vacant Property Acquisition | 27 X $0 = Refurb. Property Acquisition | 50 X $25,000 = Demolition | 27 X $10,000 = Refurbishment | 50 X $75,000 = New Construction | 17 X $100,000 = Free Market Refurbishment | 60 X $0 = Housing Total =

Community faCilities | 5 Public Facilities

Refurbish Existing Structure | 3 X $50,000 = New Construction | 2 X $100,000 = Landscaping Cost | 5 X $12,000 = Community Total =

CommerCial phase i | 130,000

Demolition = Remediation + Soil = Start-Up Grants = Display Units | 470 ft x $40/ft = Fencing = Commercial Phase I Total =

Ft2

CommerCial phase ii | 100,000

@ Retail Build Cost ~ $200/ft2 North Ave Commercial | 62,500 ft2 = Center St Commercial | 4,500 ft2 = @ Office Build Cost ~ $150/ft2 North Ave offices above | 35,000 ft2 = Façade Improvement Scheme = Commercial Phase II Total =

oVerall projeCt Costs

Housing Total: Community Total: Commercial Phase I Total: Commercial Phase II Total:

Total Project Cost:

urban agriculture

Ft2

$0 $1,250,000 $270,000 $3,750,000 $1,700,000 $0 $6,970,000

$150,000 $200,000 $60,000 $410,000

$50,000 $140,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $250,000

commercial + oFFice use $12,500,000 $900,000 $5,250,000 $500,000 $19,150,000

$6,970,000 $410,000 $250,000 $19,150,000

$26,770,000

*Streetscape initiative not included – To be completed by City of Milwaukee Department of Public Works (DPW) upon review

ConClusion

refleCtion:

The proposal outlined on the previous pages was developed following a thorough assessment of the existing conditions in Sherman Park. That assessment was influenced by countless hours of walking and driving the neighborhood as well as dozens of conversations with interested residents and organizations. It is hoped that the Urban Design Strategy developed from these interactions will assist the neighborhood as it attempts to revive the housing market and grow economically.

proCess:

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This project would not have been possible without the support of Com and Tim Nelson. Through my connections with the organization I wa stakeholders and residents in the community. I also appreciate the ensuring the success of this project from the following organizations: • • • • • •

sHerman Park community association oFFice oF alderman oF tHe 15tH district and common council President Willie l. H dePartment oF city develoPment - city oF milWaukee business imProvement district #16 – uPtoWn crossing transFormation city cHurcH st. catHerine’s ParisH


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BiBliography PH

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urBan theory:

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mmon Ground, specifically Kathleen Scott as able meet with many important time and effort committed to

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Fainstein, S., Gordon, I., & Harloe, M. (1992) Divided Cities: New York & London in the Contemporary World. Wiley-Blackwell Gehl, J. (2010) Cities for People. Island Press: Washington, D.C. Hustwit, G. (2011) Urbanized. Jacobs, J. (1961) The Death and Life of Great American Cities. Random House: New York Lynch, K. (1960) The Image of the City. Technology Press + Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA Newman, O. (1996) Creating Defensible Space. U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Office of Policy Development and Research: Washington D.C. Newman, O. (1972) Defensible Space, Crime Prevention Through Urban Design. Macmillin: New York. Whyte, W. H. (1980) The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces. The Conservation Foundation: Washington, D.C.

*

loCal issues: Massey, D.S. + Denton, N.A. (1989) ‘Hypersegregation in US Metro Areas: Black and Hispanic Segregation along Five Dimensions’. Demography, 26 (3): 373-391. Simon, R.D. (1978) ‘The City-Building Process: Housing and Services in New Milwaukee Neighborhoods 1880-1910’ The American Philosophical Society: Philadelphia v.78(5) Wilkes, R + Iceland, J. (2004) ‘Hypersegregation in the Twenty-First Century’. Demography, 41 (1): 23-36.

planning: Campus Design Solutions of University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee. (2008). The Center Street Marketplace District Revitalization Plan. Business Improvement District #39 – Center Street. Conservation Design Forum. (2010) Milwaukee Comprehensive Plan: Citywide Policy Plan. Department of City Development Gore, B. (2006) Milwaukee Comprehensive Plan: West Side Plan: A Plan for the Area. Department of City Development. PDI Graef. (2009) Milwaukee Comprehensive Plan: Washington Park: A Plan for the Area. Department of City Development Terra Engineering, Ltd. (2011) Streetscape Guidelines. City of Milwaukee. Department of Public Works and Department of City Development.


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Sherman Park Urban Design Strategy  

Individual Design Project (Thesis) MSc Urban + Rural Design candidate Woody Hanson

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