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Running on the Edge LA 461 Final Composition Hannah Zimmerman


Intentionally Blank


Site Inventory


1


LA 461 2013 Site Inventory Contents Site Location and Context Demographics History

3-6 7 8-19

Topography

20-22

Hydrology and Drainage

23-26

Watershed

27

Soil

28-30

Vegetation

31-37

Microclimate

38-48

Existing Buildings

49-51

Existing Infrastructure

52-56

Utilities

57-60

Views

62-65

Spaces and Senses

66-68

Site Functions

69-70

Existing Play Areas

71-80

Inventory Infographic

81

2


Site Location and context Stretching from the Family Douglas Preserve in the West to Leadbetter Beach to the East (2.25 miles) Meigs Road commercial area in the North all the way to the shoreline in the South (0.50 miles) This area in Santa Barbara, CA is a neighborhood referred to as the Mesa and will be my area of focus for the project.

Primary Area of Focus

3


Project Scale Site Location Project Site

California

Mendocino

Site Location

Santa Barbara Coastline

City Context PACIFIC OCEAN

Monterey

Sana Luis Obispo

Santa Barbara

Kern San Bernardino

Goleta

Santa Barbara Ventura Los Angeles

San Diego

4


Types of land uses

Site Location: Suburban residential, Institutional, Parks/Open Space, Commercial, Harbor Surrounding Area: Hillside residential, Medium Density Residential, Institutional, Commercial, Industrial

5


Mesa neighborhoods Legend:

Alta Mesa: 651 acres. It is almost entirely zoned E-1 and most of the land has been developed or committed to public use. There are steep rolling hills along the northern border and have been zoned A-1 and A-2. West Mesa: 334 acres. Area consists of residential with five dwelling units per acre. Development is similar to East Mesa with several single-family development. This is where most of the Commercial shopping areas exist. East Mesa: 383 acres. This is the primary area of my site with the federal lighthouse, access to the beach, Shoreline Park, La MEsa Park and Washington Elementary School. It is uniformly developed with smalllot, single-family residences. Most of the area is currently zoned R-2.

Alta Mesa

West Mesa

East Mesa

6


Demographics How is it ranked ?

Ages in the Area Male

Female

20% 15% 10% 5% 0%

<5

5-12

13-19

20-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

65-84

84>

http://www.areavibes.com/santa+barbara-ca/mesa/livability/

Statistic

Mesa

Santa Barbara

California

Population (2012)

11,792

88,410

37,252,956

Population (2000)

11,792

92,196

33,871,648

Male/Female Ratio

1.0:1

1.0:1

1.0:1

Married (15yrs & older)

48%

49%

58%

Have children (under 18yrs)

43%

47%

52%

Caucasian

86%

74%

69%

African American

1%

2%

4%

Asian

4%

3%

6%

Speak English

80%

64%

69%

Speak Spanish

10%

29%

22%

7

Cost of Living F Crime B Education B Employment B+ Housing A+ Weather B The Mesa has extremely pricey homes, but the area has sunshine all year round and has great school in the district.


History

542

542

Europeans 300 years

1542

The area along this waterfront was once the site of Syuxtun, a major Chumash community for about 1,000 years with about 500 people at itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s peak.

The first Europeans settled in this areas where from Spain and led by Juan Cabrillo in 1542.

However, it was not until 1769 that the Europeans established a colonizing land presence when Junipero SErra arrived. They occupied the region to convert the natives to Christianity.

1848

Mexican-American War 2 years

The Mexican-American War ended the Mexican period and Santa Barbara became part of the United States when the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed.

Current History: Sternâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s warf was first constructed in 1887 for easy access by steamboat. In 1925 a huge earthquake struck Santa Barbara, converting much of the town into rubble. It was a level 8 for the coast and most of the town was rebuilt (especially the masonry buildings)

Syuxtun Chumash Community 1,000 years

http://www.sbnature.org/research/anthro/ chumash/speak.htm

2013

8


Nearby streets

Highway 101 With over 19,000 students attending Santa Barbara City College this commuter school creates a high volume of traffic in this residential neighborhood. There needs to be additional parking and separate paths for both bikes and pedestrians.

Scenic Highway Residential Streets Bus Route Santa Barbara City College

9


Nearby trails and open space

Beach Access Points

Trail Problems: The trail is broken at several points because of residential development, the bluff erosion is eroding current paths and limiting beach access.

10


Traffic Conditions

Medium Vehicular Traffic High Vehicular Traffic

11

Heaviest traffic is by Santa Barbara City College and exiting the freeway, but medium traffic surrounds open space areas which needs to be taken into consideration.


Noise and light Pollution Elings Park

SBCC

Douglas Preserve

Shopping

La Mesa

School

Shoreline Park Pacific Ocean

Light Pollution Noise Pollution Light Pollution Areas: The four-way intersection at Meigs Road and Cliff Drive, Stadium lights at Santa Barbara City College. Noise Pollution: Busy shopping village at the intersection of Meigs Road and Cliff Drive, cars get jammed near Elings park during rush hour, Washington Elementary School has its playground against Shoreline Drive, Shoreline Park has a bust parking lot on the east end, SBCC has heavy vehicular traffic along Cliff Drive.

12


Neighborhood character

The Mesa neighborhood is filled with architecture styles ranging from Modern, to Spanish Villa all the way to Beach Bungalow. The unique homes make this one of the best places to run because you can get a close up of the beautiful houses and gardens. An eye sore to the area, however, is the several run down parks and restrooms.

13


Maturity of vegetation

Indigenous vegetation is diverse and comprises species that are suited to the Mediterranean climate, adapted to periodic drought and fire. Emblematic species include the palms, sycamore, laurel, toyon, ceanothus, and oak. The bluffs have been overtaken by Carpobrotus edulis as well as Santolina chamaecyparissus. This area typically has fewer trees, but the ones it does have are mature and iconic.

14


Intensity and type of use Douglas Preserve: The Douglas Preserve is a 70-acre recreation area that has been left in its natural state. It overlooks the Arroyo Burro Beach and is part of the seven mile Mesa Loop Trail. The trail has designated quiet zones where dogs must be kept on leash. There are several trails that visitors can chose from and there is no lighting or picnic benches on-site. Shoreline Park: Shoreline Park is a 15-acre bluff-top park that attracts visitors and locals all year round. It has paved pedestrian trails and beach access. There is a small playground and several picnic areas that are unreservable. La Mesa Park: La Mesa Park is a neighborhood park across the street from Washington Elementary School. It consists of reservable and non reservable picnic facilities and several turf areas for bounce houses. There is a bridge that overlooks the ocean and a connection to the neighborhoods near the Douglas Preserve.

15


Fluctuations of the area Real Estate Values: West Mesa: median Sales Price of House: $1,250,000 East Mesa: median Sales Price of House: $968,748 Alta Mesa: median Sales Price of House: $689,000

Climate Changes: Santa Barbara’s latitude is sufficiently south to be out of the path of most of the Pacific storms which come onto the mainland out of the northwest. This geographic location, combined with the modifying influence of the ocean and the protective mountains, hills and islands, compose a mild climate with a mean winter temperature of 56 degrees and a mean summer temperature of 71 degrees with cool nights. With averages of 17.7 inches of rainfall and more than 220 sunny days per year, occasional fogs and the infrequent storms, Santa Barbara’s climate is as much enjoyed for its diversity as for its equability. Occasionally, a mass of warm, dry air is pushed over the mountains from the eastern deserts, sweeping into the South Coast for several days at a time. Originally referred to as “Santanas,” these “Santa Ana” winds affect most of coastal Southern California during the spring and fall.

Future Changes: Though scientists have estimated that the California Sierra snow pack has decreased by 10 percent, and sea level has risen by 7 inches in the last 100 years, the impacts of climate change to date for Santa Barbara are not yet known (CA DWR, 2005). It may be necessary to consider future impacts of climate change, not only on the weather, but on existing and new development.

16


Primary points of arrival Elings Park

SBCC

Douglas Preserve

Shopping

School La Mesa

Shoreline Park Pacific Ocean

Points of Entry into Main Features The fingers represent the main points of entry into each of the main features of the Mesa. In most cases, with the exception of the finger pointing towards La Mesa Park, the main points of entry are into the parking lot. Shoreline Park has two parking lots at either end of the park and SBCC has a road that leads cars to the main parking lots. As for La Mesa park, the main point of entry is from a foot bridge that connects the nearby neighborhoods.

17


Bus Stops Elings Park

SBCC

Douglas Preserve

Shopping

La Mesa

School

Shoreline Park Pacific Ocean

Bus Stop

There are several bus stops along Cliff Drive, but there are none that go past Shoreline Park or the beach access points.

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Topography 160 150

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Douglas Preserve to Washington Elementary

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Washington Elementary to Shoreline Park

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Grade changes 150

140 130

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110 100 90

80 70 60 50 40

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30

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100 80 90

110 100

12 0

* Each line represents 10 feet of grade change

110 70 60 50 40 30 20 10

90

70 60

80

This is a typical scenario for most of the site. 50

This is a portion of the topographic map from Douglas preserve and into the surrounding neighborhood. There is a steep bluff that rises 140 feet above sea level in a very short horizontal distance. From there it levels out and this is where most of the development takes place. The Mesa: a Spanish word for â&#x20AC;&#x153;tableâ&#x20AC;? is the location in Santa Barbara that is the elevated flat ocean front along the southwestern border of the city.

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OLIVE R

90

0 12

ol Po

ORO

BR EV

E CA LL

N

O

AVENUE

LIAN JU

Po ol

E 6045000

15 0

7-1

64 9

ER

LEADBETT

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55 2

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50 40

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BEACH

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BE52AC 4

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BETT

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COOPER

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0

140

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R

Dense Trees

148 5

ES PALISAD

140

MOHAWK

Stairs

144 8 Dense Trees

CAMIN O

OLIVER

144 9 137 2 135 0

DE

143 0

548 132.43

WAY

WAY

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131 5

57 2 58 9

100 80 90

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124 2

Brush

70 60 50 40 30 20 10

Tennis

110 100

Brush

90

Brush

SE

PL

70 60

Court

124 8

120 3

122 7

80

N 1971000

53.5

109 0 54 4

N 1971000 117 3

Brush

80 70

73 6

50

Although the entire site relatively follows the same geological formation, this portion of the site contains a major swale that channels down to the ocean from La Mesa Park. This is the location of PACIFIC OCEAN the pedestrian bridge.

LIGHTHOU

129 5

0 110

12

120

136 4

Footbridge

136 8

135 8

0 10

93 1

132 9

EDGEW ATER

136 1

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127 0

0

0 11

132 5 128 2

12

40

94 8

30

10 20

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10

139 6

LUZ

132 5

147 0

LA

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146.7

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AD RO

70 60 50 40

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ing

138 8

Park

LA MESA PARK

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alt

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h Asp

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143 3

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RD

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150 5

Pool

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90

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Pool

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MEIG

GE

0

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164 7 Asph Parking

MESA PARK

148 3

130

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LA

150 1

A

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ED

146 2 145 3

MONIC

15

151 2

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DRIVE

150 3

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SANTA

143 6

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US

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152 5

Pool

165 1

LIG

152 6

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ROAD

150

N 1972000

N 1972000

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157 2 148 9

ROAD

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150 1

OCEAN

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PACIFIC

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LANE

MESA

148 3

147 0

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0 12

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RD

E 6042000 E 6042000

WAY

0 15 14 0

130

DRIVE

150 7

148 6

54 4

52 1

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55 5

57 1 58 1 58 2

58 3 58 3

60 5 62 8

66 4

68 1

PARK

73 1

12

140

PALISA DES

SA

COOPER

MOHAWK

Stairs

E 6040000

E 6039000

E 6039000

149 4 150 2

148 5

S ONDA

151 1

153 2

149 4

52 5

OCEAN

151 0

149 7

MENTE CLE

PACIFIC

N 1970000

152 2

153 6

150 9

S

155 0 153 1

LA

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N 1972000

Pa

52 4

52 1 52 9

INE

REL

SHO

LEAD 54 8

59 0

60 5

68 1

71 4

52 2

ng

rki

alt

ph

52 2 As

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55 8

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66 7

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SHORELINE

51 0

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DRIVE

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73 4

Parking

VE

DRI

58 1

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N SA

74 4

73 2 Asphalt

54 4

OCEAN

Portion of Site with the Most Elevation Change: N 1970000

66 6

72 5

60 50 30 40 10 20

PACIFIC

TA PLA

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52 1

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54 6

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ol

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84 8 88 1

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64 9 73 3

73 3 75 6

82 2

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60 61 9

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Po

70 4

Pool

71 5

PLACE

MOS ALA

81 0

91 0

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UE

92 7

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LOS

71 1

75 5

55 2

L

54 2

68 1

78 9

80 1

55 1

60 3

DE 59 3 61 6

AVEN

ELINE

77 0

70

10 20

80

CLE

83 2

78 2

SHOR 82 8

N 1971000

88 4

94 8

30

CIR

81 0

85 4 85 3

85 0 84 5

96 8

NICOLAS

70 50 30

117 3

80 70

73 6

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Brush

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sh

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79 8

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RITA

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85 3

87 4

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84 7

90 4 89 5

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66 7

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E AVENU

54 4

94 4

Pool

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50 30 10

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87 9

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80 3

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91 3

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UE EN

120 110 90

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100 7

1110

129 1

Pool Brush

124 8

120 3

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94 1

92 1 90 7 91 5

98.4

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60 7

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AV

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Court

Brush

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OS AM

Tennis

110 100

90

70 60 53.5

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98 8 549 101.44

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125 2

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129 5

Brush

DRIVE

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AL

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57 4

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79 3

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TA

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129 4

SHORELINE

70 5

52 6

61 4

60 3 68 9 68 1

66 9

62 8

64 8 75 6

87 3

83 6

89 9

SAN

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139 5

135 3

Brush

70 60 50 40 30 20 10

BLVD

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PL

81 6

FA

90

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71 7

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63 4

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RO

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RA 89 0

96 2

USE

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Poo

LIGHTHO

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Pool

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MAR E AV

L

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66 8

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SANTA

93 0

96 8

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96 6

PACIFIC

80

82 5

83 8

77 5

98 2

EL

AVE

94 5

99 5 136 4

10

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N 1971000

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0

Footbridge

136 8

WAY

92 5

93 1

100 9 99 2

99 2

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113 9

DRIVE

R

135 8

127 1

100 100 9

PACIFIC

110

92 3 96 1

117 0

Pool

1112

130

139 6

12 132 9

EDGEWATE

136 1

130

Pool

127 5

131 5

Pool

94 3

94 7

98 1

104 3

102 8

107 2 133 8

Pool

LA

0 11

132 5

127 0

SOL

548 132.43

WAY 128 2 93 1

142 9

VIEW CIR

109 1

AVENUE 120 2

136 2

Baseball Field

144 7

143 0

LUZ

132 5

10

147 0

AD RO

DE

Y BA

ROSA

SANTA

139 1

120 Dense Trees

CAMINO

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20

Pool

g

kin

150

144 8

SANTA

1118

122 3

85 1 85 2

N

t Par

152 1

146.7

EL

126 9

131 1 Pool

77 6 76 3

84 7

87 6

90 96 4

88 5

95 5

102 9

78 4

79 7

77 3

LA

93 0

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96 9

81 6

87 5

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103 7

AVE

105 0

ROSA

87 7

83 4

SA

hal

30

147 1

146 8

DEL

Asp

148 5

144 9 137 2

109 3

74 4

73 6 71 5

78 3 98 1

96 8

95 0

100 2 101 9

EN

AV

103 1

ROSA SANTA

102 9 133 3

135 0

147 1

96 6

UE

139 8

CRUZ

ER 138 8

135 0

SCHOOL Asphalt Playground

152 4

100

75 1

82 9

96 8

98 2

109 4

121 4

130

DRIVE

AT W

MEIGS

GE

148 5

DRIVE

ED

LA MESA PARK

130

139 5

138 7

ELEMENTARY

80 6

85 5

94 1 102 9 102 8

106 6

104 7

145 9

140

149 9

WASHINGTON

155 2

152 6

110

CARISMA

VIA

0

15

162 1

143 3 142 2

80 70 60 50 40

161 8

1113

106 2 109 2

106 1

SAN

160

152 8

140

112 6

115 0

108 5

0

11 128 6

151 3 Conc.

MESA PARK

Dense Trees

Pool

120

90

151 4

150 5

148 3

130

110 100

150

LA

150 1

MONICA

152 2

Pool

Pool

146 3

LOYOLA

151 2

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0

15

114 3

N 1972000

138 4

0

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SANTA 152 1

143 6

147 8

162 4

14 160

LO

152 5

150 3

146 2 145 3

140

162 1

162 3

153 0

152 6

148.6

147 9

168 6

164 7 Asph Parking

NTA

148 3 147 9

150

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E

OUS

TH

LIGH

SA

150 7

Pool

165 1

MONTE

149 4

148 5

152 5

SALIDA

149 4 150 2

149 7

123 3

N 1972000

N 1972000

152 5

154 6

152 7

149 5

160

E 6041000

157 2 148 9

150

ROAD

150 1

ROAD

ROAD

MESA

151 1

153 2

EL

E 6039000

152 2

153 6

150 9 151 0

CORDOVA

155 0 153 1

LANE

N 1972000

E 6040000

High and low points of the area

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139 5


La Mesa Park

Meigs Road

Hydrology and Drainage

Pacific Ocean

Main Drain Sewer/Drain Outlet

On average, there is main drain on every block, with the wider streets having several. Because there is only 4 inches of rain on the heaviest month on the Mesa this should suffice. On the other hand, there are very few drain inlets so this is something that should be taken into consideration when dealing with such a great grade change.

23


rk

e Pa

elin hor

S

Pacific Ocean

http://www.countyofsb.org/pwd/water/DWGSantaBarbara.htm

24


Drainage patterns

* Unless there is a road that redirects the flow of water, the water will drain perpendicular to the slope.

25


Predominant Water Direction

26


Watershed Santa Barbara Coastal Watershed Overview

Size: 1238593 acres/ 5012.4 sq km Waterbody Types: river, estuary, coastal waters The Santa Barbarbara Coastal Watershed stretches from Lompoc to the North along the coast until Carpinteria to the south.

Project Location within the Watershed Project Site

27

Watershed boundary


Soil 248700

249100

249500

249900

250300

119° 41' 38'' W

119° 44' 21'' W

Custom Soil Resource Report Soil Map 248300

250700

251100

251500

251900

252300 34° 24' 41'' N

3809000

AC:

CgC:

AgE2:

CgD2:

AgF2:

CgE2:

AhE2:

DaD:

AhF2:

DaF2:

AhG:

LdG:

BcC:

ZaE2:

3809000

3809400

3809400

3809800

3809800

3810200

3810200

3810600

3810600

3811000

3811000

34° 24' 41'' N

3808600

BE: 34° 23' 19'' N

34° 23' 19'' N

N

248700

249100

249500

249900

250300

Feet 0 250 500 1000 1500 Map projection: Web Mercator Corner coordinates: WGS84 Edge tics: UTM Zone 11N WGS84

250700

251100

251500

251900

252300 119° 41' 38'' W

119° 44' 21'' W

248300

Map Scale: 1:5,210 if printed on D landscape (34" x 22") sheet. Meters 0 50 100 200 300

8

282


Types of Soil AC: Aquents, fill areas (15.6 Acres) AgE2: Arnold Loamy Sand, 15-30% slopes (17.5 acres) AgF2: Arnold Loamy Sand, 30-50% slopes (0.8 acres) AhE2: Ayar Clay, 15-30% slopes (70.9 acres) AhF2: Ayar Clay, 30-50% slopes (12.9 acres) AhG: Ayar Clay, 50-75% slopes (47.9 acres) BcC: Baywood Loamy Sand, 2-9% slopes (73.3 acres) BE: Beaches (53.8 acres) CgC: Conception Fine Sandy Loam, 2-9% slopes (424.3 acres) CgD2: Conception Fine Sandy Loam, 9-15% slopes (70.7 acres) CgE2: Concepcion Fine Sandy Loam, 15-30% slopes (23.5 acres) DaD: Diablo Clay, 9-15% slopes (35.9 acres) DaF2: Diablo Clay, 30-50% slopes (1.1 acres) LdG: Lopez-Rock Outcrop Complex, 50-75% slopes (17.6 acres) ZaE2: Zaca Clay, 15-30% slopes (10.1 acres)

29


Percolation rates AC: Aquents, Fill Areas

CgC: Concepcion Fine Sandy Loam, 2-9% slopes

parent material: earthy fill from variable sources drainage class: poorly drained depth to water table: 24-72” flooding: rare

parent material: mixed alluvium drainage class: moderately well drained depth to water table: more than 80” flooding: none ponding: none

ponding: rare

AgE2: Arnold Loamy Sand, 15-30% slopes, eroded

CgD2: Concepcion Fine Sandy Loam, 9-15% slopes, eroded

parent material: residuum weathered from very soft sandstone drainage class: somewhat excessively drained depth to water table: More than 80” flooding: none

see above

ponding: none

parent material: residuum weathered from mudstone and/or soft shale drainage class: well drained depth to water table: more than 80” flooding: none ponding: none

AgF2: Arnold Loamy Sand, 30-50% slopes, eroded see above

AhE2: Ayar Clay, 15-30% slopes, eroded parent material: residuum weathered from mudstone or calcareous shale drainage class: well drained depth to water table: more than 80” flooding: none ponding: none

AhF2: Ayar Clay, 30-50% slopes, eroded see above

AhG: Ayar Clay, 50-70% slopes see above

BcC: Baywood Loamy Sand, 2-9% slopes parent material: beach sand drainage class: somewhat excessively drained depth to water table: more than 80” flooding: none ponding: none

CgE2: Concepcion Fine Sandy Loam, 15-30% slopes, eroded see above

DaD: Diablo Clay, 9-15% slopes

DaF2: Diablo Clay, 30-50% slopes, eroded same as above

LdG: Lopez-Rock Outcrop Complex, 50-75% slopes parent material: residuum weathered from siliceous shale drainage class: somewhat excessively drained depth to water table: more than 80” flooding: none ponding: none

ZaE2: Zaca Clay, 15-30% slopes, eroded parent material: residum weathered from mudstone and calcareous shale drainage class: well drained depth to water table: more than 80” flooding: none ponding: none

BE: Beaches parent material: sandy or stony alluvium drainage class: poorly drained depth to water table: undefined flooding: frequent ponding: frequent

30


Vegetation

1.

2.

Santa Barbara Mesa Vegetation Types: 1. 2. 3. 4.

31

Chaparral Oak Woodland Coastal Dunes Invasive non-natives

3.

4.


Color and seasonal variation The following is a color chart depicting which trees have seasonal variation and which color they turn during Autumn and into the New Year.

Jan

Feb

mar

apr

may

Jun

Jul

aug

sep

oct

nov

dec

mar

apr

may

Jun

Jul

aug

sep

oct

nov

dec

Ash Birch Cottonwood Western Redbud Ginkgo Modesto Ash Poplar Willow

Jan

Feb

Chinese Pistachio Smoke Tree Sourwood Sweet Gum

32


Species in the area

1st

Row

33

Abies concolor

Adenostoma fasciculatum

Artemisia californica

Abronia maritima

Agave americana

Baccharis pilularis

Acacia baileyana

Agoseris grandiflora

Calamagrostis rubescens

Acacia dealbata

Albizia julibrissin

Callistemon citrinus

Acacia longifolia

Antirrhinum majus

Calystegia purpurata

Acer macrophyllum

Arctostaphylos glauca

Carex barbarae

Achillea millefollium Acmispon argophyllus

2nd Row

Aristida purpurea Armeria maritima

3rd Row

Carex praegracilis Carpobrotus edulis


Species in the area

4th

Row

Castilleja affinis

Dudleya pulverulenta

Foeniculum vulgare

Caulanthus lasiophullus

Echium candicans

Fragaria chiloensis

Ceanothus arboreus

Equisetum hyemale

Frangula californica

Clarkia speciosa

Erigeron Annuus

Fremontodendron californicum

Clinopodium douglasii

Eriogonum arborescens

Hedera helix

Cosmos bipinnatus

Eschscholzia californica

Helianthus annuus

Cotoneaster pannosus Crassula ovata

5th

Row

Eucalyptus globulus Ficus carica

6th

Hesperocyparis macrocarpa Heteromeles arbutifolia

Row

34


species in the area

7th Row

35

Holcus lanatus

Lobularia maritima

Pennisetum setaceum

Hypericum formosum

Lyonothamnus floribundus

Pinus torreyana

Ipomoea indica

Malacothamnus fremontii

Quercus lobata

Iris douglasiana

Mimulus aurantiacus

Ribes californicum

Juglans regia

Myrtus communis

Romneya coulterii

Juncus effusus

Nassella tenuissima

Salvia spathacea

Leptosyne californica Linum lewisii

8th Row

Olea europaea Osteospermum fruticosum

9th Row

Washingtonia filifera Washingtonia robusta


species in the area

1

2

3

4

5

6

Birds in the area: Sanderlings, Snowy Plovers (breed locally and there are only 2,000 threatened Snowy Plovers reamining on the West Coast), and Whimbrels (winter migration).

http://ourmesaneighborhood.com/friendsOfDP.html

1. Sanderlings 2. Whimbrel 3. Snowy Plover 4. Seagull 5. Brown Pelican 6. Gray Squirrell

Squirrels are getting the upper hand in the city parks and open spaces along the waterfront. They pose health risk to kids playing on the holes that they create. Also, Seagulls wand Brown Pelicans are very common to the Santa Barbarbara coastal areas and can be a nuissance when fed.

36


species in the area Dogs in the Area Santa Barbara county has 2 miles of off-leash beach and 21 beaches that welcome dogs on-leash. The Douglas Family Preserve and Arroyo Burro beach, which are located on the west end of my site are two offleash dog areas in town and should remain that way. In general, dogs are required to be leashed within county parks and open spaces unless an off-leash privilege has been established for a specific designated area. No person shall bring a dog into within any county recreation area unless the dog is on a leash not more than six feet in length. My goal is is to work collaboratively with dog owners and park neighbors so that these canine play areas are well maintained, safe for dogs and people, and do not unduly add to noise or congestion. http://www.countyofsb.org/parks/parks01.aspx?id=9228

37


Microclimate Temperature

Precipitation

Average High Temperature Average Low Temperature Inches of Rain per Month Santa Barbaraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s topography with 4,000 foot mountains to the North and coastal foothills to the East and West, combined with itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Southern facing coastline, creates many climate zones. The Mesa has typically mild weather with fog in the mornings that burns off by the mid afternoon. http://activerain.com/blogsview/1924465/santa-barbara-ca-neighborhoods-the-mesa

Temp: Highest in July/August Rainfall: Highest in February with 4.09 inches

38


wind patterns Month of Year Dominant Wind Direction Wind Probability

Average Wind Speed (mph) Average Air Temp (째F)

Wind Distribution (Distribution %)

Exisitng vegetation Map 39


Sun Orientation

40


Sun Angles January 8am 12pm 6pm *Times are from left to right

May 8am 12pm 6pm

September 8am 12pm 6pm

41


sun angles continued The diagrams to the left represent the different angles of the sun at different times of the year and at different times during the day. The top row represents January, with 8am, 12pm, and 6pm going from left to right. The key below explains the colors mapped. These angels can be used to determine the planting palette and which areas have shade and at what times during the year.

What the Colors Represent (#â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s indicate the time of day)

42


Shadow study 8am * This is a shadow study conducted in the month of January.

Project Site Location

12pm

43


4pm

8pm

44


Shadow study 8am * This is a shadow study conducted in the month of July.

Project Site Location

12pm

451


4pm

8pm

462


Existing Vegetation Map La Mesa Park

Pacific Ocean

Existing Trees Large Grove Group of Trees The Mesa is heavily populated with trees in the residential areas. This provides abundant shade for the walking paths and creates a safe haven for wildlife. Closer to the beach are scattered palms and pines and trees are more sparse because of the difficult sandy soil.

47


Sh

rk

e Pa

in orel

Pacific Ocean

48


existing buildings La Mesa Park

Pacific Ocean

All of the houses in this area are single family dwellings which are in the category of E-3/S-D-3 for the zoning map. Because of this the paths and trails cannot interrupt the property of these homes and must follow the strict zoning of the area. Washington Elementary is indicated by the green above and it a public elementary school for the area. Just to the right of this map is where Santa Barbara City College is located so lots of traffic forms going to and from these schools.

49


ine

rel Sho

k

Par

Pacific Ocean

Washington Elementary School Single Residential House (E-3/S-D-3) Public Restroom

50


Architectural styles Santa Barbara is famous for its Spanish Colonial Revival style architecture, yet the Mesa is filled with a wealth of architectural designs. Ranging from Victorian Queen Anne to Contemporary, the area boasts a high quality of design and has strict standards to follow.

Spanish Roots

Queen Anne Victorian

Mission Revival

Craftsman Style

Tudor Revival

Modern Ranch

Victorian

Modern

51

http://harrisondesignassociates.com/files/articles/2012_-_summer_-_village_properties_-_sb_architecture.pdf


existing infrastructure Spanish Roots: Rustic, plaster walls and red-tile roofs Queen Anne Victorian: Intricate and eclectic style Mission Revival: Mission gables, red tile roofs Craftsman Style: Celebrates hand-made artistry Tudor Revival: Authentic appearance of stone, brick and half-timbering Modern Ranch: Simple ranch forms Victorian: Wood and intricate details Modern: Use of Metals and solid color blocks *These are the most common architecture types in the area, but there more not listed.

The existing architecture should tie in with the proposed designs. The coastal theme is very prevalent along the Mesa with the use of natural resources found along the coast. Drift wood, seashells, and stained glasses are a few of the most common themes. Santa Barbara is known for being ahead of its time with out of the box designs. The residents are open to change and highly praise the environment.

52


pedestrian paths Although this walking trail at the moment is broken up, if it were completed as follows it is 5.8 miles round trip. Adding the residential park and Douglas Family Preserve adds another 3 miles to the trip, making this a 8.8 miles walking path.

http://www.santabarbaracarfree.org/pdf-files/shoreline.pdf

1. Sternâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Warf 2. Los BaĂąos del Mar 3. Harbor 4. Leadbetter Beach 5. Shoreline Park

53

6. 7. 8. 9.

1,000 Steps La Mesa Park Foot Bridge Douglas Family Preserve


Bicycle paths Classification Of Bicycle Facilities Separate Facility (a.k.a. Class I) - A non-motorized facility, paved or unpaved, physically separated from motorized vehicular traffic by an open space or barrier. Also called Bicycle Path, Bike Trail, Non-motorized Trail, Multi-purpose Trail or some combination thereof. Bike Lane (a.k.a. Class II) - A portion of a roadway that is designated by striping, signing and pavement markings for the preferential or exclusive use of bicyclists. Most often these are done in couplets, each one being one way and adjacent to the outside through travel lane. Also called Bicycle Lanes. Bike Route (a.k.a. Class III) - A segment of road designated by the jurisdiction having authority, with appropriate directional and informational markers, but without striping, signing and pavement markings for the preferential or exclusive use of bicyclists. Also called Bicycle Route. Bike Friendly (a.k.a. Class IV) - A roadway not designated by directional and informational markers, striping, signing nor pavement markings for the preferential or exclusive use of bicyclists, but containing appropriate bicycle-friendly design standards such as wide-curb lanes and bicycle safe drain grates. http://www.ibike.org/engineering/glossary.htm

54


Vehicular roads La Mesa Park

Pacific Ocean

Vehicular Path

All of the roads surrounding the parks are vehicular roads with little to no bike lanes. Sidewalks end at some properties and the streets are not well lit. Although several people live in this area, the traffic in this area is not heavy except for along Meigs Road and Cliff Drive.

55


rk

e Pa

elin hor

S

Pacific Ocean

56


utilities La Mesa Park

Pacific Ocean

Electrical Poles/Utility Poles

Because this is a residential area, utility and electrical poles are very prevalent. This must be taken into consideration when redesigning the street layout and vegetating the grounds because these poles for the most part should stay in their current locations.

57


ine

rel Sho

k

Par

Pacific Ocean

58


street lights La Mesa Park

Pacific Ocean

Overhead Street Light

Street lights are scattered evenly to the East of La Mesa Park, but in the neighborhoods connecting to Douglas Preserve there are not nearly enough lights to make this a safe place to walk. There also is no lighting at any of the parks because parks are open from dusk to dawn daily to prevent crime.

59


ine

rel Sho

k

Par

Pacific Ocean

60


Intentionally Blank

61


views

Currently the views are being hidden by rusted chain link fences. There are several outlooks along the ocean front, but nothing has been done to enhance the beautiful setting.

This is the view from the pedestrian bridge that links the Douglas Preserve and La Mesa Park. It overlooks the mature vegetation and ocean, however it too is rusted a hindrance.

Beautiful architecture line the ocean front and can be a view on their own.

The narrow, steep steps that guide visitors to the beach are in bad shape, but the view they create is breathtaking.

62


good views

5.

La Mesa

1.

Park

ton Washing ry Elementa

4. Shoreline

2.

elin hor

S

3. Pacific Ocean

Locations of Good Views

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

63

Pedestrian bridge to La Mesa Park Open bluff space with no housing development Neighborhood beach access from Santa Cruz Boulevard Outlook at east end of Shoreline Park Leadbetter Beach event space

rk

e Pa

Drive


bad views

1.

Douglas Preserve

La Mesa

Me

dc

lif

fR

Park

oa

d

El Cam

ino De

La Luz

3.

ton Washing ry Elementa

2.

Shoreline

Drive

4. 5.

Locations of Bad Views

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Unkept neighbors yard that perimeters the Douglas Preserve Large utility boxes are at the entrance of La Mesa Park Trash accumulates along the fence outside of Washington Elementary School An old chain link fence poorly hides the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s play area The steps to the beach have graffiti and broken, leaky pipes

64


how to utilize views Views are what draw people to visit a site. With views unlike any other location in the world, this area must highlight them and teach visitors how to appreciate such a place.

How to go about this: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

65

Remove graffiti in the area Cut back plants that hinder the view Use plants to frame views Signage to highlight where to look and what to look for Appropriate fencing for safety Fencing should add to the site not defer people from it Make the area accessible to all individuals Dogs must be on leash in designated areas in order to keep visitors feeling safe Contain trash and utilities where people do not walk Keep native vegetation that require little to no water so that it looks lush year round


spaces and senses Sight, hearing, smelling and touch play a dominating role in spatial perception in humans. Below is an image of the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin, Germany. It is the image I think of when it comes to propesct and refuge and creating spaces where people do not feel safe. This memorial successfully creates an eerie unpleasant setting for the visitors, oposite of what I aim to do along the Santa Barbarbara waterfront.

http://artofhdr.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Berlin-memorial-2.jpg

We must design for all senses “ If architects create visual environments without bearing in mind their user friendliness,multi-sensoriality and functionality, this results in places that lack physical or mentalaccessibility: ‘distorted spaces’. For example a photogenic building can look very beautiful,but be an acoustic disaster for somebody with an ear-impairment. We do not have to adapt ourselves to the environment. It is the environment which has to be adapted to us.” (M,Ponty) The Contribution of the Five Human Senses Towards the Perception of Space by Panagiotis Hadjiphilippou

66


exposed areas Outlooks before the ocean access have single tables that have no shade or enclosure

A meditation circle is along the fence at Shoreline Park, but no one uses it because it is out in the open and too small to be functional.

Memorials scatter this area because loved ones cherished this area, however rugged fencing and lack of planting make this an eerie setting when walking along the bluffs.

67


outdoor room areas Elings Park

Douglas Preserve

Shopping

La Mesa

School

Pacific Ocean

Shoreline Park

Potential Outdoor Room Areas Locations: East end of Shoreline Park, NW end of La Mesa Park, SE corner of the Douglas Preserve, Elings park. These are the areas of the site that are enclosed and are away from vehicular traffic. They are quaint settings, perfect for an outdoor classroom.

68


site functions Nite Moves: A 3.2 miles Run in Santa Barbara along the Mesa. It starts and ends at Leadbetter Beach and has a total ascent of 144.36 feet and has a maximum elevation of 193.57 feet. The run first started on July 16, 2008 and is a night run starting at 6:25pm on May 1st and lasts throughout the summer. At the end of the run, there is a vendors village that happens with a band, refreshments and a beer garden. This is a huge event that spans the distance of the focus site.

http://www.ourmesaneighborhood.com/

Art on the Mesa Summer Series: Happening several times in July and August, Art on the Mesa Summer Series draws hundreds of people to the area. With over 40 local Artists, Musicians, Street Performers and food this event is for all ages and a great way to bring people to the Mesa. It is located at the intersection of Meigs road and Cliff Drive in the strip called Moonshine Bay.

69

http://www.ourmesaneighborhood.com/


safety hazards

!

! !! !

! !

Areas of Concern

Concern Areas (from left to right): Entrance into Douglas Preserve is unlit and has rusted metal piping, Pedestrian bridge is uneven, tree in the middle of the bike bath, bluff erosion area, path gets cut off, path empties into a busy parking lot

70


existing play areas

Existing Playground

Currently there are three play areas in the mesa area, however they have not changed for several years and lack creative play equipment. There are no tot lots in the area and the playgrounds are for ages 5-12 years old.

71


play equipment conditions

Shoreline Park: Sand flooring, wood structures, swings, small playset, climbable sculptures La Mesa Park: Wood chip flooring, small playset, open turf space for bounce house Elings Park: Largest privately funded park in America, baseball, soccer, lacrosse, rugby, tennis, ultimate frisbee, off-leash dog area, RC car racing, BMX racing, paragliding and hang gliding. There are a few small playgrounds but this park is not close enough to Shoreline Park or La Mesa Park to walk. Good event area.

72


public park rules What is a “Public Park”? “Public” playground equipment refers to equipment for use by children ages 6 months through 12 years in the playground areas of:

CPSC

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has created guidelines for both public playground and home playground equipment. These guidelines were made to prevent injury on the playground and help standardize the way playgrounds work. http://www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/122149/325.pdf

• Commercial (non-residential) child care facilities • Institutions • Multiple family dwellings, such as apartment and condominium buildings • Parks, such as city, state, and community maintained parks • Resorts and recreational developments

73


choosing a site Site Factor

Questions to Ask

If yes, then...Mitigation

Travel patterns of children to

Are there hazards in the

and from the playground

way?

Nearby accessible hazards

Could a child inadvertently

Provide a method to contain

such as roads with traffic,

run into a nearby hazard?

children within the playground.

lakes, ponds, streams, drop-

Could a younger child easily

The method should allow for

offs/cliffs, etc.

wander off toward the

observation by supervisors.

Clear hazards.

hazard? Bare metal slides, platforms, Sun exposure

Slope and drainage

Is sun exposure sufficient

and steps should be shaded or

to heat exposed bare metal

located out of direct sun.

slides, platforms, steps, and

Provide warnings that

surfacing enough to burn

equipment in intense sun can

children?

burn.

Will loose fill materials wash

Consider proper drainage

away during periods of

regrading to prevent wash outs.

heavy rain?

74


surfacing importance Minimum compressed loose-fill surfacing depths

* Shredded/recycled rubber loose-fill surfacing does not compress in the same manner as other loose-fill materials. However, care should be taken to maintain a constant depth as displacement still may occur.

Appropriate Materials - Any material that has been tested, such as engineered wood fiber.

- Asphalt - Carpet

- Pea gravel

- Dirt

- Sand

- Grass

- Shredded/recycled rubber mulch

- CCA treated wood mulch

- Wood mulch (not CCA-treated) - Wood chips

75

Inappropriate Materials


toddler: ages 6-23 months Age Separation Importance: - Climbing equipment under 32â&#x20AC;? high - Ramps - Single file step ladders - Slides - Spiral slides less than 360Âş - Spring Rockers - Stairways - Swings with full bucket seats

Children develop extremely quickly in the beginning of their life and play equipment for a toddler versus a 12 year old should be drastically different. The layout of pathways and landscaping should show the distinct age groups. The areas should be separated by at least a buffer zone, which can be an area with shrubs or benches. This separation and buffer zone will reduce the chance of injury from older more active children running through the areas of children with slower reaction times.

76


prescool: ages 2-5 years Child Development Fluidity: - Horizontal ladders less than 60” high - Merry-go-rounds - Ramps - Rung Ladders - Single file step ladders - Slides - Spiral slides up to 360º - Spring Rockers - Stairways - Swings- belt, full bucket seats - Rotating tires

77

In areas where access to the playgrounds is unlimited or enforced by only signage, the playground designer should recognize that since child development is fluid, parents and caregivers may select a playground slightly above or below their child’s abilities. This is especially common for children at the cut-off age (2 and 5). Misperceptions about the hazards a play may pose a threat if children are not clearly assigned the appropriate playground level.


grade school: ages 5-12 years Cautions to be Aware of: - Arch climbers - Chain or cable walks - Free standing climbing pieces - Fulcrum seesaws - Ladders: Horizontal, Rung and Step - Overhead rings - Merry-go-rounds - Ramps - Ring treks - Slides - Spiral slides more than one 360º turn - Stairways - Swings: belt and rotating tires - Track rides - Vertical sliding poles

Metal is not the only material that can cause thermal burns. Because it is known that bare uncoated metal slides can cause severe burns, many pieces of metal playground equipment have either been replaced with plastic equipment or coated with heat-reducing paint—yet burns still occur on playgrounds. There were at least 30 thermal burn incidents from 2001-2008 that were reported. Of those incidents, 10 were associated with plastic, rubber, or other nonmetal surfaces, and seven were associated with metal surfaces. What should I watch for? - Uncoated metal equipment, or metal equipment where the heat‐ reducing coating has rubbed off Slides, swings, or other equipment that a child may sit on - Dark colored plastics and rubbers, especially the surfacing under and around the playground equipment - Asphalt and concrete surfaces near playgrounds heat the playground significantly

78


recommended dimensions Ramps, stairways, rung ladders, and step ladders each have different recommendations for slope and tread dimension, but the steps or rungs always should be evenly spaced. *ADA has specific requirements. See next slide.

79


ada regulations ADA Intent

ADA Path Requirements

In 1990, a Federal law was passed by Congress that prohibits the discrimination against the disabled in areas intended for public use. Intent: Remove barriers which keep disabled people from participating in all aspects of our society. All parks must be updated to be brought into compliance with ADA. Parking Spaces 1 to 25 : 1 26 to 50 : 2 51 to 75 : 3 76 to 100 : 4 101 to 150 : 5 151 to 200 : 6 201 to 300 : 7 301 to 400 : 8 401 to 500 : 9 501 to 1000 : 2% of total

http://www.ada.gov regs2010/2010ADAStandards/2010ADAstandards.htm

* Number to left represents normal spaces and the number to the right is how many handicap spaces you need for that number of regular spaces.

80


Inventory Infographic The Layers of the Santa Barbara Mesa Unsafe Conditions

Location The Mesa is located in Santa Barbara, CA. It is an affluent coastal village situated near the downtown area. It gets the name from the landform that it sits on, which is elevated up to 150’ above sea level.

Vegetation

50’

Creek

By Hannah Zimmerman

The Mesa beach has been put on warning for having higher than average bacteria in it’s water. People should stay 50 yards away from creek mouths and storm drains.

Ice Plant has become invasive, choking out native plant communities. Heavy downpours can make it weigh enough to contribute to landslides instead of preventing them.

Native grasses

Ice Plant

Mesa Temperature Avg

Min

97F

Bluff Erosion

71F

Beach

The bluffs are about 150 -160 feet high and are over 60% inclined. The bluffs are in an area of active erosion. Historically, the sea-cliff retreat rate is .326 feet per year or about 1 foot every 3 years. Today

60 years later

Cliff 100%

81

vs.

80%

20%

13 miles

20F

Jan

Dec

0’

7am 8am

Male

All other times

Female

20% End of Trail

Project Site

15% 10%

Acreage of Parks 70

46F

6’

Ages in the Area

Trails and Parks

15

La Mesa Park

Cliff Bluff

There have been 4 fatal car accidents since 2012 on the Mesa.

Shoreline Park

60° or steeper

Douglas Preserve

~150’

There have been 4 pedestrians involved in fatal accidents.

Feet above Regular Tide

Max

Tide Patterns

5% 0%

3

<5

5-12

13-19

20-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55-64

65-84

84>

http://safeharborenv.com/services/steep-and-very-steep-slope-stabilizatio/, http://www.areavibes.com/santa+barbara-ca/demographics/, http://www.areavibes.com/ santa+barbara-ca/mesa, http://www.independent.com/news/2012/aug/14/ice-plants/, http://www.californiakingtides.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/tides.png


Intentionally Blank


Introduction


Intentionally Blank

1


LA 461 2013 Introduction Contents Introduction

3-4

Goals and Objectives

5-8

Design Elements

9-10

Design Matrix

11-14

Relationship Diagrams

15-18

Research

19-21

Design Sketches

22

Path Narratives

23-25

Concept A

27-34

Concept B

35-42

Concept C

43-50

2


Introduction

D

owntown Santa Barbara is known for itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wide pedestrian walkways and gorgeous shops, but many

people have never heard of the adjacent neighborhood, the Mesa. The Mesa is an upscale residential area that is a flat bench of land fronting the ocean. The Mesa stretches from Santa Barbara City College on the east and extends two and a half miles to Hendryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beach on the west. The walkability of this area is much lower than the downtown area of Santa Barbara, which stops visitors and locals from the enjoying the Mesa. There are currently no bike paths and the pedestrian walkways are cracked and falling into the ocean below. My design is intended to connect the ocean, bluff and vegetated shoreline so that it can provides pedestrians and runners with a shoreline course that takes advantage of the beautiful ocean views and varying topography.

Overall Goal With exceptional weather all year round and athletic, health conscious residents, my goal is to redesign the Mesa shoreline so that it can provide pedestrians and runners with a seamless landscape that takes advantage of the ocean views and varying topography. My design is a vision for the area that plans for environmental conservation, sustainable infrastructure and long-term stewardship.

3


Design Concept

Running on the Edge Connecting the Santa Barbara Shoreline with Trails for all Users

4


Goals and Objectives Provide a safe place for community interaction and functions during the day and night. 1. Provide lighting every 10 feet along

Create safe playgrounds for children to use during the daytime.

Clearly create a linkage from each park and the Douglas Preserve.

1. Provide a playground to

1. Mark the distance traveled in either

the pedestrian paths that turns on at

accommodate up to 30 children in a

the paving or on a sign at every quarter

5pm at Shoreline Park and La Mesa

space appropriate for children between

mile.

Park that clearly illuminates the entire

the ages of 5-12

2. Construct a unified marker that is at

path and distance in front of the

2. Provide play areas to accommodate

least 3 feet tall that points the direction

pedestrian.

up to 20 children in a space appropriate

to different locations on site at every

2. Establish shrubs and vegetation

for children between the ages of 2-5.

entrance and exit of the Shoreline Park,

along the paths that do not exceed 4

3. Construct the equipment following

Douglas Preserve and La Mesa park.

feet in height so that there is visibility

all playground regulations with no

3. Construct beach access points where

from the street into the park.

sharp objects and handrails on all

the trail is at least 10 feet away from

3. Provide additional overhead lighting

structures taller that 5 feet.

existing houses so that runners can

that illuminates the 50 person

4. Provide lighting around the

have the option to continue along the

community gathering spaces.

perimeter of the play areas that occur

residential path or along the ocean

4. Design the picnic areas so that the

every 10 feet.

when the tide permits and not trespass

barbecue pits have a radius of 5 feet of

5. Construct a 3 foot tall fence around

on peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property.

clear space from vegetation to prevent

the 2-5 age play area so that the young

4. Place a graphic sign within the first

any fires from igniting.

children can not crawl out of the site to

20 feet of Douglas Preserve that shows

5. Separate the bike path from the

ensure their safety.

visitors the trails they can chose in the

pedestrian path with an alternative

in order to connect back up the new

paving material that varies in either

trails linking to the existing parks.

color or texture to inform the users to

5. Provide separate graphic signage

keep on their own separate path during

so that children between the ages of 5

the open hours of Shoreline Park or La

and 12 can understand how they can

Mesa park.

navigate the park and what exercises they can do with the features on site that does not exceed 2 feet in height.

5


Goals and Objectives Encourage visitors to acknowledge the ocean views

Influence users to exercise in nontraditional ways.

Preserve views while creating separation for the parks.

1. Designate the areas where beach

1. Provide an agility course that weaves

1. Provide a vegetative buffer of trees

least 10 feet wide that lines the front of

access points are located by placing

runners in between a 3 foot wide

that are less than 30 feet tall and are

the houses before the Douglas Preserve

distinct signage that is within 50 feet of

path so that they work their lateral

separated by at least 10 feet so that

so that runners can chose to go in front

the stair entrance along Shoreline Drive.

movement as well as their sprints.

the neighbors on the opposite side of

of the properties to get uninterrupted

2. Build lookouts that are elevated

2. Build pilers that vary in height from

Shoreline Park can still see the ocean

views of the ocean.

between 1-10 feet from finished floor

1â&#x20AC;&#x2122; to 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122; tall so that children and adults

views.

so that visitors can see more of the

can jump and stretch on.

2. Construct a 10 foot wide bike path

ocean views without the interference of

3. Construct 20 foot long monkey bars

that lines the perimeter of Shoreline

a fence.

that vary in high from 3 feet off the

Park to ensure that the bikes are kept

3. Place signage at two of the ocean

ground to 8 feet off the ground so that

away from the driveways of the existing

lookouts that explain the ocean life and

people of various height and condition

houses on the adjacent side of the

what organisms are in the area.

can work out their arms.

street.

4. Construct stair cases to the ocean

4. Construct a running path that has

3. Apply the idea of Janette Sadik-

that are at least 4 feet wide and have

a unique element that engages on of

Khan and switch the placement of the

handrails that comply with ADA codes.

the five sense while running at every

parking spaces in areas along Shoreline

5. Provide at least one light that will

quarter of a mile or less.

road with the 10 foot wide bike path

turn on at 5pm everyday so that visitors

5. Provide a running course along

so that the parked cars create a buffer

can go to the lookouts to watch the

the ocean that is at least 5 feet wide

in-between Cliff Drive and the bikers at

sunset over the ocean and be safe.

and incorporated into the seawall so

the park.

that pedestrians can run at a different

4. Assemble solar lighting sculptures

elevation for part of the run.

that are 10-20 feet tall every 1/8 of a mile to light the path at Shoreline park and to visually create a dividing line from the surrounding neighborhood.

5. Create a linear bluff run that is at

6


Goals and Objectives Incorporate sustainable principles and instill stewardship of the coastline. 1. Construct the park using 25%

Teach the community about the flora and fauna of the site.

Reduce the pedestrian impact on the edge of the bluff.

1. Install interactive signs that vary

1. Construct a new pedestrian path

recycled local materials that are

from 1 foot tall to 15 feet tall that

that is always 5 feet from the very

exposed for the borders and seating

describe and show the flora and fauna

edge of the bluff unless it is an area

items on the site to demonstrate the

in the area and how it relates to the

where a lookout is installed with proper

materials reuse possibilities.

Channel Islands across the ocean.

reinforcement.

2. Label all environmentally sensitive

2. Up-light the vegetation with solar

2. Encourage runners and high impact

areas with a 4 food high, weather proof

lighting every 20 feet to capture the

sports to run on the trail that is

sign to instill personal stewardship of

unique textures of the native grasses

specified for them with signs that are 4

the park and awareness of where to not

and shrubs.

feet tall and are located where there are

walk on the site.

3. Provide telescopes that are 3 feet

any forks in the park so that they do not

3. Construct the elements in the

and 5 feet tall along the trail so that

encounter any fragile areas that canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

Douglas Preserve so that 95% of the

children and adults can view the ocean

withstand the impact.

materials are natural and sustainable

and the coastline.

3. Locate the parts of the bluff which

in order to blend in with the natural,

4. Within 10 feet of entry into every park

stick out more than 20 feet into the

unsettled feeling of the site.

a graphic sign will be displayed that will

ocean to determine which sites are

4. Construct a 10 foot running path

mention what they might see on their

more prone to bluff erosion.

using a porous material that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t

run/walk and what to look out for.

4. Relocate beach access points so that

puddle in the event of a rainstorm.

5. Install native plants that attract

there is one in areas with denser trees

5. Re-vegetate the eroding bluffs with

butterflies and hummingbirds to the

and mature plants so that the area can

100% native grasses and shrubs that

area so that visitors will be drawn to

withstand heavy pedestrian traffic.

have roots that will help bind the soil

smell the plants and enjoy the flowers.

5. Elevate the path by at least 1 foot

and remove all of the evasive species

6. Incorporate at least 5 demonstration

in areas with prime ocean views that

(such as Carpobrotus edulis).

gardens in the existing La Mesa Park

will be traveled to frequently so that

so that the children from Washington

minimal impact to the bluff occurs.

Elementary school can have visiting times to learn about how plants grow

7

and taste.


Goals and Objectives Plan for managed retreat with the inevitable coastal erosion. 1. Inform the viewers of the project that the plan is meant to be a visionary plan that is looking towards the future 20 years because several existing homes will be proposed to be removed.

2. Remove the 44 houses that line the ocean side of Shoreline Drive because they are in danger of sliding down the bluff in a heavy storm.

3. Adjust the main road so that it never exceeds 20 feet wide so that additional park space can be implemented on the fragile land.

4. Talk to City architects and officials at a county meeting to inform them about the 20 year vision plan and what is happening to the site so the real estate values can drop and the houses can become vacated before the 20 years are up.

5. Construct installations along the bluff that stretch for at least 50 feet in designated areas to show how different mitigation processes can help with the erosion, such as terracing and revegetation.

8


Design Elements

Design Elements

Barbecue Areas Concert Venues Plazas Water Contact Areas Drinking Stations Food Parking Lots

History Ecosystems Restoration Habitats Wildlife Botany Geology Soils Tides Physical Education

9

Leisure

Pedestrian Walkways Bike Trail Parking Lots Tanning Areas

Recreation

Bike Riding Roller Blading Skateboarding Informal Sports Lawns Agility Running Courses Running path

Circulation

Pedestrian Walkways Bike Trails Running Course Beach Trail Vehicular Circulation Bus Circulation Parking Lots

Amenities

Education Restoration

Structures

Existing Buildings Picnic Structures Art Vendors Lookout Points Playground

Aquatic Intertidal Riparian Upland


Design Features

Play

Learn

Exercise 10


Agility Running Courses Agility Running Courses

Art Vendors Barbecue Areas Beach Trail Bike Trail

Bike Trail Bus Circulation

Existing Buildings

Existing Buildings

Housing Informal Sports Lawns Lookout Points

Informal Sports Lawns

Main Walking Paths Parking Lots

Main Walking Paths Picnicking Lawns Parking Lots

Playgrounds

Picnicking Lawns

Plazas

Playgrounds

Restoration

Vehicular Circulation Water Contact Areas

11

Zoning Requirements

Zoning Requirements

Wind Wind

Wildlife Wildlife

Water/Precipitation/Fog Water/Precipitation/Fog

Views and Vistas

Vegetation

Views and Vistas

Utilities

Vegetation

Topography

Utilities

Temperature

Topography

Sun Temperature

Structures and Paving Sun

Structures and Paving Spaces and Senses

Soils

Shade

Spaces and Senses

Scale

Soils

Pollutants

Shade

Play Areas

Scale

History Influences Pollutants

FormAreas and Shape Play

History Influences Circulation

Attitude Towards Environment

Unimportant

Drinking Stations

Running Path

Utilities

Little Impact

Beach Trail

Drinking Stations

Restoration

Form and Shape

Barbecue Areas

Concert Venues

Plazas

Circulation

Related Related

Concert Venues

Lookout Points

HighHigh Impact Impact

Art Vendors

Bus Circulation

Housing

Attitude Towards Environment

Design Elements Design Elements

Utilities

Matrix

Running Path Vehicular Circulation Water Contact Areas

Little Impact Unimportant


Agility Running Courses Agility Running Courses

Art Vendors Barbecue Areas Beach Trail Bike Trail

Water Contact Areas

Wind Vehicular Circulation

Running Path Wildlife

Restoration

Water/Precipitation/Fog

Plazas

Views and Vistas

Playgrounds

Vegetation

Picnicking Lawns

Utilities

Topography

Parking Lots

Temperature

Sun Main Walking Paths

Structures and Paving Lookout Points

Informal Spaces andSports SensesLawns

Housing

Soils

Existing Buildings

Shade

Drinking Stations

Scale

Pollutants

Concert Venues

Play Areas

Bus Circulation

History Influences

Form and Shape Bike Trail

Beach Trail Circulation

Attitude Towards Environment

Utilities

Barbecue Areas

Art Vendors

Zoning Requirements

HighHigh Impact Impact

Art Vendors

Related Related

Barbecue Areas

Little Impact

Beach Trail

Unimportant

Bike Trail

Little Impact Unimportant

Bus Circulation

Bus Circulation

Concert Venues

Concert Venues

Drinking Stations

Drinking Stations

Existing Buildings

Existing Buildings

Housing

Housing

Agility Running Courses

Design Elements Design Elements

Design Elements

Matrix

Informal Sports Lawns Lookout Points

Informal Sports Lawns

Main Walking Paths

Lookout Points

Parking Lots

Main Walking Paths Picnicking Lawns Parking Lots

Playgrounds

Picnicking Lawns

Plazas

Playgrounds

Restoration

Plazas Restoration Running Path

Running Path Vehicular Circulation Water Contact Areas

Vehicular Circulation Water Contact Areas

12


Age Groups (years)

13 0% <5 5-12 13-19 20-24 25-34

http://www.areavibes.com/santa+barbara-ca/mesa/livability/

Ages in the Area

35-44 45-54

Male

55-64 65-84

Water Contact Areas

Vehicular Circulation

Running Path

Restoration

Plazas

Playgrounds

Picnicking Lawns

Parking Lots

Main Walking Paths

Lookout Points

Informal Sports Lawns

Housing

Existing Buildings

Drinking Stations

Concert Venues

Bus Circulation

Bike Trail

Beach Trail

Barbecue Areas

Art Vendors

Agility Running Courses

Design Elements

Matrix

0-5

5-12

High Impact

13-19

Related

20-24

Little Impact

25-34

Unimportant

35-44

45-54

55-64

65-84

84+

Female

20%

15%

10%

5%

84>


Matrix What this all means: Design Elements vs. Utilities Often times. the location of current utilities can assist in the design of an area, but sometimes it can help tell you where not to put something. For instance, the amphitheater is a design element that I want on my site, but after conducting this matrix I realized that there are very few places it can go because of the noise it can generate. It is best located away from houses near La Mesa Park or in the Douglas Preserve. Another connection I made through this matrix is that lookout points need to be directly related to the circulation because the trails all need to empty into these hubs so that everyone can get a glimpse of the ocean. Lastly, a discovery I made was that vehicular circulation needs to generally stay in the same location because the bus routes need to have wide enough roads to get to all the neighborhoods and with the erosion problem, it is best to keep heavy traffic the farthest away from the bluff edge.

Age Groups vs. Design Elements The last matrix I made was to compare the different age groups that will be using the site to determine what features are most important. I have gathered statistical data on the age groups listed on the left side of the matrix so I know what percentage of the area is in each of those groups. Because the most predominant age group is 35-44 I wanted to focus on what activities this age group would be most drawn to. I concluded from this matrix that the plazas and walking trails are what would attract this age group to use the site. The trails are the main features that I focus on because the circulation is key to making this a functional and usable space. By separating the bikers from the pedestrians and runners, the area will be much safer and users can chose which way they would like to view the site by. Lastly, because 45-54 is the second largest group in the area, art vendor areas and restoration should be features that are incorporated throughout the site to bring in users.

Design Elements vs. Design Elements I had never thought to compare the same thing to each other and couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t visualize it until I started. The largest thing I figured out from this matrix is where to locate the drinking stations. This is because I had originally thought that the water was best for the runners, but I quickly realized that if there are picnics going on and activities in the plaza these would too require water. I also gained from this the spatial knowledge that the plazas, barbecue areas, and concert venues should all be somewhat close in proximity because when there is a concert, people like to have food and gather with friends to watch the performance.

14


relationship diagrams Design Elements vs. Design Elements This relationship diagram was created from the Matrix comparing design elements to design elements. Because I am a spatial person it helps to visualize how each element relates to the others to spatially see how to lay out the site. From this diagram I discovered that the concert area needs to be far enough away from the existing housing so that it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t disturb the current tenants at night when music is playing. Also, I gathered that the picnic areas, playground, and barbecue areas always need to be in close proximity because often times families come to the park to use all of these features simultaneously.

15

Paths

Beach features

Site interaction

Circulation

Water elements

Housing


Age Relationship diagram

Figure A: Age Relationship Diagram * See next page for relationship diagram explanation

16


Age Relationship diagram

Figure B The age relationship diagram shown above is related to the diagram on the previous page, however this was interesting on its own because it allowed me to visually see the ages in the area. I was surprised to find out that there are not very many elderly people on the Mesa. This helps determine what design features to use because there can be more challenging grade changes and elements because most of the users are younger and more active.

Age Relationship Diagram (Figure A) For my second relationship diagram I chose to look into the users of the site and what age groups are most prevalent. Based on the statistical data that I conducted I found that there are the most 35-44 year olds that use this site, with 25-34 year olds as a close second. These age groups are highly active and would most likely use a concert venue as well as the trails. The diagram is separated into groups of ages with the size of the circle representing how dominant they are in the area. From this diagram I concluded that the paths should be the elements that I focus on most as well as the water contact areas and restoration.

17

Age Chart (Figure B):


Design Features relationship Diagram

Design Features Relationship Diagram The design of my site centers around the ideas of three features: Exercise, Play and Learn. For this relationship diagram I wanted to focus on what design elements were related to which design feature and how all of them could connect. This was an interesting activity because I discovered that there are equal elements for each feature and that they all connect back up well. Exercise and play can go hand-in-hand, but here I focus on play as a mental thing as well as an active exercise so I felt that it was necessary to give it itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own category.

18


Research It is a fact that sea levels are rising due to melting polar ice and thermal expansion of the oceans. Just in the state of California, the sea-level rise is projected to be 16 inches by 2050 and 55 inches by 2100. As the shoreline recedes, pressure will be placed on the homes lining the ocean and they will soon need to be abandoned. Instead of waiting until the very last second, I am proposing that we think ahead and adjust for the changes before a crisis occurs. There are three major options when it comes to management of this erosion:

Types of Solutions:

1.

Coastal Armoring This method seeks to resist erosive forces with hard structures such as seawalls or revetments. Depending of the height of the structure, it can still be over-topped by a wave during storms. Houses typically prefer this option because it often stops the erosion from happening for several years, however environmentalists and beach goers complain.

2.

Beach Nourishment This is the deliberate placement of sand to counteract erosion. This method is very expensive and only holds through one or two storms. If an area is dredging sand then this is a great option, otherwise it is hard to come up with a sufficient amount of sand to hold back the water.

3.

Managed Retreat This is the gradual reconfiguration or removal or man-made structures in the path of the advancing coastline. It seeks to avoid defending structures that are in natureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s path and more or less allows the natural process to occur. This is a route that should be taken if the city is on board because it is the safest and most cost effective way to avoid issues with erosion. Often times all of these strategies need to be used together to meet the needs of the area.

19


Sea walls and tide For my site, I would like to avoid to coastal armoring method because it shrinks the beach and places private interests above the right of the public to enjoy the coast. Concrete walls are typically 30-40 feet tall and over 200 feet long. This size wall would protect five homes and cost approximately $2.5 million to build. With a sea wall in place, the sand from the upper bluff piles up behind the walls and when a wave comes and hits the wall it gets additional sand which over time takes away the ocean. A method that I will focus on is re-grading the bluff as well as managed retreat. With the front houses gone, there will be more land to work with which gives way to the opportunity of terracing the bluff. This is a relatively low cost means of stabilizing the bluff and is more stable due to the reduction of gravityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forces on the bluff slope. This allows for switchbacks and more beach access as well. The cut land then can be used on the upland in the designs to reduce construction costs. The terrace design is the following:

http://www.ieca.org/members only/cms/content/Proceedings/Object355PDFEnglish.pdf

20


Sea walls and tide The coastal bank toe terraces consist of a stair-step design that is elevated (16-18 ft) above the existing beach face. Each step consists of a single (2-foot) high terrace, for a total of 8-9 terrace steps depending on the location along the eroding bank. Each terrace has a 3â&#x20AC;&#x2122; high Jute bag that extends 50 feet. This is then re-vegetated with native plants for a visually appealing, study redesign of the fragile bluff. http://www.spur.org/initiative/ocean-beach-master-plan http://articles.latimes.com/2013/may/11/local/la-me-solana-beach-20130512

Sea Wall

21

Managed Retreat Prevention

Beach Nourishment


Design Sketches

Concept Sketches Brainstorming ideas to develop successful goals and objectives. The top drawings are design features and the sketch to the left is one idea for a ocean lookout. My goal is to get the visitors to appreciate the unique site with play, education, and exercise.

22


path narratives Path 1: Elevation Trail (Runnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Path) The Elevation Trail is designed to start at the east end of the existing Shoreline Park, but it can be entered at several points along the site. The runner enters the site with a grand entrance that signifies that they are at the starting point. From here they are drawn to the coastline where they will run in the full sun and have a open view of the ocean. A decorative fence will line the entire bluff so that they feel secure from the bluff, but the fence will add to the environment and not be an eye sore. Lush planting will be planted on the fragile bluffs, which have plants (primarily grasses) that match the colors of the Channel Islands in the distance (yellows, browns, light greens and splashes of blues). The noise from the playgrounds and vehicular traffic will be muffled by the sounds of waves crashing and several water elements that will mimic the wave sounds. In order to make the trail more interesting there will be mounds along the bluff that elevate the runners higher so that they can observe the play areas and gorgeous ocean views. As they proceed to the end of the existing Shoreline Park area they will come to a new area that is for experimental play. This stretch of land extends for three blocks and consists of forested, shaded areas and pockets of sunny open meadows. This area is designated for learning about the restoration process and several signs will be in the area explaining the site and what it is evolving to become. The runner can take this time to read the signs or sit on the benches that are scattered both under the shade or along the sunny bluff edge. There are several lookout points in this area as well so that viewers can catch more of a breeze from the ocean and have the thrill factor

23

of hovering over the ocean by 100 or more feet. At the end of this section, the runner has the option of continuing along the coastline, but lowering down to a raised pier that runs parallel with the bluff, or they can stay on top of the bluff and continue into a neighborhood park currently called La Mesa Park. Here they can use the restroom, drink water or admire a performance at the amphitheater. In one alternative plan, however, the existing houses remain so the runner is forced to run along Shoreline Drive. This is the alternative that I would not choose, but should be presented just in case the homeowners are unwilling to relocate. La Mesa Park is densely shaded and feels very lush and secluded. At the west end of this park is one of the most breathtaking features of the entire trail, the Bridge Above the Bay. This is an elevated walk that sits 120 feet above a reservoir. The v-shape that the mountains create provides a threshold that frames the ocean perfectly and feels like you are lost in the mountains, yet there are benches and tables ideal for picnicking or star gazing if visited at night. In order to make this a run that can be completed at any time of day, markers will line both trails. The markers are tall linear solar sculptures that light and guide the way as well as indicate how many miles the runner has traveled from the edge of Shoreline Park and how long until the next destination, Douglas Preserve. After admiring the ocean and mountain views simultaneously the runner can chose to continue forward into the neighborhoods of the Mesa where they can observe the custom architecture and perfectly landscaped homes while at the


Elevation trail same time being protect from vehicular traffic because they are on their own path that sits outside the easement line of the houses. After four blocks of residential admiration the above path connects back up with the path that ran along the pier. The pier portion runs parallel to the above path, but consists of ocean lookouts and a boardwalk with viewsheds and several beach access points if the runner chooses to run in the sand instead. From here the runner can choose the short loop or the long loop within Douglas Preserve and enjoy the natural beauty with several shady areas to rest or eat a snack. Upon finishing the trail, the runner will know exactly how far they have run, gathered some insight into the restoration process and taken in several breathtaking ocean views from all different elevations.

24


Bluff walk and serenity bike path Path 2: Bluff Walk (Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Path) The Bluff Walk is designed to start at the east end of the existing Shoreline Park as well, but because it is designed for more leisure walkers it is not as important that they all travel in the same direction. The Bluff Walk follows a similar form to the Elevation Trail, however it is typically located a bit further away from the edge of the bluff and takes the visitor to all of the main attractions in each park. The bluff walk enters patches of sunny and shaded areas with several rest spots and lookouts. It is geared towards visitors who want to go at a slower pace and would prefer to have less elevation change and agility features. After completing the Bluff Walk, the viewer will be much more knowledgeable about the flora, fauna, and history of the site. There are telescopes along the Bluff Walk in both Shoreline Park and Douglas Preserve so the ocean and nearby islands can be observed closer. There are no distance markers along this trail, however it is a similar length to the runnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trail so the Elevation Trail signs can be read to get an understanding of how far you have walked. In each design, all three of the trails link up every block in case a visitor wants to switch to a different speed mid-way along the park.

Path 3: Serenity Bike Path (Bikerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Path) Currently the site does not allow bikes in the different parks and the bikers are unsafely crammed up against the vehicular traffic. Serenity Bike Path takes the bikers from downtown Santa Barbara to Meigs Road, which can then be traveled for several miles along the coast. The Serenity Bike Path is towards the edge of the existing Shoreline Park, but with the new design the bikers are safe from traffic because

25

the parked cars create a barrier from the cars in most instances. To prevent accidents from occurring where the parking lots are, a different texture and paving type will line the street so that cars are aware of the bikers. In designated areas all three trails connect in one large path so that the bikers can feel like they are a part of the park and can socialize with the walkers and runners if they would like. At the end of Shoreline Drive, Serenity Bike Path follows the street up past La Mesa Park and connects back with the newly redone bike paths that link the Mesa area. If the bikers would like to stop and enjoy the park areas, several bike racks will be placed near the parking areas so that they can enjoy the bike-free zones and grab water or enjoy a snack before continuing on their ride.

White Areas: The Connectors (The linkages between paths) The white areas indicate the connections between different trail types. This creates freedom throughout the park so no one group feels isolated for too long of a distance. There are features throughout each plan that should be enjoyed by all users so this linkages makes this possible.


Intentionally Blank

26


concept a

27


Concept A: Activities for All This concept is focused on creating pockets for every age group, while at the same time making the Elevation Trail the main focus of the plan. The user enters the site with a grand entrance on the east end of the current Shoreline Park location. Here they can choose to sit on the bluff edge and take in the breath-taking views or they can venture into the plaza with a massive overhead structure that can be seen from Santa Barbara City College down below. Some of the unique features of this design is that there is a mound that is for visitors to sit on and get a better view of the ocean as well as water features, like a splash pad to elevate the experience of being so close to the water. Seating pods are scattered throughout the site, making it comfortable for all age groups to mingle and enjoy the shaded seating under the trees. There are two different picnic pockets that the user can enjoy. One can be reserved and is for larger groups, whereas the individual picnic area has barbecues and several picnic tables for family events. I made sure to separate the children that are ages 2-5 and children that are 5-12 because children develop at such different rates that it is important to create a safe environment for the appropriate age range. Another feature of this plan is a braid run that is for the runners on the site to test out their maneuvering skills and cover more distance in a shorter span of land. The kite run is for all ages and is a special designated space so that people can fly their kite without any obstacles in the way. La Mesa Park is transformed so that it caters to the nearby children at Washington Elementary school The park can be used by the general public or can act as an outdoor classroom for the nearby school. There is a demonstration garden that the children can get involved with as well as an amphitheater that can be used for performances and graduation. The design for Douglas Preserve caters to the environmentalists in the area. There is very little construction done and the few pocket of development are constructed using natural elements. There is a pocket for the dog lovers as well as the children and picnickers, but other than that I wanted to leave this plan with very little interference to the land.

28


Shoreline Drive

29


30


La Mesa Park and Neighborhood

31


32


Bluff Run

33


douglas family preserve

34


concept B

35


Concept B: Art and Nature Concept B is centered around observing nature as art. The visitor enters the site and the first feature that captures their attention is a massive mound. This is a natural feature that is breath taking when you are observing it either from the ground level or on top of it. It is meant to make the visitor appreciate the gorgeous views and recognize that the planting colors and Channel Island colors are in unison. There is art scattered throughout the site with mosaic paving and temporary art displays that can be changed out monthly. In this design the paths are frequently intermixing and the runner is brought through the art displays and an agility course that is filled with custom exercise areas that use nature as a way to workout. An outstanding element of this concept is the artistic display of the techniques that can be applied to mitigate the erosion control. There are three terrace solutions for the public to observe and determine which is the most beneficial so areas with the same issue can catch on and learn from the display. As for Douglas Preserve this concept takes a more whimsical approach with winding paths for all users. There are clusters of natural vegetation so that the viewer can understand what grows well in the environment and see that plants can act as a form of art for around their homes.

36


Shoreline Drive

37


38


La mesa park and neighborhood

39


40


bluff run

41


douglas family preserve

42


concept c

43


Concept C: Learning the Land The last concept explored was one that encompasses ideas that wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t actually be done, but it help shifts your mind to think in a different way. The main focus of this concept is teaching the community about the history of the bluff landform and why mitigation measures need to be taken into consideration. The visitor enters the site and is immediately thrown into a site history lesson, teaching about the Native Americans who once inhabited the land and how one must work with nature and not against it. From here there is a climbing structure to teach about the topography of the site and showcase the breathtaking the Santa Barbara channel. The three demonstration structures are natural history centers where tourists can learn about the ocean and the different erosion control methods taking place. One of the features that I dislike most about this concept is that it leaves the houses to the west of Shoreline Park in their location so that the park gets cut off and the linkage is not as successful. Managed retreat is a forward thinking process that needs to happen and these houses soon will not be safe to live in. La Mesa park is also turned into a learning center where visitors can explore the native plants in the region as well as the art that is being created in Santa Barbara. This would be an ideal location for weekend art shows, however it is a bit too extensive for the area. Lastly, Douglas Preserved is no longer cherished for its natural beauty, but now it too is a plaza space for concerts and social gatherings. There is an additional parking lot for visitors to have easy access into the preserve as well as a round-a-bout. The preserve is very isolated from nearby houses so it does make sense to have an amphitheater there, however this disrupts the fauna in the area and no longer makes the space usable by dog walkers. There is a large viewing area with telescopes so that the visitors will continue to learn, especially about the ocean and restoration process.

44


Shoreline Drive

45


46


La Mesa park and neighborhood

47


48


bluff run

49


douglas family preserve

50


Intentionally Blank


The final project


Intentionally Blank

51


LA 461 2014 Final Project Contents Schematic Overlook

53-56

The Vision Plan

57-59

The Four Zones

60

Master Plan

61-62

Shoreline Plaza

63-71

Site Features

72-74

Shoreline Tide Walk

75-80

Mesa Meadows Amphitheater

81-82

Douglas Preserve

83

Mesa Beach Lookout

84

52


Schematic Overlook AA

Schematic forfor allall Schematic : Activities : Activities Scale: 1”=160’ Scale: 1”=160’

Douglas Family Preserve Douglas Family Preserve

BA B

BluffBluff Run Run

La Mesa ParkPark & Pier La Mesa & Pier

Bluff Run BluffBluff Run Run

La Mesa Park & Pier La Mesa ParkPark & Pier La Mesa & Pier

BluffBluff Run Run Bluff Run Bluff Run

La Mesa & Pier La Mesa ParkPark & Pier La Mesa Park & Pier La Mesa Park & Pier

Schematic : Nature Activities for all Schematic asas artart ::Nature Scale: 1”=160’ Scale: 1”=160’ Scale: 1”=160’

Douglas Family Preserve Douglas Family Preserve Douglas Family Preserve

cA c B

Schematic Activities for all Schematic the Land ::Learning Land Schematic : Learning Nature asthe art Scale: 1”=160’ Scale: 1”=160’ Scale: 1”=160’ 1”=160’ Scale:

53

Douglas Family Preserve Douglas Family Preserve Douglas Family Preserve Douglas Family Preserve

c B

Schematic : Learning Nature asthe artLand Scale: 1”=160’


To the left are my schematics that were completed in the beginning design phase. I wanted to test out the different styles, but in the end I used a matrix to create a plan that was a synthesis of all three designs.

PathPath Legend Legend Elevation Trail (Runner’s Path) Path) Elevation Trail (Runner’s Bluff Walk (Walker’s Path) Path) Bluff Walk (Walker’s SerenitySerenity Bike Path (Biker’s Path) Path) Bike Path (Biker’s

Concept A: Activities for All This concept is focused on creating pockets for every age group, while at the same time making the Elevation Trail the main focus of the plan.

Shoreline Drive Shoreline Drive

Concept B: Nature as Art The second concept is centered around observing nature as art.

Path Legend

Concept C: Learning the Land The third concept explored was one that encompasses ideas that wouldn’t actually be done, but it help shifts your mind to think in a different way.

Elevation Trail (Runner’s Path) Bluff Walk (Walker’s Path) Serenity Bike Path (Biker’s Path)

Shoreline Drive Shoreline Drive Shoreline Drive

Path Legend Elevation Trail (Runner’s Path) Bluff Walk (Walker’s Path) Serenity Bike Path (Biker’s Path)

Shoreline Drive Shoreline Drive Shoreline Drive Shoreline Drive

54


Schematic Overlook From completing a matrix (show to the right) I was able to compare the three schematic designs and determine which features from each plan that worked the best. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Activities for Allâ&#x20AC;? had the most featured that were successful so I used that plan as a base and then I layered the other parts of the different schematics that were successful on top on the plan. In the end the plan shown below is all of the features connected. I brought this image into AutoCAD where I then completed the line work for the final plan.

55


Goal 10

Goal 9

Goal 8

Goal 7

Goal 6

Goal 5

Goal 4

Goal 3

Goal 2

Goal 1

Schematic Designs

Project Goals

Schematic overlook

Schematic 1: Activities for All

Successful

Schematic 2: Nature as Art

Somewhat Successful

Schematic 3: Learning the Land

Fails to Meet Goal

Goal 1: Provide a safe place for community interaction and functions during the day and night. Goal 2: Create safe playgrounds for children to use during the daytime. Goal 3: Clearly create a linkage from each park and the Douglas Preserve. Goal 4: Encourage visitors to acknowledge the ocean views. Goal 5: Influence users to exercise in nontraditional ways. Goal 6: Preserve views while creating separation from the parks. Goal 7: Incorporate sustainable principles and instill stewardship of the coastline. Goal 8: Teach the community about the flora and fauna of the site. Goal 9: Reduce the pedestrian impact on the edge of the bluff. Goal 1o: Plan for managed retreat with the inevitable coastal erosion.

56


The Vision Plan

Land outside of the Erosion Zone Erosion Zone and Pacific Ocean Vision Trail (50 year plan)

57


Vision Plan The bluffs are about 150-160 feet tall and are over 60% inclined. The bluffs are in an area of active erosion, and sea cliff areas undergo periodic erosion caused by very high tides or storm surge. When beaches erode, the lower section of the coastal bank, known as the “toe” will collapse to re-nourish the beach. When the toe erodes, the coastal bank will erode to form a new “toe”. The sea-cliff retreat rate is approximately .326 feet per year or about one foot every three years. The line where the gray starts represents where the bluff edge will most likely be in 50 years (or 16.6 feet inland). The white path represents the portion of the trail that is safe from this erosion, but the dashed line path is what is at risk of falling into the ocean. On the colored site plan the wood paneling represents these areas as well. The path design takes this natural process into consideration so the new path formations are just as free flowing and follow the same curves of the design.

58


The Vision Plan

Erosion Vulnerability Very High High

59

Planning for Uncertainty on a Dynamic Coastline It has been proven that sea levels are rising due to melting polar ice and thermal expansion of the oceans. Coastal erosion is a problem for those who live near coasts and for marine organisms living along the coast in bays, estuaries, and shallow waters. We have seen that beaches change with the seasons, and that tsunamis and storm surges can erode coasts. The State of California projects a sea-level rise of 16 inches by 2050 and 55 inches by 2100. The frequency and severity of storms are also likely to increase, and local policymakers have no choice but to adapt.


The Four Design Zones The The FourFour Zones Design Zones

Shoreline Shoreline Trail: Trail: Shoreline Trail: Currently the strip of coastal land that runs parallel to Shoreline Drive is an out dated park called Shoreline Park. Shoreline Park is a 15-acre bluff-top Shorelinethe Trail: Currently strip of coastal land that runs parallel to Shoreline Drive is an out dated park called Shoreline Park. Shoreline Park is a 15-acre bluff-top

Currently the stripvisitors of coastal that to Shoreline Drive is ancome out dated Park. Shoreline Park a 15-acreit bluff-top park that attracts andland locals allruns yearparallel round, but the reason people to visitpark this called area isShoreline not for the park amenities, butisbecause has a Currently the stripvisitors of coastal that to Shoreline Drive is ancome out dated Park. Shoreline Park a 15-acreit bluff-top park that attracts andland locals allruns yearparallel round, but the reason people to visitpark this called area isShoreline not for the park amenities, butisbecause has a park that attracts and locals allMy year round, but the reason come tothis visitrun thisdown area park is notinto for athe park but because it has a breathtaking view visitors of the Pacific Ocean. proposed Shoreline Trail people will transform work of amenities, art. The planting and built features park that attracts and locals allMy year round, but the reason come tothis visitrun thisdown area park is notinto for athe park but because it has a breathtaking view visitors of the Pacific Ocean. proposed Shoreline Trail people will transform work of amenities, art. The planting and built features breathtaking view of the Pacific Ocean. Myare proposed Trail will transform thisbelow. run down park intoalong a work of art. The planting features all follow a whimsical, playful nature and curved Shoreline to mimic the waves of the ocean The planting Shoreline Trail followsand thebuilt curves of the breathtaking view of the Pacific Ocean. Myare proposed Trail will transform thisbelow. run down park intoalong a work of art. The planting features all follow a whimsical, playful nature and curved Shoreline to mimic the waves of the ocean The planting Shoreline Trail followsand thebuilt curves of the all follow whimsical,pattern playful so nature are have curved to mimicfeel the in waves the ocean below. planting Shoreline follows the curves the paths in aaformalized that and visitors a different eachofportion of the trail. The Several nodesalong including picnicTrail areas (reservable and of nonall follow whimsical,pattern playful so nature are have curved to mimicfeel the in waves the ocean below. planting Shoreline follows the curves the paths in aaformalized that and visitors a different eachofportion of the trail. The Several nodesalong including picnicTrail areas (reservable and of nonpaths in a formalized pattern that visitors feel in each thejust trail.a Several nodes including areas and nonreservable), playground nodesso (separated by have age), a different kite run as well as anportion art walkofare few of the elements thatpicnic visitors will (reservable enjoy. paths in a formalized pattern that visitors feel in each thejust trail.a Several nodes including areas and nonreservable), playground nodesso (separated by have age), a different kite run as well as anportion art walkofare few of the elements thatpicnic visitors will (reservable enjoy. reservable), playground nodes (separated by age), a kite run as well as an art walk are just a few of the elements that visitors will enjoy. reservable), playground nodes (separated by age), a kite run as well as an art walk are just a few of the elements that visitors will enjoy.

La La Mesa Mesa Park: Park: Mesa Park: La Mesa park currently a neighborhood park that has a small playground and non-reservable picnic areas. There is a pedestrian bridge that is uneven Mesa park Park:is La Mesa is currently a neighborhood park that has a small playground and non-reservable picnic areas. There is a pedestrian bridge that is uneven

La Mesa parkthat is currently neighborhood that has a small and is non-reservable areas. There is a pedestrian bridge that is uneven and narrow connectsathis park to the park residential area to theplayground west. My vision that this parkpicnic will become a learning center for both the residents La Mesa parkthat is currently neighborhood that has a small and is non-reservable areas. There is a pedestrian bridge that is uneven and narrow connectsathis park to the park residential area to theplayground west. My vision that this parkpicnic will become a learning center for both the residents narrow that connects this park toWashington the residential area to the west. vision is that this park willdemonstration become a learning center for both visitors the residents and the students at the neighboring Elementary school. LaMy Mesa park will have several gardens to educate about the narrow that connects this park toWashington the residential area to the west. vision is that this park willdemonstration become a learning center for both visitors the residents and the students at the neighboring Elementary school. LaMy Mesa park will have several gardens to educate about the and the students at the school. La Mesa parktowill haveinseveral demonstration gardens educate about the different plants that canneighboring be grown onWashington the Mesa, asElementary well as plazas for the children gather and learn about nature. At theto west end ofvisitors the park, there and the students at the school. La Mesa parktowill haveinseveral demonstration gardens educate about the different plants that canneighboring be grown onWashington the Mesa, asElementary well as plazas for the children gather and learn about nature. At theto west end ofvisitors the park, there different that canthat be grown the for Mesa, as well as plazas for or theeven children to gather inschool and learn about nature. Atthe thepedestrian west end ofbridge the park, is a largeplants amphitheater can beon used outdoor music festivals the elementary graduation. Because has there such different plants that can be grown on the Mesa, as well as plazas for the children to gather in and learn about nature. At the west end of the park, there is a large amphitheater that can be used for outdoor music festivals or even the elementary school graduation. Because the pedestrian bridge has such is vast a large can be the used for outdoor festivals or even the elementary graduation. thetime pedestrian hasfor such a viewamphitheater of the ocean,that I enlarged bridge so thatmusic a group can gather and each lunch onschool the bridge, while atBecause the same functionbridge as a way is vast a large can be the used for outdoor festivals or even the elementary graduation. thetime pedestrian hasfor such a viewamphitheater of the ocean,that I enlarged bridge so thatmusic a group can gather and each lunch onschool the bridge, while atBecause the same functionbridge as a way a vast view oforthe ocean,toI get enlarged bridgeneighborhoods. so that a group can gather and each lunch on the bridge, while at the same time function as a way for pedestrians runners to thethe adjacent a vast view of the ocean, I enlarged the bridge so that a group can gather and each lunch on the bridge, while at the same time function as a way for pedestrians or runners to get to the adjacent neighborhoods. pedestrians or runners to get to the adjacent neighborhoods. pedestrians or runners to get to the adjacent neighborhoods.

Shoreline Shoreline Tide Tide Walk: Walk: Shoreline Tide With the uncertainty of the bluff remaining intact over the next 20 years, the Shoreline Tide Walk is a way to ensure that visitors can still run along the Shoreline Tide Walk: Walk: With the uncertainty of the bluff remaining intact over the next 20 years, the Shoreline Tide Walk is a way to ensure that visitors can still run along the

With thebluff. uncertainty of the bluff remaining intact over 20 years, thepast Shoreline Tide is atide. wayThis to ensure canfrom still the run crashing along the coastal The Shoreline Tide Walk is a floating deckthe thatnext is situated just the point ofWalk lowest meansthat thatvisitors it is away With thebluff. uncertainty of the bluff remaining intact over 20 years, thepast Shoreline Tide is atide. wayThis to ensure canfrom still the run crashing along the coastal The Shoreline Tide Walk is a floating deckthe thatnext is situated just the point ofWalk lowest meansthat thatvisitors it is away coastal but bluff. Shoreline TidetoWalk a floating deck that distance is situated past thegrouping point of of lowest This the means that it isform away the of crashing waves, is The still close enough the is bluff that it is a short to just get to. The deckstide. follows curvilinear of from the rest the parks coastal but bluff. Shoreline TidetoWalk a floating deck that distance is situated past thegrouping point of of lowest This the means that it isform away the of crashing waves, is The still close enough the is bluff that it is a short to just get to. The deckstide. follows curvilinear of from the rest the parks waves, is still close enough decks, to the as bluff that is a short distance to get to. The of decks follows thedecks curvilinear form of thethe rest of works the parks and hasbut areas of glass-bottom well as itartistic white shade structures. Thegrouping visitors can escape to these to observe how tide and waves, is still close enough decks, to the as bluff that is a short distance to get to. The of decks follows thedecks curvilinear form of thethe rest of works the parks and hasbut areas of glass-bottom well as itartistic white shade structures. Thegrouping visitors can escape to these to observe how tide and andahas areas of glass-bottom asofwell as artistic white shade structures. The visitors can escape decksalong to observe howto the works eat picnic lunch or meet with decks, a group friends. Because of the floating construction, the decks move to upthese and down the poles sittide on the topand of andahas areas of glass-bottom asofwell as artistic white shade structures. The visitors can escape decksalong to observe howto the works eat picnic lunch or meet with decks, a group friends. Because of the floating construction, the decks move to upthese and down the poles sittide on the topand of eat aocean. picnicThere lunchisora meet with a groupwet of friends. Because of the floating the decks and down along the to sit onpedestrians the top of the chance of getting on these decks so visitors haveconstruction, to be cautious when onmove them.up The deck continues forpoles runners and eat aocean. picnicThere lunchisora meet with a groupwet of friends. Because of the floating the decks and down along the to sit onpedestrians the top of the chance of getting on these decks so visitors haveconstruction, to be cautious when onmove them.up The deck continues forpoles runners and the ocean. There is a chance getting onLane. theseThe decks so visitors granite have to nodes be cautious on them. The to deck continues forocean runners pedestrians until it meets up with the topoftrail off ofwet Mesa decomposed along when the deck are areas look-out at the restand during a run. the ocean. There is a chance getting onLane. theseThe decks so visitors granite have to nodes be cautious on them. The to deck continues forocean runners pedestrians until it meets up with the topoftrail off ofwet Mesa decomposed along when the deck are areas look-out at the restand during a run. until it meets up with the top trail off of Mesa Lane. The decomposed granite nodes along the deck are areas to look-out at the ocean rest during a run. until it meets up with the top trail off of Mesa Lane. The decomposed granite nodes along the deck are areas to look-out at the ocean rest during a run.

Douglas Douglas Preserve: Preserve: Douglas Preserve: Douglas is currently a 70-acre recreation area that is located near the intersection of Cliff Drive and Las Positas Road in the Mesa neighborhood. DouglasPreserve Preserve: Douglas Preserve is currently a 70-acre recreation area that is located near the intersection of Cliff Drive and Las Positas Road in the Mesa neighborhood.

Douglas is currently a 70-acre recreation that is located near the intersection Cliff later. Drive The and Douglas Las Positas RoadPreserve in the Mesa In 1996, Preserve the Preserve was acquired by the Trust forarea Public Lands and transferred to the City of a year Family is anneighborhood. undeveloped Douglas is currently a 70-acre recreation that is located near the intersection Cliff later. Drive The and Douglas Las Positas RoadPreserve in the Mesa In 1996, Preserve the Preserve was acquired by the Trust forarea Public Lands and transferred to the City of a year Family is anneighborhood. undeveloped In 1996, thethat Preserve waspassive acquired by the Trust for Public Lands and transferred to the City a year later. and The bicycle Douglasriding. Family Preserve is an open space provides recreation opportunities, such as hiking, dog walking, wildlife viewing, Off-leash dog useundeveloped is allowed In 1996, thethat Preserve waspassive acquired by the Trust for Public Lands and transferred to the City a year later. and The bicycle Douglasriding. Family Preserve is an open space provides recreation opportunities, such as hiking, dog walking, wildlife viewing, Off-leash dog useundeveloped is allowed open space thatinprovides passive opportunities, such as hiking, viewing, bicycle at riding. within the park select areas, butrecreation there is very minimal seating areas anddog the walking, trails arewildlife unmarked and and dangerous night.Off-leash Entry todog the use parkisisallowed from the open space thatinprovides passive opportunities, such as hiking, viewing, bicycle at riding. within the park select areas, butrecreation there is very minimal seating areas anddog the walking, trails arewildlife unmarked and and dangerous night.Off-leash Entry todog the use parkisisallowed from the within parkDrive, in select areas, butLane, thereMedcliff is very minimal seating areas and theTide trailsWalk. are unmarked and dangerous Entry some to theproviding park is from the east atthe Borton Mesa School Drive, and from the Shoreline There are over three milesat ofnight. park trails, views within parkDrive, in select areas, butLane, thereMedcliff is very minimal seating areas and theTide trailsWalk. are unmarked and dangerous Entry some to theproviding park is from the east atthe Borton Mesa School Drive, and from the Shoreline There are over three milesat ofnight. park trails, views east Bortoncoastline. Drive, Mesa School Lane, Drive,undeveloped and from the Shoreline Walk. There three milesstay of park trails, some providing of theatPacific Because this areaMedcliff is currently open space ITide believe that the are newover design should consistent with the naturalviews feel. east Bortoncoastline. Drive, Mesa School Lane, Drive,undeveloped and from the Shoreline Walk. There three milesstay of park trails, some providing of theatPacific Because this areaMedcliff is currently open space ITide believe that the are newover design should consistent with the naturalviews feel. of the Pacific coastline. is currently undeveloped space I believe that the places new design should stay consistent with natural feel. The new design includesBecause several this playarea nodes for the children as wellopen as rest areas and gathering for residents in the area. All of thethe playgrounds are of the Pacific coastline. is currently undeveloped space I believe that the places new design should stay consistent with natural feel. The new design includesBecause several this playarea nodes for the children as wellopen as rest areas and gathering for residents in the area. All of thethe playgrounds are The new design includes several nodes for the children as as rest areasBecause and gathering for residents indog the owners, area. All there of theisplaygrounds are made of natural materials and allplay of the existing vegetation willwell remain on-site. this siteplaces is so heavily used by a dog park that The new design includes several nodes for the children as as rest areasBecause and gathering for residents indog the owners, area. All there of theisplaygrounds are made of natural materials and allplay of the existing vegetation willwell remain on-site. this siteplaces is so heavily used by a dog park that made of natural and of the existing will remain on-site. Because this site is so heavily used by dog owners, there is a dog park that separates the bigmaterials dogs from thealllittle dogs with avegetation shaded seating area for the owners. made of natural and of the existing will remain on-site. Because this site is so heavily used by dog owners, there is a dog park that separates the bigmaterials dogs from thealllittle dogs with avegetation shaded seating area for the owners. separates the big dogs from the little dogs with a shaded seating area for the owners. separates the big dogs from the little dogs with a shaded seating area for the owners.

60


Master Plan 11

9

10 3

5 1

2

4

6

8

7

14 12

13

15

16

17

Plan Legend Section A: Mesa Meadows Amphitheater Section B: Shoreline Tide Walk Perspective view

Douglas Preserve 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Forested gathering circle with fountain Children’s labyrinth (raised stones form spiral) Climbing net playground Grassy play mound (soil is pilled up to create mound) Spinning play structure (wood spinning feature) Circle bench seating Children’s natural playground (see pictures above) Interpretive natural play (see pictures above) Douglas Preserve community plaza with play boulders Douglas Preserve entrance roundabout and entrance sign Access trail to Hendry’s Beach Telescope look-out Open fitness zone (area designated for adult fitness) Small dog off-leash park Large dog off-leash park Puppy Play Park with shade sail for owners Native flower display Meandering coastal bluff walk (decomposed granite trail)

La Mesa Park 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Shaded picnic nodes, typ. Reflective Fountain Demonstration gardens, typ. Entrance shade sail and playground (5-12 years) Grassy play mound Upper restroom Community plaza for art exhibits and school functions La Mesa parking lot (23 spaces) Group picnic area (reservable) Shoreline look-out foot bridge (150’ from ground) Grassy stairs for amphitheater (see section A) Mesa Learning Gardens (see section A) Mesa Meadows Amphitheater (see section A) Large look-out picnic area Access from Washington Elementary School

15

4

Shoreline Tide Walk 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Tunnel walk (area of path that has a transparent cover) Look-out with seating, typ. (Benches and tables) Overhead sail structure (see section B) Glass-bottom walk (see section B) Wooden Wave Bench and interpretive signs (see section B) Shoreline Tide Walk

3

6

2

18 5 1 7

Shoreline Trail 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30.

Lower restroom Roundabout for Shoreline Tide Walk Parking lot (57 spaces) Picnic nodes (both reservable and non-reservable) Event gathering and activity rest area Restroom and water station Adult fitness zone (movable equipment provided) Overhead solar light sculpture (see images to the right) Parking lot (39 spaces) Large picnic node (reservable space for events) Grassy look-out mounds (compacted soil and turf) Parking lot (17 spaces) Interpretive signage and seating (information about bluff) Small picnic nodes (non-reservable) Kite run (open grassy area for kite flying) Art walk with decorative walls and water features Iconic sculpture sign for picture taking (large bronze sign) Restroom and water station Tot lot (6-23 months) Playground (2-5 years) Playground (5-12 years) Playground (6-23 months) Splash pad (see image to the right) Parking lot (39 spaces) Interpretive signage and seating Break-a-way wood paneling path, typ. (See Vision Plan) Whimsical tilting planters (see night perspective) Beach look-out with seating and interpretive signs Shoreline Plaza Access from Leadbetter Beach and downtown Santa Barbara

8

9 10 11 13

12

A

1

2

3 4

61


30

29

28 27

26 24

25

6

3 1

14

2

4

8

5

20

9

21

22 23

18 19

7 6 17 11 10

5

12

14

15

16

13

B

62


Blow -up: Shoreline Plaza Shoreline Plaza

14

13

Shoreline Plaza is the gathering space at the entrance of Shoreline Trail. It is meant to be a versatile area that can cater to events held by local organizations or can even be a place to hear your favorite band. There are many curved benches to sit on and the unique planting design follows the curves of the paving and is meant to look like a vegetated art piece. The lookout area has benches and informative signs for visitors and the whimsical planters are meant to be an iconic feature of the park that will draw people closer to the ocean and take pictures.

12

10 11 9

8

7

2 3

Legend: 1

6

4

63

5

01.

Connection of all the trails

02.

Elevation Trail (Runner’s path)

03.

Whimsical tilted planters

04.

Native grass for erosion control

05.

Interpretive bluff information sign

06.

Bench, typ.

07.

Color swatch planting design

08.

Bluff Walk (Pedestrian path)

09.

Serenity Bike Path (Biker’s path)

10.

Glass sculpture ball

11.

Break-a-way walk (See Vision Plan)

12.

Red Chrome overhead structure

13.

Heavy foot traffic zone

14.

Path division planter


line Sh ore

This planting plan represents the style of planting that occurs throughout the rest of Shoreline Trail. The planting design mimics the style of the park that it is in so the closer to Douglas Preserve, the more the planting begins to look natural and untouched. This is the farthest park from Douglas Preserve, so it is full of bright colors and tilted planters.

Dr ive

Shoreline Plaza: Planting Plan

64


Shoreline Plaza: Planting Plan

65

HYDROSEED MIX Achillea millefolium / Common Yarrow Aristida purpurea / Purple Threeawn Cleome hassleriana `Cherry` / Pink Queen Cosmos bipinnatus / Cosmos Eschscholzia californica / California Poppy Gaillardia x grandiflora / Blanketflower Gazania rigens / Gazania Penstemon heterophyllus / Foothill Penstemon

2,542 sf

TURF AREA

10,857 sf


66


Shoreline Plaza: Planting Plan

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Exotic Species to Eradicate 1. Ehrharta calycina (Perennial Veldtgrass) 2. Foeniculum vulgare (Sweet Fennel) 3. Carpobrotus edulis (Hottentot Fig) 4. Cortaderia jubata (Pampas grass) 5. Cortaderia selloana (Pampas grass) 6. Eucalyptus globulus (Blue Gum) 7. Hedera canariensis (Algerian Ivy) 8. Hedera helix (English Ivy) 9. Pennisetum setaceum (Fountain grass) 10. Schinus molle (Peruvian Pepper) 11. Vinca major (Periwinkle)

67

6.


Shoreline Plaza: Planting Plan Complete List for Master Plan Trees

Erigeron glaucus (Seaside Daisy)

Setcreasea pallida (Purple Heart)

Aesculus californica (California Buckeye)

Eriogonum sp. (Buckwheat)

Grasses/sedges

Cercis occidentalis (Western Redbud)

Eriophyllum nevinii (Catalina Silver-lace)

Phormium Black (Alder Flax)

Chilopsis linearis (Desert Willow)

Galvezia speciosa (Bush Snapdragon)

Chondropetalum tectorum (Cape Rush)

Lyonothamnus floribundus (Island Ironwood)

Heteromeles arbutifolia (Toyon)

Cyperaceae sp. (Sedge)

Pinus sp. (Pine)

Hyptis emoryi (Desert Lavender)

mulenbergia rigens (Deer Grass)

Platanus racemosa (Western Sycamore)

Keckiella sp. (Bush penstemon)

Acorus gramineus (Sweet Flag)

Populus sp. (Cottonwood)

Lonicera sp. (Honeysuckle)

Liriope muscari (Lilyturf)

Prunus sp. (Cherry)

Lupinus sp. (Bush Lupine)

Ophiopogon japonicus (Mondo Grass)

Quercus sp. (Oak)

Malacothamnus sp. (Bush Mallow)

Nassella tenuissima (Mexican Feather Grass)

Cupaniopsis anacardioides (Carrotwood)

Mimimulus sp. (Bush Monkeyflower)

Sorghastrum nutans ‘Sioux Blue’ (Sioux Blue Indian

Erythrina sp. (Coral Tree)

Cistus sp. (Rockrose)

Grass)

Jacaranda mimosifolia (Jacaranda)

Leptospermum scoparium (N.Z. Tea Tree)

Festuca glauca (Blue Fescue)

Melaleuca quinquenervia (Paper Bark Tree)

Perennials

Palms

Melaleuca nesophila (Pink Melaleuca)

Achilla sp. (Yarrow)

Camaerops humulis (Mediterranean Fan Palm)

Ceiba speciosa (Honeylocust)

Asclepias sp. (Milkweed)

Washingtonia robusta (Mexican Fan Palm)

Monterey (Pine)

Aster sp. (Aster)

Trachycarpus fortunei (Windmill Palm)

Cupressus macrocarpa (Monterey Cypress)

Coreopsis sp. (Coreopsis)

Caryota species (Fishtail Palm)

Callistemon sp. (Bottlebrush)

Delphinium sp. (Larkspur)

Arecastrum romanzoffianum (Queen Palm)

Olea Europaea (Fruitless Olive)

Epilobius sp. (California Fuchsia)

Succulents

Eucalyptus cinerea (Silver Dollar Tree)

Eriopyllum confertifolium (Golden Yarrow)

Agave shawii (Agave)

Lorus nobilis (Sweet Bay)

Fragaria sp. (Strawberry)

Agave attenuatta (Century Plant)

Shrubs

Heuchera sp. (Coral Bells)

Dudleya sp. (Live Forever)

Adenostoma fasciculatus (Chamise)

Lilium humboldtii (Humboldt Lily)

Hesperoyucca whipplei (Our Lord’s Candle)

Arctostaphylos sp. (Manzanita)

Penstemon sp. (Penstemon)

Sedum sp. (Stonecrop)

Baccharis sp. (Coyote Brush)

Sisyrinchium bellum (Blue Eyed Grass)

Aloes sp. (Aloe)

Berberis sp. (Barberry)

Sidalcea sp. (Checkerbloom)

Senecio Mandraliscae (Blue Chalk Sticks)

Ceanothus sp. (California lilac)

Solidago sp. (Goldenrod)

Yucca baccata (Banana Yucca)

Cornus sp. (Dogwood)

Verbena lilacina (Lilac Verbena)

Sedum reflexum ‘Blue Spruce’ (Reflexed Stonecrop)

Encelia sp. (Bush Sunflower)

Kniphofia uvaria (Red Hot Poker)

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Shoreline Plaza: Lighting Plan

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ine Sh ore l

Currently there is no lighting in any of the parks except for a few overhead streetlights. I am proposing that my parks are used during the day and night because many Mesa residents work until 6pm or later and don’t get a chance to go outside. I have three different types of lighting (which are shown on the next page) so that it is a safe area at all times and there is lots of visibility into the park.

Dr ive

Lighting on Site

Scale: 1”=26’


Shoreline Plaza: Lighting Plan Lighting Schedule

LIGHTING_SCHEDULE

Light Fixtures Used

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Shoreline Plaza: Lighting perspective 8 7 6

4

3 5

2

Legend: 1. Circular entrance fountain 2. Planting divider 3. Red Chrome overhead structure 4. Glass sculpture ball 5. Concrete benches 6. Shoreline Trail 7. Whimsical tilted planters 8. Ocean lookout

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1


Site FEatures

Wayfinding Sign (see detail)

Interpretive Signs at Lookouts

Wayfinding Sign (see detail)

In Ground Distance Markers

Above Ground Distance Markers

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Site Features: signage Section Through Trail Signage

Scale: 1

Section through Trail Signage NTS

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Site FEatures: signage

evation of Trail Signage

Scale: 1â&#x20AC;? = 9/16

Elevation of Trail Signage NTS

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Shoreline Tide Walk With the uncertainty of the bluff remaining intact over the next 20 years, the Shoreline Tide Walk is a way to ensure that visitors can still run along the coastal bluff. The Shoreline Tide Walk is a floating deck that is situated just past the point of lowest tide. This means that it is away from the crashing waves, but is still close enough to the bluff that it is a short distance to get to. The grouping of decks follows the curvilinear form of the rest of the parks and has areas of glass-bottom decks, as well as artistic white shade structures. Because of the floating construction, the decks move up and down along the poles to sit on the top of the ocean. The deck continues for runners and pedestrians until it meets up with the top trail off of Mesa Lane. The decomposed granite nodes along the deck are areas to look-out at the ocean rest during a run.

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1

8 9 7

3

6 10

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5 2

Legend: 01.

Rest area and vegetated planter

02.

Overhead sail structure

03.

ReďŹ&#x201A;ective glass seating area

04.

Vegetated picnic areas, typ.

05.

Metal shadow sculpture

06.

Curved wood bench, typ.

07.

Metal seating look-out

08.

Pedestrian wood bridge, typ.

09.

Glass bottom walk

10.

Individual look-out benches, typ.

11.

Interpretive signs about the ocean tides

12.

Wooden Wave bench

13.

Large overhead sail structure

14.

Shoreline Tide Walk


Shoreline tide walk

10.

Individual look-out benches, typ.

11.

Interpretive signs about the ocean tides

12.

Wooden Wave bench

13.

Large overhead sail structure

14.

Shoreline Tide Walk

Section Through Floating Deck

Top View of Shoreline Tide Walk

NTS

Scale: 1” = 3/16” Scale: 1” = 9/16”

Elevation of Floating Deck NTS Elevation of Shoreline Tide Walk

Scale: 1” = 3/16”

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Scale: 1” = 9/16”


Shoreline tide walk 11 10

9 8 4

3

7

1

5

6

2

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Legend:

06.

Several curved wood seating

01.

Overhead sail structure

07.

Glass bottom decks

02.

Protective fencing

08.

Metal seating lookout

03.

Reflective seating area

09.

Shaded picnic areas

04.

Rest areas for runners and pedestrians

10.

Interpretive signs

05.

Reflective metal art feature

11.

Wooden Wave bench


Shoreline tide walk

1 2

5

3 4

Legend: 01.

Solar bollard lighting

02.

Interpretive signs about the ocean

03.

Wooden Wave bench

04.

Decorative wood paneling

05.

Overhead shade sail

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Shoreline tide walk Isometric Section through Shoreline Tide Walk

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11

11

04

10

03

Legend:

08 01

10

05 07 02

08

06

09 07

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01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12.

Metal Seating Look-out Glass bottom walk Curved wood bench Shoreline Tide Walk Wood bridge over vegetation Wooden Wave bench Overhead sail structure 01. ocean Metal Seating Shallow area-varies withLook-out tide Wave 02. zoneGlass bottom walk Mesa Beach 03. Curved wood bench Eroding rocky bluff edge 04. scrub Shoreline Tide Walk Coastal open space

Legend:

05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12.

Wood bridge over vegetation Wooden Wave bench Overhead sail structure Shallow ocean area-varies with tide Wave zone Mesa Beach Eroding rocky bluff edge Coastal scrub open space


Shoreline tide walk

Easy access beach from Shoreline Drive

Scale: 1”=16’

Coastal scrub open space connects to La Mesa Park

Mesa Beach

Tide fluctuation zone

Structural pillar, see detail

Pressure treated dark wood path

Pressure treated light wood path

Pressure treated dark wood path

Eroding coastal bluff edge

Shoreline Tide Walk

Overhead sail structure

Wooden Wave bench

Picnic deck

Wood bridge over vegetation

Glass-bottom walk

Section: Shoreline Tide walk

Section through Shoreline Tide Walk

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Scale: NTS

The Shoreline Tide Walk is a floating deck that stretches along the shoreline at sea 11

level. The design goes with the concept of my project, “Running on the Edge” because pedestrians are brought down to the edge of the cliff and can continue their run with

04

Shoreline Tide Walk The Shoreline Tide Walk is a floating deck that stretches along the shoreline at sea level. The design goes with the concept of my project, “Running on the Edge” because pedestrians are brought down to the edge of the cliff and can continue their run with the thrill of getting the ocean mist in their face. The floating decks are situated after the area where waves typically crash. There are several overhead shade sail structures, glass-bottom decks and many vegetated areas to enjoy a one of a kind picnic. The graphic to the right is an isometric portion of the deck area to clearly show some of the features of the Shoreline Tide Walk. The section above is taken from the closest edge of the isometric diagram.

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03 08 01 05

Legend: the thrill of getting the ocean mist in their face. The floating decks are situated after

02 06

01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07. 08. 09. 10. 11. 12.

Metal Seating Look-out Glass bottom walk Curved wood bench Shoreline Tide Walk Wood bridge over vegetation Wooden Wave bench Overhead sail structure Shallow ocean area-varies with tide Wave zone Mesa Beach Eroding rocky bluff edge Coastal scrub open space

the area where waves typically crash. There are several overhead shade sail structures, 09

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glass-bottom decks and many vegetated areas to enjoy a one of a kind picnic.

The graphic to the left is an isometric portion of the deck area to clearly show some of the features of the Shoreline Tide Walk. The section above is taken from the closest edge of the isometric diagram.

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Amphitheater base

Decomposed granite path

Wood paneling

Mesa Learning Gardens (Annuals)

Mesa Learning Gardens (Perennials) Decomposed granite walkway

Concrete and pavers path

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Native meadow grassland

La Mesa Park is neighbors with Washington Elementary school so I decided that this park can be a wonderful place for the children to have field trips. I designed the Mesa Meadows Amphitheater to double as a place for music concerts in the summer, as well as a place for graduation ceremonies or school functions. The Mesa Learning Gardens are a series of demonstration gardens that can also be for educating the children or the public.

Gathering deck for school functions or art exhibits

Mesa Meadows amphitheater


Open grass area for additional amphitheater seating

Amphitheater grass seats

Grass seating walkway

Cobble seating

Beginning of grass stairs

Decomposed granite walkway

Decorative curb

Colored concrete stage

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Stairs can be for performances or outside reading time

Decorative metal overhang

Mesa Meadows Amphitheater

Mesa Learning Gardens (Decorative grasses)


Douglas Preserve

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Legend: 01.

Play stumps

02.

Reflective fountain

03.

Curved trellis

04.

Entry feature for Douglas Preserve

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1

Perspective: gathering plaza in douglas preserve


Mesa Beach Look-out

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Intentionally Blank


Running on the Edge