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FEATURED PHOTOGRAPHER: MARIO TESTINO Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees. Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences

MAN OF A MILLION PICTURES

in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. Awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2013 in recognition of his career and charity work, in 2010 he was also appointed one of the highest honours in his native country, The Grand Cross Order of Merit in Peru, and became President of the Board of World Monuments Fund Peru in 2014. He has worked with Save the Children, amfAR, The Elton John Aids Foundation and CLIC Sargent for children with cancer. The arts are a source of joy to Testino to the extent that in 2012 he opened a non-profit museum in Lima. MATE – Museo Mario Testino was established to contribute to Peru through the cultivation and promotion of culture and heritage. For Testino, art is never static. It is something to be appreciated and collected as fragments that make up a greater mental library: a library that is in constant flow. In October 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, the founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother. from mariotestino.com


When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvian-born Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashion-trained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere,

GQ VOGUE ALLURE VANITY FAIR

even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour— the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends,

“You can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” - Herb Ritts Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the offguard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.” from Vanity Fair “Masters of Photography” Article


1.

Bold

26.

Visual

2.

Brilliant

27.

Aesthetic

3.

High-fashion

28.

Joyful

4.

Couture

29.

Dynamic

5.

Striking

30.

Opportunity

6.

Iconic

31.

Possibilities

7.

Luscious

32.

Serendipity

8.

Noteworthy

33.

Open

9.

Glamorous

34.

Diverse

10.

Extravagant

35.

International

11.

Dramatic

36.

Cosmopolitan

12.

Radiant

37.

Luxury

13.

Glowing

38.

Ambition

14.

Lustrous

39.

Freedom

15.

Captivating

40.

Exotic

16.

Intriguing

41.

Scandalous

17.

Curious

42.

Obvious

18.

Unexpected

43.

Flagrant

19.

Mood

44.

Grandiose

20.

Magical

45.

Movement

21.

Flattering

46.

Proximity

22.

Charming

47.

Exuberance

23.

Personality

48.

Dimension

24.

Seductive

49.

Unhinged

25.

Sensitive

50.

Insight

WORD LIST

KEY WORDS Striking 1. Attractive; Impressive 2. Noticeable; Conspicuous Glamourous 1. full of glamour; charmingly or fascinatingly attractive, especially in a mysterious or magical way. 2.full of excitement, adventure, and unusual activity Radiant 1. emitting rays of light; shining; bright: 2.bright with joy, hope, etc. 3. emitted or propagated by radiation. Curious 1. eager to learn or know; inquisitive. 2. prying; meddlesome. 3. arousing or exciting speculation, interest, or attention through being inexplicable or highly unusual; odd; strange:

Exuberance 1. the quality of being full of energy, excitement, and cheerfulness; ebullience. 2. the quality of growing profusely; luxuriance. Open 1. having no means of closing or barring 2. relatively free of obstructions to sight, movement, or internal arrangement: 3. to give access to; make accessible or available


1. “My favourite words are possibilities, opportunities and curiosity. I think if you are curious, you create opportunities, and then if you open the doors, you create possibilities.” - Mario Testino 2. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” -Mario Testino 3. “In our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.” -Mario Testino 4. “His pictures convey a “polished, flawless glamour —the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World.” -David Harris, Design Director of Vanity Fair 5. “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor 6. “Art requires depth.”

-Mario Testino

” PULL QUOTES


WORD COMBINATIONS 1. Polished Authenticity 2. Shameless Glamour 3. Radiant Charm 4. Loaded Beauty 5. Bold Luxury 6. Escape Unfolded

ARTICLE TITLE IDEAS 1. Everything 2. Charmed and Dangerous 3. Blah Blah Blah 4. Obsession 5. Made You Look 6. xoxo, Mario 7. Exposed


KEY IMAGE IDEAS


HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPHER: Richard Avedon

Among the anecdotes circulated about the legendary photographer Richard Avedon (1923-2004) is one involving the Duke and Duchess of Windsor — that is, King Edward VIII of England and Wallis Simpson, the American divorcée he married after abdicating the throne. In 1957, Avedon was commissioned to take a portrait of the couple, who were notoriously photo-savvy — way ahead of the curve of today’s paparazzi-beleaguered movie stars and royals. Knowing that they were dog lovers, obsessed with their own collection of pugs, Avedon is said to have told them that the taxi he had taken to meet them had run over a dog (which wasn’t true). The couple grimaced sympathetically, and — snap! — Avedon took the picture, which is on view in “Richard Avedon: Photographer of Influence” at the Nassau County Museum of Art in Roslyn Harbor. The photograph’s title is very specific: “The Duke and Duchess of Windsor, Waldorf Astoria, Suite 28A, New York, April 16, 1957.” And yet, it doesn’t tell us anything about its making. The moral of the story: don’t take photographs at face value. We know this, and yet, photographs look so truthful, we continually forget. Avedon never forgot, though. Born in New York in 1923, he was the son of RussianJewish immigrants working in the garment industry. His father owned a Manhattan clothing store, and his mother’s family, a dress manufacturing business. It was no surprise, then, that Avedon would grow up reading fashion magazines and gain recognition, initially, as a fashion photographer. By the time he photographed the Windsors, he was famous enough to inspire an alter ego in film: Fred Astaire’s fashion-photographer character in “Funny Face” (1957). Fashion images from the ’50s and ’60s capture protosupermodels like Dovima, Suzy Parker, Jean Shrimpton, Penelope Tree and Veruschka in inventive street settings, and later, against the stark minimalist backdrops for which Avedon became known. Photographs of Veruschka from 1967 — one in a Bill Blass dress, the other in a dress by Kimberly — find her leaping through space, like a bird or a dancer, rather than posing as a static mannequin hung with clothes. Outside the fashion world, however, Avedon is best known for his portraits. In the age of movements that challenged institutional authority, like those for civil rights and against the Vietnam War, Avedon’s portraits broke through the glossy artifice of celebrity and official power and seemed more authentic. We can see Avedon playing by the old rules in “Marlene Dietrich, Turban by Dior, the Ritz, Paris, August 1955”: we get the sultry Dietrich — smoking, of course — presented exactly as we imagine her. As the ’50s wore on, however, reverence and rules were stripped away. Marilyn Monroe, photographed in 1957, appears not as a vamping starlet, but as a vulnerable, “real” actress. The elderly Igor Stravinsky is photographed in 1969 in a white shirt against a white backdrop, looking more like a hospital patient than a celebrated composer. Grizzled versions of Ezra Pound and Chet Baker hang alongside a bloated Truman Capote, calling to mind an anecdote about Henry A. Kissinger (whose portrait is not on view) half-joking to Avedon before his sitting in the mid-1970s, “Be kind to me.”

Avedon’s virtuosity is particularly evident in photographs of couples, which attempt to unlock the nature of a relationship — or some version of it — in a single, still image. Monroe’s affectionately hugging her playwright husband, Arthur Miller, in 1957 humanizes the clichéd beauty-and-brains equation. The playful moment set up in 1993 between the film director Michelangelo Antonioni and his wife, Enrica, includes comic hectoring in the upper portion of the image. But the couple’s hands, clasped tightly in the lower part of the picture, suggest a profound, deeply intimate bond. And then, of course, there are the Windsors and the famous dog story, which has a weird resonance with Avedon’s own biography. In “Borrowed Dogs,” an essay adapted from a 1986 museum talk, Avedon described how, when he was growing up, his family would plan out their snapshots, standing in front of fancy cars and homes that weren’t theirs, with borrowed dogs. “My family took great care with our snapshots,” he wrote. “We really planned them.” They were “built on some kind of lie about who we were, and revealed a truth about who we wanted to be.” Avedon compared this version of portraiture to the portraits of the fin-de-siècle Viennese Expressionist Egon Schiele, which seemed to him “one of the highest examples of portraiture without borrowed dogs.” In Schiele’s work, there was a “candor and complexity” that completely undid the “tradition of flattery and lies in portrait-making.” Well into his career, Avedon was showing greater candor about his own history and process. The question is, then, how to present his work posthumously in a museum? The current exhibition omits some of the grittiest parts of his oeuvre: the controversial “In the American West, 1979-1984” series, which features homeless and disenfranchised people; photographs of his dying father; and a disturbing close-up of Andy Warhol’s scarred torso, photographed in 1969, a year after he had been shot and seriously wounded. Most tellingly for this show, perhaps, is the wall text posted next to the photograph of the Windsors. Taken from the official Web site of the British monarchy and Biography.com, it describes the “dashing, charming” Duke of Windsor and his union with Simpson as “one of the greatest love stories of our time.” There’s no mention of dogs, or of Avedon, whose version of the couple presents them in a different light, offering one version of the truth — even if it was built upon a lie. -The New York Times


PHOTO ESSAY: SUSAN SONTAG


HERB LUBALIN Herb Lubalin was two years old when AIGA awarded its first medal to the individual who, in the judgment of its board of directors and its membership, had distinguished himself in, and contributed significantly to, the field of graphic arts. There has been a lot of history between that moment and the evening in January 1981, when members, directors, friends and admirers gathered in the Great Hall of the New York Chamber of Commerce building to be with Lubalin as he accepted the 62nd AIGA medal. A lot of that history, at least in the graphic arts, had been written—and designed—by Herb Lubalin. And Lubalin has been recognized, awarded, written about, imitated and emulated for it. There’s hardly anyone better known and more highly regarded in the business. Lubalin’s receipt of AIGA’s highest honor was never a matter of “if,” only “when.” Coming to terms with Herb Lubalin’s work takes you quickly to the heart of a very big subject: the theory of meaning and how meaning is communicated—how an idea is moved, full and resonant, from one mind to another. Not many have been able to do that better than Lubalin. Typography is the key. It is where you start with Lubalin and what you eventually come back to. However, “typography” is not a word Lubalin thought should be applied to his work. “What I do is not really typography, which I think of as an essentially mechanical means of putting characters down on a page. It’s designing with letters. Aaron Burns called it, ‘typographics,’ and since you’ve got to put a name on things to make them memorable, ‘typographics’ is as good a name for what I do as any.” Lubalin was a brilliant, iconoclastic advertising art director—in the 1940s with Reiss Advertising and then for twenty years with Sudler and Hennessey. Recipient of medal after medal, award after award, and in 1962 named Art Director of the Year by the National Society of Art Directors, he has also been a publication designer of great originality and distinction. He designed startling Eros in the early 60s, intellectually and visually astringent Fact in the mid-60s, lush and luscious Avant Garde late in the same decade, and founded U & lc in 1973 and saw it flourish into the 80s. But it is Lubalin and his typographics—words, letters, pieces of letters, additions to letters, connections and combinations, and virtuoso manipulation of letters—to which all must return. The “typographic impresario of our time,” Dorfsman called him, a man who “profoundly influenced and changed our vision and perception of letter forms, words and language.”

Lubalin at his best delivers the shock of meaning through his typography-based design. Avant Garde literally moves ahead. The Sarah Vaughn Sings poster does just that. Ice Capades skates. There is a child in Mother & Child, and a family in Families. If words are a way of making meaning, then the shapes of their letters give voice, color, character and individuality to that meaning. The shock of meaning, in Lubalin’s artful hands, delivers delight, as well, delight that flows from sight and insight. “Lubalin,” praises Dorfsman, “used his extraordinary talent and taste to transform words and meaning from a medium to an inextricable part of the message? and in so doing, raised typography from the level of craft to art.” And it is in his paper U & lc that a lot of threads in Lubalin’s life and career get pulled together. It is publication dedicated to the joyful, riotous exploration of the complex relationships between words, letters, type and meaning—an ebullient advertisement for himself as art director, editor, publisher and purveyor of the shock and delight of meaning through typography and design. “Right now,” he said, “I have what every designer wants and few have the good fortune to achieve. I’m my own client. Nobody tells me what to do.” And 170,000 subscribers which, with a conservative pass-along estimate, yields 400,000 readers, benefit. Herb Lubalin’s unique contribution to our times goes well beyond design in much the same way that his typographic innovations go beyond the twenty-six letters, ten numerals and the handful of punctuation marks that comprise our visual, literal vocabulary. Lubalin’s imagination, sight and insight have erased boundaries and pushed back frontiers. As an agency art director, he pushed beyond the established norm of copy-driven advertising and added a new dimension. As a publication designer, he pushed beyond the boundaries that constrained existing magazines—both in form and content. In fact, some said he had pushed beyond the boundaries of “good taste,” though in retrospect that work is more notable today for its graphic excellence than for its purported prurience. Lubalin helped push back the boundaries of the impact and perception of design—from an ill-defined, narrowly recognized craft to a powerful communication medium that could put big, important ideas smack in the public eye. And finally, he pushed back what were believed to be the boundaries of design for entire generations of designers who were to follow. For such a quiet, gentle person to have accomplished so much is testimony indeed to the power of ideas in the hands of a master.


ESQUIRE MAGAZINE In the 1960’s Esquire magazine produced some of the most memorable covers that are inspiring designers all around the world even today. This is not such a surprise since they were designed by one of the legends of graphic design, George Lois. He designed 92 covers in total in the period from 1962 to 1972, although I have to start this story with Henry Wolf, great art director who set the grounds for Lois with his work in the Esquire during the 50’s. Wolf’s design sets the standards of sophistication for In 1958 Wolf left for Harper’s Bazaar to replace Alexey Brodovitch and this brings us to the beginning of the 60’s. The decade of war, assassination, and racial fear. But for an Esquire and its editor Harold T. P. Hayes this was a fertile ground for a revolutionary barrage of literary and visual firepower to America’s newsstands. December 1963 was the first issue to display the full range of literary and visual firepower that would make Esquire the great American magazine of the 1960s, if not the greatest American magazine of the 20th century which Esquire is now known. In the AIGA Design Archives, the Esquire collection represents just the tip of the iceberg, considering the magazine’s rich history. But there’s a reason the men’s monthly is still hugely successful over eight decades on. From the art directors of yore to the wonderfully talented new man at the helm, we flip through 80 years of the publication’s pages to find out what they’ve managed to do oh-so-right for oh-so-long. Born at the height of the depression in 1933 and published by Hearst, this “men’s magazine” did indeed invent the pin-up girl, featuring bathing beauties alongside lifestyle features. The debut issue contains articles by Ernest Hemingway, Gilbert Seldes, and Ring Lardner, Jr., as well as fiction by John Dos Passos, Dashiell Hammett, and, oddly enough, actor Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. Its mascot “Esky” is a doppelgänger for Mr. Monopoly, a.k.a. Rich Uncle Pennybags, who made his appearance three years later, and perhaps originally represented something to strive for in those dark days. The magazine retained its original editorial approach and design throughout the war years. In the early 1950s, Austrian designer and AIGA Medalist Henry Wolf (born in 1925) was hired in the promotion department. The publisher was so impressed with his work that he ordered the art director to work with him. When the art director quit in 1952, Wolf was promoted. A photographer as well as a designer, he utilized his own photography and design work for the magazine. Then, in 1958 he left to replace Alexey Brodovitch at Harper’s Bazaar. In an unusual move, the publishers hired ad man AIGA Medalist George Lois to design the covers, while future film director Robert Benton (writer of Bonnie and Clyde, Superman, and writer and director of Kramer vs. Kramer, to name a few) handled the interiors. Lois, alongside photographer Carl Fischer, created some of the most provocative and well-known images of the 1960s. The magazine has had many notable art directors over the years, many of whose work appears in the AIGA Design Archives, like AIGA Medalist Samuel N. Antupit who took the reigns from 1964-69 and again from 1977-78; Robert Priest from 1980-83; Rip Georges in the late ’80s; and Rhonda Rubinstein in the early ’90s.


ALEXEY BRODOVITCH

Alexey Brodovitch is remembered today as the art director of Harper’s Bazaar for nearly a quarter of a century. But the volatile Russian emigré’s influence was much broader and more complex than his long tenure at a fashion magazine might suggest. He played a crucial role in introducing into the United States a radically simplified, “modern” graphic design style forged in Europe in the 1920s from an amalgam of vanguard movements in art and design. Through his teaching, he created a generation of designers sympathetic to his belief in the primacy of visual freshness and immediacy. Fascinated with photography, he made it the backbone of modern magazine design, and he fostered the development of an expressionistic, primal style of picture-taking that became the dominant style of photographic practice in the 1950s. In addition, Brodovitch is virtually the model for the modern magazine art director. He did not simply arrange photographs, illustrations and type on the page; he took an active role in conceiving and commissioning all forms of graphic art, and he specialized in discovering and showcasing young and unknown talent. His first assistant in New York was a very young Irving Penn. Leslie Gill, Richard Avedon and Hiro are among the other photographers whose work Brodovitch nurtured during his long career. So great was his impact on the editorial image of Harper’s Bazaar that he achieved celebrity status; the film Funny Face, for example, which starred Fred Astaire as a photographer much like Avedon, named its artdirector character “Dovitch.” Despite his professional achievements and public success, however, Brodovitch was never a happy man. Born in Russia in 1898 of moderately well-to-do parents, he deferred his goal of attending the Imperial Art Academy to fight in the Czarist army, first against the Austro-Hungarian Empire and then against the Bolsheviks. In defeat, he fled Russia with his family and future wife and, in 1920, settled in Paris. There, despite the burden of exile, he prospered; in 1924 his poster design for an artists’ ball won first prize, and in 1925 he won medals for fabric, jewelry and display design at the International Exhibition of Decorative Arts (the landmark “Art Deco” exposition). Soon he was in great demand, designing restaurant décor, posters and department store advertisements. He came to the United States in 1930 to start a department of advertising (later known as the Philadelphia College of Art). There he trained students in the fundamentals of European design, while embarking on numerous freelance illustration assignments in Philadelphia and New York. In 1934 Carmel Snow, the new editor of Harper’s Bazaar, saw his design work and immediately hired him to be its art director. It was the beginning of a collaboration that was to revolutionize both fashion and magazine design, and that catapulted Bazaar past its arch-rival, Vogue. At Harper’s Bazaar, where he was art director from 1934 to 1958, Brodovitch used the work of such European artists as Man Ray, Salvador Dali, and A.M. Cassandre, as well as photographers Bill Brandt, Brasai, and Henri Cartier-Bresson. He was the first to give assignments to emigré photographers

Lisette Model and Robert Frank. Starting with a splashy, sometimes overly self-conscious style largely borrowed from his early counterpart at Vogue, Dr. M.F. Agha (AIGA medalist, 1957), he gradually refined his page layouts to the point of utter simplicity. By the 1950’s, white space was the hallmark of the Brodovitch style. Models in Parisian gowns and American sports clothes “floated” on the page, surrounded by white backgrounds, while headlines and type took on an ethereal presence. At his best, Brodovitch was able to create an illusion of elegance from the merest hint of materiality. Clothes were presented not as pieces of fabric cut in singular ways, but as signs of a fashionable life. Besides his achievements at Bazaar, Brodovitch’s legacy as a publications designer includes the short-lived but influential magazine Portfolio, three issues of which were published in 1949 and 1950. A flashy, innovative quarterly aimed at the design profession, Portfolio contained profusely illustrated feature on Alexander Calder, Charles Eames, Paul Rand, Saul Steinberg and others, as well as articles surveying the graphic variations of cattle brands and shopping bags. As art editor, Brodovitch helped conceive the magazine’s contents, as well as creating its distinct design with the help of die-cuts, transparent pages, multi-page fold outs and other elaborate (and expensive) graphic devices. Throughout his career, he continued to teach. His “Design Laboratory,” which focused variously on illustration, graphic design and photography and on occasion were offered under the auspices of the AIGA, provided a system of rigorous critiques for those who aspired to magazine work. As a teacher, Brodovitch was inspiring, though sometimes harsh and unrelenting. A student’s worst offense was to present something Brodovitch found boring; at best, the hawk-faced Russian would pronounce a work “interesting.” Despite his unbending manner and lack of explicit critical standards—Brodovitch did not formulate a theory of design—many students under his tutelage discovered untapped creative reserves. Even at the height of his powers, however, Brodovitch’s personal life remained linked to loss and disappointment. His family life was evidently unhappy. In addition, a series of house fires in the 1950s destroyed not only his country retreat but also his paintings, archives and library. In the 1960s after he left Harper’s Bazaar, he continued to teach but did little design work. He died in 1971 in a small village in southern France where he had spent the last three years of his life. Today Brodovitch’s legacy is remarkably rich. His layouts remain models of graphic intelligence and inspiration, even if seldom imitated, and the artists, photographers and designers whose careers he influenced continue to shape graphic design in the image of his uncompromising ideals.


JONATHAN HOEFLER Jonathan Hoefler is an American typeface designer. Hoefler founded The Hoefler Type Foundry in 1989, a type foundry in New York. In 1999 Hoefler began working with type designer Tobias Frere-Jones, and from 2005–2014 the company operated under the name Hoefler & Frere-Jones until their public split. Hoefler has designed original typefaces for Rolling Stone, Harper’s Bazaar, The New York Times Magazine, Sports Illustrated, and Esquire and several institutional clients, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and alternative band They Might Be Giants. Perhaps his best-known work is the Hoefler Text family of typefaces, designed for Apple Computer and now appearing as part of the Macintosh operating system. He also designed the current wordmark of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. Jonathan Hoefler is a typeface designer and armchair type historian whose New York studio, The Hoefler Type Foundry, specializes in the design of original typefaces. Named one of the forty most influential designers in America by I.D. Magazine, Hoefler’s publishing work includes award-winning original typeface designs for Rolling Stone, Harper’s Bazaar, The New York Times Magazine, Sports Illustrated, and Esquire; his institutional clients range from the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum to the rock band They Might Be Giants. Perhaps his best known work is the Hoefler Text family of typefaces, designed

for Apple Computer and now appearing everywhere as part of the Macintosh operating system. Hoefler’s work has been exhibited internationally, and is included in the permanent collection of the CooperHewitt National Design Museum (Smithonian Institution) in New York. Hoefler sees his work as an investigation into the circumstances behind historical form. In each of his designs, he attempts to interpret the critical and aesthetic theories which precipitated a particular style of letter, and to spin this internal logic into the foundation for a family of original designs. (It helps that he collects antique type specimen books, and that he is obsessed with classicism.) With the hope of presenting the studio’s work in a critical context, The Hoefler Type Foundry publishes MUSE, a type specimen appearing periodically, and available online at www.typography.com.


GAIL ANDERSON During the early part of her career Gail Anderson was seen but not much heard, which doesn’t mean she wasn’t outspoken. In fact, typographically speaking she was incredibly eloquent. At Rolling Stone magazine, where she held numerous positions from 1987–2002, starting as an associate and becoming senior art director, Anderson lent her flair to much of the conceptual typography that defined the magazine’s feature pages. She appreciably contributed to the widespread eclectic typographic fashion that prevailed throughout the 1990s but never fell into a style trap. For much of her tenure at Rolling Stone, working with art director (and AIGA Medalist) Fred Woodward, she fine-tuned her typographic expressionism in a cramped office filled floor to ceiling with all kinds of stimulating scraps, devising quirky letterforms out of traditional and untraditional materials, from hot metal and wood type to twigs and bottle caps. From this typographic wellspring came an ever-expanding vocabulary of signs and symbols, methods and mannerisms that, in turn, influenced a slew of designers who followed (and at times copied) her graphic eccentricities. After Rolling Stone she joined SpotCo, one of the largest entertainment design agencies in New York, where she is now creative director of design, and for half a dozen years her poster designs for scores of Broadway and off-Broadway plays have illuminated bus shelters, subway stations and billboards. A lifelong New Yorker, Anderson embodies three virtues: inspiring art director, inspired designer and inspirational teacher. Despite being deceptively low key, she does everything with intense passion. Her extreme devotion to craft (she often frets for ages over the minutest typographic detail) combined with an unceasing, though always natural, pursuit of whimsy distinguishes her brand of quirkiness from the larger pack of knee-jerk quirks. While some might choose to call her method retro, the work defies stylistic pigeonholing. She revels in making typography from old and new forms, which is neither modernist nor post-modernist, but rather spot-on contemporaneous. During the early digital ‘90s when typography was alternately under- and over-adorned, Anderson exacted the right balance with compositions that were elegant yet muscular, and, more importantly, surprising and delightful. “Her significant contribution to design,” says Drew Hodges, her former classmate and current employer as founder and president of SpotCo, “is a belief in the tradition of typography and a joy in using it in a contemporary vernacular.” Anderson has been the quintessential collaborator because, as she notes, “it’s more fun to work with other designers and art directors; I really enjoy the back and forth.” Every now and then, though, she needs to design alone, “in my office, with my music on.” She adds, “Most high-octane, solo designing has to be done at night. I’m trying to change my ways but it’s not always easy.” Another evolution for this formidable print designer is her expansion into new media. Fortuitously, her type, which has always seemed to move, lends itself perfectly to motion. As her lifetime achievement is being celebrated, we can be sure that Anderson has yet a lifetime more to achieve.


DAVID CARSON

David Carson is a prominent contemporary graphic designer and art director. His unconventional and experimental graphic style revolutionized the graphic designing scene in America during 1990s. He was the art director of the magazine Ray Gun, in which he introduced the innovative typographies and distinct layouts. He is claimed to be the godfather of ‘grunge typography’ which he employed perpetually in his magazine issues. On September 8, 1954, Carson was born in Corpus Christi, Texas. He went on to study Sociology from San Diego State University and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree. He touched upon graphic designing briefly while attending a two-week commercial designing class at the University of Arizona, in 1980. Subsequently, he attended the Oregon College of Commercial Art to study graphic designing and a three-week workshop in Switzerland as a part of his degree. He also took up a teaching job at a Californian high-school where he taught for several years. Besides, his many talents include professional surfing and he was ranked 9th best surfer in the world, in 1989. David Carson embarked on his passion for graphic designing in his later life. In the beginning he worked as a designer for a magazine, Self and Musician, covering surfers’ interests. His early experiences also include working for Transworld Skateboarding magazine which paved way for his experimental designing. He became the art director for the magazine in 1984 and revised its style and layout until his tenure ended. During his time at Transworld Skateboarding, he developed a signature style with the use of unconventional ‘dirty’ type photographic techniques. In 1987, he also lent his expertise to the extension of the magazine, Transworld Snowboarding. In 1989, he was landed a job at the magazine Beach Culture, as an art director. After the publication of only six issues, the magazine folded. Notwithstanding, Carson made a name for himself through the opportunity, as his designs were recognized for his for his unique style and typography and consequently earned over hundred design awards. In 1992, he was offered a job at an alternative-music magazine Ray Gun, whose publisher saw true potential of his graphic design skills. Once again, Carson proved himself as he tripled the magazine’s circulation and attracted a wide readership. In fact, to keep the spirit of the magazine alive he notoriously published a tedious interview with Bryan Ferry in Zapf Dingbats (symbol) font. His work is characterized by the chaotic typography and pattern it embodies, disarray of photos overlapping each other, seemingly meaningless at the surface but holding a larger picture. To put in simpler words as Albert Watson stated, the disorganized use of his typography has its own purpose, such as the each stroke of a painter’s brush evoke different emotion, imagery and idea, so does Carson’s designs possess such attributes. Where his innovative style of visual communication attracted new readers it also repelled many who considered his work fractured, hence misleading. Although his covers for Ray Gun were often radical and bold, it fascinated the young readership, thus the big corporations also hired him for their brand advertisements through both print and electronic media. In 1995, Carson quit his job at Ray Gun and established his own firm, David Carson Design. He signed contract with a host of major corporate clients, including Nike, Pepsi Cola, Ray Bans, Levi Strauss and MTV Global among others. Additionally, he published a comprehensive collection of his graphic works The End of Print: The Graphic Design of David Carson (1995) and other highly experimental works; 2nd Sight, Trek and Fotografiks.


NEVILLE BRODY Neville Brody is an internationally known British graphic designer and typographer, who is best known for his work on magazines, most notably ‘The Face.’ This magazine transformed the way in which designers and readers approach typography and layout. In addition to his magazine work, he designed record covers for such independent record companies as Fetish, Hannibal, and Phonogram Records in the 1980s. Along with his other work, Brody created a vast amount of typefaces throughout his career. A few of these types are Arcadia, Industrial, and Insignia. Brody was born in 1957 and grew up in Southgate, which is a suburb of North London. He commented that he does not remember a time in his life when he was planning to do anything other than art or painting. In 1975, Brody attended the Fine Art Foundation Program at Hornsey College of Art. The school was extremely conservative and at this time Brody decided to pursue a career in graphics instead of the Fine Arts. He says “why can’t you take a painterly approach within a printed medium?” In the autumn of 1976, Brody started a three-year BA course in graphics at the London College of Printing. Brody says he hated his time there, but that it was necessary to his development as a designer. “I wanted to communicate to as many people as possible, but also to make a popular form of art that was more personal and less manipulative. I had to find out more about how the process worked. The only way possible was to go to college and learn it,” His work was often considered too experimental. At one stage he was almost thrown out of the school for putting the Queen’s head sideways on the design of a postage stamp. “If tutors said they liked something I was doing, I would go away and change it, because such approval then made me think there must be something wrong with the work. I think that was a very positive and healthy attitude.” Brody’s attitude on computers has changed a lot since he first started using them. His view had been that if you could do something by hand, you should not use a machine. In 1987, Brody forced himself to play around with a friend’s computer. He says learning to use the Macintosh computer was a slow process. But in the end Brody acquired his skills with the mouse by playing a game called Crystal Quest for hours, instead of working. He realized all the ways that he could manipulate his work on a computer that he absolutely could not have done any other way. Although he still believes that a hand on experience is definitely necessary, he realizes that computers open up a whole avenue that would not be possible without their development. Dadaism and pop art have largely influenced Brody’s work. Although he says he never sought to copy these styles, he took from them a sense of dynamism and humanism and a non-acceptance of the traditional rules and values of art. These elements can be seen in Brody’s typefaces, which are having a very original and expressive design. All along the line, Neville Brody has tried to create and use typefaces that go against the grain of contemporary fashion. Others that have influenced Brody are Man Ray and Lazlo Maholy-Lazlo’s photography. Both of these men were able to stretch the limits of their fields, by inventing and manipulating techniques as never before. After his graduation, in the late 1970s, Brody began to design record covers for British punk music companies such as Fetish and Hannibal. The punk music scene then was more

concerned with the ideas behind the music than with the actual music. Brody’s outrageous cover designs were readily accepted by these companies. Cabaret Voltaire and 23 Skiddo were two bands that he worked extensively for on album covers. In 1981, Brody began working for a magazine called ‘The Face.’ During this time he questioned the traditional structure of magazine design. “Why be inhibited by the edges of the page?”says Brody. His main concerns were to encourage people to have to look twice at a page and to make the magazine as visually interesting as possible. Brody worked at ‘The Face’ until 1986. Brody also worked with ‘City Limits’ and ‘New Socialist,’ both 1980’s magazines out of London. Brody became well known around the world in 1988, when his biography was published and he displayed his work in several large art exhibitions. There was a period between 1987 and 1990, when Brody was working for the magazine ‘Arena,’ when he designed mostly minimalistic non-decorative typefaces. Brody felt his work had been ripped off too much. As a result of this he did not want to make anymore new statements what-so-ever. He began to create simple fonts and avoided creating anything too exotic for a period. Since 1987 Brody has had his own London studio. He found that overseas clients were more supportive of his work intentions — to embrace the potential of the computer and to provide companies with the templates that they wanted from his own studio. Commissions from Haus der Kulturen der Welt Berlin, Men’s Bigi and Parco in Japan, and the opportunity to design postage stamps for the Dutch PTT were followed by two major television graphics projects. The transition to working with electronic images was reflected by Brody’s involvement with digital type. In 1990 he opened FontWorks with a collogue named Stuart Jenson. Neville Brody became the director of FontShop International, with whom he launched the experimental type magazine called FUSE. Neville Brody has not only changed the world of typography, but that of graphic design as well. His ideas of creating typefaces that are more concerned with being graphically oriented than contemporary or simply readable, have affected both typography and graphic design.


TIBOR KALMAN Tibor Kalman was a renowned American graphic designer of Hungarian descent. He is recognized for his position at Colors magazine as editor-in-chief. He also authored numerous books on the subject. His accomplishments were legend within the field and widely known outside as well. Born on July 6, 1949 in Budapest, Hungary and later moved to United States with his family, attaining the residency in 1956. His family escaped Hungary under dire circumstances which involved the Soviet invasion. They permanently settled in Poughkeepsie, New York. There he studied at the New York University, although he dropped out a year after, attending journalism classes. During 70s he did a stint at a small New York City bookstore which would become one of the nation’s leading bookstores, Barnes & Noble. Soon after, he was appointed the supervisor of bookstore’s in-house design department. Subsequently, in collaboration with Carol Bokuniewicz and Liz Trovato, Kalman founded the design firm M & Co. The studio managed the corporate work providing a diverse range of solutions to their clients. The company dealt with various clients including the new wave group Talking Heads, Restaurant Florent in New York City’s Meatpacking District and the Limited Corporation. Early 90s is marked as the time when Kalman served as the creative director of Interview magazine. Moreover, the Benetton-sponsored Colors magazine sought his expertise as founding editor-in-chief. Consequently, Kalman had to dissolve M & Co. in 1993, and as to work exclusively on the

magazine he relocated to Rome. Colors focused on multiculturalism and global awareness as its motto says, a magazine about the rest of the world. The viewpoint was communicated through typography, bold graphic design, and juxtaposition of photographs and doctored images. The magazine also ran a series which featured the renowned figures, for instance the Pope and Queen Elizabeth, as racial minorities. He played an instrumental role in transforming Colors into a global phenomenon and remained a driving force behind it. Sadly, in 1995 the onset of non-Hodgkins lymphoma resulted in him withdrawing from the job and his return to New York. Upon his arrival to New York, Kalman re-opened M & Co. in 1997. He continued to work for the firm for another two years until he couldn’t fight the fatal disease anymore and passed away in Puerto Rico, in 1999. A retrospective of his graphic design work entitled Tiborocity was mounted by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, shortly after his death. Furthermore, Princeton Architectural Press published a book about Kalman and M & Co’s work, Tibor Kalman: Perverse Optimist. It has been years since Kalman’s demise, but the influence of M & Co is still strong. His legacy is still carried on by Alexander Isley, Stefan Sagmeister, Stephen Doyle, Emily Oberman and Scott Stowell. All these eminent designers had the benefit of learning from his firm and later they established their own studios. Kalman’s associates Howard Milton and Jay Smith, whom he worked with in the late 1970’s founded their own Smith & Milton studios in UK. Besides, Tibor Kalman served as a board member of Alliance Graphique Internationale (AGI). The American Institute of Graphic Arts presented him with the highest honor of graphic art, AIGA Medal, in 1999. Among the 33 signers of the First Things First 2000 manifesto, Kalman was also the one who signed the manifesto. He remained married to the author and illustrator Maira Kalman till his death.


QUESTIONS

What are the advantages of a multiple column grid? They provide flexible formats for publications that have a complex hierarchy or that integrate text and illustrations. The more columns you create, the more flexible your grid becomes. You can use the grid to articulate the hierarchy of the publication by creating zones for different kinds of content. How many characters is optimal for a line length? words per line? The optimal line length for your body text is considered to be 50-60 characters per line, 12 words per line Why is the baseline grid used in design? To keep everything organized and neat, it is used to create clear hierarchy and a clean look What are reasons to set type justified? ragged (unjustified)? Justified type makes a clean shape on the page, it also efficiently uses space. Ragged type respects the flow of language by leaving either the left or right side (sometimes both) messy. This effect is desireble as it seems more natural and free comapred to the restrictive box of justification. What is a typographic river? They are gaps in typesetting, which appear to run through a paragraph of text, due to a coincidental alignment of spaces. What does clothesline, hangline or flow line mean? Clothesline: an imaginary line that aligns horzontally to test and allows for easy readability and flow. Hangline: an area across the top of the page that images and captions, and body text can “hang” from a common line. Flow Line: a route followed by a product through successive stages of manufacture or treatment. What is type color/texture mean? This includes the typeface, size, spacing, line measurement, ect. These elements alter the density, contrast, and value of the text therefore creating texture and color. How does x-height effect type color? The x-height is the measured height of fonts considering all fonts vary in size. This measurement is used to compare fonts in relation to each other’s relative x-height. This effects type color because it either makes the font lighter and longer or shorter and more compact creating various shades of value. What are some ways to indicate a new paragraph. Are there any rules? There are many ways to indicate a new paragraph including drop caps, color, bold, italic, new font, highlight, rules, symbols, indentation, explication, weight, space, et


WORD MAP

MORE QUOTES “Commerce without art isn’t really sellable these days.” -Mario Testino “It’s very difficult to be a fashion photographer, you have to combine a lot of different things. You have to be good with people, you have to know about clothes and hair and makup, you have to know about light, you hvae to know about human relations, you have to know about business. It’s a complex profession.” -Mario Testino

- Shoot - Snap - Point - Oh My Gosh - Yes - No Doubt - Speechless - Flat Out - Trouble - Everything - Extra - Plenty - All This and More - Everything - South - Darling - Mambo - Pulse - Limelight - On Top - Foolish - Break the Ice - Exuberance - Persuing Magic - No Limits - It Man - Beyond the Border


STEP 1 TITLE, SUBTITLE, PICTURE

1.

MADE YOU LOOK The Photography of Mario Testino

2.

EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino


3.

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino

4.

BEYOND THE BORDER Photography by Mario Testino


STEP 2

FONTS & STYLE EXPERIMENTATION

NOTES

Helvetica

MADE YOU LOOK The Photography of Mario Testino Made You Look The Photography of Mario Testino

> For “Made You Look” I like all caps beacuse it’s bold and grabs attention. > Sans Serif looks clean and bold > simple and chic

made you look the photography of mario testino

MADE YOU LOOK The Photography of Mario Testino

> this font requires kerning (shown at 50)

VAG Rounded

> rounding edges are fun but still clean maybe?

Made You Look The Photography of Mario Testino

> different but not cheesy > would be fun to play on the circular shape - also mimics eyes

Archer with Univers

made you look the photography of mario testino

MADE YOU LOOK The Photography of Mario Testino Made You Look The Photography of Mario Testino the photography of mario testino made you look

> not sure this is the look I want, doesn’t look as fashionable and sleek > hard to pair fonts with Archer, tried a bunch and none look like a great match > not enough contrast or enough balance > too busy, words don’t stand out


NOTES

Basilia T with Avant Garde

MADE YOU LOOK The Photography of Mario Testino Made You Look The Photography of Mario Testino

> LOVE the look of the modern/ didone style, very sleek > don’t like how elongated the avante garde is, but changing the size will help

made you look the photography of mario testino

Bell Gothic

MADE YOU LOOK The Photography of Mario Testino Made You Look The Photography of Mario Testino

> this font is cool, has sharp edges and little details > maybe a little too janky for my liking > looks nice when kerned (shown here at 25)

made you look the photography of mario testino

MADE YOU LOOK The Photography of Mario Testino

> may be my favorite all-caps, sans-serif look

DIN Condensed

> letters are reall pretty and could be eaily manipulated/ customized

Made You Look The Photography of Mario Testino

> easily recognizable/ good readability

made you look the photography of mario testino

Meta Sans

MADE YOU LOOK The Photography of Mario Testino Made You Look The Photography of Mario Testino

> angled edges, might be cool to play with > high contrast between bold and thin > lots of variety and options > kind of like the all lowercase here

made you look the photography of mario testino


News Gothic with Avant Garde

NOTES EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino Exuberance The Work of Mario Testino

> the italics have good movement

exuberance the photography of mario testino

EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino Bell Gothic

> like this combo a lot

Exuberance The Work of Mario Testino

> all caps looks nice > visual look doesnt match the verbal word

exuberance the work of mario testino

EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino

> visual-verbal connection isn’t there

DIN Condensed

> to stiff

Exuberance The Work of Mario Testino exuberance the work of mario testino

Meta Sans

EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino Exuberance The Work of Mario Testino exuberance the work of mario testino

> variety mixes it up, has movement > shape of the lower case letters is kind of weird


New Baskerville with Helvetica

NOTES EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino Exuberance The Work of Mario Testino

there > I don’t like the serif style with this word

exuberance the photography of mario testino

EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino VAG rounded

> this combo is just okay, not sure if the balance is

Exuberance The Work of Mario Testino

> fun font, good with the word >round edges are cool > all caps and all lowercase look nice

exuberance the work of mario testino

EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino

> love the italics in this font

Archer

> good rhythm, would be fun to work with

Exuberance The Work of Mario Testino

> variety of weights

exuberance the work of mario testino

Gotham

EXUBERANCE The Work of Mario Testino Exuberance The Work of Mario Testino exuberan ce the work of mario testino

> ultra bold is cool > italics look nice here > kerning is fun to mess with on this font


NOTES

Helvetica

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino All This and More The Work of Mario Testino

> simple and sweet > is it too boring? > needs to be pushed

all this and more the work of mario testino

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino

> still like the rounded edges

VAG Rounded

> could incorportate round edges in designi

All This and More The Work of Mario Testino

> visually interesting > the lowercase letters are cute!

all this and more the work of mario testino

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino

> pretty letters, lots of freedom

Trade Gothic

> simple, could be paired with something (shown on bottom with avant garde)

All This and More The Work of Mario Testino

> could kern close or far apart

Archer with Univers

all this and more the work of mario testino

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino

> this font works well with these words > I like this combo

All This and More The Work of Mario Testino all this and more the work of mario testino

> slab serif


NOTES

Bodoni with Avant Garde

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino All This and More The Work of Mario Testino

> GOOD combo! > love the ball serifs in the lowercase, would be cool in large scale > romantic mood

all this and more the work of mario testino

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino

> lots of variety

Akzidenz

> italics look like serifs

All This and More The Work of Mario Testino

> super thin vs super bold

all this and more the work of mario testino

Orator

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino

> this font has weird spacing > weird caps vs- lowercase

All This and More The Work of Mario Testino

Sabon with Univers

all this and more the work of mario testino

ALL THIS AND MORE The Work of Mario Testino

> more subtle serifs > looks good in italics

All This and More The Work of Mario Testino all this and more the work of mario testino

> good combo with Univers


STEP 3 TYPOGRAPHIC SOULTIONS

THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF MARIO TESTINO

The Photography of Mario Testino


ma

o u y de

K

O

io

tes

tin o

o u y e d

ar

ma

L

O

th e

photograph

f yo

m


made you the photography of Mario Testino

EX

UBERANCE the work of Mario Testino

the work of mario testino


EXUBERANCE

the work of mario testino

the work of mario testino

the work of mario testino

exuberance the work of mario testino


the work of mario testino

all this and more.

the work of mario testino


all this and

MORE

his an t . d l e m or l a

ALL THIS AND MORE. Th e Wo r k o f M a r i o Te s t i n o

the work of mario testino


ALL

THIS AND

M

R O

E T h e Wo r k o f

M a r i o Te s t i n o

BEYOND THE BORDER PHOTOGRAPHS BY MARIO TESTINO


photography by Mario Testino

photography by Mario Testino


MAGAZINE COVER RESEARCH

-Nice white stroke border with the cutout and layered photo and text -Color scheme is nice, pink on pink -Centered text is strong here

-Nice negative space in the photo, lots of room to breathe -Borderline text to the edge is cool -Matching colors with text


-Bright color pops off the page, very energetic -Hand-drawn doodles on top of photo gives a fun mood, would be a fun theme -Cool portrait for cover

-Nice pop of color -I like the black frame with lots of white space, optical illusion -Cool lines that lead eyes around, would be a fun element -Barcode is a nice addition

-Bold title looks really good -Play on words -Very cool visual picture, has lots of movement and breathing room -Visual-verbal connection -White text is cool


-Text overlapping picture, creates depth/ layers -Looks dynamic because of sideways text, makes u think -Symbol on front cover, magazine logo?

-Looks like a book cover -Very clean and crisp but fun -Colored overlay on photo -White space is awesome

-Simple and beautiful -Colored background, creates strong focal point -Two-letter title is cool


-Really cool title lockup, different fonts and line weights -I like the info on both side of the title -Symmetrical look is very cool, very pretty and satisfying

-Black and white make for a cool cover -Centered type looks good -Physical manipulation/ layering of paper looks interesting

-Large type grabs attention -I like all the info lined up below the title -Justification/alignment is good


-Love this hand-drawn/ calligraphic font, so pretty -Transparent text and pop of color -Dominant barcode as a design element

-Dancing type is so cool -Poem-like words makes it seem more aesthetic and less stiff -Nice photo with diagonal lines

-Sideways text, all on left side, good use of space -Table of contents info on cover is smart -repeated elements


-Centered photo, break it up to be different and interesting -Cool line elements that make it fun and modern -I like the type treatment and making the text into design elements

-Playing with abbreviation is cool for branding the magazine -Very simple, minimal informaton -Hand-drawn elements make it less stiff and “untouchable�


part.2

design process


Font studies: Pistilli and Helvetica

Caption: re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe

THE WORK OF MARIO TESTINO INTRO TEXT 14/18PT: Ehenihic

totae et, il ipis doloratiberi sed eaquati nverfer uptatem

sunt ommodio conet que a aut omnisti busapero inte volum re non exerro veliqui quaecto ex eumquae errorum fuga. Nam ea conectatem. Ignis secta eaquata tectur? Ihit et qui digendi tatiusci voluptatus, quibus doluptatum quodi odiat odioriti aut endionet mod quia ipsandis mo con re parchil in prat excerunte simus sam que molorio vel enis aut ulliquaturit ventusdae. Fugia CALL OUTS 24/36 pt

In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae.

BODY TEXT 8.5/12pt: Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci dolenim aiorepeliqui occupta spedipidic te vendi dem dolorepercia evenit que voluptate vellupt atibere prepel ma consedi ilit deriore perspitia quatibus mi, consequatem ipsunt ut dolorro rerionsequi sequi dus arcipsandus doluptatqui non es sum conecae qui voluptatus et lab ius dolupta tibusae magnatus mos si berunt laciis aut vel is expelent ad excest, te pre, officaborum quas velessum fuga. Sus doloreptur? Sit, optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOptatis nost, sim lam nobit, odi reprate pelitiorrum quat. Ur alibusam qui illuptas apisse liquibus autemquias vollabo repudipsam, te quid moditatia sequund itatquidus que porem et qui doluptatatem sit quia digent atus am faceatem am, od eossundamus unt rem non et porem es des quamenderem quibusdam ent offic te volut etur, tetures rem ratemo enduciis eossim volupta tiunt.

Optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOmnitiist aut es ut labor as earion necerum quuntib erferibus, sam restiis ma cores ut harciis aut doluptia qui dolorpor molupta cum eatur? Nobitas event reictotatis pedi odit laborro volore si archilla as aut voloremquias dolorem porume mi, cus volore doluptatam liqui ima as porrum etur atinctem remqui am raturem aut volende rsperferiate nobis quatet, vendendandi volorro cus audipsumquat liquiant omnisim olupta diat omnis acimint quisime cum corit hillo eum ut hiciam, non etur, oditat qui apis aut elit veria ped quaeper ioremol uptaten daecessinum, id milisqui dolorum estrum aut volupta spelecte pla sam, qui dollent paria adioribus reicipi cienimu sciandae doluptam faceat dis si il ipsapita quia delit et, conessi minullab id everiberit mo beati re volest, sandae lab imusam, est vel ipsapellat quassequi vita doloribus mo to et labo. Et ulluptatur am fugit magnihil et aces aliquam endis modis essin nimoluptatem dolorum suntur sam conecer sperum ne min reperspedit hario. Hic te explatem sinum nonsequi berrum ventur autem. Nam quas explis eiusti. In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta voluptatur? Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo


Font studies: bebas, mensch, and Avant garde

Caption: re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae

etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta

South THE WORK OF MARIO TESTINO INTRO TEXT 14/18PT:

Ehenihic totae et, il ipis doloratiberi sed eaquati nverfer

uptatem sunt ommodio conet que a aut omnisti busapero inte volum re non exerro veliqui quaecto ex eumquae errorum fuga. Nam ea conectatem. Ignis secta eaquata tectur? Ihit et qui digendi tatiusci voluptatus, quibus doluptatum quodi odiat odioriti aut endionet mod quia ipsandis mo con re parchil in prat excerunte simus sam que mol CALL OUTS 24/36 pt BODY TEXT 8.5/12pt: Agnationsed exerem velestis-

In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae.

quam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci dolenim aiorepeliqui occupta spedipidic te vendi dem dolorepercia evenit que voluptate vellupt atibere prepel ma consedi ilit deriore perspitia quatibus mi, consequatem ipsunt ut dolorro rerionsequi sequi dus arcipsandus doluptatqui non es sum conecae qui voluptatus et lab ius dolupta tibusae magnatus mos si berunt laciis aut vel is expelent ad excest, te pre, officaborum quas velessum fuga. Sus doloreptur? Sit, optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOptatis nost, sim lam nobit, odi reprate pelitiorrum quat. Ur alibusam qui illuptas apisse liquibus autemquias vollabo repudipsam, te quid moditatia sequund itatquidus que porem et qui doluptatatem sit quia digent atus am faceatem am, od eossundamus unt rem non et porem es des quamenderem quibusdam ent offic te volut etur, tetures rem ratemo enduciis eossim volupta tiunt.

Optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOmnitiist aut es ut labor as earion necerum quuntib erferibus, sam restiis ma cores ut harciis aut doluptia qui dolorpor molupta cum eatur? Nobitas event reictotatis pedi odit laborro volore si archilla as aut voloremquias dolorem porume mi, cus volore doluptatam liqui ima as porrum etur atinctem remqui am raturem aut volende rsperferiate nobis quatet, vendendandi volorro cus audipsumquat liquiant omnisim olupta diat omnis acimint quisime cum corit hillo eum ut hiciam, non etur, oditat qui apis aut elit veria ped quaeper ioremol uptaten daecessinum, id milisqui dolorum estrum aut volupta spelecte pla sam, qui dollent paria adioribus reicipi cienimu sciandae doluptam faceat dis si il ipsapita quia delit et, conessi minullab id everiberit mo beati re volest, sandae lab imusam, est vel ipsapellat quassequi vita doloribus mo to et labo. Et ulluptatur am fugit magnihil et aces aliquam endis modis essin nimoluptatem dolorum suntur sam conecer sperum ne min reperspedit hario. Hic te explatem sinum nonsequi berrum ventur autem. Nam quas explis eiusti. In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta voluptatur? Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit


Font studies: pistilli, mensch, and Avant Garde

Caption: re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae

South

etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta volupt

THE WORK OF MARIO TESTINO INTRO TEXT 14/18PT:

Ehenihic totae et, il ipis doloratiberi sed eaquati nverfer

uptatem sunt ommodio conet que a aut omnisti busapero inte volum re non exerro veliqui quaecto ex eumquae errorum fuga. Nam ea conectatem. Ignis secta eaquata tectur? Ihit et qui digendi tatiusci voluptatus, quibus doluptatum quodi odiat odioriti aut endionet mod quia ipsandis mo con re parchil in prat excerunte simus sam que molorio vel enis aut ulliquatu-

CALL OUTS 24/36 pt BODY TEXT 8.5/12pt: Agnationsed exerem velestisquam

In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae.

facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci dolenim aiorepeliqui occupta spedipidic te vendi dem dolorepercia evenit que voluptate vellupt atibere prepel ma consedi ilit deriore perspitia quatibus mi, consequatem ipsunt ut dolorro rerionsequi sequi dus arcipsandus doluptatqui non es sum conecae qui voluptatus et lab ius dolupta tibusae magnatus mos si berunt laciis aut vel is expelent ad excest, te pre, officaborum quas velessum fuga. Sus doloreptur? Sit, optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOptatis nost, sim lam nobit, odi reprate pelitiorrum quat. Ur alibusam qui illuptas apisse liquibus autemquias vollabo repudipsam, te quid moditatia sequund itatquidus que porem et qui doluptatatem sit quia digent atus am faceatem am, od eossundamus unt rem non et porem es des quamenderem quibusdam ent offic te volut etur, tetures rem ratemo enduciis eossim volupta tiunt.

Optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOmnitiist aut es ut labor as earion necerum quuntib erferibus, sam restiis ma cores ut harciis aut doluptia qui dolorpor molupta cum eatur? Nobitas event reictotatis pedi odit laborro volore si archilla as aut voloremquias dolorem porume mi, cus volore doluptatam liqui ima as porrum etur atinctem remqui am raturem aut volende rsperferiate nobis quatet, vendendandi volorro cus audipsumquat liquiant omnisim olupta diat omnis acimint quisime cum corit hillo eum ut hiciam, non etur, oditat qui apis aut elit veria ped quaeper ioremol uptaten daecessinum, id milisqui dolorum estrum aut volupta spelecte pla sam, qui dollent paria adioribus reicipi cienimu sciandae doluptam faceat dis si il ipsapita quia delit et, conessi minullab id everiberit mo beati re volest, sandae lab imusam, est vel ipsapellat quassequi vita doloribus mo to et labo. Et ulluptatur am fugit magnihil et aces aliquam endis modis essin nimoluptatem dolorum suntur sam conecer sperum ne min reperspedit hario. Hic te explatem sinum nonsequi berrum ventur autem. Nam quas explis eiusti. In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta voluptatur? Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati bus-


Font studies: Miller and Vag Rounded

Caption: re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe

South

sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta volupt

THE WORK OF MARIO TESTINO INTRO TEXT 14/18PT:

Ehenihic totae et, il ipis doloratiberi sed eaquati nverfer uptatem

sunt ommodio conet que a aut omnisti busapero inte volum re non exerro veliqui quaecto ex eumquae errorum fuga. Nam ea conectatem. Ignis secta eaquata tectur? Ihit et qui digendi tatiusci voluptatus, quibus doluptatum quodi odiat odioriti aut endionet mod quia ipsandis mo con re parchil in prat excerunte simus sam que molorio vel enis aut ulliquaturit ventusdae. Fugia nulparum iur si com-

CALL OUTS 24/36 pt

In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae.

BODY TEXT 8.5/12pt: Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci dolenim aiorepeliqui occupta spedipidic te vendi dem dolorepercia evenit que voluptate vellupt atibere prepel ma consedi ilit deriore perspitia quatibus mi, consequatem ipsunt ut dolorro rerionsequi sequi dus arcipsandus doluptatqui non es sum conecae qui voluptatus et lab ius dolupta tibusae magnatus mos si berunt laciis aut vel is expelent ad excest, te pre, officaborum quas velessum fuga. Sus doloreptur? Sit, optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOptatis nost, sim lam nobit, odi reprate pelitiorrum quat. Ur alibusam qui illuptas apisse liquibus autemquias vollabo repudipsam, te quid moditatia sequund itatquidus que porem et qui doluptatatem sit quia digent atus am faceatem am, od eossundamus unt rem non et porem es des quamenderem quibusdam ent offic te volut etur, tetures rem ratemo enduciis eossim volupta tiunt.

Optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOmnitiist aut es ut labor as earion necerum quuntib erferibus, sam restiis ma cores ut harciis aut doluptia qui dolorpor molupta cum eatur? Nobitas event reictotatis pedi odit laborro volore si archilla as aut voloremquias dolorem porume mi, cus volore doluptatam liqui ima as porrum etur atinctem remqui am raturem aut volende rsperferiate nobis quatet, vendendandi volorro cus audipsumquat liquiant omnisim olupta diat omnis acimint quisime cum corit hillo eum ut hiciam, non etur, oditat qui apis aut elit veria ped quaeper ioremol uptaten daecessinum, id milisqui dolorum estrum aut volupta spelecte pla sam, qui dollent paria adioribus reicipi cienimu sciandae doluptam faceat dis si il ipsapita quia delit et, conessi minullab id everiberit mo beati re volest, sandae lab imusam, est vel ipsapellat quassequi vita doloribus mo to et labo. Et ulluptatur am fugit magnihil et aces aliquam endis modis essin nimoluptatem dolorum suntur sam conecer sperum ne min reperspedit hario. Hic te explatem sinum nonsequi berrum ventur autem. Nam quas explis eiusti. In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta voluptatur? Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci Sus doloreptur?


Font studies: Bodoni and Avant Garde

Caption: re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae

SOUTH

THE WORK OF MARIO TESTINO INTRO TEXT 14/18PT:

Ehenihic totae et, il ipis doloratiberi sed eaquati nverfer

uptatem sunt ommodio conet que a aut omnisti busapero inte volum re non exerro veliqui quaecto ex eumquae errorum fuga. Nam ea conectatem. Ignis secta eaquata tectur? Ihit et qui digendi tatiusci voluptatus, quibus doluptatum quodi odiat odioriti aut endionet mod quia ipsandis mo con re parchil in prat excerunte simus sam que molCALL OUTS 24/36 pt BODY TEXT 8.5/12pt: Agnationsed exerem velestisquam

In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae.

facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci dolenim aiorepeliqui occupta spedipidic te vendi dem dolorepercia evenit que voluptate vellupt atibere prepel ma consedi ilit deriore perspitia quatibus mi, consequatem ipsunt ut dolorro rerionsequi sequi dus arcipsandus doluptatqui non es sum conecae qui voluptatus et lab ius dolupta tibusae magnatus mos si berunt laciis aut vel is expelent ad excest, te pre, officaborum quas velessum fuga. Sus doloreptur? Sit, optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOptatis nost, sim lam nobit, odi reprate pelitiorrum quat. Ur alibusam qui illuptas apisse liquibus autemquias vollabo repudipsam, te quid moditatia sequund itatquidus que porem et qui doluptatatem sit quia digent atus am faceatem am, od eossundamus unt rem non et porem es des quamenderem quibusdam ent offic te volut etur, tetures rem ratemo enduciis eossim volupta tiunt.

Optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOmnitiist aut es ut labor as earion necerum quuntib erferibus, sam restiis ma cores ut harciis aut doluptia qui dolorpor molupta cum eatur? Nobitas event reictotatis pedi odit laborro volore si archilla as aut voloremquias dolorem porume mi, cus volore doluptatam liqui ima as porrum etur atinctem remqui am raturem aut volende rsperferiate nobis quatet, vendendandi volorro cus audipsumquat liquiant omnisim olupta diat omnis acimint quisime cum corit hillo eum ut hiciam, non etur, oditat qui apis aut elit veria ped quaeper ioremol uptaten daecessinum, id milisqui dolorum estrum aut volupta spelecte pla sam, qui dollent paria adioribus reicipi cienimu sciandae doluptam faceat dis si il ipsapita quia delit et, conessi minullab id everiberit mo beati re volest, sandae lab imusam, est vel ipsapellat quassequi vita doloribus mo to et labo. Et ulluptatur am fugit magnihil et aces aliquam endis modis essin nimoluptatem dolorum suntur sam conecer sperum ne min reperspedit hario. Hic te explatem sinum nonsequi berrum ventur autem. Nam quas explis eiusti. In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta voluptatur? Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti


Font studies: VAG rounded and Helvetica

Caption: re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis

THE WORK OF MARIO TESTINO INTRO TEXT 14/18PT: Ehenihic

totae et, il ipis doloratiberi sed eaquati nverfer uptatem

sunt ommodio conet que a aut omnisti busapero inte volum re non exerro veliqui quaecto ex eumquae errorum fuga. Nam ea conectatem. Ignis secta eaquata tectur? Ihit et qui digendi tatiusci voluptatus, quibus doluptatum quodi odiat odioriti aut endionet mod quia ipsandis mo con re parchil in prat excerunte simus sam que molorio vel enis aut ulliquaturit ventusdae. Fugia CALL OUTS 24/36 pt

In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae.

BODY TEXT 8.5/12pt: Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci dolenim aiorepeliqui occupta spedipidic te vendi dem dolorepercia evenit que voluptate vellupt atibere prepel ma consedi ilit deriore perspitia quatibus mi, consequatem ipsunt ut dolorro rerionsequi sequi dus arcipsandus doluptatqui non es sum conecae qui voluptatus et lab ius dolupta tibusae magnatus mos si berunt laciis aut vel is expelent ad excest, te pre, officaborum quas velessum fuga. Sus doloreptur? Sit, optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOptatis nost, sim lam nobit, odi reprate pelitiorrum quat. Ur alibusam qui illuptas apisse liquibus autemquias vollabo repudipsam, te quid moditatia sequund itatquidus que porem et qui doluptatatem sit quia digent atus am faceatem am, od eossundamus unt rem non et porem es des quamenderem quibusdam ent offic te volut etur, tetures rem ratemo enduciis eossim volupta tiunt.

Optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOmnitiist aut es ut labor as earion necerum quuntib erferibus, sam restiis ma cores ut harciis aut doluptia qui dolorpor molupta cum eatur? Nobitas event reictotatis pedi odit laborro volore si archilla as aut voloremquias dolorem porume mi, cus volore doluptatam liqui ima as porrum etur atinctem remqui am raturem aut volende rsperferiate nobis quatet, vendendandi volorro cus audipsumquat liquiant omnisim olupta diat omnis acimint quisime cum corit hillo eum ut hiciam, non etur, oditat qui apis aut elit veria ped quaeper ioremol uptaten daecessinum, id milisqui dolorum estrum aut volupta spelecte pla sam, qui dollent paria adioribus reicipi cienimu sciandae doluptam faceat dis si il ipsapita quia delit et, conessi minullab id everiberit mo beati re volest, sandae lab imusam, est vel ipsapellat quassequi vita doloribus mo to et labo. Et ulluptatur am fugit magnihil et aces aliquam endis modis essin nimoluptatem dolorum suntur sam conecer sperum ne min reperspedit hario. Hic te explatem sinum nonsequi berrum ventur autem. Nam quas explis eiusti. In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta voluptatur? Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex


Font studies: Archer and Helvetica

Caption: re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur

THE WORK OF MARIO TESTINO INTRO TEXT 14/18PT: Ehenihic

totae et, il ipis doloratiberi sed eaquati nverfer up-

tatem sunt ommodio conet que a aut omnisti busapero inte volum re non exerro veliqui quaecto ex eumquae errorum fuga. Nam ea conectatem. Ignis secta eaquata tectur? Ihit et qui digendi tatiusci voluptatus, quibus doluptatum quodi odiat odioriti aut endionet mod quia ipsandis mo con

CALL OUTS 24/36 pt

In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae.

BODY TEXT 8.5/12pt: Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci dolenim aiorepeliqui occupta spedipidic te vendi dem dolorepercia evenit que voluptate vellupt atibere prepel ma consedi ilit deriore perspitia quatibus mi, consequatem ipsunt ut dolorro rerionsequi sequi dus arcipsandus doluptatqui non es sum conecae qui voluptatus et lab ius dolupta tibusae magnatus mos si berunt laciis aut vel is expelent ad excest, te pre, officaborum quas velessum fuga. Sus doloreptur? Sit, optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOptatis nost, sim lam nobit, odi reprate pelitiorrum quat. Ur alibusam qui illuptas apisse liquibus autemquias vollabo repudipsam, te quid moditatia sequund itatquidus que porem et qui doluptatatem sit quia digent atus am faceatem am, od eossundamus unt rem non et porem es des quamenderem quibusdam ent offic te volut etur, tetures rem ratemo enduciis eossim volupta tiunt.

Optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOmnitiist aut es ut labor as earion necerum quuntib erferibus, sam restiis ma cores ut harciis aut doluptia qui dolorpor molupta cum eatur? Nobitas event reictotatis pedi odit laborro volore si archilla as aut voloremquias dolorem porume mi, cus volore doluptatam liqui ima as porrum etur atinctem remqui am raturem aut volende rsperferiate nobis quatet, vendendandi volorro cus audipsumquat liquiant omnisim olupta diat omnis acimint quisime cum corit hillo eum ut hiciam, non etur, oditat qui apis aut elit veria ped quaeper ioremol uptaten daecessinum, id milisqui dolorum estrum aut volupta spelecte pla sam, qui dollent paria adioribus reicipi cienimu sciandae doluptam faceat dis si il ipsapita quia delit et, conessi minullab id everiberit mo beati re volest, sandae lab imusam, est vel ipsapellat quassequi vita doloribus mo to et labo. Et ulluptatur am fugit magnihil et aces aliquam endis modis essin nimoluptatem dolorum suntur sam conecer sperum ne min reperspedit hario. Hic te explatem sinum nonsequi berrum ventur autem. Nam quas explis eiusti. In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta voluptatur? Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes


Bau and Helvetica

Caption: re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe

THE WORK OF MARIO TESTINO INTRO TEXT 14/18PT:

Ehenihic totae et, il ipis doloratiberi sed eaquati nverfer uptatem

sunt ommodio conet que a aut omnisti busapero inte volum re non exerro veliqui quaecto ex eumquae errorum fuga. Nam ea conectatem. Ignis secta eaquata tectur? Ihit et qui digendi tatiusci voluptatus, quibus doluptatum quodi odiat odioriti aut endionet mod quia ipsandis mo con re parchil in prat excerunte simus

CALL OUTS 24/36 pt

In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae.

BODY TEXT 8.5/12pt: Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes non res nam dis coreper ationest, elicillut que pa sed magnatur maio doluptas nosamenduci dolenim aiorepeliqui occupta spedipidic te vendi dem dolorepercia evenit que voluptate vellupt atibere prepel ma consedi ilit deriore perspitia quatibus mi, consequatem ipsunt ut dolorro rerionsequi sequi dus arcipsandus doluptatqui non es sum conecae qui voluptatus et lab ius dolupta tibusae magnatus mos si berunt laciis aut vel is expelent ad excest, te pre, officaborum quas velessum fuga. Sus doloreptur? Sit, optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOptatis nost, sim lam nobit, odi reprate pelitiorrum quat. Ur alibusam qui illuptas apisse liquibus autemquias vollabo repudipsam, te quid moditatia sequund itatquidus que porem et qui doluptatatem sit quia digent atus am faceatem am, od eossundamus unt rem non et porem es des quamenderem quibusdam ent offic te volut etur, tetures rem ratemo enduciis eossim volupta tiunt.

Optis nobitat emquas estruptae nis doluptat quatum, qui corerum volorro eici ditiore, ute nullis commo dolorum facerspe sam, explam quidebis as dipis pariore cone officii strundi dello cuptat. Orehent quia voluptur? Ferro et es et odit adios et vernam inciur ratur aut porro odis ex etum esti sapel et quate peribero cus quat ium fugitate estiasp eribus et magnatur? Fuga. Assit quaspitatiis et eumet et quam harum estiistis venimol uptiam quame numquis ea iliaese dissitiur, sapidere nonsequi voluptatiae experias ex ea auta doluptae vellestrum consed quo te doloruptate si as debisciis dit modiate mporemp oribusa nobit perspedit, od miliber ovidebit, sit at aut lab inturio tem consequas ut autatintur moluptis dolupta incipsuOmnitiist aut es ut labor as earion necerum quuntib erferibus, sam restiis ma cores ut harciis aut doluptia qui dolorpor molupta cum eatur? Nobitas event reictotatis pedi odit laborro volore si archilla as aut voloremquias dolorem porume mi, cus volore doluptatam liqui ima as porrum etur atinctem remqui am raturem aut volende rsperferiate nobis quatet, vendendandi volorro cus audipsumquat liquiant omnisim olupta diat omnis acimint quisime cum corit hillo eum ut hiciam, non etur, oditat qui apis aut elit veria ped quaeper ioremol uptaten daecessinum, id milisqui dolorum estrum aut volupta spelecte pla sam, qui dollent paria adioribus reicipi cienimu sciandae doluptam faceat dis si il ipsapita quia delit et, conessi minullab id everiberit mo beati re volest, sandae lab imusam, est vel ipsapellat quassequi vita doloribus mo to et labo. Et ulluptatur am fugit magnihil et aces aliquam endis modis essin nimoluptatem dolorum suntur sam conecer sperum ne min reperspedit hario. Hic te explatem sinum nonsequi berrum ventur autem. Nam quas explis eiusti. In re et que etustest, qui remquatur abo. Dam facerem que ilitati andenim quae etur repe sundipis voluptiis sint velendi iliatiis ipicipsae. Feriati dolupta voluptatur? Agnationsed exerem velestisquam facilla pedit eosti sintiam utem quisti custore raecto blandus andisi quis et lique es sed maximil ellatur epudit voluptas aut plitati busdae paruntis ut volo te net alignih itassit ationsecti cum quis ex entusciam vendebis dolupti cum raeratur? Qui coresequo iliam sequatum ne ratentis antur, odit vendese ditiundaes


FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHER 25 OPENING SPREADS Must have: Title, Subtitle, By Line, Running Head, Page Numbers Optional: Intro Text and/or Intro Paragraph and/or Quote


O S U 66 // Made You Look


U

The Work of Mario Testino

T H By Hannah Wexler

Made You Look // 67


The Work of Mario Testino By Hannah Wexler

68 // Made You Look


I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.

-Mario Testino

Made You Look // 69


S U

O H

70 // Made You Look

T The Work of Mario Testino By Hannah Wexler


Made You Look // 71


72 // Made You Look


By Hannah Wexler Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, EstĂŠe Lauder and LancĂ´me. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output.

S

O

U

T

H

The Work of Mario Testino

Made You Look // 73


The Work of Mario Testino Written By Hannah Wexler

74 // Made You Look


S O U


T H The Work of Mario Testino Written By Hannah Wexler


south The Work of Mario Testino Written By Hannah Wexler


S The Work of Mario Testino By Hannah Wexler

80 // Made You Look

Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, EstĂŠe Lauder and LancĂ´me. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output.


The Work of Mario Testino By Hannah Wexler

82 // Made You Look


Made You Look // 83


The Work of Mario Testino By Hannah Wexler

84 // Made You Look


I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.

-Mario Testino

Made You Look // 85


I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew

up in a society where beauty plays a big role— South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.

-Mario Testino

s o u 86 // Made You Look


The Work of Mario Testino By Hannah Wexler

t h Made You Look // 87


The Work of Mario Testino By Hannah Wexler

Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, EstĂŠe Lauder and LancĂ´me. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output.


Peruvian-born Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, EstĂŠe Lauder and LancĂ´me. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/ collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output.

Written By Hannah Wexler

90 // Made You Look


Made You Look // 91


S O U

so uth

Peruvian-born Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, and beauty. Written By Hannah Wexler

92 // Made You Look

Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, EstĂŠe Lauder and LancĂ´me. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output.

Peruvian-born

Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.


T H Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during

apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.”

Made You Look // 93


so u th

Peruvian-born

Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

94 // Made You Look


Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his

experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work… when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.”

Made You Look // 95


I was obsessed by beauty,

fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.

96 // Made You Look


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98 // Made You Look


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Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

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south Peruvian-born Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, and beauty. Written By Hannah Wexler

106 // Made You Look

Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, EstĂŠe Lauder and LancĂ´me. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output.


S by hannah wexler

“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality. “

108 // Made You Look

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“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality. “

110 // Made You Look


Peruvian-born Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

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Made You Look // 111


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112 // Made You Look


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114 // Made You Look


Peruvian-born

Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, and beauty. By Hannah Wexler Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, EstĂŠe Lauder and LancĂ´me. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output.


FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHER SPREAD DIRECTION OPTIONS


Peruvian-born Mario Testino on borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, EstĂŠe Lauder and LancĂ´me. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output.

Written By Hannah Wexler

118 // Made You Look


Made You Look // 119


Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique 120 // Made You Look

and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees. Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits


exhibition attracted more visitors than any other

show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions

of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then

Made You Look // 121


started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively… this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. In October 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, the founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother.

122 // Made You Look


“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role— South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.”

Made You Look // 123


124 // Made You Look


When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvian-born Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashion-trained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour— the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has

observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the off-guard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.” Made You Look // 125


so uth The Work of

Mario Testino

126 // Made You Look


Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Ste-

phen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy Made You Look // 127


with

“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” 128 // Made You Look

them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees. Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any

other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles


and

Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke

Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s

Made You Look // 129


S by hannah wexler

“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” 130 // Made You Look

O


U T the work of mario testino

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borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

132 // Made You Look

Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees. Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in

1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam


(Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work

isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. Awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2013 in recognition of his career and charity work, in 2010 he was also appointed one of the highest honours in his native country, The Grand Cross Order of Merit in Peru, and became President of the Board of World Monuments Fund Peru in 2014. He has worked with Save the Children, amfAR, The Elton John Aids Foundation and CLIC Sargent for children with cancer. The arts are a source of joy to Testino to the extent that in 2012 he opened a non-profit museum in Lima. MATE – Museo Mario Testino was established to contribute to Peru

through the cultivation and promotion of culture

and heritage. For Testino, art is never static. It is something to be appreciated and collected as fragments that make up a greater mental library: a library that is in constant flow. In October 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, the founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother.

Made You Look // 133


“His pictures convey a polished, flawless glamour —the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World.”

-David Harris, Design Director of Vanity Fair

134 // Made You Look


it man

Made You Look // 135


MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvian-born Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashion-trained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour— the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic

vision. He’s got that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has

observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the off-guard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.” Made You Look // 137


South

138 // Made You Look


of the border of expectations of precedent of opinions of rules of here the work of mario testino by hannah wexler Made You Look // 139


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Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer


“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.”

142 // Made You Look


Made You Look // 143


144 // Made You Look


mario's world When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvian-born Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashiontrained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour—the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got

that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has observed that in Testino’s

portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the offguard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.”


FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHER SPREAD DIRECTION REFINEMENTS One Refined + One Alternate Version


S by hannah wexler

“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.”

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“His pictures convey a polished, flawless glamour —the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World.” -David Harris, Design Director of Vanity Fair 150 // Made You Look


it man

Made You Look // 151


borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

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Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees. Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others.


Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists

such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. Awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2013 in recognition of his career and charity work, in 2010 he was also appointed one of the highest honours in his native country, The Grand Cross Order of Merit in Peru, and became President of the Board of World Monuments Fund Peru in 2014. He has worked with Save the Children, amfAR, The Elton John Aids Foundation and CLIC Sargent for children with cancer. The arts are a source of joy to Testino to the extent that in 2012 he opened a non-profit museum in Lima. MATE – Museo Mario Testino was established to contribute to Peru through the cultivation and promotion of culture and heritage. For Testino, art is never static. It is something to be appreciated and collected as fragments that make up a greater mental library: a library that is in constant flow. In October 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, the founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother. Made You Look // 153


MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvian-born Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashion-trained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour—the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got that

great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the off-guard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.”

Made You Look // 155


S by hannah wexler

“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.”

156 // Made You Look

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T the work of mario testino

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Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees.

borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

158 // Made You Look


it man

Made You Look // 159


“His pictu flawless beautifu seen in y long legs Mario Wo


ures convey a polished, s glamour —the most ul people you’ve ever your life, bronzed skin, s, fabulous shoes, orld.” -David Harris, Design Director of Vanity Fair


162 // Made You Look


Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. Awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2013 in recognition of his career and charity work, in 2010 he was also appointed one of the highest honours in his native country, The Grand Cross Order of Merit in Peru, and became President of the Board of World Monuments Fund Peru in 2014. He has worked with Save the Children, amfAR, The Elton John Aids Foundation and CLIC Sargent for children with cancer. The arts are a source of joy to Testino to the extent that in 2012 he opened a non-profit museum in Lima. MATE – Museo Mario Testino was established to contribute to Peru through the cultivation and promotion of culture and heritage. For Testino, art is never static. It is something to be appreciated and collected as fragments that make up a greater mental library: a library that is in constant flow. In October 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, the founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother.

“art requires depth”

Made You Look // 163


When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvian-born Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions— not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashion-trained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour—the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of

whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the off-guard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.”

MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE

Made You Look // 165


FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHER SPREAD REFINEMENTS 1


S by hannah wexler

“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” Kate Moss, Los Angeles, Harper’s Bazaar, 1996

2 // Made You Look

O


U

T the work of mario testino

H


Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/ collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees.

borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

4 // Made You Look


it man

Clockwise from top left: Bryan Clay and Raquel Zimmermann in Versace, US Vogue, 2008. Madonna, Miami, Ray of Light Album, 1998. Towel Series 37, Cara Delevingne, Karlie Kloss, Joan Smalls, Fei Fei Sun, Andreea Diaconu, Arizona Muse, Imaan Hammam, Vanessa Axente, and Edie Campbell.

Made You Look // 5


“His pictu flawless beautifu seen in y long legs Mario Wo


ures convey a polished, s glamour —the most ul people you’ve ever your life, bronzed skin, s, fabulous shoes, orld.” -David Harris, Design Director of Vanity Fair


Diana, Princess of Wales, London, Vanity Fair, 1997

8 // Made You Look


Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. Awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2013 in recognition of his career and charity work, in 2010 he was also appointed one of the highest honours in his native country, The Grand Cross Order of Merit in Peru, and became President of the Board of World Monuments Fund Peru in 2014. He has worked with Save the Children, amfAR, The Elton John Aids Foundation and CLIC Sargent for children with cancer. The arts are a source of joy to Testino to the extent that in 2012 he opened a non-profit museum in Lima. MATE – Museo Mario Testino was established to contribute to Peru through the cultivation and promotion of culture and heritage. For Testino, art is never static. It is something to be appreciated and collected as fragments that make up a greater mental library: a library that is in constant flow. In October 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, the founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother.

star power

Made You Look // 9


“My favourite words are possibilities, opportunities and curiosity. I think if you are curious, you create opportunities, and then if you open the doors, you create possibilities.”

of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the off-guard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.”

MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE

Kate Moss, London, National Portrait Gallery, 2002

When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvianborn Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashiontrained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour—the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures


Made You Look // 11


FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHER SPREAD REFINEMENTS 2


S by hannah wexler

“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.”

2 // Made You Look

O


U

T the work of mario testino

H


Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/ collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees.

borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

4 // Made You Look


it man

Made You Look // 5


“His pictu flawless beautifu seen in y long legs Mario Wo


ures convey a polished, s glamour —the most ul people you’ve ever your life, bronzed skin, s, fabulous shoes, orld.” -David Harris, Design Director of Vanity Fair


8 // Made You Look


Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. Awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2013 in recognition of his career and charity work, in 2010 he was also appointed one of the highest honours in his native country, The Grand Cross Order of Merit in Peru, and became President of the Board of World Monuments Fund Peru in 2014. He has worked with Save the Children, amfAR, The Elton John Aids Foundation and CLIC Sargent for children with cancer. The arts are a source of joy to Testino to the extent that in 2012 he opened a non-profit museum in Lima. MATE – Museo Mario Testino was established to contribute to Peru through the cultivation and promotion of culture and heritage. For Testino, art is never static. It is something to be appreciated and collected as fragments that make up a greater mental library: a library that is in constant flow. In October 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, the founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother.

star power

Made You Look // 9


“My favourite words are possibilities, opportunities and curiosity. I think if you are curious, you create opportunities, and then if you open the doors, you create possibilities.”

When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvianborn Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashiontrained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour—the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures

of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the off-guard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.”

MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE


Made You Look // 11


FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHER SPREAD REFINEMENTS 3


S by hannah wexler

“ I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” Kate Moss, Los Angeles, Harper’s Bazaar, 1996

2 // Made You Look

O


Made You Look // 11


U

T the work of mario testino

H


Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees.

borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

4 // Made You Look


it man

Clockwise from top left: Bryan Clay and Raquel Zimmermann in Versace, US Vogue, 2008. Madonna, Miami, Ray of Light Album, 1998. Towel Series 37, Cara Delevingne, Karlie Kloss, Joan Smalls, Fei Fei Sun, Andreea Diaconu, Arizona Muse, Imaan Hammam, Vanessa Axente, and Edie Campbell.

Made You Look // 5


“His pictu flawless beautifu seen in y long legs Mario Wo


ures convey a polished, s glamour —the most ul people you’ve ever your life, bronzed skin, s, fabulous shoes, orld.” -David Harris, Design Director of Vanity Fair


Diana, Princess of Wales, London, Vanity Fair, 1997

8 // Made You Look


Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people”[4]. He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. Awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2013 in recognition of his career and charity work, in 2010 he was also appointed one of the highest honours in his native country, The Grand Cross Order of Merit in Peru, and became President of the Board of World Monuments Fund Peru in 2014. He has worked with Save the Children, amfAR, The Elton John Aids Foundation and CLIC Sargent for children with cancer. The arts are a source of joy to Testino to the extent that in 2012 he opened a non-profit museum in Lima. MATE – Museo Mario Testino was established to contribute to Peru through the cultivation and promotion of culture and heritage. For Testino, art is never static. It is something to be appreciated and collected as fragments that make up a greater mental library: a library that is in constant flow. In October 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, the founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother.

star power

Made You Look // 9


“My favourite words are possibilities, opportunities and curiosity. I think if you are curious, you create opportunities, and then if you open the doors, you create possibilities.”

of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the off-guard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.”

MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE

Kate Moss, London, National Portrait Gallery, 2002

When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvianborn Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashiontrained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour—the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.” For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures


MAGAZINE COVER 10 DESIGN IDEAS


MADE YOU LOOK Fall 2017 Volume 1


Fall 2017 Volume 1 Fall 2017 Volume 1


Fall 2017 // Volume 1

Fall 2017 Volume 1


MADE YOU LOOK

Fall 2017 // Volume 1


MADE YOU LOOK

Fall 2017 // Volume 1


MADE YOU LOOK

Fall 2017 // Volume 1


look up Look DOwn look around Look OUt Look In Look at them look at us

MADE YOU LOOK

Fall 2017 // Volume 1


MADE

you Look Fall 2017 Volume 1


look up look down look around look out look in look at them look at us

made you look Fall 2017 Volume 1


Fall 2017 Volume 1


Fall 2017 Volume 1


Fall 2017 // Volume 1

made you look


MAGAZINE COVER REFINEMENT 1


look up Look DOwn look around Look OUt Look In Look at them look at us

M Y L


MADE YOU LOOK

Spring 2017 // Volume 3


Spring 2017 Volume 3


Spring 2017 Volume 3


MAGAZINE COVER REFINEMENT 2


HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHER SPREAD DIRECTIONS


t R 2 // Made You Look

U


by hannah wexler

t

“there is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.�

h

the work of richard avedon

Made You Look // 3


move maker


Christian Dior’s 1947 New Look influenced fashion forever, not least in the way it was to be presented. Although that change came not from Paris, but from New York, bought about by a magazine (Harper’s Bazaar); an editor (Carmel Snow); an art director (Alexey Brodovitch); a fashion editor (Diana Vreeland) and a very young and inexperienced photographer: Richard Avedon. Born in 1923 to a Jewish retail family, Avedon’s interest in photography developed early. His father showed him how cameras worked and the many family group portraits taken when he was a boy gave him a sense for the importance of presentation. In later life he recalled how his family “dressed” their photographs with dogs borrowed from friends and relatives, and shot them in doorways or in front of cars, none of which were theirs. Brodovitch surely saw Avedon’s unique quality. Even as a young, aspiring photographer his contemporaries noted his bold attitude and risk-taking in scale and imagery. And it stayed with him for his entire working life. People who were part of his teams over the years recall how his energetic imagination gave birth to arresting images, whether portraits, such as the uniquely telling one he shot of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, or in his many fashion shoots sparkling with life and originality. What he brought to all his work was an intellectual curiosity rarely seen in the fashion world. He is probably the only fashion photographer of the twentieth century who can be called an intellectual — or, at least, exceptionally well read and culturally informed.

Changing the game.

Avedon was a portrait photographer at heart, an obsession that had begun with his Rachmaninoff shot and was augmented by his daily head and shoulders work for the Merchant Marines. His ‘eye’ can be cruel in his portrait shoots such as the 1963 group photo, The Generals of the Daughters of the American Revolution, or the many he took of ordinary unknown individuals in which he allowed the lens to tell the truth without any flattery at all. But he also believed that fashion photographers could have a sense of fun and his first success showed how. The massive breakthrough in Richard Avedon’s career came in 1948 when, in the wake of Dior’s New Look, he accompanied Carmel Snow to Paris in order to photograph the couturier’s second show. And, with the youthful confidence that really doesn’t acknowledge failure, he broke away from the decades-old traditional way of photographing fashion. The frozen, sculptural look of Horst P Horst or Beaton’s pastiches of eighteenth century portraits were all about the stillness of formality; the presentation of clothes as a part of the stiffness of upper class life. In a glorious anticipation of Vreeland’s famous axiom, ‘give em what they never knew they wanted,’ Avedon broke up the frozen, dignified image. His photographs were about action. Although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947. Movement in fashion photography was not new, of course. It had been developed in the thirties, but only on sporting shoots: women jumping into the sea and other essentially informal activities. What Avedon did was to introduce movement to some of the most formal clothes in the world and to give them a spirit that made them exciting for young women — a first in formal couture. He took clothes that were actually very structured and made them, if not totally casual, at least accessible, a fact that 7th Avenue realized and quickly capitalized on. It is no exaggeration to claim that it was Avedon who matched Dior’s masterstroke with his own masterstroke which was to make visible the possibilities of the new way of dressing. And he did so by Americanizing its presentation. He began with the models: Suzy Parker, Dovima, Dorian Leigh, Sunny Harnett were all beautiful, young and full of personality. They ran across Place de la Concorde, they roller skated, they sat at the counters of louche bars, they were accompanied by modern looking young men - a favorite was an English dental student called Robin Tattersall - and they made clothes look universal, fresh and desirable but above all real and speaking to a new sort of couture customer. It was, in itself a new look and, although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947.

Made You Look // 5


6 // Made You Look


“a Camera lies all the time. all it does is lie, because when you choose this moment instead of this moment, you’ve made a choice, you’re lying about something larger.”

Made You Look // 7


t R U


by hannah wexler

“there is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. Allphotographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.�

h t the work of richard avedon Made You Look // 9


move maker


Christian Dior’s 1947 New Look influenced fashion forever, not least in the way it was to be presented. Although that change came not from Paris, but from New York, bought about by a magazine (Harper’s Bazaar); an editor (Carmel Snow); an art director (Alexey Brodovitch); a fashion editor (Diana Vreeland) and a very young and inexperienced photographer: Richard Avedon. Born in 1923 to a Jewish retail family, Avedon’s interest in photography developed early. His father showed him how cameras worked and the many family group portraits taken when he was a boy gave him a sense for the importance of presentation. In later life he recalled how his family “dressed” their photographs with dogs borrowed from friends and relatives, and shot them in doorways or in front of cars, none of which were theirs. Brodovitch surely saw Avedon’s unique quality. Even as a young, aspiring photographer his contemporaries noted his bold attitude and risk-taking in scale and imagery. And it stayed with him for his entire working life. People who were part of his teams over the years recall how his energetic imagination gave birth to arresting images, whether portraits, such as the uniquely telling one he shot of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, or in his many fashion shoots sparkling with life and originality. What he brought to all his work was an intellectual curiosity rarely seen in the fashion world. He is probably the only fashion photographer of the twentieth century who can be called an intellectual — or, at least, exceptionally well read and culturally informed.

Changing the game.

Avedon was a portrait photographer at heart, an obsession that had begun with his Rachmaninoff shot and was augmented by his daily head and shoulders work for the Merchant Marines. His ‘eye’ can be cruel in his portrait shoots such as the 1963 group photo, The Generals of the Daughters of the American Revolution, or the many he took of ordinary unknown individuals in which he allowed the lens to tell the truth without any flattery at all. But he also believed that fashion photographers could have a sense of fun and his first success showed how. The massive breakthrough in Richard Avedon’s career came in 1948 when, in the wake of Dior’s New Look, he accompanied Carmel Snow to Paris in order to photograph the couturier’s second show. And, with the youthful confidence that really doesn’t acknowledge failure, he broke away from the decades-old traditional way of photographing fashion. The frozen, sculptural look of Horst P Horst or Beaton’s pastiches of eighteenth century portraits were all about the stillness of formality; the presentation of clothes as a part of the stiffness of upper class life. In a glorious anticipation of Vreeland’s famous axiom, ‘give em what they never knew they wanted,’ Avedon broke up the frozen, dignified image. His photographs were about action. Although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947. Movement in fashion photography was not new, of course. It had been developed in the thirties, but only on sporting shoots: women jumping into the sea and other essentially informal activities. What Avedon did was to introduce movement to some of the most formal clothes in the world and to give them a spirit that made them exciting for young women — a first in formal couture. He took clothes that were actually very structured and made them, if not totally casual, at least accessible, a fact that 7th Avenue realized and quickly capitalized on. It is no exaggeration to claim that it was Avedon who matched Dior’s masterstroke with his own masterstroke which was to make visible the possibilities of the new way of dressing. And he did so by Americanizing its presentation. He began with the models: Suzy Parker, Dovima, Dorian Leigh, Sunny Harnett were all beautiful, young and full of personality. They ran across Place de la Concorde, they roller skated, they sat at the counters of louche bars, they were accompanied by modern looking young men - a favorite was an English dental student called Robin Tattersall - and they made clothes look universal, fresh and desirable but above all real and speaking to a new sort of couture customer. It was, in itself a new look and, although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947.

Made You Look // 11


12 // Made You Look


Made You Look // 13


14 // Made You Look


“a Camera lies all the time. all it does is lie, because when you choose this moment instead of this moment, you’ve made a choice, you’re lying about something larger.”

Made You Look // 15


trut 16 // Made You Look


th the work of richard avedon

by hannah wexler

“there is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.�


move maker


Christian Dior’s 1947 New Look influenced fashion forever, not least in the way it was to be presented. Although that change came not from Paris, but from New York, bought about by a magazine (Harper’s Bazaar); an editor (Carmel Snow); an art director (Alexey Brodovitch); a fashion editor (Diana Vreeland) and a very young and inexperienced photographer: Richard Avedon. Born in 1923 to a Jewish retail family, Avedon’s interest in photography developed early. His father showed him how cameras worked and the many family group portraits taken when he was a boy gave him a sense for the importance of presentation. In later life he recalled how his family “dressed” their photographs with dogs borrowed from friends and relatives, and shot them in doorways or in front of cars, none of which were theirs. Brodovitch surely saw Avedon’s unique quality. Even as a young, aspiring photographer his contemporaries noted his bold attitude and risk-taking in scale and imagery. And it stayed with him for his entire working life. People who were part of his teams over the years recall how his energetic imagination gave birth to arresting images, whether portraits, such as the uniquely telling one he shot of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, or in his many fashion shoots sparkling with life and originality. What he brought to all his work was an intellectual curiosity rarely seen in the fashion world. He is probably the only fashion photographer of the twentieth century who can be called an intellectual — or, at least, exceptionally well read and culturally informed.

Changing the game.

Avedon was a portrait photographer at heart, an obsession that had begun with his Rachmaninoff shot and was augmented by his daily head and shoulders work for the Merchant Marines. His ‘eye’ can be cruel in his portrait shoots such as the 1963 group photo, The Generals of the Daughters of the American Revolution, or the many he took of ordinary unknown individuals in which he allowed the lens to tell the truth without any flattery at all. But he also believed that fashion photographers could have a sense of fun and his first success showed how. The massive breakthrough in Richard Avedon’s career came in 1948 when, in the wake of Dior’s New Look, he accompanied Carmel Snow to Paris in order to photograph the couturier’s second show. And, with the youthful confidence that really doesn’t acknowledge failure, he broke away from the decades-old traditional way of photographing fashion. The frozen, sculptural look of Horst P Horst or Beaton’s pastiches of eighteenth century portraits were all about the stillness of formality; the presentation of clothes as a part of the stiffness of upper class life. In a glorious anticipation of Vreeland’s famous axiom, ‘give em what they never knew they wanted,’ Avedon broke up the frozen, dignified image. His photographs were about action. Although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947. Movement in fashion photography was not new, of course. It had been developed in the thirties, but only on sporting shoots: women jumping into the sea and other essentially informal activities. What Avedon did was to introduce movement to some of the most formal clothes in the world and to give them a spirit that made them exciting for young women — a first in formal couture. He took clothes that were actually very structured and made them, if not totally casual, at least accessible, a fact that 7th Avenue realized and quickly capitalized on. It is no exaggeration to claim that it was Avedon who matched Dior’s masterstroke with his own masterstroke which was to make visible the possibilities of the new way of dressing. And he did so by Americanizing its presentation. He began with the models: Suzy Parker, Dovima, Dorian Leigh, Sunny Harnett were all beautiful, young and full of personality. They ran across Place de la Concorde, they roller skated, they sat at the counters of louche bars, they were accompanied by modern looking young men - a favorite was an English dental student called Robin Tattersall - and they made clothes look universal, fresh and desirable but above all real and speaking to a new sort of couture customer. It was, in itself a new look and, although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947.

“I think all art is about control - the encounter between control and the uncontrollable.”

Made You Look // 19


20 // Made You Look


“a Camera lies all the time. all it does is lie, because when you choose this moment instead of this moment, you’ve made a choice, you’re lying about something larger.”

Made You Look // 21


trut truth 22 // Made You Look


th h the work of richard avedon

by hannah wexler

“there is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.�


move maker


Christian Dior’s 1947 New Look influenced fashion forever, not least in the way it was to be presented. Although that change came not from Paris, but from New York, bought about by a magazine (Harper’s Bazaar); an editor (Carmel Snow); an art director (Alexey Brodovitch); a fashion editor (Diana Vreeland) and a very young and inexperienced photographer: Richard Avedon. Born in 1923 to a Jewish retail family, Avedon’s interest in photography developed early. His father showed him how cameras worked and the many family group portraits taken when he was a boy gave him a sense for the importance of presentation. In later life he recalled how his family “dressed” their photographs with dogs borrowed from friends and relatives, and shot them in doorways or in front of cars, none of which were theirs. Brodovitch surely saw Avedon’s unique quality. Even as a young, aspiring photographer his contemporaries noted his bold attitude and risk-taking in scale and imagery. And it stayed with him for his entire working life. People who were part of his teams over the years recall how his energetic imagination gave birth to arresting images, whether portraits, such as the uniquely telling one he shot of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, or in his many fashion shoots sparkling with life and originality. What he brought to all his work was an intellectual curiosity rarely seen in the fashion world. He is probably the only fashion photographer of the twentieth century who can be called an intellectual — or, at least, exceptionally well read and culturally informed.

Changing the game.

Avedon was a portrait photographer at heart, an obsession that had begun with his Rachmaninoff shot and was augmented by his daily head and shoulders work for the Merchant Marines. His ‘eye’ can be cruel in his portrait shoots such as the 1963 group photo, The Generals of the Daughters of the American Revolution, or the many he took of ordinary unknown individuals in which he allowed the lens to tell the truth without any flattery at all. But he also believed that fashion photographers could have a sense of fun and his first success showed how. The massive breakthrough in Richard Avedon’s career came in 1948 when, in the wake of Dior’s New Look, he accompanied Carmel Snow to Paris in order to photograph the couturier’s second show. And, with the youthful confidence that really doesn’t acknowledge failure, he broke away from the decades-old traditional way of photographing fashion. The frozen, sculptural look of Horst P Horst or Beaton’s pastiches of eighteenth century portraits were all about the stillness of formality; the presentation of clothes as a part of the stiffness of upper class life. In a glorious anticipation of Vreeland’s famous axiom, ‘give em what they never knew they wanted,’ Avedon broke up the frozen, dignified image. His photographs were about action. Although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947. Movement in fashion photography was not new, of course. It had been developed in the thirties, but only on sporting shoots: women jumping into the sea and other essentially informal activities. What Avedon did was to introduce movement to some of the most formal clothes in the world and to give them a spirit that made them exciting for young women — a first in formal couture. He took clothes that were actually very structured and made them, if not totally casual, at least accessible, a fact that 7th Avenue realized and quickly capitalized on. It is no exaggeration to claim that it was Avedon who matched Dior’s masterstroke with his own masterstroke which was to make visible the possibilities of the new way of dressing. And he did so by Americanizing its presentation. He began with the models: Suzy Parker, Dovima, Dorian Leigh, Sunny Harnett were all beautiful, young and full of personality. They ran across Place de la Concorde, they roller skated, they sat at the counters of louche bars, they were accompanied by modern looking young men - a favorite was an English dental student called Robin Tattersall - and they made clothes look universal, fresh and desirable but above all real and speaking to a new sort of couture customer. It was, in itself a new look and, although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947.

“I think all art is about control - the encounter between control and the uncontrollable.”

Made You Look // 25


26 // Made You Look


“a Camera lies all the time. all it does is lie, because when you choose this moment instead of this moment, you’ve made a choice, you’re lying about something larger.”

Made You Look // 27


HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHER SPREAD REFINEMENTS 1


t R Twiggy, hair by Ara Gallant, Paris, January 6, 1968

U


by hannah wexler

“there is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. Allphotographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.�

h t the work of richard avedon Made You Look // 3


Christian Dior’s 1947 New Look influenced fashion forever, not least in the way it was to be presented. Although that change came not from Paris, but from New York, bought about by a magazine (Harper’s Bazaar); an editor (Carmel Snow); an art director (Alexey Brodovitch); a fashion editor (Diana Vreeland) and a very young and inexperienced photographer: Richard Avedon.

Changing the game.

Born in 1923 to a Jewish retail family, Avedon’s interest in photography developed early. His father showed him how cameras worked and the many family group portraits taken when he was a boy gave him a sense for the importance of presentation. In later life he recalled how his family “dressed” their photographs with dogs borrowed from friends and relatives, and shot them in doorways or in front of cars, none of which were theirs. Brodovitch surely saw Avedon’s unique quality. Even as a young, aspiring photographer his contemporaries noted his bold attitude and risk-taking in scale and imagery. And it stayed with him for his entire working life. People who were part of his teams over the years recall how his energetic imagination gave birth to arresting images, whether portraits, such as the uniquely telling one he shot of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, or in his many fashion shoots sparkling with life and originality. What he brought to all his work was an intellectual curiosity rarely seen in the fashion world. He is probably the only fashion photographer of the twentieth century who can be called an intellectual — or, at least, exceptionally well read and culturally informed.


Veruschka, dress by Bill Blass, New York, January 4, 196

Avedon was a portrait photographer at heart, an obsession that had begun with his Rachmaninoff shot and was augmented by his daily head and shoulders work for the Merchant Marines. His ‘eye’ can be cruel in his portrait shoots such as the 1963 group photo, The Generals of the Daughters of the American Revolution, or the many he took of ordinary unknown individuals in which he allowed the lens to tell the truth without any flattery at all. But he also believed that fashion photographers could have a sense of fun and his first success showed how. The massive breakthrough in Richard Avedon’s career came in 1948 when, in the wake of Dior’s New Look, he accompanied Carmel Snow to Paris in order to photograph the couturier’s second show. And, with the youthful confidence that really doesn’t acknowledge failure, he broke away from the decades-old traditional way of photographing fashion. The frozen, sculptural look of Horst P Horst or Beaton’s pastiches of eighteenth century portraits were all about the stillness of formality; the presentation of clothes as a part of the stiffness of upper class life. In a glorious anticipation of Vreeland’s famous axiom, ‘give em what they never knew they wanted,’ Avedon broke up the frozen, dignified image. His photographs were about action. Although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947. Movement in fashion photography was not new, of course. It had been developed in the thirties, but only on sporting shoots: women jumping into the sea and other essentially informal activities. What Avedon did was to introduce movement tox some of the most formal clothes in the world and to give them a spirit that made them exciting for young women — a first in formal couture. He took clothes that were actually very structured and made them, if not totally casual, at least accessible, a fact that 7th Avenue realized and quickly capitalized on. It is no exaggeration to claim that it was Avedon who matched Dior’s masterstroke with his own masterstroke which was to make visible the possibilities of the new way of dressing. And he did so by Americanizing its presentation. He began with the models: Suzy Parker, Dovima, Dorian Leigh, Sunny Harnett were all beautiful, young and full of personality. They ran across Place de la Concorde, they roller skated, they sat at the counters of louche bars, they were accompanied by modern looking young men - a favorite was an English dental student called Robin Tattersall - and they made clothes look universal, fresh and desirable but above all real and speaking to a new sort of couture customer. It was, in itself a new look and, although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947.

Made You Look // 5


Marilyn Monroe, actress, New York City, May 6, 1957

Carmen (Homage to Munkacsi) Coat by Cardin, Place Francois-Premier, Paris, August, 1957

6 // Made You Look Audrey Hepburn and Art Buchwald, with Simone D’Aillencourt, Frederick Eberstadt, Barbara Mullen, and Dr. Reginald Kernan, evening dresses by Balmain, Dior, and Patou, Maxim’s Paris, August 1959


Marian Anderson, singer, in the role of Ulrica in “Un Ballo in Maschera,” New York City, June 30, 1955

“a Camera lies all the time. all it does is lie, because when you choose this moment instead of this moment, you’ve made a choice, you’re lying about something larger.”

Dovima with elephants, evening dress by Dior, Cirque d’Hiver, Paris, August 1955

Made You Look // 7


Nastassja Kinski, actress, Los Angeles, June 14, 1981

8 // Made You Look


Made You Look // 9


HISTORICAL PHOTOGRAPHER SPREAD REFINEMENTS 2


t R Twiggy, hair by Ara Gallant, Paris, January 6, 1968

U


by hannah wexler

“there is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. Allphotographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.�

h t the work of richard avedon Made You Look // 3


Christian Dior’s 1947 New Look influenced fashion forever, not least in the way it was to be presented. Although that change came not from Paris, but from New York, bought about by a magazine (Harper’s Bazaar); an editor (Carmel Snow); an art director (Alexey Brodovitch); a fashion editor (Diana Vreeland) and a very young and inexperienced photographer: Richard Avedon.

Changing the game.

Born in 1923 to a Jewish retail family, Avedon’s interest in photography developed early. His father showed him how cameras worked and the many family group portraits taken when he was a boy gave him a sense for the importance of presentation. In later life he recalled how his family “dressed” their photographs with dogs borrowed from friends and relatives, and shot them in doorways or in front of cars, none of which were theirs. Brodovitch surely saw Avedon’s unique quality. Even as a young, aspiring photographer his contemporaries noted his bold attitude and risk-taking in scale and imagery. And it stayed with him for his entire working life. People who were part of his teams over the years recall how his energetic imagination gave birth to arresting images, whether portraits, such as the uniquely telling one he shot of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, or in his many fashion shoots sparkling with life and originality. What he brought to all his work was an intellectual curiosity rarely seen in the fashion world. He is probably the only fashion photographer of the twentieth century who can be called an intellectual — or, at least, exceptionally well read and culturally informed.


Veruschka, dress by Bill Blass, New York, January 4, 196

Avedon was a portrait photographer at heart, an obsession that had begun with his Rachmaninoff shot and was augmented by his daily head and shoulders work for the Merchant Marines. His ‘eye’ can be cruel in his portrait shoots such as the 1963 group photo, The Generals of the Daughters of the American Revolution, or the many he took of ordinary unknown individuals in which he allowed the lens to tell the truth without any flattery at all. But he also believed that fashion photographers could have a sense of fun and his first success showed how. The massive breakthrough in Richard Avedon’s career came in 1948 when, in the wake of Dior’s New Look, he accompanied Carmel Snow to Paris in order to photograph the couturier’s second show. And, with the youthful confidence that really doesn’t acknowledge failure, he broke away from the decades-old traditional way of photographing fashion. The frozen, sculptural look of Horst P Horst or Beaton’s pastiches of eighteenth century portraits were all about the stillness of formality; the presentation of clothes as a part of the stiffness of upper class life. In a glorious anticipation of Vreeland’s famous axiom, ‘give em what they never knew they wanted,’ Avedon broke up the frozen, dignified image. His photographs were about action. Although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947. Movement in fashion photography was not new, of course. It had been developed in the thirties, but only on sporting shoots: women jumping into the sea and other essentially informal activities. What Avedon did was to introduce movement tox some of the most formal clothes in the world and to give them a spirit that made them exciting for young women — a first in formal couture. He took clothes that were actually very structured and made them, if not totally casual, at least accessible, a fact that 7th Avenue realized and quickly capitalized on. It is no exaggeration to claim that it was Avedon who matched Dior’s masterstroke with his own masterstroke which was to make visible the possibilities of the new way of dressing. And he did so by Americanizing its presentation. He began with the models: Suzy Parker, Dovima, Dorian Leigh, Sunny Harnett were all beautiful, young and full of personality. They ran across Place de la Concorde, they roller skated, they sat at the counters of louche bars, they were accompanied by modern looking young men - a favorite was an English dental student called Robin Tattersall - and they made clothes look universal, fresh and desirable but above all real and speaking to a new sort of couture customer. It was, in itself a new look and, although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947.

Made You Look // 5


Marilyn Monroe, actress, New York City, May 6, 1957

Carmen (Homage to Munkacsi) Coat by Cardin, Place Francois-Premier, Paris, August, 1957

6 // Made You Look

Audrey Hepburn and Art Buchwald, with Simone D’Aillencourt, Frederick Eberstadt, Barbara Mullen, and Dr. Reginald Kernan, evening dresses by Balmain, Dior, and Patou, Maxim’s Paris, August 1959


“a Camera lies all the time. all it does is lie, because when you choose this moment instead of this moment, you’ve made a choice, you’re lying about something larger.”

Made You Look // 7


Nastassja Kinski, actress, Los Angeles, June 14, 1981

8 // Made You Look


Made You Look // 9


PHOTOGRAPHY ESSAY SPREAD DIRECTIONS


ON photog plato’s Cave susan sontag Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato’s cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth. But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. The inventory started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. This very insatiability of the photographing eye changes the terms of confinement in the cave, our world. In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally, the most grandiose result of the photographic enterprise is to give us the sense that we can hold the whole world in our heads -- as an anthology of images. »To collect photographs is to collect the world. Movies and television programs light up walls, flicker, and go out; but with still photographs the image is also an object, lightweight, cheap to produce, easy to carry about, accumulate, store. In Godard’s Les Carabiniers (1963), two sluggish lumpen-peasants are lured into joining the King’s Army by the promise that they will be able to loot, rape, kill, or do whatever else they please to the enemy, and get rich. But the suitcase of booty that Michel-Ange and Ulysse triumphantly bring home, years later, to their wives turns out to contain only picture postcards, hundreds of them, of Monuments, Department Stores, Mammals, Wonders of Nature, Methods of Transport, Works of Art, and other classified treasures from around the globe. Godard’s gag vividly parodies the equivocal magic of the photographic image., Photographs are perhaps the most mysterious of all the objects that make up, and thicken, the environment we recognize as modern. Photographs really are experience captured, and the camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its acquisitive mood. »To photograph is to appropriate the thing photographed. It means putting oneself into a certain relation to the world that feels like knowledge -- and, therefore, like power. A now notorious first fall into alienation, habituating people to abstract the world into printed words, is supposed to have engendered that surplus of Faustian energy and psychic damage needed to build modern, inorganic societies. But print seems a less treacherous form of leaching out the world, of turning it into a mental object, than photographic images, which now provide most of the knowledge people have about the look of the past and the reach of the present. What is written about a person or an event is frankly an interpretation, as are handmade visual statements, like paintings and drawings. Photographed images do not seem to be statements about the world so much as pieces of it, miniatures of reality that anyone can make or acquire.

»Photographs, which fiddle with the scale of the world, themselves get reduced, blown up, cropped, retouched, doctored, tricked out. They age, plagued by the usual ills of paper objects; they disappear; they become valuable, and get bought and sold; they are reproduced. Photographs, which package the world, seem to invite packaging. They are stuck in albums, framed and set on tables, tacked on walls, projected as slides. Newspapers and magazines feature them; cops alphabetize them; museums exhibit them; publishers compile them. »For many decades the book has been the most influential way of arranging (and usually miniaturizing) photographs, thereby guaranteeing them longevity, if not immortality -- photographs are fragile objects, easily torn or mislaid -- and a wider public. The photograph in a book is, obviously, the image of an image. But since it is, to begin with, a printed, smooth object, a photograph loses much less of its essential quality when reproduced in a book than a painting does. Still, the book is not a wholly satisfactory scheme for putting groups of photographs into general circulation. The sequence in which the photographs are to be looked at is proposed by the order of pages, but nothing holds readers to the recommended order or indicates the amount of time to be spent on each photograph. Chris Marker’s film, Si j’avais quatre dromadaires (1966), a brilliantly orchestrated meditation on photographs of all sorts and themes, suggests a subtler and more rigorous way of packaging (and enlarging) still photographs. Both the order and the exact time for looking at each photograph are imposed; and there is a gain in visual legibility and emotional impact. But photographs transcribed in a film cease to be collectable objects, as they still are when served up in books.


graphy »Photographs furnish evidence. Something we hear about, but doubt, seems proven when we’re shown a photograph of it. In one version of its utility, the camera record incriminates. Starting with their use by the Paris police in the murderous roundup of Communards in June 1871, photographs became a useful tool of modern states in the surveillance and control of their increasingly mobile populations. In another version of its utility, the camera record justifies. A photograph passes for incontrovertible proof that a given thing happened. The picture may distort; but there is always a presumption that something exists, or did exist, which is like what’s in the picture. Whatever the limitations (through amateurism) or pretensions (through artistry) of the individual photographer, a photograph -- any photograph -- seems to have a more innocent, and therefore more accurate, relation to visible reality than do other mimetic objects. Virtuosi of the noble image like Alfred Stieglitz and Paul Strand, composing mighty, unforgettable photographs decade after decade, still want, first of all, to show something “out there,” just like the Polaroid owner for whom photographs are a handy, fast form of note-taking, or the shutterbug with a Brownie who takes snapshots as souvenirs of daily life. »While a painting or a prose description can never be other than a narrowly selective interpretation, a photograph can be treated as a narrowly selective transparency. But despite the presumption of veracity that gives all photographs authority, interest, seductiveness, the work that photographers do is no generic exception to the usually shady commerce between art and truth. “Even when photographers are most concerned with mirroring reality, they are still haunted by tacit imperatives of taste and conscience.” The immensely gifted members of the Farm Security Administration photographic project of the late 1930s (among them Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Russell Lee) would take dozens of frontal pictures of one of their sharecropper subjects until satisfied that they had gotten just the right look on film -- the precise expression on the subject’s face that supported their own notions about poverty, light, dignity, texture, exploitation, and geometry. In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another, photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects. Although there is a sense in which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are. Those occasions when the taking of photographs is relatively undiscriminating, promiscuous, or self-effacing do not lessen the didacticism of the whole enterprise. This very passivity -- and ubiquity -- of the photographic record is photography’s “message,” its aggression. »Images which idealize (like most fashion and animal photography) are no less aggressive than work which makes a virtue of plainness (like class pictures, still lifes of the bleaker sort, and mug shots). There is an aggression implicit in every use of the camera. This is as evident in the 1840s and 1850s, photography’s glorious first two decades, as in all the succeeding decades, during which technology made possible an ever increasing spread of that mentality which looks at the world as a set of potential photographs. Even for such early masters as David Octavius Hill and Julia Margaret Cameron who used the camera as a means of getting painterly images, the point of taking photographs was a vast departure from the aims of painters. From its start, photography implied the capture of the largest possible number of subjects. Painting never had so imperial a scope. The subsequent industrialization of camera technology only carried out a promise inherent in photography from its very beginning: to democratize all experiences by translating them into images. »That age when taking photographs required a cumbersome and expensive contraption -- the toy of the clever, the wealthy, and the obsessed -- seems remote indeed from the era of sleek pocket cameras that invite anyone to take pictures. The first cameras, made in France and England in the early 1840s, had only inventors and buffs to operate them. Since there were then no professional photographers, there could not be amateurs either, and taking photographs had no clear social use; it was a gratuitous, that is, an artistic activity, though with few pretensions to being an art. It was only with its industrialization that photography came into its own as art. As industrialization provided social uses for the operations of the photographer, so the reaction against these uses reinforced the self-consciousness of photography-as-art.


o ON p h to plato’s Cave susan sontag

Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato’s cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth. But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. The inventory started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. This very insatiability of the photographing eye changes the terms of confinement in the cave, our world. In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally, the most grandiose result of the photographic enterprise is to give us the sense that we can hold the whole world in our heads -- as an anthology of images. To collect photographs is to collect the world. Movies and television programs light up walls, flicker, and go out; but with still photographs the image is also an object, lightweight, cheap to produce, easy to carry about, accumulate, store. In Godard’s Les Carabiniers (1963), two sluggish lumpen-peasants are lured into joining the King’s Army by the promise that they will be able to loot, rape, kill, or do whatever else they please to the enemy, and get rich. But the suitcase of booty that Michel-Ange and Ulysse triumphantly bring home, years later, to their wives turns out to contain only picture postcards, hundreds of them, of Monuments, Department Stores, Mammals, Wonders of Nature, Methods of Transport, Works of Art, and other classified treasures from around the globe. Godard’s gag vividly parodies the equivocal magic of the photographic image., Photographs are perhaps the most mysterious of all the objects that make up, and thicken, the environment we recognize as modern. Photographs really are experience captured, and the camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its acquisitive mood. To photograph is to appropriate the thing photographed. It means putting oneself into a certain relation to the world that feels like knowledge -- and, therefore, like power. A now notorious first fall into alienation, habituating people to abstract the world into printed words, is supposed to have engendered that surplus of Faustian energy and psychic damage needed to build modern, inorganic societies. But print seems a less treacherous form of leaching out the world, of turning it into a mental object, than photographic images, which now provide most of the knowledge people have about the look of the past and the reach of the present. What is written about a person or an event is frankly an interpretation, as are handmade visual statements, like paintings and drawings. Photographed images do not seem to be statements about the world so much as pieces of it, miniatures of reality that anyone can make or acquire. Photographs, which fiddle with the scale of the world, themselves get reduced, blown up, cropped, retouched, doctored, tricked out. They age, plagued by the usual ills of paper objects; they disappear; they become valuable, and get bought and sold; they are reproduced. Pho-

tographs, which package the world, seem to invite packaging. They are stuck in albums, framed and set on tables, tacked on walls, projected as slides. Newspapers and magazines feature them; cops alphabetize them; museums exhibit them; publishers compile them. For many decades the book has been the most influential way of arranging (and usually miniaturizing) photographs, thereby guaranteeing them longevity, if not immortality -- photographs are fragile objects, easily torn or mislaid -- and a wider public. The photograph in a book is, obviously, the image of an image. But since it is, to begin with, a printed, smooth object, a photograph loses much less of its essential quality when reproduced in a book than a painting does. Still, the book is not a wholly satisfactory scheme for putting groups of photographs into general circulation. The sequence in which the photographs are to be looked at is proposed by the order of pages, but nothing holds readers to the recommended order or indicates the amount of time to be spent on each photograph. Chris Marker’s film, Si j’avais quatre dromadaires (1966), a brilliantly orchestrated meditation on photographs of all sorts and themes, suggests a subtler and more rigorous way of packaging (and enlarging) still photographs. Both the order and the exact time for looking at each photograph are imposed; and there is a gain in visual legibility and emotional impact. But photographs transcribed in a film cease to be collectable objects, as they still are when served up in books. Photographs furnish evidence. Something we hear about, but doubt, seems proven when we’re shown a photograph of it. In one version of its utility, the camera record incriminates. Starting with their use by the Paris police in the murderous roundup


a g r h o p y of Communards in June 1871, photographs became a useful tool of modern states in the surveillance and control of their increasingly mobile populations. In another version of its utility, the camera record justifies. A photograph passes for incontrovertible proof that a given thing happened. The picture may distort; but there is always a presumption that something exists, or did exist, which is like what’s in the picture. Whatever the limitations (through amateurism) or pretensions (through artistry) of the individual photographer, a photograph -- any photograph -- seems to have a more innocent, and therefore more accurate, relation to visible reality than do other mimetic objects. Virtuosi of the noble image like Alfred Stieglitz and Paul Strand, composing mighty, unforgettable photographs decade after decade, still want, first of all, to show something “out there,” just like the Polaroid owner for whom photographs are a handy, fast form of note-taking, or the shutterbug with a Brownie who takes snapshots as souvenirs of daily life. While a painting or a prose description can never be other than a narrowly selective interpretation, a photograph can be treated as a narrowly selective transparency. But despite the presumption of veracity that gives all photographs authority, interest, seductiveness, the work that photographers do is no generic exception to the usually shady commerce between art and truth. “Even when photographers are most concerned with mirroring reality, they are still haunted by tacit imperatives of taste and conscience.” The immensely gifted members of the Farm Security Administration photographic project of the late 1930s (among them Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Russell Lee) would take dozens of frontal pictures of one of their sharecropper subjects until satisfied that they had gotten just the right look on film -- the precise expression on the subject’s face that supported their own notions about poverty, light, dignity, texture, exploitation, and geometry. In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another, photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects. Although there is a sense in which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are. Those occasions when the taking of photographs is relatively undiscriminating, promiscuous, or self-effacing do not lessen the didacticism of the whole enterprise. This very passivity -- and ubiquity -- of the photographic record is photography’s “message,” its aggression. »Images which idealize (like most fashion and animal photography) are no less aggressive than work which makes a virtue of plainness (like class pictures, still lifes of the bleaker sort, and mug shots). There is an aggression implicit in every use of the camera. This is as evident in the 1840s and 1850s, photography’s glorious first two decades, as in all the succeeding decades, during which technology made possible

an ever increasing spread of that mentality which looks at the world as a set of potential photographs. Even for such early masters as David Octavius Hill and Julia Margaret Cameron who used the camera as a means of getting painterly images, the point of taking photographs was a vast departure from the aims of painters. From its start, photography implied the capture of the largest possible number of subjects. Painting never had so imperial a scope. The subsequent industrialization of camera technology only carried out a promise inherent in photography from its very beginning: to democratize all experiences by translating them into images. »That age when taking photographs required a cumbersome and expensive contraption -- the toy of the clever, the wealthy, and the obsessed -- seems remote indeed from the era of sleek pocket cameras that invite anyone to take pictures. The first cameras, made in France and England in the early 1840s, had only inventors and buffs to operate them. Since there were then no professional photographers, there could not be amateurs either, and taking photographs had no clear social use; it was a gratuitous, that is, an artistic activity, though with few pretensions to being an art. It was only with its industrialization that photography came into its own as art. As industrialization provided social uses for the operations of the photographer, so the reaction against these uses reinforced the self-consciousness of photography-as-art.


ON o ph t o a h g p r y


plato’s Cave susan sontag Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato’s cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth. But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. The inventory started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. This very insatiability of the photographing eye changes the terms of confinement in the cave, our world. In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally, the most grandiose result of the photographic enterprise is to give us the sense that we can hold the whole world in our heads -- as an anthology of images. To collect photographs is to collect the world. Movies and television programs light up walls, flicker, and go out; but with still photographs the image is also an object, lightweight, cheap to produce, easy to carry about, accumulate, store. In Godard’s Les Carabiniers (1963), two sluggish lumpen-peasants are lured into joining the King’s Army by the promise that they will be able to loot, rape, kill, or do whatever else they please to the enemy, and get rich. But the suitcase of booty that Michel-Ange and Ulysse triumphantly bring home, years later, to their wives turns out to contain only picture postcards, hundreds of them, of Monuments, Department Stores, Mammals, Wonders of Nature, Methods of Transport, Works of Art, and other classified treasures from around the globe. Godard’s gag vividly parodies the equivocal magic of the photographic image., Photographs are perhaps the most mysterious of all the objects that make up, and thicken, the environment we recognize as modern. Photographs really are experience captured, and the camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its acquisitive mood. To photograph is to appropriate the thing photographed. It means putting oneself into a certain relation to the world that feels like knowledge -- and, therefore, like power. A now notorious first fall into alienation, habituating people to abstract the world into printed words, is supposed to have engendered that surplus of Faustian energy and psychic damage needed to build modern, inorganic societies. But print seems a less treacherous form of leaching out the world, of turning it into a mental object, than photographic images, which now provide most of the knowledge people have about the look of the past and the reach of the present. What is written about a person or an event is frankly an interpretation, as are handmade visual statements, like paintings and drawings. Photographed images do not seem to be statements about the world so much as pieces of it, miniatures of reality that anyone can make or acquire. Photographs, which fiddle with the scale of the world, themselves get reduced, blown up, cropped, retouched, doctored, tricked out. They age, plagued by the usual ills of paper objects; they disappear; they become valuable, and get bought and sold; they are reproduced. Photographs, which package the world, seem to invite packaging. They are stuck in albums, framed and set on tables, tacked on walls, projected as slides. Newspapers and magazines feature them; cops alphabetize them; museums exhibit them; publishers compile them. For many decades the book has been the most influential way of arranging (and usually miniaturizing) photographs, thereby guaranteeing them longevity, if not immortality -- photographs are fragile objects, easily torn or mislaid -- and a wider public. The photograph in a book is, obviously, the image of an image. But since it is, to begin with, a printed, smooth object, a photograph loses much less of its essential quality when reproduced in a book than a painting does. Still, the book is not a wholly satisfactory scheme for putting groups of photographs into general circulation. The sequence in which the photographs are to be looked at is proposed by the order of pages, but nothing holds readers to the recommended order or indicates the amount of time to be spent on each photograph. Chris Marker’s film, Si j’avais quatre dromadaires (1966), a brilliantly orchestrated meditation on photographs of all sorts and themes, suggests a subtler and more rigorous way of packaging (and enlarging) still photographs. Both the order and the exact time for looking at each photograph are imposed; and there is a gain in visual legibility and emotional impact. But photographs transcribed in a film cease to be collectable objects, as they still are when served up in books. Photographs furnish evidence. Something we hear about, but doubt, seems proven when we’re shown a photograph of it. In one version of its utility, the camera record incriminates. Starting with their use by the Paris police in the murderous roundup of Communards in June 1871, photographs became a useful tool of modern states in the surveillance and control of their increasingly mobile populations. In another version of its utility, the camera record justifies. A photograph passes for incontrovertible proof that a given

thing happened. The picture may distort; but there is always a presumption that something exists, or did exist, which is like what’s in the picture. Whatever the limitations (through amateurism) or pretensions (through artistry) of the individual photographer, a photograph -- any photograph -- seems to have a more innocent, and therefore more accurate, relation to visible reality than do other mimetic objects. Virtuosi of the noble image like Alfred Stieglitz and Paul Strand, composing mighty, unforgettable photographs decade after decade, still want, first of all, to show something “out there,” just like the Polaroid owner for whom photographs are a handy, fast form of note-taking, or the shutterbug with a Brownie who takes snapshots as souvenirs of daily life. While a painting or a prose description can never be other than a narrowly selective interpretation, a photograph can be treated as a narrowly selective transparency. But despite the presumption of veracity that gives all photographs authority, interest, seductiveness, the work that photographers do is no generic exception to the usually shady commerce between art and truth. Even when photographers are most concerned with mirroring reality, they are still haunted by tacit imperatives of taste and conscience. The immensely gifted members of the Farm Security Administration photographic project of the late 1930s (among them Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Russell Lee) would take dozens of frontal pictures of one of their sharecropper subjects until satisfied that they had gotten just the right look on film -- the precise expression on the subject’s face that supported their own notions about poverty, light, dignity, texture, exploitation, and geometry. In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another, photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects. Although there is a sense in which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are. Those occasions when the taking of photographs is relatively undiscriminating, promiscuous, or self-effacing do not lessen the didacticism of the whole enterprise. This very passivity -- and ubiquity -- of the photographic record is photography’s “message,” its aggression.

“Even when photographers are most concerned with mirroring reality, they are still haunted by tacit imperatives of taste and conscience.”

»Images which idealize (like most fashion and animal photography) are no less aggressive than work which makes a virtue of plainness (like class pictures, still lifes of the bleaker sort, and mug shots). There is an aggression implicit in every use of the camera. This is as evident in the 1840s and 1850s, photography’s glorious first two decades, as in all the succeeding decades, during which technology made possible an ever increasing spread of that mentality which looks at the world as a set of potential photographs. Even for such early masters as David Octavius Hill and Julia Margaret Cameron who used the camera as a means of getting painterly images, the point of taking photographs was a vast departure from the aims of painters. From its start, photography implied the capture of the largest possible number of subjects. Painting never had so imperial a scope. The subsequent industrialization of camera technology only carried out a promise inherent in photography from its very beginning: to democratize all experiences by translating them into images. »That age when taking photographs required a cumbersome and expensive contraption -- the toy of the clever, the wealthy, and the obsessed -- seems remote indeed from the era of sleek pocket cameras that invite anyone to take pictures. The first cameras, made in France and England in the early 1840s, had only inventors and buffs to operate them. Since there were then no professional photographers, there could not be amateurs either, and taking photographs had no clear social use; it was a gratuitous, that is, an artistic activity, though with few pretensions to being an art. It was only with its industrialization that photography came into its own as art. As industrialization provided social uses for the operations of the photographer, so the reaction against these uses reinforced the self-consciousness of photography-as-art.


ON a o g h p t r p h o y


plato’s Cave susan sontag Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato’s cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth. But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. The inventory started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. This very insatiability of the photographing eye changes the terms of confinement in the cave, our world. In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally, the most grandiose result of the photographic enterprise is to give us the sense that we can hold the whole world in our heads -- as an anthology of images. To collect photographs is to collect the world. Movies and television programs light up walls, flicker, and go out; but with still photographs the image is also an object, lightweight, cheap to produce, easy to carry about, accumulate, store. In Godard’s Les Carabiniers (1963), two sluggish lumpen-peasants are lured into joining the King’s Army by the promise that they will be able to loot, rape, kill, or do whatever else they please to the enemy, and get rich. But the suitcase of booty that Michel-Ange and Ulysse triumphantly bring home, years later, to their wives turns out to contain only picture postcards, hundreds of them, of Monuments, Department Stores, Mammals, Wonders of Nature, Methods of Transport, Works of Art, and other classified treasures from around the globe. Godard’s gag vividly parodies the equivocal magic of the photographic image., Photographs are perhaps the most mysterious of all the objects that make up, and thicken, the environment we recognize as modern. Photographs really are experience captured, and the camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its acquisitive mood. To photograph is to appropriate the thing photographed. It means putting oneself into a certain relation to the world that feels like knowledge -- and, therefore, like power. A now notorious first fall into alienation, habituating people to abstract the world into printed words, is supposed to have engendered that surplus of Faustian energy and psychic damage needed to build modern, inorganic societies. But print seems a less treacherous form of leaching out the world, of turning it into a mental object, than photographic images, which now provide most of the knowledge people have about the look of the past and the reach of the present. What is written about a person or an event is frankly an interpretation, as are handmade visual statements, like paintings and drawings. Photographed images do not seem to be statements about the world so much as pieces of it, miniatures of reality that anyone can make or acquire. Photographs, which fiddle with the scale of the world, themselves get reduced, blown up, cropped, retouched, doctored, tricked out. They age, plagued by the usual ills of paper objects; they disappear; they become valuable, and get bought and sold; they are reproduced. Photographs, which package the world, seem to invite packaging. They are stuck in albums, framed and set on tables, tacked on walls, projected as slides. Newspapers and magazines feature them; cops alphabetize them; museums exhibit them; publishers compile them. For many decades the book has been the most influential way of arranging (and usually miniaturizing) photographs, thereby guaranteeing them longevity, if not immortality -- photographs are fragile objects, easily torn or mislaid -- and a wider public. The photograph in a book is, obviously, the image of an image. But since it is, to begin with, a printed, smooth object, a photograph loses much less of its essential quality when reproduced in a book than a painting does. Still, the book is not a wholly satisfactory scheme for putting groups of photographs into general circulation. The sequence in which the photographs are to be looked at is proposed by the order of pages, but nothing holds readers to the recommended order or indicates the amount of time to be spent on each photograph. Chris Marker’s film, Si j’avais quatre dromadaires (1966), a brilliantly orchestrated meditation on photographs of all sorts and themes, suggests a subtler and more rigorous way of packaging (and enlarging) still photographs. Both the order and the exact time for looking at each photograph are imposed; and there is a gain in visual legibility and emotional impact. But photographs transcribed in a film cease to be collectable objects, as they still are when served up in books. Photographs furnish evidence. Something we hear about, but doubt, seems proven when we’re shown a photograph of it. In one version of its utility, the camera record incriminates. Starting with their use by the Paris police in the murderous roundup of Communards in June 1871, photographs became a useful tool of modern states in the surveillance and control of their increasingly mobile populations. In another version of its utility, the camera record justifies. A photograph passes for incontrovertible proof that a given thing happened. The picture may distort; but there is always a presumption that something exists, or did exist, which is like what’s in the picture. Whatever the limitations (through amateurism) or pretensions (through artistry) of the individual photographer, a photograph -- any photograph -- seems to have a more innocent, and therefore more accurate, relation to visible reality than do other mimetic objects. Virtuosi of the noble image like Alfred Stieglitz and Paul Strand, composing

mighty, unforgettable photographs decade after decade, still want, first of all, to show something “out there,” just like the Polaroid owner for whom photographs are a handy, fast form of note-taking, or the shutterbug with a Brownie who takes snapshots as souvenirs of daily life. While a painting or a prose description can never be other than a narrowly selective interpretation, a photograph can be treated as a narrowly selective transparency. But despite the presumption of veracity that gives all photographs authority, interest, seductiveness, the work that photographers do is no generic exception to the usually shady commerce between art and truth. Even when photographers are most concerned with mirroring reality, they are still haunted by tacit imperatives of taste and conscience. The immensely gifted members of the Farm Security Administration photographic project of the late 1930s (among them Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Russell Lee) would take dozens of frontal pictures of one of their sharecropper subjects until satisfied that they had gotten just the right look on film -- the precise expression on the subject’s face that supported their own notions about poverty, light, dignity, texture, exploitation, and geometry. In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another, photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects. Although there is a sense in which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are. Those occasions when the taking of photographs is relatively undiscriminating, promiscuous, or self-effacing do not lessen the didacticism of the whole enterprise. This very passivity -- and ubiquity -- of the photographic record is photography’s “message,” its aggression.

“Even when photographers are most concerned with mirroring reality, they are still haunted by tacit imperatives of taste and conscience.”

»Images which idealize (like most fashion and animal photography) are no less aggressive than work which makes a virtue of plainness (like class pictures, still lifes of the bleaker sort, and mug shots). There is an aggression implicit in every use of the camera. This is as evident in the 1840s and 1850s, photography’s glorious first two decades, as in all the succeeding decades, during which technology made possible an ever increasing spread of that mentality which looks at the world as a set of potential photographs. Even for such early masters as David Octavius Hill and Julia Margaret Cameron who used the camera as a means of getting painterly images, the point of taking photographs was a vast departure from the aims of painters. From its start, photography implied the capture of the largest possible number of subjects. Painting never had so imperial a scope. The subsequent industrialization of camera technology only carried out a promise inherent in photography from its very beginning: to democratize all experiences by translating them into images. »That age when taking photographs required a cumbersome and expensive contraption -- the toy of the clever, the wealthy, and the obsessed -- seems remote indeed from the era of sleek pocket cameras that invite anyone to take pictures. The first cameras, made in France and England in the early 1840s, had only inventors and buffs to operate them. Since there were then no professional photographers, there could not be amateurs either, and taking photographs had no clear social use; it was a gratuitous, that is, an artistic activity, though with few pretensions to being an art. It was only with its industrialization that photography came into its own as art. As industrialization provided social uses for the operations of the photographer, so the reaction against these uses reinforced the self-consciousness of photography-as-art.


PHOTOGRAPHY ESSAY SPREAD REFINEMENTS 1


ON

a o g h p t r p h o y Made You Look // 20


For many decades the book has been the most influential way of arranging (and usually miniaturizing) photographs, thereby guaranteeing them longevity, if not immortality – photographs are fragile objects, easily torn or mislaid – and a wider public. The photograph in a book is, obviously, the image of an image. But since it is, to begin with, a printed, smooth object, a photograph loses much less of its essential quality when reproduced in a book than a painting does. Still, the book is not a wholly satisfactory scheme for putting groups of photographs into general circulation. The sequence in which the photographs are to be looked at is proposed by the order of pages, but nothing holds readers to the recommended order or indicates the amount of time to be spent on each photograph. Chris Marker’s film, Si j’avais quatre dromadaires (1966), a brilliantly orchestrated meditation on photographs of all sorts and themes, suggests a subtler and more rigorous way of packaging (and enlarging) still photographs. Both the order and the exact time for looking at each photograph are imposed; and there is a gain in visual legibility and emotional impact. But photographs transcribed in a film cease to be collectable objects, as they still are when served up in books. Photographs furnish evidence. Something we hear about, but doubt, seems proven when we’re shown a photograph of it. In one version of its utility, the camera record incriminates. Starting with their use by the Paris police in the murderous roundup of Communards in June 1871, photographs became a useful tool of modern states in the surveillance and control of their increasingly mobile populations. In another version of its utility, the camera record justifies. A photograph passes for incontrovertible proof that a given thing happened. The picture may distort; but there is always a presumption that something exists, or did exist, which is like what’s in the picture. Whatever the limitations (through amateurism) or pretensions (through artistry) of the individual photographer, a photograph – any photograph – seems to have a more innocent, and therefore more accurate, relation to visible reality than do other mimetic objects. Virtuosi of the noble image like Alfred Stieglitz and Paul Strand, composing mighty, unforgettable photographs decade after decade, still want, first of all, to show something “out there,” just like the Polaroid owner for whom photographs are a handy, fast form of note-taking, or the shutterbug with a Brownie who takes snapshots as souvenirs of daily life. While a painting or a prose description can never be other than a narrowly selective interpretation, a photograph can be treated as a narrowly selective transparency. But despite the presumption of veracity that gives all photographs authority, interest, seductiveness, the work that photographers do is noexception to the usually shady commerce between art and truth. Even when photographers are most concerned with mirroring reality, they are still haunted by tacit imperatives of taste and conscience. The immensely gifted members of the Farm Security Administration photographic project of the late 1930s (among them Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Russell Lee) would take dozens of frontal pictures of one of their sharecropper subjects until satisfied that they had gotten just the right look on film – the precise expression on the subject’s face that supported their own notions about poverty, light, dignity, texture, exploitation, and geometry. In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another, photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects. Although there is a sense in which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are. Those occasions when the taking of photographs is relatively undiscriminating, promiscuous, or self-effacing do not lessen the didacticism of the whole enterprise. This very passivity – and ubiquity – of the photographic record is photography’s “message,” its aggression. Images which idealize (like most fashion and animal photography) are no less aggressive than work which makes a virtue of plainness (like class pictures, still lifes of the bleaker sort, and mug shots). There is an aggression implicit in every use of the camera. This is as evident in the 1840s and 1850s, photography’s glorious first decades, as in all the succeeding decades, during which technology made possible an increasing spread of that mentality which looks at the world as a set of potential photographs. Even for early masters as David Octavius Hill and Julia Margaret Cameron who used the camera as a means of getting painterly images, the point of taking photographs was a vast departure from the aims of painters. From its start, photography implied the capture of the largest possible number of subjects. Painting never had so imperial a scope. The subsequent industrialization of camera technology carried out a promise inherent in photography from its beginning: to democratize all experiences by translating them into images. That age when taking photographs required a cumbersome and expensive contraption – the toy of the clever, the wealthy, and the obsessed – seems remote indeed from the era of sleek pocket cameras that invite anyone to take pictures. The first cameras, made in France and England in the early 1840s, had only inventors and buffs to operate them. Since there were then no professional photographers, there could not be amateurs either, and taking photographs had no clear social use; it was a gratuitous, that is, an artistic activity, though with few pretensions to being an art. It was only with its industrialization that photography came into its own as art. As industrialization provided social uses for the operations of the photographer, so the reaction against these uses reinforced the self-consciousness of photography-as-art.

“to collect photographs is to collect the world.”

plato’s Cave By susan sontag Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato’s cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth. But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. The inventory started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. This very insatiability of the photographing eye changes the terms of confinement in the cave, our world. In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally, the most grandiose result of the photographic enterprise is to give us the sense that we can hold the whole world in our heads – as an anthology of images. To collect photographs is to collect the world. Movies and television programs light up walls, flicker, and go out; but with still photographs the physical image is also an object, lightweight, cheap to produce, easy to carry about, accumulate, store. In Godard’s Les Carabiniers (1963), two sluggish lumpen-peasants are lured into joining the King’s Army by the promise that they will be able to loot, rape, kill, or do whatever else they please to the enemy, and get rich. But the suitcase of booty that Michel-Ange and Ulysse triumphantly bring home, years later, to their wives, turns out to contain only picture postcards, hundreds of them, of Monuments, Department Stores, Mammals, Wonders of Nature, Methods of Transport, Works of Art, and other classified treasures from around the globe. Godard’s gag vividly parodies the equivocal magic of the photographic image. Photographs are perhaps the most mysterious of all the objects that make up, and thicken, the environment we recognize as modern. Photographs are experience captured, and the camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its beautifully acquisitive mood. To photograph is to appropriate the thing photographed. It means putting oneself into a certain relation to the world that feels like knowledge – and, therefore, like power. A now notorious first fall into alienation, habituating people to abstract the world into printed words, is supposed to have engendered that surplus of Faustian energy and psychic damage needed to build modern, inorganic societies. But print seems a much less treacherous form of leaching out the world, of turning it into a mental object, than photographic images, which now provide most of the knowledge people have about the look of the past and the reach of the present. What is written about a person or an event is frankly just an interpretation, as are handmade visual statements, like paintings and drawings. Photographed images do not seem to be statements about the world so much as pieces of it, miniatures of reality that anyone can make or acquire. Photographs, which fiddle with the scale of the world, themselves get reduced, blown up, cropped, retouched, doctored, tricked out. They age, they disappear; they become valuable, and get bought and sold; they are reproduced. Photographs, which package the world, seem to invite packaging. They are stuck in albums, framed and set on tables, tacked on walls, projected as slides. Newspapers and magazines feature them; cops alphabetize them; museums exhibit them; publishers compile them.


Final Magazine

part.3


Spring 2018 // VOlume 3


contents avedon // 2-9 testino // 10-19 sontag // 20-21


t R Twiggy, hair by Ara Gallant, Paris, January 6, 1968

U


by colin Mcdowell

“there is no such thing as inaccuracy in a photograph. All photographs are accurate. None of them is the truth.�

h t the work of richard avedon Made You Look // 3


Christian Dior’s 1947 New Look influenced fashion forever, not least in the way it was to be presented. Although that change came not from Paris, but from New York, bought about by a magazine (Harper’s Bazaar); an editor (Carmel Snow); an art director (Alexey Brodovitch); a fashion editor (Diana Vreeland) and a very young, inexperienced photographer: Richard Avedon. Born in 1923 to a Jewish retail family, Avedon’s interest in photography developed early. His father showed him how cameras worked and the many family group portraits taken when he was a boy gave him a sense for the importance of presentation. In later life he recalled how his family “dressed” their photographs with dogs borrowed from friends and relatives, and shot them in doorways or in front of cars, none of which were theirs. Brodovitch surely saw Avedon’s unique quality. Even as a young, aspiring photographer his contemporaries noted his bold attitude and risk-taking in scale and imagery. And it stayed with him for his entire working life. People who were part of his teams over the years recall how his energetic imagination gave birth to arresting images, whether portraits, such as the uniquely telling one he shot of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, or in his many fashion shoots sparkling with life and originality. What he brought to all his work was an intellectual curiosity rarely seen in the fashion world. He is probably the only fashion photographer of the twentieth century who can be called an intellectual — or, at least, exceptionally well read and culturally informed.

Changing the game.

Made You Look // 6


Veruschka, dress by Bill Blass, New York, January 4, 196

Avedon was a portrait photographer at heart, an obsession that had begun with his Rachmaninoff shot and was augmented by his daily head and shoulders work for the Merchant Marines. His ‘eye’ can be cruel in his portrait shoots such as the 1963 group photo, The Generals of the Daughters of the American Revolution, or the many he took of ordinary unknown individuals in which he allowed the lens to tell the truth without any flattery at all. But he also believed that fashion photographers could have a sense of fun and his first success showed how. The massive breakthrough in Richard Avedon’s career came in 1948 when, in the wake of Dior’s New Look, he accompanied Carmel Snow to Paris in order to photograph the couturier’s second show. And, with the youthful confidence that really doesn’t acknowledge failure, he broke away from the decades-old traditional way of photographing fashion. The frozen, sculptural look of Horst P Horst or Beaton’s pastiches of eighteenth century portraits were all about the stillness of formality; the presentation of clothes as a part of the stiffness of upper class life. In a glorious anticipation of Vreeland’s famous axiom, ‘give em what they never knew they wanted,’ Avedon broke up the frozen, dignified image. His photographs were about action.Although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947. Movement in fashion photography was not new, of course. It had been developed in the thirties, but only on sporting shoots: women jumping into the sea and other essentially informal activities. What Avedon did was to introduce movement tox some of the most formal clothes in the world and to give them a spirit that made them exciting for young women — a first in formal couture. He took clothes that were actually very structured and made them, if not totally casual, at least accessible, a fact that 7th Avenue realized and quickly capitalized on. It is no exaggeration to claim that it was Avedon who matched Dior’s masterstroke with his own masterstroke which was to make visible the possibilities of the new way of dressing. And he did so by Americanizing its presentation. He began with the models: Suzy Parker, Dovima, Dorian Leigh, Sunny Harnett were all beautiful, young and full of personality. They ran across Place de la Concorde, they roller skated, they sat at the counters of louche bars, they were accompanied by modern looking young men - a favorite was an English dental student called Robin Tattersall - and they made clothes look universal, fresh and desirable but above all real and speaking to a new sort of couture customer. It was, in itself a new look and, although traditionalists in Paris tut-tutted, it was clear that Richard Avedon had, in one season, completed what Dior had started in 1947.

Made You Look // 5


Marilyn Monroe, actress, New York City, May 6, 1957

Carmen (Homage to Munkacsi) Coat by Cardin, Place Francois-Premier, Paris, August, 1957

Audrey Hepburn and Art Buchwald, with Simone D’Aillencourt, Frederick Eberstadt, Barbara Mullen, and Dr. Reginald Kernan, evening dresses by Balmain, Dior, and Patou, Maxim’s Paris, August 1959


“a Camera lies all the time. all it does is lie, because when you choose this moment instead of this moment, you’ve made a choice, you’re lying about something larger.”

Made You Look // 7


Nastassja Kinski, actress, Los Angeles, June 14, 1981

Made You Look // 10


S by david friend

“I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.”

O

Kate Moss, Los Angeles, Harper’s Bazaar, 1996

Made You Look // 12


U

T the work of mario testino Made You Look // 13

H


it man

Clockwise from top left: Gisele BĂźndchen, New York City, Vanity Fair, 2009. Daria Werbowy, Los Angeles, American Vogue, 2004. Sienna Miller, Rome, American Vogue, 2007.

14 // Made You Look


Mario Testino OBE is widely regarded as one of the most influential fashion and portrait photographers of our times. His photographs have been published internationally in magazines such as Vogue, V Magazine and Vanity Fair. He has contributed to the success of leading fashion and beauty houses, creating emblematic images for brands from Gucci, Burberry, Versace and Michael Kors to Chanel, Estée Lauder and Lancôme. Alongside his 40-year practice as a photographer, Testino has released a body of work as a creative director, guest editor, museum founder, art collector/collaborator and entrepreneur. In 2007, at the request of his clients to provide full creative direction services, he formed MARIOTESTINO+ which today is a growing team of individuals who support Testino to release the breadth of his creative output. Born in Lima in 1954 to a traditional Catholic family, remote from the worlds of fashion and Hollywood, Testino moved from Peru to London in 1976. It was during apprenticeships at the studios of John Vickers and Paul Nugent that he made his first attempts as a photographer, inspired by how photography masters documented the society of their times: “I tried to emulate the English – the Mitford sisters, Stephen Tennant and Cecil Beaton.” His career began tentatively with a commission to photograph a girl’s haircut for British Vogue. The girl in the picture was stylist Lucinda Chambers and the shoot sparked a personal friendship and professional partnership that has lasted to this day. During the early nineties, Testino looked to his experience growing up in Peru and his long teenage summers in Brazil for inspiration, which helped him to create a unique and personal photographic language. “I noticed an evolution in my work…when I tried to recreate my youth in pictures.” Testino’s is an artistic vocabulary that transgresses genders, mixes masculinity and femininity and suggests sensuality rather than sexuality. Suzy Menkes, Vogue’s International Editor explains, “Testino’s skill is first and foremost to catch the moment and to bring out the humanity in his subjects.” Testino’s subjects appear confidently alive; he captures their energy by creating an openness and intimacy with them. Known for the extraordinary way in which he can capture the most private of moments, Testino’s spontaneous, intimate portraits offer the viewer new perspectives on famous faces, often establishing new fashion icons. He has documented subjects from A-list stars, muses, supermodels and artists, to subjects that he has encountered throughout his travels, from magnificent cities by night to mysterious landscapes and private soirees.

borders, boundaries, business, and beauty.

Made You Look // 13


“His pictur flawless beautiful seen in you long legs, Mario Wor


es convey a polished, glamour —the most people you’ve ever ur life, bronzed skin, fabulous shoes, rld.” David Harris, Design Director of Vanity Fair


Gwyneth Paltrow, Paris, American Vogue, 2005


Testino was nicknamed the “John Singer Sargent of our times” by Terence Pepper, photography curator at The National Portrait Gallery in London. The Gallery’s 2002 Portraits exhibition attracted more visitors than any other show in the museum’s history at the time. Charles Saumarez Smith, then director of the NPG, compared Testino to court artists and portraitists from Holbein to Reynolds. “There is a strong relationship between Mario’s work and the general tradition of portrait artists. Just like court artists in the past, he works to a tight timetable and significant commercial constraints.” One of Testino’s most memorable sittings to this day is his series with Diana, Princess of Wales. Commissioned for Vanity Fair in 1997, he said: “One of my greatest experiences in life was photographing Princess Diana. It’s not only that the experience itself was amazing, but she opened a door for me because I then started photographing the royal families of Europe extensively…this brings out my love for tradition, for a way of showing family and the longevity of people.” He has photographed many royals including The Prince of Wales, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry, the King and Queen of Jordan and King and Queen of the Netherlands, among others. Testino’s work has been exhibited at museums around the world, among them the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (In Your Face, 2012), the Shanghai Art Museum (Private View, 2012), Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid (Todo o Nada, 2010), the Metropolitan Museum in Tokyo (Portraits, 2004) and Foam in Amsterdam (Portraits, 2003). Solo exhibitions of his work have been presented at galleries such as Mary Boone Gallery in New York, Phillips de Pury in London, Yvon Lambert in Paris and Timothy Taylor in London. More than sixteen books have been published on his work including Portraits (National Portrait Gallery, 2002), Let Me In! (Taschen, 2007), In Your Face (Taschen, 2012) and SIR (Taschen, 2015). His growing personal collection of artworks ranging from painting to sculpture and photography has also been the subject of numerous shows. Testino’s relationship with fine art developed after frequent visits to galleries and artist’s studios. He said: “Just as photography is a vehicle for me to live a new moment, to go to a new place, meet a new person and so on, art is a process of encounter and discovery. The display of art for me is not just about seeing the work isolated in a white cube. It’s also about engaging with the art – and sometimes the artist – to make something new.” He has collaborated in the creation of some unique works with artists such as Keith Haring, Vik Muniz, John Currin and Julian Schnabel. Awarded the Order of the British Empire in 2013 in recognition of his career and charity work, in 2010 he was also appointed one of the highest honours in his native country, The Grand Cross Order of Merit in Peru, and became President of the Board of World Monuments Fund Peru in 2014. He has worked with Save the Children, amfAR, The Elton John Aids Foundation and CLIC Sargent for children with cancer. The arts are a source of joy to Testino to the extent that in 2012 he opened a non-profit museum in Lima. MATE – Museo Mario Testino was established to contribute to Peru through the cultivation and promotion of culture and heritage. For Testino, art is never static. It is something to be appreciated and collected as fragments that make up a greater mental library: a library that is in constant flow. In 2016, Testino opened the Parques Teresita playpark in association with Natalia Vodianova, founder of Naked Heart Foundation, the Provincial Municipality of Urubamba, and with the support of SURA Perú. Located in Cusco, Perú, Parques Teresita is named in memory of Testino’s late mother.

star power.

Made You Look // 17


“My favorite words are possibilities, opportunities and curiosity. I think if you are curious, you create opportunities, and then if you open the doors, you create possibilities.”

For early guidance as a portraitist, he studied the pictures of George Hurrell, who aggrandized Hollywood’s luminaries, and Cecil Beaton, who rendered his subjects, many of whom were close acquaintances, with affection and levity. Among his greatest inspirations, he admits, was Herb Ritts (like Hurrell and Beaton, a Vanity Fair mainstay). As a neighbor and peer of those he photographed, Ritts secured their trust even before he picked up the camera. “Through his work,” Testino contends, “you can see he felt comfortable, that they were his friends. He’s not just a documenter. He was Hollywood. The photographer of the stars was a star.” Likewise, Testino has tried to place his subjects in their best light, in every sense of the word. “I work to make them shine. It’s funny. I grew up self-obsessed. But you have to give it to them. At the end of the day, it’s their image. You are the executor. [Richard] Avedon—he was interested in the off-guard moment. I almost discard those moments—the gloom, the doubt. I will try to predict their most positive and assured moment. I’m very solar that way. I’m the lighter side of life, joie de vivre.” Having studied economics, math, and law in his youth, Testino believes that in the end what he strives to attain is the permanent truth in the ephemeral instant, the reduction of his subject to his or her purest, most iconic expression. “It’s like the result of a formula in algebra,” he says excitedly. “You document a moment that is so minimal—a split second. And many times I look at a laptop to edit my film: there aren’t 20 pictures that are great. There’s one.” The marvel of the photographic portrait, he insists, is that “in our lives, that are 85 years, on average, a single moment can exist that synthesizes your whole being, who you are. What is magical [is] if you manage to capture in that moment your subject’s joy, their kindness, their essence.”

MIXING BUSINESS WITH PLEASURE.

Kate Moss, London, National Portrait Gallery, 2002

When he started in fashion photography, in the early 1980s, Mario Testino had an aversion to shooting the famous. Instead, he was enamored of the accoutrements, the surfaces, the luscious ambience of objects and light and environment. “At first, I completely dismissed portraiture,” says the Peruvian-born Testino. “I was obsessed by beauty, fashion, clothes. I grew up in a society where beauty plays a big role—South America is about beauty, sensuality, sexuality.” As his reputation grew in fashion circles, however, he began to feel that “mere beauty was not enough. A certain depth was required. Art requires depth.” And soon, encouraged by a young British Vogue editor named Patrick Kinmonth, now a designer and curator, he began to turn his lens on the souls inside the clothes, expanding his vision and gaining the trust of his ever more celebrated subjects. “I used to go to those shoots freaking out,” he says, “because I wasn’t as successful as those subjects. I was intimidated. Then, through the years, when I began taking portraits [of personalities] such as [Princess] Diana and Madonna, [I learned to] stand by what I believe. In photographing celebrities, your mind is made to travel—through their films, their roles, their music, their worlds.” Today he travels first-class, photographically speaking, routinely shooting the best-known women in the world (he has been a V.F. contributor since 1995) and persuading them to trust him, surrender to his lens, and shed all inhibitions—not to mention, on occasion, their clothes. Indeed, if any fashion-trained portraitist is considered photographic royalty, it is Testino. In 1997, when Diana, Princess of Wales, sat for what would be her last major portrait session, the photographer she chose was Testino, whose classic images of her were first published in Vanity Fair—12 weeks before she died in a Paris car crash. (Princes William and Harry would later agree to pose for him as well.) Though Diana was the woman whom cameras followed everywhere, even to her death, it is Testino’s images by which we remember her at her most glamorous. “His pictures,” says V.F.’s design director, David Harris, convey a “polished, flawless glamour— the most beautiful people you’ve ever seen in your life, bronzed skin, long legs, fabulous shoes, Mario World. He’s got the most voyeuristic vision. He’s got that great Latin drive.” Kinmonth has observed that in Testino’s portraits his subjects “seem in control of how they look. There is an implied permission. When photographing, he will wait for his subjects to arrive at the moment when they are confident enough to give the [best] version of themselves. It is his ability to reveal the allure that he sees … that has made some of the most photographed people in the world appear as if for the first time in his pictures.”


Made You Look // 21


ON

a o g h p t r p h o y Made You Look // 20


For many decades the book has been the most influential way of arranging (and usually miniaturizing) photographs, thereby guaranteeing them longevity, if not immortality – photographs are fragile objects, easily torn or mislaid – and a wider public. The photograph in a book is, obviously, the image of an image. But since it is, to begin with, a printed, smooth object, a photograph loses much less of its essential quality when reproduced in a book than a painting does. Still, the book is not a wholly satisfactory scheme for putting groups of photographs into general circulation. The sequence in which the photographs are to be looked at is proposed by the order of pages, but nothing holds readers to the recommended order or indicates the amount of time to be spent on each photograph. Chris Marker’s film, Si j’avais quatre dromadaires (1966), a brilliantly orchestrated meditation on photographs of all sorts and themes, suggests a subtler and more rigorous way of packaging (and enlarging) still photographs. Both the order and the exact time for looking at each photograph are imposed; and there is a gain in visual legibility and emotional impact. But photographs transcribed in a film cease to be collectable objects, as they still are when served up in books. Photographs furnish evidence. Something we hear about, but doubt, seems proven when we’re shown a photograph of it. In one version of its utility, the camera record incriminates. Starting with their use by the Paris police in the murderous roundup of Communards in June 1871, photographs became a useful tool of modern states in the surveillance and control of their increasingly mobile populations. In another version of its utility, the camera record justifies. A photograph passes for incontrovertible proof that a given thing happened. The picture may distort; but there is always a presumption that something exists, or did exist, which is like what’s in the picture. Whatever the limitations (through amateurism) or pretensions (through artistry) of the individual photographer, a photograph – any photograph – seems to have a more innocent, and therefore more accurate, relation to visible reality than do other mimetic objects. Virtuosi of the noble image like Alfred Stieglitz and Paul Strand, composing mighty, unforgettable photographs decade after decade, still want, first of all, to show something “out there,” just like the Polaroid owner for whom photographs are a handy, fast form of note-taking, or the shutterbug with a Brownie who takes snapshots as souvenirs of daily life. While a painting or a prose description can never be other than a narrowly selective interpretation, a photograph can be treated as a narrowly selective transparency. But despite the presumption of veracity that gives all photographs authority, interest, seductiveness, the work that photographers do is noexception to the usually shady commerce between art and truth. Even when photographers are most concerned with mirroring reality, they are still haunted by tacit imperatives of taste and conscience. The immensely gifted members of the Farm Security Administration photographic project of the late 1930s (among them Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange, Ben Shahn, Russell Lee) would take dozens of frontal pictures of one of their sharecropper subjects until satisfied that they had gotten just the right look on film – the precise expression on the subject’s face that supported their own notions about poverty, light, dignity, texture, exploitation, and geometry. In deciding how a picture should look, in preferring one exposure to another, photographers are always imposing standards on their subjects. Although there is a sense in which the camera does indeed capture reality, not just interpret it, photographs are as much an interpretation of the world as paintings and drawings are. Those occasions when the taking of photographs is relatively undiscriminating, promiscuous, or self-effacing do not lessen the didacticism of the whole enterprise. This very passivity – and ubiquity – of the photographic record is photography’s “message,” its aggression. Images which idealize (like most fashion and animal photography) are no less aggressive than work which makes a virtue of plainness (like class pictures, still lifes of the bleaker sort, and mug shots). There is an aggression implicit in every use of the camera. This is as evident in the 1840s and 1850s, photography’s glorious first decades, as in all the succeeding decades, during which technology made possible an increasing spread of that mentality which looks at the world as a set of potential photographs. Even for early masters as David Octavius Hill and Julia Margaret Cameron who used the camera as a means of getting painterly images, the point of taking photographs was a vast departure from the aims of painters. From its start, photography implied the capture of the largest possible number of subjects. Painting never had so imperial a scope. The subsequent industrialization of camera technology carried out a promise inherent in photography from its beginning: to democratize all experiences by translating them into images. That age when taking photographs required a cumbersome and expensive contraption – the toy of the clever, the wealthy, and the obsessed – seems remote indeed from the era of sleek pocket cameras that invite anyone to take pictures. The first cameras, made in France and England in the early 1840s, had only inventors and buffs to operate them. Since there were then no professional photographers, there could not be amateurs either, and taking photographs had no clear social use; it was a gratuitous, that is, an artistic activity, though with few pretensions to being an art. It was only with its industrialization that photography came into its own as art. As industrialization provided social uses for the operations of the photographer, so the reaction against these uses reinforced the self-consciousness of photography-as-art.

“to collect photographs is to collect the world.”

plato’s Cave By susan sontag Humankind lingers unregenerately in Plato’s cave, still reveling, its age-old habit, in mere images of the truth. But being educated by photographs is not like being educated by older, more artisanal images. For one thing, there are a great many more images around, claiming our attention. The inventory started in 1839 and since then just about everything has been photographed, or so it seems. This very insatiability of the photographing eye changes the terms of confinement in the cave, our world. In teaching us a new visual code, photographs alter and enlarge our notions of what is worth looking at and what we have a right to observe. They are a grammar and, even more importantly, an ethics of seeing. Finally, the most grandiose result of the photographic enterprise is to give us the sense that we can hold the whole world in our heads – as an anthology of images. To collect photographs is to collect the world. Movies and television programs light up walls, flicker, and go out; but with still photographs the physical image is also an object, lightweight, cheap to produce, easy to carry about, accumulate, store. In Godard’s Les Carabiniers (1963), two sluggish lumpen-peasants are lured into joining the King’s Army by the promise that they will be able to loot, rape, kill, or do whatever else they please to the enemy, and get rich. But the suitcase of booty that Michel-Ange and Ulysse triumphantly bring home, years later, to their wives, turns out to contain only picture postcards, hundreds of them, of Monuments, Department Stores, Mammals, Wonders of Nature, Methods of Transport, Works of Art, and other classified treasures from around the globe. Godard’s gag vividly parodies the equivocal magic of the photographic image. Photographs are perhaps the most mysterious of all the objects that make up, and thicken, the environment we recognize as modern. Photographs are experience captured, and the camera is the ideal arm of consciousness in its beautifully acquisitive mood. To photograph is to appropriate the thing photographed. It means putting oneself into a certain relation to the world that feels like knowledge – and, therefore, like power. A now notorious first fall into alienation, habituating people to abstract the world into printed words, is supposed to have engendered that surplus of Faustian energy and psychic damage needed to build modern, inorganic societies. But print seems a much less treacherous form of leaching out the world, of turning it into a mental object, than photographic images, which now provide most of the knowledge people have about the look of the past and the reach of the present. What is written about a person or an event is frankly just an interpretation, as are handmade visual statements, like paintings and drawings. Photographed images do not seem to be statements about the world so much as pieces of it, miniatures of reality that anyone can make or acquire. Photographs, which fiddle with the scale of the world, themselves get reduced, blown up, cropped, retouched, doctored, tricked out. They age, they disappear; they become valuable, and get bought and sold; they are reproduced. Photographs, which package the world, seem to invite packaging. They are stuck in albums, framed and set on tables, tacked on walls, projected as slides. Newspapers and magazines feature them; cops alphabetize them; museums exhibit them; publishers compile them.


Made You Look // 22


colophon Made you look was designed by Hannah Wexler for Typographic Systems, 2017. All of the images and text were sourced from publications and the interent and are only being used for design education purposes. Fonts: Bebas Neue, ITC Avant Garde. Printed at Jayhawk Ink, Lawrence KS.


Made You Look // 26


Made You Look // 27


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