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hannah kramer


hannah kramer 314.308.9456 hannahckramer@gmail.com


Hannah Kramer Education current GPA: 3.73

2603 Windsor Place #B300 • Lawrence, KS 66049 • 314.308.9456 • hannahckramer@gmail.com

University of Kansas Masters of Architecture Fall 2009 - Spring 2014 (anticipated graduation date)

Universität Stuttgart study abroad – architecture + design-build Stuttgart, Germany 2011 - 1012 academic year

Internationales Kulturinstitut study abroad – German language intensive Vienna, Austria Summer 2011

Cor Jesu Academy College Preparatory Fall 2005 - Spring 2009

Employment

Hastings+Chivetta Architects

intern architect – graphics + programming + marketing May 2013 - December 2013

Chesterfield Concessions

cashier + stocker + food preparation 2008 - 2010

Carol Bowman Academy of Dance teaching assistant 2007 - 2009

Honors + Awards Scholarships

Computer Skills

School of Architecture ARCHU/M.Arch Honor Roll – Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010 University of Kansas Honors Program – Fall 2009 - present Amsden Art History Award for outstanding work in an art history course – Fall 2009 AIA St. Louis Scholarship – 2013 - 2014 academic year Robert L. Rosenfeld Scholarship – 2013 - 2014 academic year AIA St. Louis Wischmeyer Scholarship – 2012 - 2013 academic year Donald P. Ewart Memorial Scholarship – 2011 - 2012 academic year Baden-Württemberg Stipendium – 2011 - 2012 academic year J. Gordon Moorman Memorial Scholarship – Fall 2011 Office of Admissions Scholarship – Fall 2009 Adobe Illustrator • Adobe Indesign • Adobe Photoshop • Autodesk 3-D Studio Max • Autodesk Revit • Corel Draw • Google Sketchup • Microsoft Excel • Microsoft PowerPoint • Microsoft Word well-versed in both PC + Macintosh computers


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Culinary Incubator Spring 2O13

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Chicago Lyric Opera

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M1 à la Tour de l’Architect

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Lawrence Public Library

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Performance Pavilion

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Graduate Study Library

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Kit of Parts

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Span

Fall 2O12

Spring 2O12

Spring 2O11

Fall 2O1O

SprIng 2O1O

Spring 2O1O

Fall 2OO9


Culinary Incubator Spring 2O13 Location: Five Points, Denver, Colorado, USA Project Description: Design a culinary incubator community center for the Five Points district. The central focus of my design is the unpredictable and unusual café space. I have drawn on multiple inspirations for its unique form. I hearkened back to grain silos of the plains and farms surrounding Denver for its initial iteration. I then began to derive the shape further, inspired by both the kivas of the local Native American heritage and by the Rocky Mountains so symbolic of Colorado. Furthermore, the glimpses that passersby on Welton Street will get of the café’s peaks are a play on the setback residential eaves that peek out over the storefronts all over the Five Points District. In terms of the lighting and interior feel of the café, I took additional precedence from the kivas previously mentioned. The angular oculus in each of the pockets of the café brings light down into the space in the same way that the oculus in the Native American kivas brought in light. The light becomes an event, tracing its way across the walls and floor of the spaces as the day progresses. The rest of the building sits in stark contrast with the faceted, unique form of the café. It is my hope to take the brick that is so typical of the Five Points and apply it to the façade of the rest of the building. These spaces indicate a less frivolous function than the activity boasted by the café, featuring various shops and public services. So as to even further contrast the café in terms of materiality, I decided to play with the brick in the same way that Office dA did with the Tongxian Gatehouse. This will make the brick masonry seem lighter, further contrasting the heavy monolithic walls enclosing the café.

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The U-shaped plan of the building is designed to envelop the café and adjacent plaza while still allowing sunlight to stream into the central square. Suddenly the most desirable space to be, this plaza will thus become a focal point for community gathering. Its draw comes from the warmth provided by the sunlight, the shelter from outside forces provided by the outer building, and the distinctive character provided by the backdrop of the faceted café walls. The central plaza becomes the hearth of the community building. Here, a number of planters are mixed among outdoor café tables. They are arranged in a way reminiscent of harvest lines stretching off into the distance in the agricultural areas surrounding Denver. This dual function serves the true meaning behind the idea of a culinary incubator—it is where people come to cultivate, sell, and purchase food. It will be a link for the community to connect back to itself and feed revenue and resources back into the neighborhood, as well as a link for the entire city to connect to the Five Points community. It will bring in additional revenue to this reemerging part of Denver, rejuvenating the area by giving its residents something to rally around. By educating the people of the Five Points in healthy, organic eating, the culinary incubator only further serves the community. The benefits of this culinary community center are boundless for the physical, fiscal, communal, and spiritual health of the Five Points District.


Top left: Native American kiva featuring the oculus to bring in sunlight - served as inspiration for the development of the form of the cafĂŠ. Top right: the front of the culinary incubator hearkens back to this neighboring storefront setback of the residential eaves that can be seen throughout the Five Points district Bottom left: brick patterning on the Tongxian Gatehouse by Office dA Bottom right: grain silos setting a backdrop for the grain harvest - my initial cafĂŠ inspiration.

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Top: City of Denver with mountains serving as a dramatic backdrop Bottom: Denver airport with mountains serving as immediate local formal inspiration

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California St

PEDESTRIAN

Welton St

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TRAM LINE

26th St

25th St

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Glenarm Pl

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Tremont Pl


(Opposite Page) site circulation green represents vehicular; purple represents public transit (This Page) concept development Top: the first concept with a central courtyard, putting the garden at the heart of the plan Middle: flipping the plan so that the central courtyard sits on the south end of the site, optimizing sunlight Bottom: creating a backdrop for the central garden courtyard. it began as grain silos, and developed from there.

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Parti

cafÉ as physical and conceptual core 7


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Business Incubator

Food Truck Commisary Kitchen

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Cafe

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Commercial Kitchen


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Level 3 24' - 0"

Think Tank Level 2 12' - 0"

Food Pantry Level 1 0' - 0"

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Level 3 24' - 0"

Level 2 12' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

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Welton Street Elevation (Southeast Elevation) 1/4” = 1’

Welton Street Elevation

26th Street Elevation (Northeast Elevation) 1/4” = 1’

26th Street Elevation

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Level 3 24' - 0"

Level 2 12' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

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0 1’ 3’

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Longitudinal Detail Section

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0 1’ 3’

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SECTIONAL MODEL 15


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SECTIONAL MODEL: Process


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FIRST LEVEL

Trans. Section

Welton Elevation

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Food Pantry

Mechanical

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Wood Shop 26th Elevation

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Storage

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SECOND LEVEL

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Welton Elevation

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Level 2 1/8" = 1'-0"

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Chicago Lyric Opera Fall 2O12 Location: Ogden Plaza, Chicago, Illinois, USA Team: Daniel Allen, Chinonso Ike, Hannah Kramer Project Description: In teams of three, design a new opera house for the Chicago Lyric Opera. Two different site options were available: Wolf Point and Ogden Plaza. My team chose Ogden Plaza because of its location as a more central pedestrian hub. Our focus was on creating a rich auditorium that was subtle enough not to take away from the performance. We accomplished this by lining the walls with rich but darkly-colored wood akin to the Copenhagen Operaen and giving the chairs a dark red velvet material. This dark, rich auditorium contrasted the lighter jewel box lobby area that encased it. Everything about the materiality suggests a gradient from public to private spaces. The diamond windows around the lobby grew smaller and more sparse as the opera house transitioned from public foyer to private backstage. The form of the building with its glass lobby quite literally symbolized the theater as a cultural gem in the city. This jewel would shimmer during the daytime and glow during the nighttime. The terraced plaza designed around adjacent to the opera house created a journey for the opera-goers: the patrons must ascend up toward the pinnacle jewel that is the opera house, the highest point on the site. Lush planter boxes and an urban orchard created interest along this path up to the opera house.

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Site


Top: aerial view from northwest Bottom: aerial view from southeast

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BASEMENT LEVEL

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ENTRANCE LEVEL 123456789-

Mechanical Orchestra Pit Orchestra Lounge Scene Shop Lift Loading Dock Trap Space Instrument Storage Conductor’s Dressing Room 10- Green Room 11- Offices 12- Rehearsal Room 13- Staff Lounge

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14-Restroom 15- Electrical Repair Shop 16- Box Office 17- Boutique 18- Cloak Room 19- Solo Dressing Rooms 20- Dressing Rooms 21- Warm-Up Rooms 22- Prop Shop 23- Storage 24- Chorus Lounge 25- Wig Shop 26- Wardrobe 27- Costume Construction Shop


FIRST BALCONY LEVEL

UPPER BALCONY LEVELS

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Auditorium Section 33


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STUDY ABROAD - STUTTGART, GERMANY DESIGN BUILD - MONTHOIRON, FRANCE

M1 à la Tour de l’Architect spring 2O12 Location: Monthoiron, Poitou-Charentes, France Team: Sean Ahlquist + Julian Lienhard | Markus Bernhard, David Cappo, Celeste Clayton, Oliver Kärtkemeyer, Hannah Kramer, Andreas Schönbrunner Project Description: Adjacent to the site of a historical medieval tower designed by an unnamed but renowned architect, the client requested a structure that would initially serve as the headquarters for the tower’s restoration and eventually act as part of the restored tower’s Visitors’ Center. Dubbed M1, this structure served as a demonstrator, showcasing the technologies being developed at Universität Stuttgart in the Institute for Computational Design (ICD) and the Institute for Building Structure and Structural Design (ITKE) by Sean Ahlquist and Julian Lienhard under Achim Menges and Jan Knippers, respectively. The innovative structural concepts of M1 are spatially and technically oriented to situate a canopy with a minimal exertion of force, but with a maximally articulated spatial presence on the site. This was accomplished, at multiple scales, through a macro-system of interwoven bending rods that form leaf-like shapes, and an internal differentiated cell system installation. The minimally invasive, force-active, articulated material system was a necessity given the closely neighboring and currently very unstable context of the crumbling stone tower. Overall, the material system of M1 explores the structural capacity and formal variability of a lightweight structure comprised of highly elastic rod elements and stiff membrane surfaces. The very nature of the system demanded simultaneous study of how structural equilibrium is formed and determination of the spatial performative capacity of the result. As such, the design methodology was formed to track both articulation of material properties and differentiation of spatial consequences. The final building serves the tower as an exemplification of innovitive structures generated of experimental means, as well as providing fundamental function for meeting and workspace within the complex of buildings as the site undergoes redevelopment. For ongoing research, the building serves as a demonstrative prototype for hybrid force-active structures in their realization, as well as computational design methodologies for their generation. 37


Site Plan_00 | La Tour de l’Architecte

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site information 39

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ENTRANCE GALLERY

CIRCULATION

ENTRANCE GALLERY

CIRCULATION

Top left: site - Monthoiron, France Bottom left: final plan with tower, circulation, and projected location of one of the buried buttress footings Middle: aerial photo of tower + site Right: options for circulation and plan organization

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iterations 41


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Bending Rod Structure 43


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(This Page) Top left: test connection Top right: setup for connection test Bottom left: GFRP fiberglass rods + rubber for added friction + lashing rope Bottom right: setup for connection test (Opposite Page) Top left: lashed connection for footings Top right: tying the lashed connection Middle left: parallel connection for lashing three structural leaves Middle right: bamboo lashing method for connecting two perpendicular rods Bottom left: connection label system

lashing Connections 45

Bottom right: connecting rods + membrane + open-weave mesh


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(This Page) Left: membrane pieces for installation Top right: welding cell connectors onto membrane Bottom right: temporary zip tie connection for fully tensile membrane

Membrane Installation 47

(Opposite Page) while installing the membrane, we took great care not to cause tears or rips before the membrane was fully tensioned


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Deep Surface Cell Construction 49


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Completed Structure 51


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Lawrence Public Library Spring 2O11 Location: Downtown Lawrence, Kansas, USA Project Description: Design a new public library for the city of Lawrence, KS. This studio placed strong emphasis on hand craft — both highquality model making and hand drafting. The focus of this library was community, featuring a children’s reading room, a Langston Hughes special collections reading room, an historical gallery for the underground railroad movement, and a community meeting room. The plaza shape was another community focal point, which I emphasized by creating interest with the trapezoidal shape. I chose to handle the issue of harmful direct lighting in several ways. The clerestory above the lobby filters diffused light down into the atrium and mezzanine level. The screen over the special collections reading room keeps direct light from fading the Langston Hughes Special Collection. The children’s reading room is shaded from direct sunlight by the overhanging special collections. Much of the historical gallery, as well as the computer lab, is glazed with frosted window panes. In order to engage the context, the plaza and library are oriented in such a way that the diagonal outer wall beckons pedestrians from Massachusetts Street — Lawrence’s main downtown avenue — and entices them to approach the community plaza and public library. A nearby parking garage and on-street parking both draw any vehicular traffic nearby as well.

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Top: west elevation Bottom: east elevation

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Top left: upper level of library as seen by the removable roof on the model Top right: detail of reading room screen, which provides a buffer between the room and the plaza and serves to diffuse light into the special collections reading room Bottom left: detail of the variety of options used to bring light into the library and diffuse direct sunlight (clerestory, frosted glass, screens, and transparent fenestration) Bottom right: detail of atrium + mezzanine which serves as the focal point of the interior of the library

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GROUND LEVEL

hand drafted floor plans 59


UPPER MEZZANINE LEVEL

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SECTION A-A’

SECTION B-B’

Hand Drafted Sections + Elevations 61


EAST ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

NORTH ELEVATION

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Performance Pavilion Fall 2O1O Location: Potter Lake, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA Project Description: Provide a performance facility including a pavilion and platform on site at the University of Kansas. The studio was given two site options: Pioneer Cemetery and Potter Lake, both at the University of Kansas. I chose the Potter Lake site for several reasons. Primarily, Potter Lake is a more frequented site, which gives the opportunity for more visibility across the university community. However, more importantly, Potter Lake sits at the bottom of a bowl-like valley — contrasting Poineer Cemetery which sits atop a hill. The topography around Potter Lake offered a chance for the site to envelop the building. To keep consistent with the concept of the site hugging the building, the green roof seeks to join the building with the slope of the hill rising behind it.

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Top: concept 1 - treehouse

Concept Development 65

Bottom: concept 2 - lines of intersrection


Top: concept 3 - colonnade Middle: concept 4 - intersected rectangles, inspired by concept 1 Bottom: precedent - Reitveld Pavilion: sliding planes + rectangles

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mech

indoor performance space

green room

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Graduate Study Library Spring 2O1O Location: Potter Lake, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, USA Team: Jordan Goss, Hannah Kramer Project Description: With a partner, design a small study library for graduate students at the University of Kansas at the heart of campus near Potter Lake. My partner and I decided we wanted to use light to create varying senses of urgency and peace for different parts of the library. Essentially, the design was driven by the idea of a transition of light and space. The first space that occupants encounter is an open space containing bookshelves, backlit by soft diffused light from the channel glass. Overhead is a skylight that highlights the central table, used for organizing research. The narrow transition spaces at the stairs feature louvers and dim lighting that promote a more urgent sense of passage through the space rather than promoting a sense of lingering. The final space encountered is the open reading room that features light streaming in through the ceiling-height window which frames a view out toward the picturesque lake landscape. Opening up to the back half of the building, it becomes the destination of any path through the small library.

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Top: study model 1 - pentagon shape MIddle: emphasis placed on study desks, giving enough space for students to spread out Bottom: separation of intensive study space and relaxed reading space

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Top: study model 2 - separation of stacks space and study space Middle: stacks area Bottom: study area with individual light wells for more private study

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GRADUATE STUDY LIBRARY TRANSITION OF LIGHT + SPACE

(Opposite Page) Top left: site model - Potter Lake at the University of Kansas Top right: stair and louver daylighting detail Middle left: our specific site selection Middle right: desk for private study Bottom left: section model Bottom right: full model

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Kit of Parts Spring 2O1O Location: Island of Santorini, Greece Team: Katie Caufield, Hannah Kramer Project Description: Create a meditation space using a set kit of parts. Additionally, the design must be centered around the procession of Approach, Threshold, and Destination. We were told to design for a blind person in order to consider more than just visual stimuli. My partner and I chose to implement a more tactile stimulus by orienting our space in such a way that the “Destination” side of the parti wall would be warmed by the afternoon sun. However, in order to incorporate visual stimuli as well, we decided to color the wall behind the “destination” space a deep blue that would glow on the “Approach” side of the parti wall. In addition, this blue and white aesthetic reflects the traditional whitewashed stone buildings and blue accents typical of Santorini. As an additional factor of this project, the studio learned how to hand draft perspective drawings, and the final presentation included three different perspectives of the design. These perspectives were to be done twice: once with the sight and perspective lines included and once rendered by hand in the style of each student’s choosing.

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Kit of Parts: Pieces 79


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Span Fall 2OO9 Project Description Part I: The goal of the first part of this project was to teach the first-semester studio how to draft and how to build quality models. We were to choose from a selection of Tony Smith sculptures. The emphasis was on the repeated cellular structure that features prominently in most of his artwork. For my very first studio model, I chose Smith’s Bees Do It as a precedent. The second requirement for this part of the project called for hand-drafted axonometric, plan, and section drawings of the model, expanding the pattern to show a basic understanding of the sculpture’s structure. Team: Adam Brcic, Joseph Chan, Ken Grothman, Hannah Kramer, Brendan Nelson Project Description Part II: After dividing into groups, we then had to choose another Tony Smith sculpture to work with, expanding and interpreting the sculpture’s structural pattern in order to span a set base as a requirement for all groups. As an added challenge, each model had to hold fifteen pounds of plaster for several days. My group chose to take Smith’s Smug and reinterpret the triangular pattern into a space frame. The final model easily held the required weight, suspended from three anchor points held in the center of the structure.

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Bees Do It - Tony Smith

Smug - Tony Smith


(This Page) Top row: my individual model based on Bees Do It Bottom left: charcoal abstraction of the honeycomb cellular structure Bottom middle: 3D axonometric Bottom Right: plan and section (Opposite Page) Top left: the final model was required to hold fifteen pounds of plaster Top right: the group’s initial design inspiration based on Smug Middle row: close-ups of the modified triangular structure

learning to draft and build models 85

Bottom left: mylar was used to highlight added structural support on the base Bottom right: expansion of initial model


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Academic Architecture Portfolio  

Hannah Kramer - Portfolio - University of Kansas - Masters of Architecture 2014

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