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HANNAH JANE BROWN University of Virginia Master’s of Landscape Architecture | 2022 hjb8ma@virginia.edu | 540 808-5273

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Soil “sections” at Observatory Hill Foundation Studio 1 | Fall 2019


CONTENTS RESUME STUDIO

COURSEWORK

PROFESSIONAL

1 Re-composition

3

Studies of the Rivanna

14

Trace

18

Tactical Wellness

21

Winter Works

26

Ode to Albers

31

Chidori Table

35

Biocultural Farm

39

Jones & Jones

42


HANNAH JANE BROWN EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA | School of Architecture Master of Landscape Architecture Candidate | 2019 - Present

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON | College of Built Environments One year of M.Arch + MLA program before transferring to UVA | 2017 - 2018

STANFORD UNIVERSITY | School of Engineering Bachelor of Science in Sustainable Engineering Design | 2012 - 2016

EXPERIENCE OAK SPRING GARDEN FOUNDATION | Interim Farm Manager Upperville, VA | February 2018 - June 2019 I was responsible for all aspects of starting the Biocultural Conservation Farm, from comprehensive planning to developing critical infrastructure. Additionally, I cultivated 1.75 acres, growing heirloom vegetables and herbs.

OAK SPRING GARDEN FOUNDATION | Intern Upperville, VA | November 2018 - February 2019 I worked with the Land Management team on restoration projects, including reforestation, meadow installation, pruning, and trail system development. I also created graphic and written materials, including a trail map.

JONES & JONES | Intern Seattle, WA | June 2018 - September 2018 I developed and refined construction set drawings for the Ballard Locks project, updated as-builts from on-site measurements, and completed illustrative sets for clients representing concepts, plans, sections, and project narratives.

BERREY HILL FARM | Farm Apprentice Madison, VA | March 2017 - September 2017 I gained experience across all aspects of farm work and management.

U.S. GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL | Schneider Fellow Washington, D.C. | June 2016 - September 2016 As a fellow, I studied the climate and social equity benefits of green infrastructure. I analyzed the use of green infrastructure practices in climate action plans. Ultimately, I developed a policy brief with recommendations for green infrastructure best practices and five articles for the USGBC blog.

KIGALI FARMS | Project Consultant Stanford, CA and Kigali, Rwanda | January 2016 - September 2016 Through Design for Extreme Affordability, I worked on a team assisting cooperatives of mushroom farmers in Rwanda achieve higher yields and smooth variable incomes through the design of a more affordable growhouse.

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hjb8ma@virginia.edu ADDITIONAL EXPERIENCE NELSON BYRD WOLTZ| Externship Charlottesville, VA | January 2020

RESEARCH LANDSCAPE STUDIES INITIATIVE | Research Assistant Charlottesville, VA | January 2019 - Present

RECOGNITION Landscape Architecture Departmental Merit Scholarship University of Virginia | 2019 - 2022 Selected Student Work | CELA Conference Selected for Design Computation 1 work “Generative Landforms” University of Virginia | 2019 Schneider Fellow| U.S. Green Building Council Stanford University | 2016

INVOLVEMENT Student Association of Landscape Architecture and Design University of Virginia | August 2019 - Present Fabrication Lab | Teaching Assistant University of Virginia | August 2019 - January 2019

CAPABILITIES CONCEPTUAL

Human centered design methodology, sustainable building practices, writing and research, physical modeling, prototyping

DIGITAL

ArcGIS, AutoCAD, Rhino, Adobe Creative Suites (Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign), Grasshopper

PHYSICAL

Laser cutting, 3D printing, woodworking, welding, CNC routing, wheel-thrown ceramics, sewing

AGRICULTURE & HORTICULTURE

Ecological agriculture, pruning, crop planning, raising pastured poultry, arboricultural knowledge, strong familiarity with Virginia native plants and ecoregions

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STUDIO


RECOMPOSITION Observatory Hill, Charlottesville, VA Foundation Studio 1 | with Leena Cho University of Virginia

Recomposition proposes a natural burial site on the perceived “back-side” of Observatory Hill that will allow for the re-entanglement of humans in nutrient cycling post-mortem. The burial takes the form of a field of sinuous mounds, punctuated with spaces for rituals and gatherings. Due to the profound impact of animal decomposition on forest structure and type, the reconstitution of the body is registered by ever-evolving successional communities. Far from the static and sterile (yet toxic) cemeteries of today, this burial site celebrates regeneration. My proposal deviates from the prompt which asked for a sequence of experiences designed around interactions with another species. I was driven to reinterpret the sordid legacy of medical cadavers being illegally buried at Observatory Hill to study how humans influence other species in the “after” life.

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Burial mounds and plantings: the presence of flowers in funerial practices worldwide was a driver to create year-round interest and color through planted form

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5


Dying in the anthropocene: critiquing available options in light of environmental and cultural challenges

Animal decomposition: how does it impact plant communities?

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The logistics of natural burial: livestock composting literature informed by understanding of natural burial requirements and key factors.

7


Phasing: conceptual, experiential, and spatial studies

BURIAL MOUND SUCCESSION AND PHASING DIAGR

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Burial mound form and phasing: the illustrated mound demonstrates two emergent post-burial plant communities, as well as a portion being preparation for upcoming burial VISITATION: tending the grave leaving flowers

VISITATION: BURIAL: tending the grave leaving flowers synthetic, highly

removed

VISITATION: tending the landscape planting flowers

VISITATION: tending the landscape planting flowers

BURIAL: more intimate, personal

VISITATION: tending the grave leaving flowers

VISITATION: tending the landscape planting flowers

VISITATION: tending the grave leaving flowers

BURIAL: highly synthetic, removed

RAM

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Landform iterations: Combining site-specific natural burial requirements and archetypal burial forms Models made by casting plaster in CNC-routed formwork

earliest burials

earliest burials

successional gap

planting creates less programme spaces as well

successional gap

pla cre les pro spa wel

gathering space

gathering space

planted trees screen water tower view, allow mountain view planted trees screen water tower view, allow mountain view

existing unpaved road

existing unpaved road

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Future site plan: Imagining the evolution of spontaneous growth and planned plantings over time

valley leads to existing trails

gathering space

earliest burials

anting eates ss ogrammed aces as ll gathering space

successional gap gathering space

most recent burials eastern red cedar, ironwood, and dogwood

mountain view

existing organic material storage

old dump site; remaining garbage removed american beech and eastern red cedar planted to shield water tower

parking

water tower

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Valley gathering space: a private space that offers the experience of descending “underground�

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Ridge gathering space: A spatially and visually open and connected space for group rituals

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STUDIES OF THE RIVANNA Riverview Park, Charlottesville, VA Summer Design Institute | with Brad Cantrell, Emma Mendel, Katie Stranix University of Virginia

Through this set of one-week exercises, I was given the opportunity to obsess over the Rivanna River, studying it through multiple lenses, mediums, and scales. The first exercise combined on-site observations and drawing with analytical mapping to create a series of notational drawings that tease apart ecological phenomena and processes. The second exercise proposes a public park across the Rivanna. The park concept comes from an exploration of the pyramid of functional lift, with each node representing a stage preceding biological function.

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Studying ecological systems at Riverview Park through notational drawings. Hand drawn on trace and mylar, with Linnea Laux.

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Understanding the Rivanna as a “biologically degraded” river: conceptualizing interventions at each stage of functional lift

Hydrology

Functional Lift

USFWS: http://www.fws.gov/chesapeakebay/newsletter/Fall11/Pyramid/Pyramid.html

SECTION PERSPECTIVE Map and section were produced with Sean Geygan.

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SECTION PERSPECTIVE Spatializing functional lift : Creating forms that actively alter and make visible stages of functional lift.

0’

50’

150’

350’

SITE PLAN NODE

NODE

HYDROLOGY

HYDRAULIC

HYDROLOGY

HYDRAULIC

NODE: PHYSIOCHEMICAL

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TRACE

Judkins Park, Seattle, WA ARCH Foundation Studio 2 | with Peter Cohan and Gundula Proksch University of Washington The concept for this project arose from a rumination on “trace” which eventually shaped a proposed site intervention and initial architectural forms. As a verb, “trace” implies an active reimagination of found artifacts. My initial site intervention began as a series of abstract, parallel walls tracing the historic lot divisions revealed by old insurance maps. Taking the form of gabion walls, these traces emerge as the walls of buildings, subtle garden edges, and benches before receding back into the landscape. Though subtle, the power of these traces is in their repetition — they introduce a rigor and datum to the site. Like the warp on a loom, the program and gardens weave them together.

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Indoor / outdoor rooms: The stone “traces� unite interior spaces with programmed outdoor gardens.

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Layered site histories: from neighborhood to landfill to park

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Historic photos from the City of Seattle park


TACTICAL WELLNESS

Capitol Hill, Seattle, WA ARCH Foundation Studio 3| with Elizabeth Golden and Rick Mohler University of Washington Sitting adjacent to Cal Anderson Park in a rapidly gentrifying Seattle neighborhood, the Wellness Hub draws on the neighborhood’s storied history and its unique character and creativity to create a space that is distinctly “Capitol Hill.” The Wellness Hub’s character is that of an unfinished building. The building takes cues from tactical urbanism (also known as guerilla urbanism or popup urbanism). Exposed and rugged, the building retains a DIY, in-progress aesthetic experience meant to promote adaptation and informal uses. I interpreted the given program to better serve the existing community’s needs. A laundromat café addresses needs of the homeless population while adding a coffee counter and ping pong tables to create a novel and delighful space. The changing rooms are designed to serve this queer neighborhood; the changing nook is lined with lockers, has two genderneutral bathrooms as well as 30 individual shower/changing rooms.

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Distinctly Capitol Hill: looking to tactical urbanism precedents to inspire a community space by and for the people

From The Villager

San Anton Pavilion MAAN | Maximillian Nowotka

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Building systems and spatial experience: mass, frame, and skin combine to create an “in-progress� aesthetic while still allowing for private moments

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Building as playground: Imagining potential uses and additions to the frame

Developing a spatial logic: program in relation to street-level conditions

LAUNDROMAT KITCHEN

LAUNDROMAT DRESSING ROOMS

OFFICES

COURT

COURT METRO

PARK “STAGE”

RACQUETBALL

LAUNDROMAT CAFE

LAUNDRY

WC

KITCHEN

WC

DESK OFFICES

WC EGRESS

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EGRESS


Private to public: private spaces are situated within the concrete mass, while public spaces occupy voids in the frame

GALLERY+ ART SPACE

CHILL ZONE

TRACK SAUNA

YOGA

YOGA

HANGOUT

TRACK

GALLERY

WHIRLPOOL

YOGA STUDIO

YOGA STUDIO

SAUNA

STRETCHING PLATFORM

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26

COURSEWORK


WINTER WORKS

Observatory Hill, Charlottesville, VA Design Computation 1 | with Zihao Zhang University of Virginia This three-week, exploratory project considers the off-season, seeking to better understand how the winter impacts the growing season. It explores freeze-thaw cycles, the ephemeral topographies of snow, and urban management patterns to better understand how one might better predict and design with the off-season. Modeling was vital to this exploration. Both test models and illustrative models were key to understanding how to better comprehend and represent winter landscapes.

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Speculating on ephemeral, delayed, and useful impacts of winter landscapes

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Testing: ice melt, freeze, and thaw timelapse study of xeric, clay, and mesic soils from Observatory Hill. Made with Jamie Hark.

Melt timelapse

Thaw timelapse

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Representing the forms and processes of winter Models made of rockite, various soils, plaster, glycerin, and baking soda

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30


HOMAGE TO THE CIRCLE San Francisco, CA Color, Light and Space| with Beverly Cho Stanford University

This installation drew inspiration from Josef Albers’ manipulations of color, light and form to challenge intuitive understandings. Four frames running in a series lead the viewer’s eyes toward the window at the end of the room. Each frame is woven with string to create the negative shape of a circle. When viewed from the entrance, these concentric circles expand, lighten, and desaturate as they approach the light. For this project, I was part of a team of four.

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Modeling and making: We used Rhino to model the parametric weaving and created many mock-ups to get the weaving patterns down before the final installation.

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34


CHIDORI TABLE

Processes of Manufacturing| with Dave Beach Stanford University This table is an exploration of traditional manufacturing practices in furniture making that evaluates the role of craft as furniture becomes more modular. Taking inspiration from chidori, traditional Japanese joinery, this project attempts to find a middle ground between fluidity and durability. The table is comprised of eight welded, steel joints which mimic the functionality of a chidori joint by emphasizing linear directionality in three perpendicular planes. The structure does not require any fasteners; each of the redwood pieces is sized to fit into the metal joints.

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Inspiration to prototype: adopting precedents to metal processes

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Making: welded square steel tubing , powdercoated. Fitted with redwood lumber. No fasteners or adhesives were used.

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PROFESSIONAL


JONES & JONES Summer Intern | 2017 Seattle, WA

As an intern at Jones & Jones, I worked on both the architectural and landscape sides of on-going projects. My work primarily focused on the Ballard Locks Renovation project, which is now currently underway. The renovation will transform the salmon ladder viewing room into an accessible and informative space. I worked with the project manager on all aspects of the design, from digitizing and verifying as-builts, to developing concepts for commemorative sculpture, to creating detailing and framing plans for bench seating. I was a key team member in producing the construction set for the Locks project. In addition, during my time at Jones & Jones, I also worked on the Dublin Zoo project creating illustrative drawings for client meetings.

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Ballard Locks construction set

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Illustrative plans for the Dublin Zoo

G r e y W o l f H a b i tat P l a n

A

neW Grey Wolf H o l D i n G (50 m 2 )

B

D D

C

Grey Wolf o f f -v i e W H a b i tat 480m 2

caScaDe Stone leDGe

OPEN MEADOW

DENSE FOREST

DENSE FOREST

Grey Wolf H a b i tat a r e a 1 7 50 m 2 S H a l lo W Pool

bone cacHe

rocky outcroPS

+Wl 30.5

Wolf P a S S -t H r u

caScaDe

Den

v i e W S H e lt e r

oPen vieW

B

exHibit fence PeoPle barrier

v i e W S H e lt e r

r e ta i n i n G Wall

C

v i e W S H e lt e r

D

G r e y W o l f H a bD i t a t S e c t i o n S Section c

exi StinG beec H (be yon D)

NO RTH

2.10m

A

Habitat barrier

0

5

10

15 m

bone c ac He

Dublin Zoo

ARCHITECTS L A N D S C A P E A R C H I T E CT S PLANNERS

J u ly 2 0 1 8

G r e y W o l f H a b i tat S e c t i o n S

Grey Wolf HolDinG builDinG floorPlan Section c

anD

PatH & vie WinG SHelter

SectionS

Habitat

HolDinG

Hu S b a nD ry co r r iD o r

2 . 1 0m

W o lv eS Den 2 8.5

PatH & vie WinG SHelter

m2

21.5

e xH i b i t barrier

Se r v i c e

Habitat

o u t Do o r Ho l D i nG ya rD

vieo WinG G rPatH e y &W l f H o l D i n G bHabitat u i l D i n G f l o o r P HolDinG l a n a n DSerSvice ectionS SHelter

e x iSt i nG co n i f e r

limeStone re taininG Wall

c a Sc a De

1 4 . 5 mmeSH 2 WooD/ fence Gabion Wall

Habitat barrier

bone c acHe

Section D

c a Sc a De

W o lv eS Den 1 exi StinG beec H (be yon D)

Ser vice

Section D

W o lv eS De n 3

m2

19.5

foo D P reP

m2

e l e vat i o n

Plan

He at mat

HuSban Dry corriD or c aS c aDe

c aSc a De Woo D/me SH fence Gabion Wall

exi StinG conifer

WolveS Den 1 14.5

limeS tone re tainin G Wall

WolveS D en 2 8.5

PatH & vie WinG SHelter

Ser vice

Habitat

De n 3

Section

e l eDe vat n 2i o n

m2

outDoor Hol Din G yarD 21.5

f o oD PreP

m2

ex Hibit barrier

Den 1

Plan

WolveS D en 3

m2

19.5

outDoor H o l Di n G ya rD

ARCHITECTS L A N D S C A P E A R C H I T E CT S PLANNERS

Den 2

Section

f o oD Pr e P

m2

HuS banD ry corri Dor

Heat mat

ARCHITECTS L A N D S C A P E A R C H I T E CT S PLANNERS

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BIOCULTURAL FARM For Oak Spring Garden Foundation Upperville, VA

While at Oak Spring Garden Foundation, I served as Interim Farm Manager, managing the startup of the Biocultural Conservation Farm and the hand-off to the permament farm manager. In this role, I researched and developed a comprehensive spatial and programming strategy for the farm. With the incoming farm manager, I developed an 18-month plan and budget. My design for the farm includes a seed saving plot, a perennial food forest, a forest farming plot, and a “CSA� for Oak Spring visiting scholars and artists. During my time as Interim Farm Manager, I also cultivated half an acre of vegetables and herbs, piloted the CSA produce box, and established a key relationship with Virginia Food Works to begin canning Oak Spring’s abundant vegetables and fruit. After developing a field program and layout, I plowed, tilled, and planted an additional one and a half acres in cover crops. Developing critical infrastructure was an important part of my role. With the maintenance team, I developed plans and budgets for a packhouse, fencing, irrigation, and a greenhouse conversion, all of which are now complete.

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A weekly harvest headed to the Artists in Residence

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Whole farm planning: Considering existing conditions and future needs.

blue ridge mountains

ashby gap

A

B

D

J

walled garden

A

(future) forest botanicals test plots

F 44

perennial food forest

B thematic plantings C old stud barn converted int G + H annual production plantings I grape vine


A

C F

D

G

E I

H

K

upper fields

to pack house

J

D

E

1930’s glass greenhouses

thematic plantings: living exhibits

K

cold frames to be converted to strawberry boxes

historic perennial flowers and herbs

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Field layout and preparation: Tilling, cover cropping, alley cropping, and soil solarization were used in different areas in response to existing conditions and future planting needs.

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Growing (from top left): Thematic plantings based on library materials, food for the kitchen and guests, pioneering organic methods on existing fruit crops, medicinals and herbals

Updating infrastructure: Renovating the energy-intensive old greenhouses into passively heated, year-round growing spaces

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Flood frequency and vegetation density Summer 2019

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Profile for Hannah Jane Brown

Hannah Jane Brown | MLA 2022 | Portfolio  

Hannah Jane Brown | MLA 2022 | Portfolio  

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