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HANNAH HIRZEL DESIGN PORTFOLIO


HANNAH HIRZEL hirzel.hannah@gmail.com / 419.308.3498


CONTENTS SELECTED ACADEMIC WORK

PUNCTURED PRIVACY 04 CO-LAB 14 CRAFTED OPERATION 24 CHAMBER 30 HISTORIC EXPANSION 36 GROWING MACHINE 42

ADDITIONAL WORK

SELECTED RESEARCH INTERN WORK 48 SELECTED PROFESSIONAL WORK 50 SKETCHES & PHOTOGRAPHY 52


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P U N C T U R E D P R I VA C Y Urban Bathhouse in Portland, OR Studio Instructor: Chris Brown Fall 2017 / Graduate Level Studio A bath house is inherently split into two parts of equal program that work in tandem to each other without intersecting. My punctured privacy concept explores how these two spaces can be separate but equal and create moments of intersection. The third and fourth floors contain the key moments of intersection, where the warm soaking spaces puncture into the sauna and cold soaking spaces of the opposite gender [and vice versa]. The moments of interaction are expressed through semi-transparent walls, where one can sense movement and activity on the opposite side without getting a full visual. A series of punches through the floors help connect the spaces vertically. As these punches slip back and forth, their overlapping spaces are captured by a refracting light well. The light well travels from the rooftop to the washing spaces and filters natural light into the building. As the concept expresses the relationship of the “leftover� spaces to the main spaces, the light wells reinforce the overlapping, puncturing program.

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NW 2ND AVE.

NW 3RD AVE.

NW COUCH ST.

W BURNSIDE ST.

Site Plan

MODELING THE PROBLEM

Analysis of the site, the traditional Japanese Sento bathhouse, and how those two things fit together in a modern context: These four models represent four probable issues in which to grapple through the design process. ACTIVITY MAPPING representing the level of activity throughout the day in the bathhouse itself and the surrounding site; BOTTLENECK showing the lack of access to the long, narrow

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site. Everything must come and go through one facade; WAVERING TRANSPARENCY symbolizing the illusion of transparency between spaces. Modeled to give moments of visual connection between spaces; MOMENT OF OVERLAP diagramming the large amount of program needed to fit in a very small state. Two spaces overlap, creating a third condition.


CONCEPT

Two equal but opposite programmatic spaces puncture one another and define space within the other. The interstitial space resulting from the puncturing volumes become mixing zones and places for interaction.

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BALCONY

RESTROOM

OFFICE

STORAGE

MECHANICAL

MEN’S CHANGING

RESTROOM

MEN’S WASHING RESTROOM

GATHERING

ELEVATOR MECH. ROOM

WOMEN’S CHANGING

STORAGE

LINEN CLOSET LOBBY

OPEN TO BELOW

LAUNDRY RECEPTION

CAFE

RESTROOM

Basement Level

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WOMEN’S WASHING

RESTROOM

First Level

Second Level

STORAGE


MECH.

BALCONY

STORAGE

MEN’S COLD SOAKING MEN’S SAUNA

MEN’S HOT SOAKING

OPEN TO BELOW

MEN’S CHANGING

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

SEMI-PRIVATE GATHERING SEMI-PRIVATE GATHERING

GATHERING

GATHERING

MEN’S WARM SOAKING

WOMEN’S WARM SOAKING

WOMEN’S COLD SOAKING

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

OPEN TO BELOW

WOMEN’S CHANGING

WOMEN’S HOT SOAKING WOMEN’S SAUNA

BALCONY

Third Level

BALCONY

Fourth Level

Fifth Level

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MEN’S HOT SOAKING

MEN’S HOT SOAKING

CHANGING

MEN’S CHANGING

WOMEN’S HOT SOAKING

CHANGING

MEN’S WARM SOAKING BALCONY

MEN’S WARM SOAKING MEN’S WARM SOAKING

MEN’S SAUNA

WOMEN’S SAUNA

WOMEN’S WARM SOAKING

WOMEN’S WARM SOAKING

WOMEN’S WARM SOAKING

MEN’S WASHING

MEN’S SAUNA

MENS WASHING

WOMEN’S WASHING

BALCONY

CHANGING

LOBBY OFFICES

RESTROOM

LOBBY

RESTROOM

LAUNDRY MECHANICAL

Section A

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STORAGE

LINEN CLOSET

MECHANICAL

Section B


West Elevation

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Photographs of 1/4� scale interior space models

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CO-LAB A Vision Plan for Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resource Laboratory at The Ohio State University; Columbus, OH Studio Instructors: Andrew Cruse, Kristi Cheramie, Paula Meirjerink Combined Architecture & Landscape Architecture Studio, Landscape Architecture Team Members: Katherine Beaton, Sean McNulty, Katie Pettee, Dominique Raymond Spring 2016 / Undergraduate Level Studio Research is represented on a variety of platforms that range in levels of privacy. Waterman Agricultural and Natural Resource Laboratory offers a unique site to explore this gradient of public to private research. Space is organized according to this gradient, giving way to public space, outdoor test plots, Co-Lab spaces, private outdoor plots, to private research laboratories. These Co-Lab spaces encourage collaboration among cross-disciplinary research. The design capitalizes on these conditions to encourage horizontal thinking across disciplines and allow public interaction with research. The gradient of spaces available are made comfortable through the use of harnessing summer and winter winds, as well as sun patterns.

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A N A LY Z I N G W AT E R M A N

MEGA MODEL

Before beginning work on a plan moving forward, the studio as a whole built a 16’ x 16’ model of the site in order to analyze and define the research and work currently being done there. The model takes a more systematic and diagrammatic approach, as opposed to a traditional site model. Many layers and scales were used to show the hierarchy of elements and activities happening on Waterman. The model shows who engages with the site and how often, as well as the different types of research being done on the agricultural test plots, apple orchard, and dairy cows.

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t Use

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ura Agricult

Age Prog ressio

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Cow s

ard Orch

Co ws /Cro p

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used

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testin

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S Y S T E M S AT W O R K

This graphic of a portion of the site focuses on the dairy barns, apple orchard, and agricultural test plots. I have identified a few of the most important “systems� occurring on the current site. The relationship between the crops and the dairy cows, for instance, is an important cyclical system on the farm. The crops are raised to feed the cows, then the cows create waste which is used to fertilize the crops.

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UPPER ARLINGTON

NESTLED PRIVATE RESEARCH

KENNY RD. HYDROLOGY SYSTEMS CLASSROOMS, LABS, & CO-LABS OUTDOOR COLLABORATIVE SPACES

PUBLIC RECREATIONAL SPACES

LANE AVE.

FRED BEEKMAN PARK

OSU MAIN


PRIVATE RESEARCH LABS

PRIVATE OUTDOOR TEST PLOTS PRIVATE OUTDOOR TEST PLOTS

CO-LAB CO-LABS OSU CLASSROOMS & LOUNGES CLASSROOMS CONFERENCE ROOMS

PRIVATE RESEARCH LABS

RESEARCH GRADIENT

PRIVATE PRIVATE

Z OUTDOOR OUTDOOR ACCESSIBLE ACCESSIBLE TEST PLOTS TEST PLOTS

RESEARCH GRADIENT

JUNE 21

PUBLIC PUBLIC

PUBLIC SPACE PUBLIC SPACE

Y

X

12:00 PM

2:00 PM

10:00 AM

WINDS FROM THE NORTHWEST COOLCOOLER WINDS FROM THE NORTHWEST

M I C R O C L I M AT E S BER 21 DECEM

4:00 PM

Because the scope of research being done on Waterman is so broad, the new vision plan includes a wide variety of spaces to conduct research. The organization of these research spaces is driven by privacy. The southeast corner of the site is most public, due to its proximity to campus and the public park across the street. This area becomes useful for research that involves the public, and showcases some of the work being done on the land. Moving further back into the site, the research plots become increasingly more private by the way the land is formed and foliage is arranged. The gradient of privacy works its way back to the most secluded types of research, where confidential labs house sensitive research material.

12:00 PM 10:00 AM

2:00 PM

8:00 AM

N CAMPUS 5:00 AM

Topography plays a large role in defining the spaces on this expansive site. By using a cut and fill method to reshape the topography, the wind and sun can be directed to create microclimates. Lower cut channels funnel warm southwest winds across the public areas to create a more comfortable environment, while the forested areas and mounds block cold winds from the northwest.

9:00 PM

WARM WINDS FROM THE SOUTHWEST WARM WINDS FROM THE SOUTHWEST

THESIS

11:00 PM 12:00 AM

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Private Rooftop Research Garden

Semi-Public Workspace Greenhouses for climate-controlled agricultural research

LEVELS OF PRIVACY

The built element on the Waterman campus houses classrooms, offices, a variety of research workspaces, and a collaborative laboratory, called the co-lab. The privacy gradient that has been implemented into the overall vision plan of the site is also incorporated into the design of the building. The level of privacy is increased on the Z-axis. The ground level contains classrooms and gathering spaces for people across the university and community. The interior spaces become increasingly more private as one meanders up through the building. The bar of collaborative lab spaces is the threshold between the accessible and private labs.

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Publ


Private Indoor/Outdoor Workspace

Greenhouses for climate-controlled agricultural research

Semi-Private Indoor/Outdoor Workspace Collaborative Lab Spaces

Public Workspace

Public Classrooms

lic Classrooms and Offices

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Levels of Thermal Control High Moderate Low

SITE-DRIVEN FORM

The building is tucked into the topography to take advantage of the insulation from the ground and splits open to funnel airflow through the indoor/outdoor workspaces.

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THERMAL ZONES

Containing a variety of research spaces is accomplished by varying the thermal qualities of the spaces. For some researchers experimenting in an agricultural field, control over the thermal environment is important as the temperatures change outside the building. For others, an outdoor space with natural light and fresh air is crucial to their research. This building accommodates for both needs. When these areas of high and low thermal control overlap, a new research environment is created.

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C R A F T E D O P E R AT I O N Craft Brewery in Cincinnati, OH Studio Instructor: Jackie Gargus Fall 2014 / Undergraduate Level Studio Located in a newly revitalized Cincinnati neighborhood, this urban craft brewery marks the corner of Race and Findlay. Both streets have fairly heavy automobile, bus, and bike traffic, making the corner a hard edge between destination and circulation. The opposite corner of the site faces Findlay market, a popular weekend destination. These factors indicate visitors to the brewery will be coming from all directions. Rather than having a “front” and “back,” this building needed to be iconic and welcoming from almost all sides. Opposite ends of the building offset each other. The street corner edge pulls away and forms a voided patio as the market corner is pulled up, creating a beacon of glass displaying the brewing tanks. The building is combining production and consumption, as a brewery and restaurant built into one. The process of creating beer is put on display throughout the building. From Findlay Avenue, the beer hall and brewing tanks can be seen through one transparent axis longitudinally across the building.

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B

A

First Level Plan with Surrounding Site

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OPEN TO BELOW

Second Level Plan

Third Level Roof Plan

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Section A

Section B

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Starts as two separate entities: Production & Consumption of beer

Spine connects the two programmatic spaces and serves as the viewing corridor for brewery tours

Production & Consumption spaces split to form a small entrance courtyard facing Findlay Market. Brewery production grows vertically to account for large machinery

Public plaza is created as building pulls away from the street corner, creating a welcoming entrance

Corner mass created by plaza void grows upward to create a private party room on top level and allows for remaining roof surface to become an elevated beer garden

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CHAMBER Hanging Gallery Installation Studio Instructor: Kristy Balliet Team Members: Lane Autry, Michael Corbitt, Matthew Hayes, Skyla Leavitt Spring 2013 / Undergraduate Level Studio *Selected for the Knowlton School Student Archives In this somewhat conceptual project, we were tasked with creating a gallery space that hangs from the ceiling. The main focus of the project was designing and constructing the 3’x3’x2’ hanging chamber. The massing of this “room” is especially important. The form consists of a rectangular prism shell with a second rectangular prism inside, but offset so when hanging, the interior floor space is flat, but the exterior shell hangs asymmetrically. Being a gallery, we created spaces for items to be on display. These spaces were created by puncturing through the prisms at a variety of angles. The result is a void on the exterior and an object on the interior. The void, marked with green in the model, becomes the “shelf” for holding gallery items. The excess poche of the object piercing in becomes storage space. These punctures occur on all six sides of the prism in order to distort the typology of a gallery where pieces are hung on the wall. The objects come through the floor ceiling and walls at a variety of angles and sizes to curate views and create a different experience with each one.

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Interior model photographs

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Small scale form models to explore positive and negative space

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H I S T O R I C E X PA N S I O N Renovation & Addition to Hale Hall at The Ohio State University; Columbus, OH Studio Instructor: Kay Bea Jones Spring 2015 / Undergraduate Level Studio Hale Hall is home to the office of diversity and inclusion and the black cultural center at The Ohio State University. Running out of room and lacking an identity of its own, Hale Hall needed a renovation of its existing historic building as well as additional space. My design creates a pedestrian axis that respects the original framework plan of the campus and existing circulation patterns. This exterior path slices between the buildings, draws people into the space and allows them to feel the presence of the building without even entering. Part of my addition to Hale Hall nestles itself onto the corner of the existing building, and the other sits as a detached building. The attached section contains spaces to be used by students on a day to day basis. The detached building contains an auditorium for larger meetings or events, with administrative offices above. The existing structure is renovated to in order to create a more conducive space for student gathering, studying, and interaction between students and staff. The design of the new addition is driven by the desire to bring the community into Hale Hall. The auditorium is multifunctional for larger events and the reception space encourages more informal gatherings and mingling as it is flooded with natural light and views of the beautiful south oval.

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Ground Level Plan

UP

Lower Level Plan

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GROWING MACHINE Transformable Public Space Studio Instructor: Justin Diles Fall 2015 / Undergraduate Level Studio The Growing Machine is a destination designed for the people of an urban area. Tasked with creating a transitional space meant for public use, I created a vertically transformable garden and marketplace. Using a hydraulic system to move the support poles up and down, the space is converted into five different arrangements that serve different functions. In the colder months when plants are not being grown, the roof comes all the way down to the ground, enclosing the structure and creating a seating area. The system then moves upward, exposing planting troughs and versatile counter space beneath. Depending on the height of these elements, the space transforms from a planting, working, and teaching space, to a small marketplace of buying and selling. In an urban setting, this space serves as a teaching ground for people to learn about planting and producing their own food.

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Section A: Complete Closed Structure

Section B: Complete Open Structure

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Fully enclosed system creates outdoor seating space.

Lifted roof with planting troughs still suspended at the ceiling height creates an open, covered, versatile meeting space.

Planting troughs come down to establish a work space for planting, watering, and weeding, making a classroom-like setting.

Different levels of planting troughs can be adjusted separately from one another to create easy access and a comfortable workspace.

Planting troughs can rise back up to the ceiling level to make space for people to stand and sell their goods. Thin planes are then pulled up from the floor to be counter space to display and sell fruits and vegetables grown in the planting troughs.

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1:100 scale model with 3D printed roof structure

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SELECTED RESEARCH INTERN WORK During the spring of 2016, I was hired by professor Kay Bea Jones to create drawings to coincide with her sabbatical research. The basis of the research was the Olivetti typewriter company located in Ivrea, Italy, and the great architecture that resulted from it. The Olivetti company has a long history of caring and providing for its employees. Because of this, a community of avant garde, modern buildings arose. Adriano Olivetti, the president of the company from the 1930s to 1960, hired some of Italy’s finest architects to design apartments, schools, childcare facilities, medical clinics, libraries, and factories with plenty of natural light. The Olivetti workers lived in these communities designed with the human quality of life in mind. My task was to draw the plans and sections for some of these buildings to better understand the

sequence of spaces in these highly geometric buildings. Pictured below is the canteen, where the workers would eat. It also includes leisure areas for workers to rest, read, or play games. The hexagonal shape of the building nestles itself into the hillside and follows the surrounding topography. Pictured on the right is the Social Center, which housed offices of social services for the people of the community, as well as a medical clinic and library. The hinged structure torques in plan, dividing the building in two. The warm climate of Ivrea drove the design of many occupiable, covered outdoor spaces. Both buildings included here have balcony spaces that block the harsh, hot sunlight but allow circulation on the exterior of the building.

The Canteen Ground Level Plan Architect: Ignazio Gardella Built: 1953

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M F

10 20

20 40

60

Social Center 2nd Level Plan

Social Center 1st Level Plan M F

10 20

20 40

60

Social Center Ground Level Plan Architects: Luigi Figini & Gino Pollini Built: 1959

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SELECTED PROFESSIONAL WORK / MKC ARCHITECTS

Two Tenant Option: Level 1

CARRIAGE HOUSE RENOVATION

The carriage house of the Seneca Hotel in downtown Columbus has sat empty for quite some time, and is now being advertised as available office space. I was tasked with creating floor plans and renderings for the two level space. The design is ideal for highly collaborative businesses, as it houses a variety of semiprivate meeting areas and large open desk space. The building can occupied by two different tenants, or one making use of both levels. The renderings display views of both options and highlight how the exposed brick and refinished old wooden floors can be incorporated into a professional, modern workplace.

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Two Tenant Option: Level 2

TINY HOUSE

The client originally had an existing metal roof over a concrete slab with the wish to turn it into a livable enclosed space. With the main house located on the other side of 250 acres of rural land, the client imagines this structure as an entertaining space and guest quarters. The movable glass walls are perfect for entertaining as they open up to the patio space and constitute more occupiable space. Inspired by the “tiny house� trend, the design includes many smaller versions of appliances and spaces in order to make a functional living space. At only 500 square feet, including a lofted sleeping area, the tiny house is small, but creates a unique spot for one or two people to enjoy.


2nd Level Plan

1st Level Plan Meeting/Conference Private Office Open Office

One Tenant Option: Entrance Lobby

Primary Working Spaces

Lobby/Reception Kitchen/Supply Room IT/Mechanical/Restrooms

Secondary Supporting Spaces

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Maison Louis Carré: Bazoches-sur-Guyonne, France

Maison Carrée: Nimes, France

Château d’Azay-le-Rideau: Azay-Le- Rideau, France

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Walden 7 Housing: Barcelona, Spain

Arcade: Brussels, Belgium


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THANK YOU.

Hannah Hirzel_Design Portfolio  
Hannah Hirzel_Design Portfolio  
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