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HANNAH KING

interior architecture portfolio 2019


what's INSIDE COMMERCIAL piégato

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the depot

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uw credit union e-commerce center

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RESIDENTIAL 517 vermont st.

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the horse barn

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INDUSTRIAL furniture design

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lighting design

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CREDENTIALS about hannah + credentials

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WELCOME TO


EST. 2017 Piegato is a crepe + coffee restaurant in downtown Detroit, overtaking the abandoned Franklin architectural materials building. Located on the Detroit riverfront, Piegato serves as a destination for fine foods and coffees from local sellers and co-ops. With the goal of adapting an old building for new uses, Piegato aimed to seamlessly transition what was once decrepid and ugly into something vibrantly urban. Ultimately, Piegato reflects the personality of the once crestfallen city of Detroit newly overtaken by a generation of millenials.

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first floor & mezzanine level street entry

patio entry

entry cafÉ

patio

east bar main dining

back dining

FLOORPLANS The inspiration for Piegato’s floorplan began with the idea of a European street - casual seating around the edges with a central core running right down the middle. The entry is open to the full scope of the dining area, compromised of two main zones.

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The first zone is the cafe, which includes the full-service coffee bar furnished with a house name brand of coffee products (p.12 bottom). The second major zone is the main dining area, or the ‘central spine’ of the floorplate. Running along that spine is a

mirrored set of banquettes, cut into four sections and serving as the main focal point of the space. Four secondary zones also exist: the east bar, the back dining area, the patio dining, and the mezzanine level dining area.

mezzanine


top: hostess stand area looking into main dining room & mezzanine

bottom: coffee bar within cafe area with view of mezzanine

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top: close-up of banquette table and place settings bottom: view of mezzanine level stairs and dining

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PIEGATO AS A BRAND Piegato’s dual-function as a restaurnat and coffee shop offers unique opportunities for branding. To take advantage of this, Piegato will offer an array of coffee and food products for retail in the front, where classically trained baristas can guide customers to exactly what they need. The large merchandise wall located adjacent to the cafe seating area lets Piegato dedicate a specific area to their retail, focusing a customer directly on all of the possible items to purchase. Individual retail items, such as the coffee, feature a hint of Detroit flair; the Bricktown Blend is named for the Bricktown district that Piegato is located in, while the simple syrups all get their names from different motown icons. Nods to Detroit are also found in their weekly specials pegboard, where seasonal crepes are named after Ford’s famous Model T and iconic local landmarks like the Detroit Iron Fist.

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Cafe- Menu Detail

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King Suite- Bedroom Door

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T I O R T DE

The Depot aims to take ownership of the city of Detroit’s abandoned past, and with it, create something unique to the millennial generation reclaiming it. Using Michigan Central Station as it’s platform, The Depot will make a large statement about the future of Detroit and the type of style that is slowly shaping it. Working in tandem with the site’s original architecture and design detailing, The Depot tries to implement the urban occurrences of repetitive geometric shape and blunt color alongside the infamous ornate features of 20’s-era industrial design. By featuring things like local small businesses on the Third Rail Cafe menu and displaying artwork Detroit is most famous for- graffiti- The Depot will take the idea of a hotel experience to an uncharted new level. By staying at The Depot, guests from across the globe will get a glimpse at the future of Detroit. *selected- 2018 Ruth Davis juried showcase


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Lobby- Tunnel to Elevators

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Lobby- Check-In

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MICHIGAN CENTRAL N STATION O I T A T S

Located at 2001 15th Street in the heart of downtown, MCS has been affectionately known to locals as ‘the waffle house’, for its knocked-out windows on both the north and south sides. The last departing train left the station in 1989, but the building had been slowly shutting down long before that. Commissioned alongside Grand Central Station in New York, MCS was never fully finished after the main floor was built.


FLOORPLAN

*yellow denotes scope of project

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The Depot’s main dining area, Third Rail Café, was designed with the purpose of being a destination for both tourists and locals alike. With Michigan Central Station’s ideal location downtown, home to four seperate college campuses, Third Rail’s comfortable seating contrasted with harsh colors create an atmosphere that empowers the creative spirit in everyone. Detroit’s rugged personality comes to life and celebrates how different it is from other large cities. The branding of the hotel was equally as important as the design inside, acting as a parallel piece of design work that shaped the identity of the hotel against all other downtown hotels. Creating a brand that featured iconic local art was a necessity, and in choosing the yellow graffiti monster, The Depot hints at the more playful side of a very blunt, straightforeward concept.

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The guest rooms in The Depot are meant to feel spacious and comfortable, while maintaining some of the motifs and patterns used in the downstairs lobby and dining area. By zoning enough space for a kitchenette, living space, as well as a private bedroom, guests at The Depot will experience the new type of luxury Detroit has to offer. To add more individual character to the guest suites, small pieces of reclaimed Detroit history are featured. The yellow traincar doors to MCS’s old trains were taken off their hinges and featured as roll-shut pocket doors to the bedroom, and Heidelberg Project pianos were refurbished and placed inside the living areas.

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King Suite- Bathroom


King Suite- Bedroom

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King Suite- Piano

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King Suite- Entry

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HELLO,

HOW CAN I

HELP YOU?

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UW Credit Union e-commerce center

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ENTRY

FLOORPLAN The staff at UW Credit Union’s e-commerce center wanted a friendly, easily-navigable layout with a fresh, enjoyable atmosphere. Spending the majority of their days on the phone or looking at a computer screen, they needed zones with good acoustics and comfortable, personalized work spaces that could encourage them to get throguh the work day. Specifying multiple types of desks aided in creating unique work spaces, allowing employees who 95 instead stand or walk while working. In addition to these requests, the employees also wanted areas where they could forget about work- respite spaces where they could wind down and relax. A separate lunch area, a fireplace seating space, and three hammock lounges all work to provide workers with the public and private break areas they need.

bottom: hammock respite area

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top: lunch break area

bottom: standing-height desk and seated-height desk zones

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COME HOME TO


517vermont Located in DuPont Circle, the apartment at 517 Vermont was developed with raw materials and a delicate pallette in mind. The goal with this concept was to express the ways in which heavy form could be coupled with gentler tones, conveying a sense of groudedness while still maintaining an airy atmosphere within the space.

517 Vermont is an old building with a strong architectural foundation. By keeping certain characteristics of the original design, the dichotomy between old and new becomes a prominent creative statement. Original window webbing creates a unique sense of formality in the living room, where softer textures and quiet colors were added to make the space feel more approachable. Existing geometric walnut floors express a particular type of east coast rigidity, while circular tile patterns and freeform lighting fixtures help articulate a design that celebrates the intersection of structured and organic materialiy.

This concept culminated in a space that balances bold shape with tame neutrality, offering D.C. residents a new way to appreciate historical architecture alongside modern design.

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DINING

KITCHEN BATHROOM

BEDROOM

LAUNDRY

LIVING

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DINING

IT’S ALL IN THE

DETAILS


Artwork was a major driver behind the design detailing choices that were made in this project. By choosing pieces based in the hyperrealistic realm of thought, the doors opened to build forms that pushed the boundaries of typical construction.

KITCHEN

Hammock-shaped stools get their shape from the bar they’re beneath, while the bar is supported by a custom slab intended to mirror the silhouette of the fireplace floor stone. Each shape within the space was chosen with another in mind.

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HALLWAY

THE IMPORTANCE OF

SMALL SPACES The apaprtment at 517 Vermont is a new form of modern luxury, and the small spaces within provide designers with opportunities to execute big ideas that redefine what people think of as luxurious. Bathrooms are often the last area 25

to get attention, but they remain one of the most-used rooms in a building. For 517 Vermont, it was one of the first areas designed. A simple vanity leaves little space for unsightly clutter, while a pairing of patterns on the walls and floors

distracts from the existing bathroom’s size constraints. The final design evokes a sense of calming softness that draws your eye to each small detail in the room.

B


BATHROOM

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THE HORSE BARN

Living room


two bedroom electrical plan

FLOORPLANS The horse barn is a historic landmark on UW-Madison’s campus; currently sitting at the top of Linden Drive, the Horse is currently overlooked by the thousands of students that pass by it every day. The new design for this treasured site takes found objects and materials from the original structure and

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repurposes them in an event and convention space, which also features rentable apartments above. These apartments aim to attract visiting professors and alumni who are staying for an extended amount of time, along with grad students looking for a nicer alternative to current graduate

housing. An eclectic, Wisconsin-inspired flair can be felt throughout the space, resulting in a comfortable and cozy atmosphere for anyone to be able to call home.


above: living room into kitchen area

second floor floorplan 28


FURNITURE  DESIGN

above: Backbone high lounge

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HK HANNAH KING

Furniture and industrial design are two fields that have heavy influence on the evolution of architecture and interior architecture. By taking time to better understand these fields, interior architects can attempt to predict future trends for the wider scope of the design world. Backbone is the centerpiece of

a line of bar-height furniture; minimalistic in nature and simple in material selection. By taking a bar-height chair and recreating it to fit more current needs- like office desks as well as it’s original bar counter function, Backbone takes a new stance on furniture application and crossover.

The goal with the backbone high lounge was to create wonder around how the chair was supported, leaving the user with a curiousity about the structure of the form. It’s shape is taken from the simplest form of a spine; your backbone.

 

        

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IDEATION  The thought process for Backbone started with the idea for a dual-furniture line, LB and RB. LB, or “Left Brainâ€?, was intended to be a line for the analytical thinker. Someone who clearly appreciated simple stucture that could also stand out. With a streamlined materials palette, LB was going to be a modern answer to design problems in both upscale residential and commercial office projects. RB, or “Right Brainâ€?, was the exact opposite of LB. It was a concept based on emphasising the whimsicality of a piece of furniture, with a lot of added stucture organic in nature and idea. A line for the modern hippie, RB was intended to offer pieces of a sentimental nature to projects more hospitality and residentially-based. LB was the line that moved into further developmental phases, and eventually became Backbone.

                 


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Track Light- Mobile Arm

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Track Light- Fixed Arm

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Wall Sconce- Extended Mobile Arm

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Track Light- Fixed

LIGHTING DESIGN t

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DETROIT 31

The Depot presented a design problem- a severe lack of BIM objects in online libraries that truly fit the new design style being implemented. Most of the final furniture and design detailing were new, custom designs, as was nearly all of the lighting pieces. Lighting design is an extremely

intereting field of study, and the majority of inspiration for the lighting in The Depot came from Arne Jacobsen’s body of work. His AJ lamp, an icon of industrial design, was never adapted to meet built-in needs. Both the standing-height lamp and desk lamp are free-standing pieces, so The Depot adapted

the headpiece of the lamp and created new pieces such as a multi-arm track light, an extended arm wall sconce, and a fixed wall sconce. Other lighting pieces were also developed for The Depot, but all were designed with the intent of being secondary to the Arne Lamp adaptations.


ELEVATIONS & S PROFILES E L I PROF

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Circle Chandelier- Low

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Circle Chandelier- Raised

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Bubble Pendent- Low

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Bubble Sconce


HELLO i’m hannah, an interior architecture graduate from the university of wisconsin-madison. i’m a michigan (detroit) native, which has been a constant source of inspiration (questionable looks) throughout design school. in my free time i enjoy running (walking) & love to experience new places and things (restaurants & food, more or less).

EDUCATION university of wisconsin-madison Bachelor’s of Science in Interior Architecture 3.78 cumulative GPA 3.9 major GPA

WORK EXPERIENCE WEISBACH A+D 2018-Present San Francisco, CA Designer - taking design lead on multiple hospitality and residential projects - working on projects through all phases of research and design - tasked with creating full CD sets and FF+E plans for construction bidding

porter

2017-2018 Madison, WI Barista - in charge of maintaining professional Instagram page - hired to do freelance graphic design work for Porter’s 3 sister businesses - responsible for public display work within the retail space

faro-creative 2016-2017 Milwaukee, WI Intern - tasked with creating schematic client presentations - designed and rendered innovative new cashwrap areas for project bid presentations

SKILLS revit

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autocad

sketchup

rhino

illustrator

photoshop

indesign


HANNAH

“Design is taking a seed of inspiration and translating it into a tangible space for generations to enjoy. Being able to understand a building’s history and envision a new future for it is what drives my desire to develop into a better designer. Taking spaces forgotten by society and transforming them into revitalized centers for an entire community is proof that designers can make a difference.�

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Profile for Hannah King

Interior Architecture Portfolio - 2019  

Hannah King's Interior Architecture Portfolio - University of Wisconsin-Madison

Interior Architecture Portfolio - 2019  

Hannah King's Interior Architecture Portfolio - University of Wisconsin-Madison