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Nov 20, 2009

SCRIPTORIA


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Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

Adviser’s Letter

Volume XXIX No. II November 20, 2009

The world of journalism is changing. The challenges journalists face today are daunting. Sometimes, a journalist doesn’t know if he or she is going to wake up the next day, go to work, and the position he or she occupied is still available. Perhaps that week-long furlough was moved to permanent status. It’s widely understood that newspaper publishers are struggling due to an emphasis on online media and a struggling economy. No one knows if rock bottom has been reached. I believe these are exciting times in journalism. The opportunity exists exists to make all the changes positive ones. A mentor once told me that newspaper writers are cops without the cuffs. The profession still that newspaper writers are cops without the cuffs. The profession still has unbelievable power to shape a community and a city. has unbelievable power to shape a community and a city. Cities still need a voice for the people. C ities still need a voice for the people. As Scriptoria heads into its 29th year in production, I can look back and be proud of the many accomplishments we, as a class, have experienced. More importantly, the students who journey through my advanced journalism class are completely prepared to handle the rigors and challenges of university life once their four years have concluded. I always tell my students, “I am not here to recruit all of you into the world of journalism. I am here to prepare you to challenge your peers academically as you enter a global economy.” Readers, I encourage you to visit hanksmedia.com. Any story that is written in Scriptoria is available to post comments on the website. As I enter my fourth year in the castle, and 26th year in the community, I continue to look forward to the many challenges this publication will most certainly offer. That’s what makes this job fun. ALEX NAVARRO

Scriptoria/hanksmedia.com adviser Hanks graduate 1994

Scriptoria is the magazine of J.M. Hanks High School. The opinions expressed by this staff do not necessarily refl ect those of J.M. Hanks High School or the Ysleta Independent School District. Scriptoria follows the district and state guidelines established for student high school publications. Advertising Information: If you would like to advertise in Scriptoria, please call 4345276, or email ads@hanksmedia.com, and an advertising representative will provide you with advertising rates and details. Contributions: All Scriptoria articles appear on hanksmedia.com. Scriptoria highly encourages students, faculty, staff and members of the of the J.M. Hanks High School community to contribute to its publication. A comments section proceeds all articles online. Once your comment has posted, an email will follow either confi rming or rejecting your post. The adviser reserves the right to reject any comment deemed inappropriate. Letters to the Editor can be mailed to: J.M. Hanks High School C/O Hanksmedia.com/Scriptoria 2001 Lee Trevino El Paso, TX 79936

ON-LINE

Hanksmedia.com is a digital version of the print magazine updated daily with Webexclusive stories and photographs. Scriptoria was recognized as the best newspaper in the State of Texas from 19942001, 2004.

REDUCE RECYCLE REUSE

Recycling old magazines is one of the easiest ways to help the environment. To increase the supply of recoverable wood fi ber and to reduce demand on the world’s landfi lls, hanksmedia.com urges our readers to support recycling efforts in their communities.

2009-2010 SCRIPTORIA STAFF

Editor in Chief Associate Editor Copy Editor Online Editors Section Editors Scriptoria Staff

Adviser

Rachel Cheek Jordanne Diaz Kyle Kehrwald Matt Romero April Ortegon, Kyle Monticone, Rosalie Rubio, Kat Alanis Robert Alvarez, Domonique Calderon, Eddie Chozet, Krizel Cruz, Alex Flores, April Hernandez, Jenna Martinez, Yviana Mendoza, Steve Rojo, Derek Sims, Carlos Valdez, Denisse Violante, Jarrett Williams , Zach Ziegler Alex Navarro


campus 02

Obama’s Education Reform could

spell problems for students

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Making grades and getting paid

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How CLEP works with seniors

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Radio censorship

18 Football season concludes

enTerTainment 26

Music and the mind

30

The end is near

It’s crunch time for 6 the SATs

HealTh 23

Fish oil good for the brain

News 32

Slim City

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The new look of print

Science 14

The practice of cryonics

24

Cheating death

28

Habitat for inhumanity

sporTs 12

Kimbo Slice on the comeback trail

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Dawn of the NFL quarterback

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Making the Band

SCRIPTORIA

conTenTs

Nov 20, 2009


SCRIPTORIA

Nov 2o, 2009

Obama’s Education Reform:

mid July to late August; winter vacation from late December to early February There is also a short intercession from mid February to March 1. The schedules are generally standardized, however, it can vary slightly from region to region. In comparison to South Korea’s educational calendar, the YISD school calendar counts with 84 instructional days in the fi rst semester and 94 in the second for a total of 178 days of instruction per year. In South Korea there are about 220 days of instruction per year. That’s a difference of 42 more school days to students in South Korea. Many people greatly oppose the idea of year-round school. There was an instance in which a group of parents in Wake Forest, North Carolina, sued the local school district for making year-round school mandatory. Furthermore, several studies, including one from Ohio State Junior Natasha Hecht watches the clock as she waits for class to end; if the reform is passed students University in 2007, found that are looking at longer days and class periods (photo by Rosalie Rubio/Scriptoria). students test scores did not improve over those students who attended a regular-school Hanks, as well as many other schools schedule are vital for school children to schedule. “I don’t know that shorter in the Ysleta Independent School be able to compete in a global economy. summers and longer days are the District, have faced many changes Furthermore, he wishes to increase class answer to improving education,” since the 2009-2010 school year started. time by adding several hours to the school said Andrew Halatyn, Knight Stricter enforcement of cell phone and day. electronics policies and a new schedule School is to start an hour earlier than it Country’s testing coordinator. are among the main changes. does now and will end an hour later. He “Teachers, as well as students, More changes may be on the way for will also allow schools to stay open even should work smarter, not harder,” The longer school days would Knight Kingdom as well as all schools on weekends to serve as a safe place for be draining to both students and nationally. students. In a speech in March, 2009, Obama President P resident Barack Obama and his said that the current school-year calendar teachers. Oswaldo Salcido, a math Secretary S ecretary of Education, Arne Duncan, puts us at a disadvantage with students teacher in Knight Country, agreed plan p lan to reform the nation’s education from other countries such as South Korea. with the idea of year round school system. In South Korea the school year is divided but opposed the thought of a Changes in the yearly and daily into two semesters. The fi rst begins in longer schedule. “The solution isn’t more hours, school schedules are to be made. early March and ends in mid-July; the it’s more resources,” said Salcido. Obama believes that longer second begins in late August and ends in school days and a year-round mid February. Summer vacation is from “There aren’t enough teachers

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Nov 20, 2009

Editorial

SCRIPTORIA

Big problem for students

Rosalie Rubio co-opinion editor

for the number of students we have, and students who are and homework, and having to come up with lesson plans, the teachers are quite overwhelmed. With class work struggling are falling through the cracks.” Although the opportunity will exist to fi nish more work and homework from all eight classes, it’s no surprise that in class, the possibility also exists that students will have students have become overwhelmed as well. “I feel overwhelmed everyday, I have homework homework for all eight classes anyway and less time at everyday, its ridiculous! I have tests at the end of every home to accomplish all the homework. Additionally, many extracurricular activities would suffer. week and at that point I’m so tired that its no surprise if I Some activities are very demanding and require more than the fail,” said sophomore Patricia Boydston. This, unfortunately, is a sad reality for students in the given class time to practice. With less time after school, some students wouldn’t be willing to participate in these activities Kingdom. The reform’s purpose was to improve overall academic with all the work he or she must do and the little time he or she would have after school to balance schoolwork with performance in school and prepare students for the real world. extracurricular commitments. But if the reform actually makes Before judgment is life that much more diffi cult for passed on extracurricular students, the reform loses purpose. activities, studies show that Extracurricular activities are extracurricular activities what a lot of students work hard in improve both the intellectual school for. It serves as the escape and social development in from stress as well as motivation to students. continue working hard, especially Mary Rombokas, an because of eligibility. It also teaches educational expert, performed essential leadership, social, and time studies on college-aged management skills that could not be students who participated learned sitting in a classroom. in extracurricular activities. The point in the fi rst place was to She found that students who improve education. By adding more were actively engaged in hours to the day, and more days to extracurricular activities did in If Obamaʼs education reform passes, Knight Kingdom may open the year, isn’t the way to go. fact do better in school. “As a student, my its doors earlier and close them later. Hanks might also be open The cons outweigh the pros in the year round (photo by Rosalie Rubio/Scriptoria). sense that more things should’ve been extracurricular activities are taken into consideration when Arne some of the more fun and enjoyable parts of my education,” said senior Maria Juarez. Duncan helped to develop the education reform. The plan began with good intentions. However, in “Two extra hours of schooling would eliminate most extracurricular activities. Adding hours and making school the attempt to “leave no child behind,” the high school busybodies were disregarded. year round is not the answer.” Enough is enough. Students haven’t been the only ones having a hard time For many students, much of the high school experience adjusting to the new schedule. Teachers also have been struggling to get important lessons crammed into a short takes place outside the classroom. With more time being spent confi ned inside the class in a desk year round almost 45-minute class period. “I don’t like the schedule change. It has changed a lot all day robs the students of the experience. Although it is important to prepare for the future, a lot of the way I do things. Last year I was able to do more experiments and things like that and now I can’t. We used to of the preparation doesn’t have to take place in a classroom. If the future of America must be better prepared for have 90 minutes and now 45 minutes. It actually takes twice the real world, then so be it. The schedule changes would as long as it did before to cover a subject,” said Salcido. Yes, the teacher may see students on a daily basis but just get in the way of actually living in the real world. The sometimes it’s as if he or she is rushed to teach his or her answer is to not confi ne the young minds; the answer is to subject matter before the bell rings. Although teachers better prepare them, use better resources, and work smarter have the same amount of time in different intervals, it is so students could go out and really learn and apply quite obvious that with grading the students’ tests, quizzes, the lessons learned.

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Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

Making Grades and Getting Paid

How students balance both school and work

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Jarrett Williams Scriptoria

One thing that is noticeably increasing on this campus is the number of students who have part-time jobs. Some students willingly look for a way to make some extra money. Other students need to earn money to keep up with his or her spending habits. Some students get a job because he or she has to help fi nancially at home. Whatever the reason, one wonders if a part-time job for a high school student will benefi t or harm the student with regard to academics and extracurricular activities. All the paychecks in the world cannot add up to an eeducation. ducation. It can sometimes be diffi cult to fi nd a place of work w ork where a manager is willing to work with a highsschool student and be fl chool student and be fl exible with the hectic schedule that aa teenager usually has. teenager usually has. According A ccording to the U.S. Department of Labor, under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), a high-school student cannot work more than three hours in one school day and 18 hours in one school week while school is in session. Additionally, a student can’t work past 7 p.m. on a

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school night. The FLSA does not limit the amount of hours worked or times of day for students who are 16 years old and older. If said job is found, it is imperative that the business is supportive of education and has a strong tolerance for student workers who can only work a certain number of hours due to all the laws in place, the homework he or she is given, and any extracurricular activities in which he or she participates. For many teens, a fi rst job can be a big deal; It can be seen as an introduction into the real world. There are many lessons to be learned from a part-time job. Responsibility, as cliché as it sounds, is undoubtedly one of them. Work ethic is another. The hardest lesson to learn would have to be budgeting. Paychecks come in but, in the blink of an eye, the money is gone and the only thing that’s left is one’s desire for more things, leaving no other options but to continue working. Without noticing, a student is sucked into the game of life where things he or she covets, like a Playstation 3 or some new clothes, can be grasped if he or she continues to work to earn expendable income. It is one thing to be a student and be an employee; it’s another thing to be a student and a manager at their job. Senior Sam Chatterton works at Major Players on George Dieter. He was recently given a promotion to shift manager. Obviously, he can be seen as the ideal student/worker


Nov 20, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

Junior Mariana Briseño (Left) and Nancy Murga (Below) are just a couple of examples of high school students who have taken on part time jobs at different locations. Briseño works at Hudsonʼs Restaurant and Murga works at The El Paso Ballerina Dance Academy (photos by April Hernandez/Scriptoria).

because he found the perfect balance. Chatterton passes all his classes and the main manager at his job trusts him enough to promote him. “You really have to fi gure out your priorities,” Chatterton said. “You can be a good student and a good worker. It just takes some responsibility and open-mindedness on how to make it work.” McDonald’s is the top franchise responsible for providing jobs to teens. Roughly 20 percent of the American population has worked at Mickey D’s at some point in their lives. ”It is all up to that individual and how much they get out of the experience is shown by the amount of work that they are willing to put in,” Alicia Vasquez, who manages the McDonald’s on George Dieter and Vista Del Sol, said. While a majority of her workers are in high school or in

the early years of college, she believes that getting a job is a defi nite way to have kids get a taste of the real world. “I have seen many kids who, after working at McDonald’s as students, are now successful lawyers, doctors, and so forth,” Vasquez said. It certainly can’t hurt to have a job while still in school as long as that job’s manager understands that a student’s responsibility is to his or her education fi rst. Whether having a job builds character or instills work ethic is debatable. Many students with a part-time job go into the workforce for the sake of increasing the size of his or her wallet. With the many struggles that come with a part-time job not everyone loves the work but does love the paycheck.

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Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA Robert Alvarez Scriptoria

Crunch Time

The time, and the stress associated, with the Standardized Test (SAT) is here

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Senior Jerry Hernandez goes over SAT questions with Seniors Renee Gonzalez, Cynthia Gurrola, and Eraina Porras (photo by Evee Mendoza/ Scriptoria).

The time has come when seniors have to prepare and start applying for college. Sadly, this also leads to one of the most important tests of his or her academic career: the SAT . The SAT is a standardized test for college admissions in the United States. The SAT is owned, published, and developed by the College Board, a non-profi developed by the College Board, a non-profi t organization in the United States. in the United States. The SAT, while obviously important, is graded according to a complicated scale. The SAT is scored on the scale of 600-2400 with a mean score of 1500. The SAT is divided into three sections: math, critical reading, and writing. Each sections can garner a maximum 800 points. The writing section is divided into two parts: a multiple choice and an essay. The multiple choice counts for approximately 70 percent of the writing score and the essay counts 30 percent toward the overall grade of the section. The test taking itself is a three-hour-and-45

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minute test of timed sections. Each of the major sections is divided to equal a total of 10 sub-sections with an additional “experiment” 25-minute section which can be in any of the 3 major sections. The essay is graded by two readers who grade on a scale of 0-6 and the scores are added to provide the score between 0-12 unless each reader’s grades differ by more than a point. In those instances a senior reader then reads the essay. Guessing is not an option on the SAT as the test taker is penalized for every wrong answer he or she makes. Therefore, it is wise only to answer the questions he or she absolutely knows. While the SAT is not the only factor in determining admission into universities, it is a rather important one and can be a deciding factor when schools choose which students will gain entry into the university. “I’m always hearing about how important the test is by my parents, friends, and teachers,” said senior Josh Reyes. “I can honestly say that I was really stressed out


Nov 20, 2009

by the whole situation. All that I would hear for weeks at home was, ‘Josh you better do well on that test,’ and it was diffi cult to understand what to do in that stressful situation.” The majority of seniors at Hanks share the same sentiment as Reyes. In a poll conducted on campus, 74 percent of the students surveyed said they were stressed out about the SAT. Many students also felt they were not prepared to handle the stress that comes with the SAT. Students also said the primary reason for the stress is that they did not fully understand the test or feel prepared. “I felt like the stress was making me freak out more than I needed to,” said senior Tim Saenz. “I feel as if the stress of the whole thing may have affected my score due to not being focused while taking the test. Sitting in that room all I could think about was about what will happen if I bomb the test completely. I just had to snap myself out of it.” Suffi ce to say that several students wish he or she didn’t have to take the test. However, it is mandatory in order to graduate and apply for college. The best thing to do is to relieve the stress that comes with the test. One of the best things to help is to take practice tests to get familiar with the complexity of the SAT. It is also important to set reasonable expectations because not everyone can score a 2400. Also, understand that the SAT can be taken multiple times. Statistics prove that scores increase with every attempt. Knowing that there is a next time can make a difference. As a student, especially a senior, stress is at its highest point. Students could use tips on how to manage it. Knowing how to cope with stress is a useful tool not only for SAT but also for everyday student life. Doing simple things can lower stress while making a student more productive during school. For example, taking power naps for the lack of sleep used in late night studying helps students focus when called upon during the day. Exercising is the healthiest way to

SCRIPTORIA

blow off some steam and will not only help test anxiety but will also improve one’s overall health. Music is also a great way to calm down and can help maintain focus on school work. Eating healthy is essential as the body will function better with nutritious food instead of junk food. Following these steps can really help one’s stress level and make the hardest of tasks not as diffi cult.


Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

L e t ’s t a l k a b o u t CLEP, baby College-Level Examination Program offers senior high school students an opportunity to earn college credit 8

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Denisse Violante Scriptoria

Students in high school or college looking to advance as much as a semester in a college class and save money are encouraged to take every opportunity thrown his or her way. If a student is looking to save time, avoid unnecessary tuition costs, and place out of introductory college courses, then the College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) offers that opportunity. CLEP awards college credits at more than 2,900 U.S. colleges and universities for demonstrating achievement in aa subject by means of a computer-based exam. According to subject by means of a computer-based exam. According to tthe College Board’s CLEP scoring system, students can earn he College Board’s CLEP scoring system, students can earn aa scaled score composed from two different calculations: The raw score and the scaled score. T he raw score and the scaled score. A scaled score can be from 20 (lowest) to 80 (highest).


Nov 20, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

Based on the American Council on Education’s about the specifi c subject in which he or she wishes to College Credit Recommended Service (ACE Credit), test. The study guides are available online and can be each subject CLEP has a recommended score in order downloaded for $10 each. The full study guide, also to receive college credit. For example, in Composition available for download at $24, includes the thirty-four and Literature, a student can earn three semester subjects along with sample questions. Textbook versions hours if he or she passes with a scaled score of 50 in are also available. the American Literature CLEP exam. To put expenses in perspective, one class at UTEP A student can earn the same amount of credit as (three semester hours) cost around $740, which includes someone who successfully completes the same course lab and miscellaneous fees. Students enrolled full-time at that school. Students who are enrolled in accelerated(12 hours) can expect to pay roughly $3,000 per semester. degree programs are more likely to be encouraged If a student signs up for a CLEP exam, buys the $24 study to take CLEP exams. All other students are strongly guide booklet, the total cost is approximately $110. If encouraged as well. Students can begin to take the a student passes the exam, then he or she receives the CLEP exams three semester once he or she hours toward is enrolled as a his or her senior in high degree plan. school. CLEP According exams consist to Jeffrey mostly of Taylor, the multiple-choice Go Center questions, fi llspecialist on in-the-blank, campus, all and an essay schools accept in English CLEP credits Composition and allow with Essay. up to thirty The tests are semester credit administered hours. The by a computer CLEP and usually are program about one-andhas many a-half-hours incentives that long. It’s are offered highly by taking recommended and passing a that students CLEP exam. Top Left - Go Center Specialist Jeffrey Taylor and a student look over CLEP Exam paperwork plan on testing Students can (photo by Jenna Martinez/Scriptoria). Above: Students Taking Clep ( photo courtesy AP images/ for about two accelerate his or hours and that he Used with permission). her degree with or she takes no CLEP. Passing the exam will allow a student to skip more than two different subject CLEP exams in one day. beginner courses. Furthermore, he or she will be able If he or she fails the test, he or she has to wait six months to take higher-level courses faster. The exam will help to retest in the same subject. determine if a student is ready for a particular class. Auspiciously, there are 33 other subject exams in Also, when a student is a few credits behind in his which to choose. The material covered in CLEP exams or her degree plan, credits from a CLEP test can get is equivalent to what is taught in courses that students him or her caught up and, most importantly, it saves a take as requirements in the fi rst two years of college, also student money on books and tuition. widely regarded as a student’s general studies. The fee for each CLEP exam is $72 plus any Most of the time, students don’t take advantage of this administration fees, usually $15, payable to the opportunity because of the lack of information. Taylor, testing center. For eligible military service members who has been in charge of the Go Center in the Kingdom for two years, can help a senior student by providing all and eligible civilian employees, CLEP exams are free of charge. This does not include the cost of the information regarding the CLEP exams. study guides needed to study for the exams. The study guides include sample questions and text

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Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

You c a n ’ t s a y T H AT on t h e r a d i o Jordanne Diaz associate editor

Yisd board president attempts to censure trustee

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Radio talk shows are notorious for discussing anything and everything in the public eye. Fortunately, guest speakers are protected by the First Amendment in the constitution which prevents he or she from facing repercussions from anything discussed on the show that is protected by free speech. In early October, Ysleta Independent School District trustee Lisa Montelongo appeared on Paul Strelzin’s talk show on station KHRO. Montelongo did nothing more than exercise her right of free sspeech. Some of the other members of the board, though, claim peech. Some of the other members of the board, though, claim tthat she selectively left out information about district problems hat she selectively left out information about district problems or policies. o r policies. News of Montelongo’s joint appearance on the show with Noel Candelaria, the president of the Ysleta Teachers Association, worried board president Marty Reyes, who is often at odds with Montelongo. Reyes was in Houston for a conference when she received text messages about the scheduled appearance. She told district staff members to record the show then had it transcribed by a court reporter. Administrators said this service was provided for free by the school district’s attorneys. Montelongo, as she often has in many forums, offered opinions and critiques of district business and administrators during the show. Reyes did not like what she heard. “If she had something bad to say, I would hope she would come to all of the board and say, ‘I’ve got something to talk about,’ instead of not talking to any of us and going on a radio talk show and just putting it all out there,” Reyes said. “It was just a lot of misinformation.” Montelongo commented that the show was nothing more than an opportunity for her to speak honestly to citizens about the school district. “I am sorry but I am always going to say the good, the

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bad and the ugly,” she said. “That is why I was elected.” During the show, Montelongo told Strelzin she disagreed with Reyes’ attempt to bypass district policy and the superintendent’s authority to hire a nonprofi t group for $150,000. The group would try to motivate 25 parents whose children are in danger of dropping out of school. Montelongo commented on the show about Reyes violating procedure because she did not seek proposals. Instead, Reyes handpicked the group she wanted to receive the contract. District administrators later derailed Reyes’ plan, saying it was improper. Montelongo also told Strelzin that the district could have done more to provide affordable health insurance for employees. Then she criticized Trustee Bob Ward for saying that hourly employees, who could not afford the district’s health insurance plan, could seek state help through initiatives such as the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). She also discussed a $780,000 contract with Houstonbased PBK architects that drew criticism from El Paso businesspersons who disagreed with the selection process and worried about the fi rm’s past relationship with the district’s superintendent, Michael Zolkoski. Montelongo defended a district decision to move teacher training to Saturdays to minimize the use of substitutes. She disagreed with some of the superintendent’s decisions but believed he is an effective leader. A few days after the show, Montelongo found a written transcript of the interview at her doorstep. She learned that fellow school board members planned to meet behind closed doors with the district’s lawyer to discuss their dissatisfaction with the comments she made. Montelongo requested that the meeting be held in public under a provision of the state’s Open Meetings Act. Reyes brought Montelongo’s conduct before the board for various reasons. She stated that Montelongo was not authorized to speak to the media on behalf of the school board. “I totally understand that the district might not be spending money wisely, but that needs to stay behind closed doors. All of the commotion negatively impacts YISD but most importantly Hanks because she is our


Nov 20, 2009

representative,” a senior student at Knight Country said. According to Reyes, trustees had agreed not to say negative things about the district or its superintendent. She accused Montelongo of lying to the community and keeping quiet as Strelzin made critical remarks about administrators. At various times, Strelzin called the superintendent a “chicken,” “an idiot,” and a “turkey.” She also said that Montelongo was part of a 7-0 vote to award a contract to PBK architects but did not correct Strelzin when he said that she voted against the contract. Montelongo became a critic of the process after voting for the contract. Reyes would not specifi cally say how Montelongo misinformed the public about the superintendent and administrators. “Fellow board members are attempting to stifl e free speech by silencing those who oppose them,” Montelongo said. On Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2009, Reyes withdrew an agenda item from a meeting that, if approved, would have publicly censured, or disapproved, Montelongo for comments she made on a radio show. “It was my duty and right as a board member to comment on issues that affect the district,” Montelongo

SCRIPTORIA

said. Reyes did not say during the board meeting why she changed her mind about the item. She could not be reached for comment after the meeting. The board president was one of four trustees who met behind closed doors for one hour to seek advice from the district’s lawyer about alleged unauthorized comments made by Montelongo. Montelongo and trustees Beth Riggs and Ray Mendoza stayed behind to protest the closed-door meeting after Reyes rejected a request to discuss the matter in a public forum. They were applauded by a group of teachers, some of whom spoke in support of Montelongo during the meeting. “It was Montelongo’s right to request a public discussion of the agenda item,” the trustees said. “All trustees deserved the right to speak freely to their constituents.” After returning from the meeting, Reyes deleted the item on the agenda that called for a news release to disapprove of Montelongo’s comments. “I hope I can continue to speak out and not have to worry about censorship,” Montelongo said after the meeting.

District employee Lisa Montelongo requested a public decision to discuss the item on the agenda. The item was withdrawn by the board president (photos by Jordanne Diaz/ Scriptoria).

It was my duty and right as a board member to comment on issues that affect the district. -Lisa Montelongo

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SCRIPTORIA

Nov 2o, 2009

Derek Sims Scriptoria

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A

Nov 20, 2009

As society becomes more technologically advanced, personalities are being born off the Internet. Past generation stars such as Lucille Ball, Gilligan, and Bill Cosby are being replaced by Numa Numa, the guitar master pro, and the WoW (World of Warcraft) kid who freaked out after his mom canceled his WoW account. One YouTube star stands out above the rest. Known for his ruthless backyard fi ghts which drew attention not only from YouTube fans but also from Dana D ana White, the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) president. Kimbo Slice is now living comfortably. His life, p resident. Kimbo Slice is now living comfortably. His life, however, wasn’t always this way. h owever, wasn’t always this way. Kimbo Slice (Kevin Furgeson) was born Feb. 8, 1974, in Nassau, Bahamas. Soon after, his family moved to United States and settled in Cutler Ridge, Fla., where he was raised, along with his two brothers, by his single mother Rosemary Clarke. Slice fi rst attended Bel-Air Elementary School where he got his fi rst taste of fi ghting after defending a friend from a school bully. While enrolled in Miami’s Palmetto High School, he played football and became the star middle linebacker. After Slice graduated high school in 1992, his house was destroyed by Hurricane Andrew. For a month Slice lived in his 1987 Nissan Pathfi nder. Because of the circumstances which left him homeless for a month, he was highly motivated to rebuild his life, go to college, and pursue a career. Kimbo was accepted into the University of Miami and Bethune-Cookman University where he earned an athletic scholarship for football and studied criminal justice. He did not complete all four years of college. Instead, he completed a year-and-a-half and tried out for the Miami Dolphins. Although he did make the practice team he was unable to earn a permanent spot on the team and was later released. In 2003, he began his backyard street-fi ghting career. Kimbo was an immediate success as his fi rst recorded fi ght was posted on YouTube against “Big D.” Viewers who saw the fi ght began calling Kimbo “Slice” after seeing the large slice Kimbo had bestowed along Big D’s eye. The nickname “Slice” accompanied his childhood nickname Kimbo and formulated the name he is known as today. Kimbo fought and won many more brutal fi ghts until losing to former cop and MMA fi ghter Sean Gannon. The fi ght created much hype and popularity for the fi ghters. Suddenly, people knew the names of the two men and Kimbo was thrown into the limelight. The popularity helped propel the beginning of Kimbo Slice’s MMA career. In preparation for offi cial MMA fi ghts, Kimbo began training with Bas Rutten, retired MMA fi ghter, and boxing instructor Randy Khatami at EliteMMA Rutten. Kimbo’s debut fi ght was against the former WBO Heavyweight champion and Olympic gold-medalist Ray Mercer at “Cage Fury Fighting Championships V.” Critics were watching this fi ght very closely as they waited to see if Slice would live up to the hype. He did. Slice won the fi ght in the fi rst round by submission due to a guillotine choke and stunned many viewers who believed

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Kimbo could only stand and throw punches. This win propelled Kimbo into the spotlight and, on Oct. 11, 2007, EliteXC signed Slice to its extensive list of fi ghters. Kimbo’s next fi ght was to be against Mike Bourke, another reformed street fi ghter, but due to injuries Bourke had to withdraw and was replaced by Bo Cantrell. The fi ght lasted a dismal 19 seconds as Slice literally pummeled Cantrell into submission. Kimbo’s third fi ght was set for Feb. 16, 2008, as he took on veteran Tank Abbott in the main event at “EliteXC: Street Certifi ed.” Like the other two fi ghts, Kimbo won again in a speedy manner as he dismantled Tank in 43 seconds by defeating him by way of knockout. Slice’s fourth fi ght would be his biggest and most controversial yet. The fi ght was televised on the Primetime Network and drew in viewers from across the globe. It was time to see what Kimbo was made of. He took on James Thompson on May 31, 2008, in the main event of “EliteXC: Primetime.” This fi ght would be like no other Kimbo had fought. The fi ght lingered into the third and fi nal round with Thompson winning the fi rst two rounds. Kimbo needed a miracle. His prayers were answered as he busted open Thompson’s ear in the beginning of the third round with a vicious hay-maker. The eventual bleeding caused the offi cial to stop the fi ght due to Thompson’s cut. Kimbo was now 4-0 and rising up the ranks quickly. His fairy-tale career was about to take a turn for the worst. On Oct. 4, Slice was set to battle Kent Shamrock at the BankAtlantic Center in Sunrise, Fla., on CBS’ “Saturday Night Fights.” The fi ght was only hours away when Shamrock received a cut to his left eye during warm-up, therefore disabling him to carry on his fi ght against Kimbo. The head of operations Jeremy Lappen had to choose a replacement fast. Lappen chose Seth Petruzelli for the main event as he saw him as the best fi t. The fi ght began and ended almost instantly. Petruzelli rocked Kimbo with a right punch to the chin and fi nished him off all in the span of 14 seconds. The fi ght allowed critics to have a fi eld day with Kimbo and he seemed to vanish from the MMA scene. Not much was heard about Kimbo after the embarrassing fi ght until June 1 when news was announced that Slice was to be featured on “The Ultimate Fighter: Heavyweights.” This once again sparked interest in Slice, both positive and negative. “He has given many people hope,” said Brazilian Jiujitsu instructor Ben Acosta. “Those who are struggling to make it in this profession see what he has become and have used that as motivation. Fighters see him as an average guy working hard and taking in criticism to learn and work his way through the ranks.” Where Kimbo will end up in the MMA world is unsure. One thing is for sure though: Slice is not ready to throw in the towel on his short-but-much-hyped career. “Every fi ght, the best man is going to win,” said Slice. “Whoever trains the hardest and wants it more is going to win, hands down, and that’s what it’s about for me.”

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Nov 2o, 2009

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Dawn of the quarterbacks

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Eddie Chozet Scriptoria

Drew Brees (left) and Peyton Manning (right) are the undisputed leaders of their respective team. The NFL is witnessing a rise in franchise quarterbacks (photos courtesy AP Images/Used with permission).

The National Football League is witnessing its greatest collection of quarterbacks in one generation in the history of its league. In the 1990s there was great quarterbacks like Steve Young, Dan Marino, Troy Aikman, John Elway, and Jim Kelly. All these quarterbacks were fi rst-ballot hall-of-famers. Since several college programs are using a pro-style offense, rookie quarterbacks are quickly adapting to the speed of professional football. Furthermore, teams are no longer waiting three years to see a return on its investment. When W hen New York Jet’s football coach Rex Ryan saw newly-drafted quarterback Mark Sanchez for the fi n ewly-drafted quarterback Mark Sanchez for the fi rst time, he walked up to him, shook his hand, and said, “What’s h e walked up to him, shook his hand, and said, “What’s up franchise.” u p franchise.” The story illustrates what most teams wish they had: a franchise quarterback. In this generation, more teams have found stability at the quarterback position. FRANCHISE QUARTERBACKS

Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints. The Saints found their franchise quarterback in 2006 when they signed Brees as a free agent. He led the Saints to the conference championship one year after the team fi nished 3-13. In

2008, Brees fell 16 yards short of breaking Marino’s record for yards in one season with 5,069. If he continues his play, then look for the Saints to march to Miami for Super Bowl XLIV. Peyton Manning, Indianapolis Colts. The league’s most valuable player for the 2003, 2004, and 2008 season. When Indianapolis defeated Chicago 29-17 in super bowl XLI, Manning also won the super-bowl mvp. Age is a factor for Manning (33). However, he is playing the best football in his career this season. Manning has always had weapons surrounding him which has led to much of his success. His group of receivers in 2009 are all go-to-guys and are lighting up the board. In week three of the season, Manning broke the all-time franchise record for passing yards and touchdowns. He could retire this year and still be a fi rstballot hall of famer. If he retires sometime in the future, he will probably own every major statistical passing record. Tom Brady, New England Patriots. Brady reached his peak in 2007 when he led his team to an undefeated season. In the same season, Brady set NFL records in passing touchdowns with 50 and touchdown to interception ratio of +42. He also earned the leagues most valuable player in 2007. In week six against the Tennessee Titans With the same group of receivers catching receptions from Brady,


Nov 20, 2009

New England could easily bounce back as one of the teams who will continue to compete in the AFC. Eli Manning, New York Giants. In 2007 when the Giants defeated the Patriots in Super Bowl XLII, Manning was nearly perfect and unstoppable. He was also named super bowl most valuable player. This season has been the best he has looked so far. The Giants are dangerous with him under center. His young targets, Mario Manningham and Steve Smith, are the go-to-guys that will continue to grow with Manning. Ben Roethlisberger, Pittsburgh Steelers. Roethlisberger has been great since being drafted back in 2004 when he was named AP and Diet Pepsi rookie of the year. He has won two super bowls in his young career, defeating the Seahawks, 21-10, in Super Bowl XL and defeating the Cardinals, 27-23, in Super Bowl XLIII. Brett Favre, Minnesota Vikings. In his amazing career, with several NFL records and awards, he is the only quarterback in history to beat all 32 teams, is a 10time pro bowl selection, three-time NFL most valuable player (1995-1997), fi ve time NFC player of the year and super bowl champion. He holds the records for most major quarterback stats, including passing touchdowns, yards, and consecutive starts. Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons. As a rookie, Ryan won AP offensive rookie of the year award. Ryan is in his second year in the NFL and is quickly becoming an icon. He has accomplished much in his early career but will have to keep playing his best. The most memorable play in his young career is the fact that the fi rst pass he ever threw in the NFL went 62 yards for a score. With Ryan, the Falcons believe they have a chance at the playoffs for the next ten years. Donovan McNabb, Philadelphia Eagles. McNabb played his best football in 2004 when the Eagles made it all the way to Super Bowl XXXIX. In his career, McNabb has fi ve pro bowl selections and NFC player of the year in 2004. In week seven of the 2009 season, McNabb threw his 200th touchdown to Desean Jackson and passed 30,000 yards as well. Joe Flacco, Baltimore Ravens. Flacco was drafted last season out of Division-II school Delaware. One could argue that he had a more successful season than Matt Ryan since he led the Ravens to the conference championship and was the fi rst rookie quarterback to win two playoff games. Flacco also won the 2008 Diet Pepsi rookie of the year award. He, like Ryan, must continue to push forward in their young and bright career. Philip Rivers, San Diego Chargers. Even though the Chargers have been inconsistent, the quarterback play has been exceptional. Rivers has had only one pro bowl selection and led the Chargers to one conference championship game. Rivers will be linked forever with Drew Brees and Eli Manning. Suffi ce to say that all three teams are happy with its quarterback play. Kurt Warner, Arizona Cardinals. Warner is a twotime AP NFL most valuable player (1999-2001). He was also Super Bowl XXXVI MVP when he played for the St.

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Louis Rams and defeated the Titans 23-16. Warner also plays big in the biggest games. He has the three highest single-game passing yards in the three super bowls in which he’s played. Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay Packers. Rodgers had huge shoes to fi ll at the start of the 2008 season after legendary Brett Favre signed with the New York Jets. Rodgers is in his second season as a starter. Even though the team fi nished 6-10 in 2008, he’s shown fl ashes that he is capable of supplanting Favre as the franchise quarterback. Jay Cutler, Chicago Bears. After the big trade with the Denver Broncos, Cutler is now a Chicago Bear. Cutler, a pro bowl quarterback, has not taken his team to the playoffs yet. Cutler, at 25, has yet to reach his peak. However, the Bears believe enough in him to trade two fi rst-round picks, Kyle Orton, and give him an extension that will keep him in Chicago until 2013. Tony Romo, Dallas Cowboys. Romo is a two-time pro bowl selection (2006-2007). Romo has had a great September, October and November. December and January have been extremely disappointing. He has not won a playoff game as the Cowboy’s starter. America’s team wants super bowls not just regular season games. Carson Palmer, Cincinnati Bengals. Palmer was the Heisman winner in 2002 when he played for USC and was a pro bowl selection in 2005 and 2006. Palmer started out strong early in his career. However, the knee injury he suffered in the 2005 playoffs against the Pittsburgh Steelers set him back. In 2008, he did not play the fi nal 12 games of the season after tearing a ligament in his elbow. In 2009, Palmer is healthy and back as one of the elite quarterbacks in the NFL. The team also is experiencing a revival in 2009. As Palmer goes, so do the Bengals. Mark Sanchez, New York Jets. In his early career the rookie has won three Pepsi NFL rookie of the week awards. The Jets drafted Sanchez because the team believes he is the answer. Fans have to see what he will do this season for the Jets. He is off to a great start. Matthew Stafford, Detroit Lions. Stafford, the fi rst round pick of the 2009 draft, won a game for the 19-game winless Lions back in week three against the Redskins. NFL fans will see what Stafford accomplishes in his early start. THE BREAK Kyle Orton, Denver Broncos. Orton has had a much better start than when he played in Chicago. Having more weapons surrounding him may be the case why. Keep an eye on him as the Broncos, under the coaching of Josh McDaniels, may have found their guy. Matt Cassel, Kansas City Chiefs. Cassel has had a rough start playing for this team. He doesn’t have the quality players he had in New England.

Continued on next page 15

The Chiefs may have their guy, however, coaches


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will wait and see what happens at the end of the season to see if it made a good trade or not and signed him to a $63-million contract extension. Chad Pennington, Miami Dolphins. Pennington is a two-time NFL comeback winner in 2006 and 2008. He had an awesome 2008 season but a shoulder injury in week three against the San Diego Chargers took him off the franchise list. Backup Chad Henne may be the guy depending on a good record at the end of the season. Matt Schaub, Houston Texans. Schaub is on the brink of becoming an elite guy. He has many weapons, including receiver Andre Johnson. If Schaub keeps playing and winning, he will be the franchise quarterback for the Texans. Matt Hasselbeck, Seattle Seahawks. A three-time pro bowl selection, Hasselbeck has not been the same since having issues with his back. He should belong in the franchise category after breaking the legendary Warren Moon and Jim Zorn’s franchise records. However, his career may have already begun its descent. NEED OF A QUARTERBACK

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Buffalo Bills - Trent Edwards is not the man for the Bills. Michael Vick may be an option in the offseason. Cleveland Browns - This franchise has not been able to fi nd a quarterback. Brady Quinn and Derek Anderson can’t fi ll the job. Look for the Browns to draft one of the quarterbacks coming out this year (Tebow, McCoy, Bradford). Oakland Raiders - First round draft pick in 2007 Jamarcus Russell has offi cially been named a bust by NFL fans and experts. Carolina Panthers - Delhomme,

a pro Bowl selection in 2005 and Carolina’s all-time leader in passing attempts, completions, and yards. Delhomme has lost his game. Carolina needs to make a trade or draft a quarterback. Delhomme needs to go. Tampa Bay - Josh Freeman may be the answer for the Bucs. The only successful quarterback the franchise has ever had was in 2002, when they won the super bowl with Brad Johnson. The team traded away its other franchise quarterback when Steve Young was sent to the San Francisco 49ers. Washington Redskins - Jason Campbell can’t get it going in Washington. Mark Sanchez was an option for them back in April in the 2009 draft. Hindsight is always the best sight. Tennessee Titans - Kerry Collins is old and rusty. Vince Young is different from what he was at Texas. Now that the team’s season is going nowhere, Jeff Fisher is giving Young a shot to redeem himself. St. Louis Rams - Marc Bulger, a former pro bowler, has not had a winning season in three years. Get more weapons, a line, and make the trade! Jacksonville Jaguars - David Garrard needs to perform more consistently. Until then the Jags need a new guy under center. San Francisco 49ers - Shaun Hill is more of a quality back-up quarterback. Since the three greats — Joe Montana, Steve Young and Jeff Garcia — the 49ers can’t fi nd a franchise quarterback. Alex Smith, the fi rst overall pick in 2005, has yet to prove he can lead this franchise for the next decade.

Nov 2o, 2009


The Exeter

Nov 20, 2009

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Hanks Literary and Arts Magazine ARE YOU: A WRITER? A POET? A LYRICIST? A PHOTOGRAPHER? A GRAPHIC ARTIST? A SCRIBBLER? A DOODLER?

The Exeter, the nationally recognized literary and arts magazine of Hanks High School, is now accepting submissions for the 2010 issue. Submission forms and guidelines are available in the library, Dome 2, and from your English teacher. All Hanks students, faculty, and staff are invited to submit their original prose, poetry, art, photograph, and recorded music for publication. Submissions will be evaluated anonymously by Exeter staff. Submission of material is not a guarantee of acceptance for publication. SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS MONDAY FEBRUARY 1, 2010 Contact Mr. O’Keeffe, room 207, for further info. jokeeffe@yisd.net (915) 434-5071

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SCRIPTORIA

Nov 2o, 2009

Above -- Senior Quarterback Matt Reyes runs for a first down against Americas. Below -- The knights defense trample over the Aztec player as he tries to run for a touchdown (photos by Evee Mendoza/Scriptoria).

18


Nov 20, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

2009 Football Season Concludes

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Krizel Cruz Scriptoria

Future of program looks great as junior varsity, freshman team finish strong in district play

The fi rst day of school means the beginning of a new school year and the start of a new high school football season. This sport, more than any other sport on campus, involves the effort and dedication of the players and the support of the students and faculty. Fridays mean the end of the school week as the sound of the Hanks drumline resonating down the halls. The beating of the drums signals to students to put on their black shirts and go to the fi eld to support their team. Unfortunately, everything that starts comes to an end. The varsity football team fi nished 5-5 overall (3-5 in district). As A s this year’s season has concluded, Knight Country sstood by its team through the exciting plays, hard hits, and tood by its team through the exciting plays, hard hits, and breathtaking performance by the varsity football team and b reathtaking performance by the varsity football team and iits players. ts players. The Knights started off the season on the right track after beating Parkland 38-20, exterminating Gadsen 56-0, and conquering Bel-Air 34-6. The team lost some of its momentum after it lost to Montwood, 35-14, on a rainy night at Excalibur Stadium. “Well in some ways it has been disappointing. Of course we didn’t win as many games as we would have liked but overall it was a good season,” said head football coach Jeff Cleveland. “All teams have ups and downs but when times are tough you have to turn bad situations into good ones.” The team went through a rough spot in the middle of the season after the Montwood game. The Knights lost three consecutive games to 1-5A powerhouses El Dorado, Coronado, and Franklin, respectively. The team picked a good place to win its next game after the tight-and-exciting win against Americas, 35-34. The team’s most crushing blow, however, may have come in the second-to-last game of the season. Facing an upstart Socorro team, the Knights lost to the Bulldogs, 3517, for the fi rst time in Cleveland’s time at the helm. The Knights rebounded with a resounding and tight win against traditional rival Eastwood, 42-41 The losses did not put the players down as they fought hard and played with determination in every game. “We had a lot of injuries which slowed us down,” But

the guys practiced hard and prepared themselves each week,” said Cleveland. Like every year, the fans say goodbye to the season and to the seniors who played for the last time. “It’s sad knowing that all the hard work from the past four years has come to an end,” senior Manny Villanueva said. “I wouldn’t change a single thing from hot summer practices to the last game of the season. The team will be losing many good players at almost every position. The entire starting offensive line is graduating. After arriving from El Dorado at the beginning of his junior year, senior Matt Reyes started two years on the varsity team. This year, he fi nished the season 175-for-295 for 2,292 yards, 23 touchdowns and 12 interceptions. Reyes’ favorite receivers this year were seniors Saul Muñoz and Jacob Hesford. Muñoz finished with 52 receptions for 622 yards and five touchdowns. Hesford finished the year with 30 receptions for 435 yards and four touchdowns. Electrifying junior Isaac Porras led the ground attack as he rushed 85 times for 603 yards and three touchdowns. The defense was led by seniors Adrian Rodriguez and Ivan Ibarra. Both players finished with over 100 tackles on the year. Rodriguez led the team with 103 tackles and two sacks. Seniors Sergio Figueroa, Villanueva, and Tevin Williamson each tied the team lead with three sacks. Suffi ce to say the team is loaded with talented players going through the program. The junior varsity team fi nished 7-3 on the season and the freshman team fi nished 8-2. “We got young players that are very good and will step up to fi ll in those spots left open,” said Cleveland. The end of the season does not mean the end of practice. Practice keeps going year round. It helps motivate players to the fullest and makes each student athlete a better individual which will build a better team in the long run. “We will be picking up the slack we did this year and show everyone how we were thought to play,” said junior Anthony Sanchez.

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Nov 2o, 2009

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“This band has learned that it’s not good enough when you’re your best every day but it’s when you desire to be THE best that you pass the mear horizon and truly rise up and bask in glory.” - Cassie Hammond

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Photo by Carlos Valdez/Scriptoria


Nov 20, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

Silver Knights Marching On

The band continues to distinguish itself as one of the best in the city

F

From middle of the pack to leaders; from feeling it can belong to believing it can win; from thinking it can place to knowing it can walk away as the best in the city. Somewhere along the journey the Silver Knights Marching Band fi gured out it was really good at something: competing against successful band programs like Coronado aand nd Americas, arguably two of the strongest marching bands in the city. b ands in the city. “I stepped into this band program two years ago when things were just beginning to breach the horizon,’ said Cassie Hammond, the newest band director. “The Hanks band program came a long way when the students began to realize that they were not reaching their potential as a band. With the help of much needed consistency in the right staff, as well as some younger, but experienced staff with their eyes set on a greater goal that expands beyond El Paso, the band began to take off. As someone who came in at just the right time, this band has learned that it’s not good enough when you’re your best every day but it’s when you desire to be THE best that you pass the mear horizon and truly rise up and bask in glory.” The 2009 marching season concluded Saturday, Nov. 7, at Dixie State College in St. George, Utah, for the regional championship — AKA the Big Bang. The band placed fi rst in its class and third place overall. There were 22 other bands from all over the United States who were there for the same purpose: to be named the best of the best. The Silver Knights Marching band received outstanding general Effect, outstanding visual performance, and outstanding music performance. The Silver Knights marching band was the only band from Texas and not many at the competition had any idea Hanks even existed. After the performance, mostly everyone knew exactly who the band was and who it would be competing with in the future. “After the competition, we knew we had truly represented Hanks High School, Ysleta Independent School District, El Paso and Texas the best we could,” said junior Selina

Alexandra Flores Scriptoria DeLucio. To prepare for the big regional championship in Utah, the band performed on Saturday, Oct. 31 at the NMSU Tournament of Bands competition. The marching band placed second out of 33 bands. The band was seven-tenths of a point behind El Paso’s Coronado High School from ranking fi rst. As a band director of many years, I have seen many

Continued on next page

The members of the Silver Knights marching band perform at halftime at various football games (photos by Carlos Valdez/Scriptoria and Cindy Gurrola/Shield.

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Nov 2o, 2009

bands progress and achieve,” said head band director freshmen,” said freshman Edith Lujan. “Of course as time Horacio Gomez. “But the Hanks band has worked diligently came, we were able to step up and become good marchers to toward the goal of being its best and risen to be considered help the band be successful.” In the 2008 marching season, the Silver Knights marching one of the best bands in El Paso, along with Coronado, who has always been a quite successful band. It took much work band fi nally had the opportunity to compete at state unlike not only from the Hanks band and staff but also a lot of work any other El Paso school. The Hanks band had not been at state in the past 18 years. State competition is once every with the Hanks feeder schools.” The drum line/percussion placed fi rst at Eastwood two years. At the UIL State Competition, the band was among the Middle School in October and received best tenor section and best front line. The percussion’s main competitors were best of the best in Texas. Although some members of the band felt very intimidated, they also felt they could not let Bel Air High School and Coronado. Of course, band is not just any easy thing to put this opportunity go to waste. “It was very outstanding to be in the Alamo Dome in the together. There are things such as marching technique, quality sound and balancing, timing, choreography and presence of other amazing bands,” said sophomore Bianca teamwork. The band choreography is not just making up Salas. After a very hectic Saturday in San Antonio inside the moves to take up space. It’s diffi cult to fi nd an experienced person that is willing to try to help the band. The band Alamo Dome, the band came to fi nd out it was able to stay with the best of the best but members spent many hours needed a little more work to enhance the performance which would only come before the Big Bang. with time. The band placed Bright lights and Friday 21-out-of-32 bands. nights. People waited This was something anxiously for the band to start incredible for the band and its 2009 marching season. the members all knew the At its fi rst competition, on hard work paid off. The Oct. 7 at Socorro’s Student band now knew it could Activities Complex, the band be just as good, or better, did amazingly well on a cold than the other bands. and rainy day. The band was After reaching this point, awarded straight one division the band members made ratings. The percussion a goal to continue to be section took second place, superior and make every edged out slightly by practice and performance Coronado. Four days an improvement from the later, the band performed last one. at the Andress Marching “We are greatly looking Invitational and won fi rst forward to our opportunity place overall. In addition, the to help make a name for band won best visual, best Hanks High School not only percussion, best music, and locally but on a national best color guard. level,” said Gomez. To begin the 2009 marching Without the help of season, tryouts began for the drum line in January Senior Paul Miranda marches at halftime during one of the football the many band directors here on campus and at the so students could be well games (photo by Cindy Gurrola/Shield). feeder schools who greatly prepared for the competitive contribute to the foundation season ahead. Although the band lost many veterans, there were many lowerclassmen to take his or her spot and fi ll the of the band, the band would not be at the level it is now. positions admirably. “I feel that we should all thank our band directors When the band fi nished with concert season in May, — Horacio Gomez, Douglas Brown, Cassie Hammond, 2009, the rest of the band members began to practice for the Albert Martinez, Max Sierra, Yvonne Darancou, and Calvin start of the marching season. While learning the music and Edwards — for all of the time and dedication they give to the beginning to memorize it, the band members knew the team could exceed the expectations after last year’s successful band,” said junior Alex Urueta. “We should also thank our principal Louis D. Martinez and assistant principals Fernie marching season. The very fi rst weeks of August, 2009, the band members Flores, Wes Mottinger, Marie Anaya, Nina Price and Cyndi began rehearsing long hot days in the sun learning by the Ponce for supporting the Silver Knights Marching band basics of marching so he or she could begin to learn the show. through our journey of achievement as a representation of “It was very hard when we fi rst started and seeing Hanks.” the upperclassmen was very amusing for us as

22


Fish OiL for the SouL

Nov 20, 2009

W

SCRIPTORIA

Carlos Valdez Scriptoria

Natural supplement increases intellect and health

Want to increase intelligence, brain activity, ambition, and alleviate symptoms of depression? Then fi sh oil/ Omega-3 fatty acids is a great place to start. Along with increasing one’s intellect and quality of life, fi sh oil increases cardiovascular health and can help prevent risk factors such as strokes, heart attacks, and cancer. Omega-3 is an essential fatty acid. Omega-3 can’t be be manufactured by the body and must be obtained through one’s diet. Most lack these essential fatty acids. through one’s diet. Most lack these essential fatty acids. The American Heart Association recommends eating fi sh — especially fatty fi sh such as mackerel, lake trout, herring, sardines, albacore tuna, and salmon — at least two times a week. The natural supplement fi sh oil is an easily accessible alternative to acquiring these essential fatty acids. There are three major types of omega-3 fatty acids: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). These essential fatty acids are highly concentrated in the brain and appear to be particularly important for brain memory and performance. “With a balanced brain we are able to learn from our own experiences and from other people to make our lives the best they can be,” wrote clinical neuroscientist, psychiatrist, and brain imaging expert Daniel G. Amen. “An unbalanced brain causes its owner immeasurable trouble, including diffi culties learning, being distracted and impulsive, and making the same mistakes again and again.” Excessive alcohol, drug abuse, poor diet, smoking, head injuries, sleep apnea, excessive caffeine, lack of exercise, too much television or violent video games, and chronic stress deteriorate the brain’s overall activity which results in the development of an insuffi cient mind and unbalanced brain. Along with fi sh oil, regular exercise, a well-balanced diet, and other natural supplements helps one maintain a balanced brain. “A magnifi cent mind starts with a balanced brain,” wrote Amen. “The characteristics of a magnifi cent mind include personal responsibility, clear goals, good attention, consistent effort, effective social skills, impulse control, motivation, integrity, and creativity.” Many stresses in life such as one’s job, school, and relationships distracts and mentally tears at the mind.

By practicing a healthy diet and inducing natural supplements, exercise, and healthy eating relieves some stress and alleviates depression. Working hard in the ruthless fi eld of advertisement, Eddie Valdez is relieved by regularly taking fi sh oil. “Fish oil has really helped my general sense of my mental well being,” Valdez, advertisement major and long term user of fi sh oil, said. “Fish oil has made my mind feel sharper, calmer, and it has elevated my mood.” The essential fatty acids found in fi sh oil help to lower cholesterol, tryglicerides, Low-DensityLipoproteins (LDLs) and blood pressure while at the same time increasing good HDL cholesterol. This adds years to one’s life expectancy. Moreover, these fatty acids exterminate clots in arterial walls before it can cause any damage, therefore preventing future heart attacks and strokes. It’s important to maintain an appropriate balance of omega-3 and omega-6 (another essential fatty acid) in the diet because these two substances work together to promote health. A healthy diet should consist of roughly 2-4 times more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fatty acids. The typical American diet contains 14-25 times more omega-6 fatty acids than omega-3 fatty acids. Fish oil should be taken as a daily supplement and higher doses for most major health challenges affecting the heart, brain, eyes, skin, immunity, digestion and joint health. Three grams of fi sh oil per day is highly recommended to maintain a magnifi cent mind. Suggested brands for fi sh oil are Caromega, Nordic Naturals, Carlson Laboratories, and Vitamin Shoppe Brand. Fish oil can be found as capsules, liquid, and even chewy tablets which come in assorted fl avors. Fish oil is not a medical cure. However, the benefi ts of increasing one’s fi sh oil intake is positive. When the body and mind are brought into balance many health issues and concerns people believe are hereditary are merely imbalances and not necessarily diseases or imperfections. Fish oil is one of the quickest, safest, and most effective way to get the essential omega-3 fatty acids that most people require to maintain proper balance.

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Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

Cheating Death Biologist finds solution to slow death process

T

April Ortegon

news/online editor

medicine. The biologist performing this experiment, Mark Roth, has fi gured out the puzzle. “While it’s true we need oxygen to live, it’s also a toxin,” said Roth. As hard as it may be to believe, Roth has proven this theory through multiple experiments. Apart from guiding visitors at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Roth has also studied the idea that death is not necessarily caused by oxygen deprivation but by a chain of damaging chemical reactions triggered by decreasing

patient survives. Roth’s work was inspired by personal tragedy when his daughter died after a year of painful medical complications. It was after her death that he decided to fi nd a probable cure or prevention to a tragedy like this from happening to anyone else. His experiment began with developing fi sh embryos. He found a way to drain the oxygen from their cells and soon discovered that the embryos would not die. Instead it would cease to grow. He then replaced the missing oxygen and realized the embryos

The testing rat sniffs the air inside an incubator a few times. Less than a minute goes by and its natural twitch becomes almost still. The monitor in the other observation room shows breathing and heart rate changing to a downward slope. The 50-year-old biologist previously asks his assistant to turn the dial that would release poison gas in the sealed enclosure that contained the rat. The gas could kill approximately a dozen people with just one ounce. At fi rst observation, this looks bad. Human beings need oxygen Biologist Mark Roth tested the effects of oxygen deprivation on this laboratory rat. The picture illustrates two lines connected to survive. If a person to the incubator. One line extracts oxygen while the other releases toxin (photo courtesy AP Images/Used with permission). doesn’t receive air for several minutes the outcome could be fatal. However, something else is going on inside this rat. The rat, who probably died or is dying slowly, is actually nowhere near death at all. It’s a puzzling question oxygen levels. would grow from where it originally stopped. that is almost hard to The aforementioned reactions require the A strange result but a breaking point in what understand or even presence of some oxygen. Hydrogen sulfi de he was experimenting. answer. replaces oxygen which serves as prevention Roth’s next variable for testing was Its real answer is from such reactions taking place. No chain fruit fl ies. In this experiment he would gas the future of reaction, no cell death and, remarkably, the them inside an incubator. The outcome was emergency

Biologist Mark Roth has studied the idea that death is not necessarily caused by oxygen deprivation but by a chain of damaging chemical reactions triggered by decreasing oxygen levels.

24


Nov 20, 2009

inevitable: they stopped moving and eventually died. His next process would be to return them to life by injecting fresh air into the enclosure. Remarkably the fl ies came back to life. The air living creatures — including human beings — breathe on this earth is 21 percent oxygen. At fi ve percent almost every living organism which intakes oxygen to survive would be dead in just a few minutes. However, at 0.1 percent, the results proved to be another story. “You get a state of suspended animation and the creatures do not pass away, and that’s the basis of what we see as an alternative way to think about critical care medicine,” Roth said. “What you want to do is to have the patient’s time slowed down, while everyone around them [like doctors] move at what we would call real time.” If the patient’s process of death decreased doctors would be given an advantage in an attempt to save his or her life. In medicine, especially emergency medicine, time is of the essence. If doctors could somehow stretch the ability to work on a patient, the end result could prove favorably to doctors having to perform emergency procedures. A prominent example refl ects the history of open-heart surgery. For years, surgeons usually had the technical advantage on tools to make simple repairs to the heart. However, doctors could not help the patient until the

SCRIPTORIA

development of the heart-lung machine. The machine has the ability to replicate the function of the heart and lungs for a few minutes while doctors work on the actual heart. Roth also experimented with hydrogen sulfi de on mice. Although it was not same experiment, he did not expose the mice to enough gas to shut down its metabolism entirely or kill them. He dropped the breathing rate below 10 percent normal. When he reversed the process six hours later, the mice were fi ne. “[Using hydrogen sulfi de] is so simple, it’s genius,” said David Lefer, a researcher and cardiothoracic surgeon at Emory University, who is now experimenting with hydrogen sulfi de in his own lab. “The failures with larger animals have been a big disappointment. To make this effective for humans may take a combination of sodium sulfi de and additional agents. We’re just not sure what form it will take.” Roth wishes that a drug containing hydrogen sulfi de can be used in a conventional setting to treat people who can benefi t. “There are almost certainly reasons it would not, but I don’t know what they are yet,” Roth said. Roth’s success placed him in the pages of “Ripley’s Believe it or Not.” He also received a MacArthur Genius Grant and has secured more than $600 million worth of venture capital funding for Ikaria, the company he co-founded.

Biologist Mark Roth (above) first began the concept of slowing the death process after he lost his daughter to medical complications. His team of scientists continue to work in his lab (left) advance the possibility that the process can indeed be brought to a near standstill (photos courtesy AP Images/ Used with permission).

25


Music &

SCRIPTORIA

Nov 2o, 2009

the Mind

Katherine Alanis Co-Opinion Editor

M

A student listens to music on his mp3 player during lunch. Studies show that music is beneficial to the mind, body, and soul (photo by Kat Alanis/Scriptoria).

It’s the music that saves you when your not so sure you’ll survive. — Jack’s Mannequin’s “Swim” Music has a huge effect on the listener. It’s hard to believe but music m usic can work as a stress reliever, eenergy booster, study aid, and even as nergy booster, study aid, and even as medicinal treatment. m edicinal treatment. According to the American Music Therapy Association,

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music is benefi cial to mind, body, and soul. It helps people with things from doing homework to dealing with emotional and physical pain. Lets say a student needs to learn the preamble. How long would it take a person to memorize the fi rst fi fty-two words of the constitution? Probably a long time. However, it’s proven that if he or she recites the preamble with a catchy jingle, or along with an

entertaining tune, he or she will have a easier time remembering the words. As a student studies, there are many distractions that make it hard for he or she to focus. There are many types of music that can be distracting but there is music that can help one’s mind focus on what needs to get done. According to a report in the Journal of Neuroscience of Behavior and Psychology, the Russian Academy of


Nov 20, 2009

Sciences discovered that a person can recognize letters, images, and numbers faster when he or she listens to rock or classical music. “Music with out words (classical, etc.) will help you concentrate better,” Cyndi Rains, biology teacher, said. “It’s been proved scientifi cally.” Maybe a little Mozart can help a student pass that math test. Let’s say the day hasn’t been so great; bad luck and unhappy situations are at every turn. All a person has to do is fi nd the right song to listen to. Whether it’s the song that makes one cry, smile or scream, the music helps he or she vent and release any negative stress or positive energy. “Music affects you because it changes how you feel,” sophomore Jazmyn Luna said. “It changes your mood and makes you feel better.” It’s an emotional stress reliever without drugs and treatment. “It’s ecstasy to the mind,” senior Diego Sanchez said. “Depending on your mood or your feelings, there will be music to go with it.” Music can act as a can of red bull without all the sugar. When a person hears a particular rhythm, a feeling of wanting to get up and dance takes over. Think of it this way: not only is the music giving the person an energy boost but it also gets the heart rate going. Entertainment and exercise. When a person listens to music, it’s like he or she is in an entirely different world and nothing hurts.

Studies have shown that patients suffering from cancer use music as therapy for his or her pain. The patient listens to music while in therapy to ease the discomfort of the side effects from chemotherapy. Music has been proven to heal aches and pains, help with physical rehabilitation, and people with disabilities. It also can be used as speech therapy on a child who suffers

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from autism. People with insomnia have been able to sleep better. “(Music) plays a huge role on a person’s personality, attitude, goals and values, “junior Belen Garcia said. “Music can affect our mind set.” Music helps in everyday situations. It’s a place people can go to without moving; words he or she can say without speaking.


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Habitat for inhumanity Loss of habitat for some creatures is beginning to end its existence Zach Ziegler Scriptoria

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P

Nov 2o, 2009

People have changed a lot over time. 100 years ago there was no such thing as global warming and nobody really cared much about the environment. Now that people have more knowledge of the world, they are more cautious about preserving the environment. Mostly cautious. People P eople in the past acted horribly. Four aanimals nimals that recently became extinct were iintentionally ntentionally killed off for selfi sh reasons. Four more became extinct directly because of humans. The Thylacine, or Tasmanian tiger, was hunted down by farmers because it was a threat to small farm animals. Hunters nearly wiped out every single one in the wild. In 1936 it was fi nally put on the endangered species list. Too little too late, unfortunately. In the same year the last Thylacine died at a zoo in Tasmania. It was locked out of its shelter and died due to freezing temperatures. The Quagga was a subspecies of zebra. It was also hunted to extinction because they ate grass, which ranchers wanted for livestock. The quagga was also hunted for meat and leather. The last Quagga lived at the Amsterdam Zoo and died in 1883. Since Quagga was a term for all zebras, it took years to realize that she was the last of its kind. The Caribbean monk seal was the only seal native to the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. It was hunted down to near extinction for two reasons: oil and competition. The last recorded sighting of one of the seals was near Jamaica in 1952 but it was not offi cially extinct until June 6, 2008. The fi nal species that people decided didn’t want is the Javan tiger. The tigers lived abundantly on the island of Java for a long time. When the island began being cultivated people began hunting and poisoning all of the tigers. The last sighting of one was in 1972 but it is believed that the species survived until the 1980s. The passenger pigeon and the Bubal Hartebeest were both hunted to extinction. Both were hunted for meat and, more specifi cally, the hartebeest was also hunted for fun. The last of each species were females that died in a zoo. The last pigeon was named Martha, and died at the Cincinnati Zoo on September 1, 1914. The last Hartebeest died at the Paris Zoo in 1923. The Tecopa pupfi sh and the Baiji River dolphin both went extinct because of habitat loss caused by humans. The pupfi sh was


Nov 20, 2009

Editorial

SCRIPTORIA Polar bears (left) are dying because of habitat loss. The polar ice caps are melting, so the bears are drowning or dying of starvation. (photo courtesy AP images/Used with permission). The Baiji river dolphin (below) was declared extinct in 2006. They died from getting caught in fishermanʼs nets and habitat loss. Photo courtesy AP images/Used with permission).

offi cially declared extinct in 1981. Half of the Baiji River dolphin’s population died from getting tangled in fi shing nets. The species was declared functionally extinct in 2006. “I don’t think what they did was right,” said junior Brigette Hufford. “They could’ve found another way to handle things without killing the animals.” Even though people are more aware about the environment, many of them still don’t care about it. One of the biggest issues today is the polar ice caps. They are melting quickly which causes polar bears, an endangered species, to die off due to habitat loss. Some organizations are trying to help save the polar bears but it is hard because the species is not dying from an easily-fi xed problem. We can try to keep as many bears as we can in captivity but nothing can really be done to save its natural environment. One thing we can prevent, but don’t, is deforestation. The Amazon rainforest is one of the most diverse places on the planet, but it is disappearing quickly because of people. Even though we don’t intentionally send animals into extinction, most people still don’t really care about what happens to the environment “I think that people today are more aware of what they’re doing,” said Hufford. “Things like this still happen sometimes, and it’s just something that each generation has to learn on its own, since the world can’t seem to learn as a whole.”

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Nov 2o, 2009

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A crator from a meteor that has crashed into the earth (photo courtesy AP Images/Used with permission).

The End

T

Is Nigh!

The earth is crumbling beneath us! The citizens of Earth are about to be struck by a meteor! Pack an emergency supply kit! Grab little Timmy and run! With doomsayers, random signifi cant dates and calendars, and various propaganda from both the media and apocalyptic movies, it’s hard not to get caught up in the ‘the end of the world as we know it’ mentality. The most popular end of the world theory of the moment T he most popular end of the world theory of the moment iis the Mayan calendar. According to the calendar, the world s the Mayan calendar. According to the calendar, the world ssupposedly ends on Dec. 21, 2012. The Mayans based one of upposedly ends on Dec. 21, 2012. The Mayans based one of its calendars on a 260-day calendar called the Sacred

30

Kyle Kehrwald copy editor

Year. The calendar consisted of a repeating cycle of 13 days and were combined with 20 days. The second calendar, called the Vague Year, is similar to the Gregorian calendar many countries use today. It has 18 months that are 20 days each plus another fi ve-day month. These two calendars were combined to form the Calendar Round. Specifi c dates would only occur once every 52 years. The major hype over the winter solstice apocalypse is that it is the end of one Baktun, which is an era consisting of 395 years. So far there have been 12 Baktuns as evidenced in the calendars; each has occurred without incident. The


Nov 20, 2009

upcoming date is the fi rst Baktun that people will witness the end of since the rediscovery of the Mayan calendar. Overall the date signifi es the end of an era and possibly a change in human mind set. However, many people who understand the workings of this calendar and of the Mayan culture believe that this will not be the end of the world. People invent an end of the world every 10 to 20 years. Some believed that George Orwell’s “1984” would come true and everyone would be cursed to live in a world controlled by Big Brother. Then came the turn of the century, or Y2K. Some believed there would be the second coming of Christ, signaling

John Cusack is at a press conference for his disaster movie, 2012 (photo courtesy AP Images/Used with permission).

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Armageddon and the end of the world. Thomas Chase predicted the Y2K bug. The bug would cause a worldwideelectrical failure, create a world economic depression, and bring the Antichrist to earth. “I think every generation has it’s own doomsayers, and while the world will eventually end, people shouldn’t waste their life waiting for the end to come,” English teacher James O’Keeffe said. “When the world does end, it will be when we least expect it and in a way we have never thought of before.” With every passing year, some sort of prediction is made that the world will end by some horrendous natural disaster. From hurricanes to volcanic eruptions, even global warming or being hit by an object from space, people foretell the end on a yearly basis. “People need the huge event. Natural disasters are the best effects,” junior Luis Rivera said. “And once that passes people develop a new end of the world. It’s a cycle.” Movie production companies are turning the end of the world into a cash cow with almost infi nite possibilities for plots. A movie based on the 2012 end of the world, titled “2012,” claims to be “an epic adventure about a global cataclysm that brings an end to the world and tells of the heroic struggle of the survivors,” according to the offi cial website. Other apocalyptic movie plots involve anything from natural disasters, the world being blown up, or even taken over by zombies and the human’s fi ght for survival along the way. Take a deep breath, put down little Timmy, and relax. People have been predicting the end of the world for thousands of years and, overall, the earth is still going strong, outliving every prophecy thus far.

Hanks psychology

teacher

weighs in

“I’m not sure humans as a whole need or look forward to a doomsday. I think it’s more of a fascination, like a curiosity about how the world works. Perhaps the appeal of a doomsday is to know there Sophia Hernandez is the AP psychology and sociology teacher at Hanks (photo by Kyle Kehrwald). is something greater than us, to know that there is an explanation for the way the world works.” -Sophia Hernandez, psychology

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S L I M

Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

The inaccuracies portrayed in the modeling industry create a negative domino effect for women

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C i t y

RACHEL CHEEK editor in chief

Pick up any magazine these days and a flawless-faced, perfectly-toned model with straight, stunning white teeth is sure to be on the cover. However, chances are, she didn’t start out that way. Recently, Ralph Lauren fired model Filippa Hamilton for being too overweight to model its line of clothing. Hamilton was w as 5’10, and weighed 120 pounds, a very hhealthy ealthy weight for someone her height. She S he also is a size four. Hamilton appeared in a Ralph Lauren ad in which several parts of her body were excessively manipulated by using digitalphotography software. The resulting image made the model look grotesquely thin. “I think they owe American women an apology, a big apology,” said Hamilton. “I’m very proud of what I look like, and I think a role model should look healthy.” While representatives from Ralph Lauren did apologize for the photo, this is hardly the first time the modeling and fashion industry has been the center of controversies such as this. In past months, Glamour magazine was under fire for featuring model Lizzie Miller, who posed nearly nude with excess stomach fat and what were referred to as “thick thighs.” Situations and controversies like this reflect the insecurities of women all over and instill the thoughts into these female’s minds that healthy and natural is not beautiful. Healthy bodied women such as Hamilton were fired or scorned for representing true-to-life images.

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“Women are beautiful, regardless what anyone tells them,” said senior Kelsie Burdett. “Models who are fired for not fitting into a size 0 are experiencing the evils of vanity and appearance that prevails all over the world. This is exactly why girls end up with eating disorders. Girls should never feel as if they are not good enough because they might have more meat on them.” In this society, where someone with such a healthy appearance and weight as

Miller’s is labeled a plus-size model and is heckled for being overweight with the natural fat a woman is supposed to have. Its naturally going to cause women and teenage girls to have doubts about her own body and image. This can cause girls to look at “overweight” and “plus-size” models with average bodies and believe she is overweight. They begin think that something is wrong because they resemble a model who is considered

The Ralph Lauren advertisement featuring model Filippa Hamilton. The ad sparked controversy due to Hamiltonʼs overly-manipulated photograph. (photo courtesy AP Images/Used with permission).


Nov 20, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

The emphasis put on a model’s weight is ridiculous. It definitely sends the wrong message to young girls who look up to these models because it seems as though if you’re not painfully thin, you’re not beautiful. - Laura Aponte, Junior

“less than perfect” in the eyes of society and the world of fashion. “The emphasis put on a model’s weight is ridiculous,” said junior Laura Aponte. “If a girl with a healthy body weight tries to become a model, she’s deemed a plus-size, or she doesn’t make it at all. It definitely sends the wrong message to young girls who look up to these models because it seems as though if you’re not painfully thin, then you’re not beautiful, despite personality or anything else. It can really destroy someone’s self esteem.” The average woman who picks up a magazine will be upset over the fact that she does not resemble the thin models on every page but rather the plus-size models who are often labeled as overweight or undesirable by society. Photoshop and other editing software programs which allow anyone to touch up a photo and manipulate certain items make the photo less desirable and create such a dilemma in this society. While it is customary to create a flawless magazine ad or a smooth commercial, it can alter the reality that women see every day when she looks in the mirror or at one another. “Situations like that affect not only individual females but also greatly affect society as a whole,” said senior Raquel Salinas. “Models are constantly hurting themselves by trying to meet the high standards of the modeling industry, which is nothing like the real world. As it is, teenagers already have a hard enough life trying to fit in with their friends.

A teenage girl measures herself. Media portrayals of women can cause females to feel insecure and obsess over their weight. (Photo by April Hernandez/Scriptoria) Trying to look a certain way doesn’t help one’s self esteem at all; it only brings them down.” In a world where comments, controversies, and such negative aesthetic commentary runs rampant, it’s no wonder females all over the country receive such a bad message about her own body from the

media. “I think people these days want something realistic,” said senior April Gallegos. “They want to see real girls [and] not skeletons that no one can relate to. Girls are growing up seeing these models and think, ‘It’s okay to be that thin,’ when it’s not. It’s not healthy or ideal.”

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Nov 2o, 2009

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With the onset of technological advancements to make reading books more accessible, print publications (above) are quickly becoming in danger of becoming obsolete (photo by Carlos Valdez/Scriptoria).

The new look of print

I

Matt Romero online editor

It’s amazing how technology has found its way into every aspect of life. The cars people drive need a computer to function. The mp3 players people listen to have memory cards and LCD screens; the cell phones people rely on from a day-to-day basis only get more technologically advanced as the days go on. Yet Y et as new innovations in Silicon S ilicon Valley seem to thrive iin n the world of media and entertainment, e ntertainment, other forms of media are fighting for its lives.

34

Since the world and its

In today’s world, paper is almost a burden.

news is on display through the Internet the need for newspapers and magazines has diminished. After all, why pay for a subscription when all the articles and information one will ever need is just a click away free of charge? Nowadays, even books and movies are getting put to the test with services like Google books and Netflix amassing decades of work for a pittance. The everyday consumer is getting away with a free pass when it comes to the mainstream media, a fact in which the industry is well aware. Companies are scrambling to make ends meet by manipulating modern technology to make a buck. Ironically, the same technology that sunk print media in a hole could very well dig it out. New e-book readers, like Kindle, are condensing the world’s literature into a sleek, lightweight, package


Nov 20, 2009 by offering centuries of literature in a two-lb. hunk of technology. The Kindle in particular relies on users to buy publications online for a smaller fee than the print version. While the focus of e-readers is books, newspaper and magazine publishers are offering periodic feeds of its work directly to the device. Consumers can now skip the delivery process and enjoy his or her publication on demand. The timing of such products could not have been better. Within the last few months, market shares of newspapers have plummeted and subscription numbers have been abysmal. According to a New York Times report, subscription numbers have decreased by about seven percent. All the while, the publication’s online viewership had increased over 10 percent. The report also indicated that almost all newspapers nationwide experienced a decrease in subscriptions, ranging anywhere between half a percent to over 22 percent. In today’s world, paper publications are almost a burden. People nowadays are used to streamlined and simplified products that a book with printed words seems almost archaic. When publications began offering articles online at no charge, consumers found it unnecessary to indulge in paying a fee for the written version. Written publications needlessly put itself where it is now through bad marketing strategies and ineffective solutions at attracting subscribers. “I yearn for the day when we can do our jobs without looking over our shoulders,” said Bill Keller, the executive editor of The New York Times. New York Times Company (NYTC), the publisher who owns the New York Times, recently trimmed 100 positions after making record-low profit off of the New York Times alone. Other newspapers in NYTC fired as many as 120 employees in response to the lackluster sales figures. Some newspaper publishers are yielding on print and are offering access to its articles online under a monthly subscription fee. Other publishers are riding the wave on digital downloads to make ends meet. The woes of the digital era aren’t for the printing press alone. Lately, companies who either sell or rent DVDs has seen a decrease in DVD sales and movie rentals because many users are opting to have DVDs sent directly via mail or are downloading the movie through on-demand services from Direct TV and Dish Network.

SCRIPTORIA Netflix in particular has begun what seems to be the all-you-can-eat buffet of the movie world. It offers massive libraries of movies for shipment and an ever-increasing pile of on-demand movies online for the price of a few five-day rentals of yesteryear. Production companies are taking damage toward its bottom line. Change is on the horizon as to how people choose his or her form of entertainment. Companies are going to be craftier at padding its pocketbooks. All financial issues aside, one thing is certain: entertainment as an industry is shifting toward the instant gratification available on the Internet and the consumers are the ones to benefit. So strap up your Kindles and get your iPods ready to go. The on-demand revolution is upon us.

Students across the nation (above) are using Kindles for studying in lieu of carrying multiple heavy books. Electronic readers also feature several study-friendly features such as highlighting and bookmarking (photo courtesy AP Images/Used with permission).

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Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

Kyle Monticone entertainment editor

the controversial practice of...


C

Nov 20, 2009

Cryo is a Greek root meaning “cold.” Cryonics is the practice of preserving a legally dead person for possible revival when future science can cure all diseases, therefore reversing all damage that was done to a body during cryopreservation. Cryonics has been practiced in the world for nearly n early 50 years. It was invented by Karl Werner iin n 1965 when he founded the Cryonics Society of New York. C ryonics Society of New York. There are many places around the world that practice cryogenics in the hope of someday being able to save lives and to extend lifespan. One of these areas is the Cryonics Institute in Michigan. The Cryonics Institute cools the legally dead to the temperature of liquid nitrogen when physical decay stops. The bodies are stored in a vault at temperatures below -200°F. The tank and the body constantly receive liquid nitrogen. The practice of Cryonics is considered legal in the United States but can only be applied to a person who has been pronounced dead by an authorized health personnel. There are currently two types of Cryonics that are practiced in the United States: normal cryopreservation, which freezes the entire body; neurosuspension, in which it deals only with the head of a Cryonic’s patient. Neurosuspension is not as accepted in society. Reports tend to surface over the maltreatment of cryopreservation patients. One of these reports over maltreatment of cryopreservation is being made public by Larry Johnson. Johnson worked for eight months at The Alcor Life Extension Foundation. Johnson then left without reason and remained quiet for over eight years. Now, he has emerged with unsettling information which will be featured in his book, “Frozen: My Journey Into the World of Cryonics, Deception and Death.” In his book, he discusses how many employees of Alcor were discourteous to the heads of patients. For the last three months of his job at Alcor, Johnson claimed that he secretly wore a wire to record his conversations, took photographs, and collected internal documents. In a statement released Oct. 7, 2009, Alcor accused Johnson of “exaggerations and misrepresentations,” and has tried multiple times to sue Johnson to silence him. Johnson witnessed three suspensions, also known as cryopreservation, on his fi rst day. “It was barbaric...the third suspension that I witnessed, they actually used a hammer and a chisel,” he said. “I actually witnessed them remove

SCRIPTORIA

a head with a chisel and a hammer.” Johnson also set out to fi nd out the story on one of Alcor’s most famous frozen residents, and Johnson’s admitted childhood hero, Ted Williams. On July 5, 2002, Williams, a famous baseball hall-of-fame player for the Boston Red Sox, was pronounced dead after suffering cardiac arrest. His body was immediately fl own to Alcor’s facility

“Without that...the head would have just toppled over.”

Front of the Alcor Life Extension Foundation in Scottsdale, Ariz. (photo courtesy Cronkite News Service Photo/Kelly McGrath/Used with permission). in Arizona to be frozen at the request of his son. Upon arrival, his blood was pumped out and replaced with a secret chemical formula to minimize any freezing damage. “They put his head into a vessel called the Cryo-star, which is really not meant for freezing human heads...It was faulty, they didn’t know how to use it ... it was having very dramatic temperature swings,” Johnson said. According to Johnson, Williams’ head remained in the malfunctioning chamber for over a year. In his book, Johnson also claims that Williams’ head was cut off without prior approval from his family. “He was supposed to be a whole-body suspension,” Johnson said, “He was supposed to be in one piece. They got him to the O.R. at Alcor and proceeded to cut through his neck.” In July, 2003, Alcor decided it was time to move Williams’ head into a more permanent facility. “They put him in another vessel called the LR-40. They took a tuna can, a Bumble Bee tuna can, they set it down on the bottom of the LR-40 and put his head into the LR-40 and set it on the tuna can. Without that tuna can, the head would have just toppled over.”

Continued on next page 37


Nov 2o, 2009

SCRIPTORIA

Q&A Do you think cryonics should be practiced?

“It depends on the person. Personally, I would like to. If I get another chance to live, why not?”

Angel U. Ortega Sophomore “Nope. It’s weird. Why would you freeze people? And to cut off their heads? That’s disgusting!”

Brittany Gamez Junior

“Yes, but at the same time - it would be gross to come back alive and not be the same or look the same.”

Silvia Valencia Sophomore

“I think Cryonics is disgusting. It’s just gross and wrong because of the possibility of having your head cut off.”

Samantha Sida Freshman

Ted Williams (left) with Carl Yastrzemski at a Boston Red Sox Training Camp in Scottsdale, Ariz., in 1963 (photo courtesy AP Images/Used with permission). The next day he watched in disapproval as an Alcor employee moved the head into a silver pot that would store it for years to come. “They actually carry the heads around on hooks to move them from one point to another,” he said. “Well, the tuna can is frozen to the top of his head. The only way to get that off is with a hammer or a wrench. [An employee] got a wrench, cocked his arm back to strike that can to knock it off, and missed - hitting the side of Ted Williams’ head. Then he cocked back, took another swing, hit the can square on, and it went fl ying across the room,” Johnson said. In another statement posted on the Alcor website, the company denies mistreating the remains of Ted Williams. “That incident was the turning point for me,” Johnson said. “I had to get out of there.” Dr. David Monticone, a doctor who studies general medicine, is aware of cryonics as a practice. “I think cryonics is all a money-making hoax,” Monticone said. “There is no way you can revive the human brain hundreds of years from now. We can’t even verify that the temperature will remain constant. We don’t know if the electricity or the liquid nitrogen will somehow shut off for a period of time, [therefore], allowing the head to freeze and unfreeze.” According to Monticone, when Williams died, all living cells in his body died before he reached the cryogenic facility so his remains could be frozen. “Theoretically, you can freeze a frozen embryo or sperm that is living and thaw them at a later date. But when a cell is dead it can’t ever be revived,” Monticone said. For more information on Cryonics, visit http://www.Cryonics.org/ or http://www.alcor.org/

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Nov 20, 2009

@

Entertainment

SCRIPTORIA

HANKSMEDIA.COM

>> Weekly Recaps on your favorite shows such as: - The Office - Smallville - Grey’s Anatomy - Vampire Diaries - CSI >> Weekly Top 10 ‘Top Moments’ List >> and much much more... Visit the ‘Entertainment’ section @ hanksmedia.com

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Nov 2o, 2009

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Advertise with Scriptoria ads@hanksmedia.com

Advertise with Scriptoria ads@hanksmedia.com

Coupons available at Hanksmedia.com


Nov 20, 2009

Script

SCRIPTORIA

& Toria

Present!

Scriptoriaʼs first ever

advice column! Do you ever feel all the happiness drained out of your life? Did your kitten cross the line and you don’t know where to turn? Has a lost lover ever re-entered you’re life? Are you stuck with planning the next big prank? These things happen and Script & Toria are here to help! E-mail us at advice@hanksmedia.com Simply use an alias to keep yourself anonymous, like Clueless Klepto Disclaimer: Script & Toria are happy to help unless professional help is needed

Love,

Script & Toria


SCRIPTORIA

Nov 2o, 2009


Issue Two