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UPDATE THE OFFICAL NEWSLETTER OF OPENHOUSE

NOVEMBER 2012 VOLUME I, EDITION 1 1800 MARKET STREET, PMB 93 THIRD FLOOR SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94102 (415) 296-8995 info@openhouse-sf.org www.openhouse-sf.org

55 LAGUNA

HISTORIC VICTORY AND COMMUNITY SPIRIT Dr. Marcy Adelman presents the rendering of Richardson Hall with retail space, new Openhouse offices and 40 apartments (staff photo). article by marcy adelman, phd

The San Francisco Planning Commission unanimously approved our senior-housing development in August 2012. This is a victory we all can share in. Approval of the Openhouse plan to build the city’s first—and the nation’s largest—affordable housing community welcoming to LGBT seniors is an historic moment that brings us much closer to obtaining our long-held dream. But the accomplishment also reveals something enduring about the spirit of our community. (continued on page 2)

WELCOME TO THIS ISSUE. MUCH MORE INSIDE:

letter from the executive director / openhouse at a glance / housing and community: it takes a village supporters consider the future / estate gift enables strategic planning / volunteer profile: eva lilly partnering with the carlisle / profile: support groups / our supportive community: the spring fling! i love openhouse because… / thank you to our donors / moving to the lgbt community center


WHO WE ARE OPENHOUSE IS A COMMUNITY FOR PEOPLE OF ALL AGES WHO ARE:

Proud and active LGBT older adults LGBT seniors from diverse backgrounds at all levels of income, mobility and community engagement Friends and family who care about LGBT seniors Loving caregivers Social workers, service practitioners and housing developers Community members who want to ensure dignity for LGBT seniors and themselves

THE NEW OPENHOUSE BUILDING WITH 70 UNITS AND A COMMUNITY CENTER

55 LAGUNA (continued from page 1)

A RENOVATED RICHARDSON HALL WITH RETAIL SPACE, NEW OPENHOUSE OFFICES AND 40 APARTMENTS

RICHARDSON HALL | Laguna & Hermann Corner SAN FRANCISCO, CA | 5/22/12| MERCY HOUSING CALIFORNIA

Think back: four years ago, we won a similar Planning Commission approval just before the country’s economy crashed, local financing sources suddenly dried up, and housing projects had to be abandoned. But we never gave up. Openhouse kept moving forward. Openhouse’s strong new leadership formed new partnerships and collaborations with Mercy Housing California and renewed the cooperation and commitment of the Mayor’s Office of Housing. In the midst of the economic downturn, the LGBT community – volunteers, donors and champions – responded by enthusiastically supporting our vision and our mission. It is this resilient spirit that keeps our LGBT community going forward despite oppression, discrimination, and family alienation. We never give up and, no matter what, we keep moving forward. 2

Nobody exemplifies this spirit more than today’s LGBT elders, who lived and thrived through much harder times than now. LGBT elders haven’t just witnessed amazing transformations; they’ve created them. They lead us in spreading this proud spirit that moves us forward. They serve on the Openhouse Board. They’re our volunteers, our donors and our clients. Really, they’re not “they” at all. “They” are us. I invite you and your friends to join us. There are more victories to be won.


LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Dear Friends, What an incredible year we’ve had at Openhouse! Thanks to the steadfast support of volunteers, donors, sponsors, participants and advocates like you, we’re stronger than ever. First and foremost, as our unstoppable founder, Dr. Marcy Ademan, writes in this issue, the San Francisco Planning Commission unanimously approved our housing plan for 55 Laguna! The product of years of community organizing and planning, this historic vote is proof that, by standing together, we can make LGBT senior housing a reality in San Francisco. For decades, LGBT people have flocked to San Francisco to find personal freedom and acceptance. Today, more than 25,000 LGBT seniors call San Francisco home. As older adults, however, many LGBT seniors feel pressure to go back into the closet to receive quality care. Many face serious challenges in finding welcoming, affordable housing and must relocate, leaving their cherished city and dear friends behind. 55 Laguna will provide such housing in the heart of San Francisco, along with services and resources to help LGBT seniors remain safe and comfortable in the community they spent a lifetime to build. 55 Laguna promises to be another proud landmark in the history of LGBT people in San Francisco, the region, and the nation.

clockwise from top: Matthew Cimino, Michelle Alcedo, Seth Kilbourn, Ellyn Bloomfield and Fairley Parson, missing from photo: Joel Evans and Scott Haitsuka (photo by Stephanie Jaeger).

OPENHOUSE STAFF

Michelle Alcedo, Director of Programs Ellyn Bloomfield, Social Services Manager Matthew Cimino, Office Manager Joel Evans, Director of Development and Marketing

In other developments, please take a moment to review “Openhouse at a Glance” for a drill-down on this year’s key achievements. Among other things, we have increased the number of seniors we serve by 52%, while maintaining our commitment to quality. As you can see, with expanding activities and services, we continue to reduce isolation and build community, while improving heath, well-being and security.

Scott Haitsuka, Program Coordinator

To the seniors we serve, the professionals we train and the volunteers we engage, thank you for sustaining us and a community of ever more diverse, proud and numerous LGBT seniors. We couldn’t do it without you.

Bill Scherer, Secretary

Seth Kilbourn, Executive Director Fairley Parson, Activities Manager OPENHOUSE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Cynthia Martin, President Martin Skea, Vice President Daniel Johnson, Treasurer Dr. Marcy Adelman, Founder Xavier Barrera

In a closing note, as you think about your year-end charitable givGloria Cavanaugh ing, please keep LGBT seniors in mind. Thank you for returning the Randi Gerson enclosed envelope with your most generous gift. We so appreciate your continued support. Please stay in touch. Happy Holidays!

Hadley Dale Hall Arthur Hurwith Marla Jurosek

Saralie Pennington Matile Rothschild Neil Sims Deborah Schmall Stan Watson

Seth Kilbourn, Executive Director

Sonni Zambino

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OPENHOUSE AT A GLANCE YEAR OVER YEAR COMPARISONS

These quick and informative metrics show how rapidly Openhouse has been growing. They compare numbers from our recently completed fiscal year (July 2011–June 2012) against the previous one (July 2010–June 2011). Served 604 LGBT senior community members, up from 398 the year before, through activities, social services, housing assistance, Friendly Visitor volunteers and more. Organized 1,408 hours of group activities with community members, up from 965. Completed 3,440 social-service interactions with community members, up from 1,672. Worked with 402 community members who live alone, up from 267 (derived from intake data). Helped 187 community members understand and/or access housing options, up from 108. Matched 20 Friendly Visitor volunteers with community members, up from 10. Trained 671 care providers from 101 California agencies, up from 344 care providers and 44 agencies.

CONSUMER SURVEY

Given Openhouse’s rapid growth, we are particularly pleased that rates of satisfaction have remained high. 85.5% of seniors felt more connected to the LGBT older adult community, compared to 85% the year before. 84% felt more supported and less isolated, compared to 82%. 80% expressed a more positive outlook, compared to 79%. 84% acquired useful information to remain independent, compared to 81%. 90% found services/activities useful or beneficial, compared to 80%. 94% would recommend Openhouse to a friend, compared to 93%. 92% ranked the quality of services either “excellent” or “good,” compared to 93%. 94% ranked the effectiveness of Openhouse staff as either “excellent” or “good,” compared to 91%.

HOUSING ASSISTANCE

Placed 132 LGBT seniors on appropriate housing waitlists or in affordable and welcoming housing over two years.

HIV STATUS AMONG NEW CLIENTS

28% of men reported being HIV positive, 51% reported being negative, and 21% either don’t know or declined to state. 4% of women reported being HIV positive, 71% reported being negative, and 24% either don’t know or declined to state.


“Thank goodness Openhouse was there to guide us through the process and provide emotional support” — LY N N J O R D AN

HOUSING + COMMUNITY IT TAKES A VILLAGE photo on left: Jim Bauer, Lynn Jordan and Joe Childress holding Rupert (staff photo). photo on right: MJ Isabell with Uradiva (photo by Stephanie Jaeger). o p e n h o u s e s ta f f w r i t e r

Joe Childress, a longtime resident of San Francisco, was living in housing that was in such bad shape he couldn’t even receive meal deliveries. He needed help urgently. YOU ARE NOT ALONE

A friend urged Joe to attend an Openhouse housing clinic with Social Services Manager Ellyn Bloomfield. “I had a great meeting with Ellyn,” said Joe. “Dealing directly with my landlord was very stressful. But Ellyn was so helpful and encouraging. She gave me hope.” Ellyn identified a likely opportunity for new housing in the Mission Bay neighborhood – though Joe would have to enter a random lottery and then apply. Ellyn also urged Joe to join our Friendly Visitor program, which is how volunteer Lynn Jordan entered his life. Lynn and Joe hit it off, taking walks and having regular coffee meets. “Joe and I discovered that we enjoy new exhibits at the art museum, browsing in antiques stores, and talking about old movies and TV shows,” said Lynn.

Out of 1,000 applications, Joe’s was one of 300 selected at random. Accompanied by his friend Lynn, he selected a lovely one-bedroom apartment. Lynn made sure Joe’s beloved four-legged companion, Rupert, could move in at no extra cost. A NEW LEASE

Knowing that Joe would need help with his move, Lynn recruited a friend with a truck. Another Openhouse Friendly Visitor volunteer, Jim Bauer, also joined the crew and moved Joe into his brand new home. “It’s the nicest place I’ve ever lived,” Joe said. “I feel a re-kindled desire to give more of myself to the community and to share my positive experience with others.” For more information about Openhouse housing assistance and Friendly Visitor Program, please call Ellyn Bloomfield at (415) 296-8995, x305.

Lynn also helped Joe navigate the hurdles of applying for the new housing. “Thank goodness Openhouse was there to guide us through the process and provide emotional support,” said Lynn. This combination of support proved invaluable for Joe. “I don’t know how I would have gotten through this without Ellyn and Lynn.”

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Supporters Consider the Future SUPPORTERS Hadley Dale HallCONSIDER and Warde Laidman Make Plans THE FUTURE Why did you include Openhouse in your estate plans? HADLEY DALE HALL AND WARDE LAIDMANservices MAKEand PLANS Hadley: I agree with providing housing

to LGBT seniors. Openhouse fills a much-needed gap in senior services of all kinds. They do an incredible job. Warde: Some people don’t have the capacity to give continuously, but down the line there’s always real estate, financial assets like IRAs, cars and other valuable property. Was there a catalyst to making these plans? Hadley: It was a natural thing to do when revising our trusts 10 years ago. Warde: My catalyst was Hadley, agitating behind the scenes! Has making this plan changed your view of Openhouse? Hadley: No. I know the Openhouse mission, governance and community. I’m comfortable with it all. We want to see it stable and independent, and can support that long-term. Warde: My nieces, nephews and siblings don’t need it. And it’s a matter of community continuity. Do you have special hopes for your intended gift or for Openhouse’s financial future? Hadley: As the past director of a social service agency, I know the value of unrestricted funds. On the other hand, for growth and stability, an organization needs facilities and financial reserves. I see Openhouse’s assets in permanent facilities, plus cash reserve to guarantee operations and independence, especially in lean times. Warde: I’m especially interested in helping seniors stay out of the closet. Anyone growing up in our era was faced with hateful role models and expectations. I was executive director of Family Service Agency and ran the psych department at St. Mary’s Hospital. Among my professional goals was to see staff more reflective of our service populations. Speed forward to today and I want to see the same sensitivity and diversity of staffing at our elder care facilities and programs. How can others include Openhouse in their estate plans? Hadley: It’s so easy. If you think about Openhouse as an heir, it will naturally fit into your planning activities, whether through your will, a trust of some sort, or directly from a retirement account. Text box Please contact Joel Evans at (415) 728-0196 to talk about Openhouse in your estate plans, or simply to let us know we’re already included in your plans. We can also refer you to a specialized estate planner.


i n t e r v i e w w i t h j o e l e va n s

Why did you include Openhouse in your estate plans? Hadley: I agree with providing services and housing to LGBT seniors. Openhouse fills a much-needed gap in senior services of all kinds. They do an incredible job. Warde: Some people don’t have the capacity to give continuously, but down the line there’s always real estate, financial assets like IRAs, cars and other valuable property. Was there a catalyst to making these plans? Hadley: It was a natural thing to do when revising our trusts 10 years ago. Warde: My catalyst was Hadley, agitating behind the scenes! Has making this plan changed your view of Openhouse? Hadley: I know the Openhouse mission, governance and community. I’m comfortable with it all. We want to see it stable and independent, and can support that long-term. Warde: My nieces, nephews and siblings don’t need it. And it’s a matter of community continuity.

Warde: I’m especially interested in helping seniors stay out of the closet. Anyone growing up in our era was faced with hateful role models and expectations. I was executive director of Family Service Agency and ran the psych department at St. Mary’s Hospital. Among my professional goals was to see staff more reflective of our service populations. Speed forward to today and I want to see the same sensitivity and diversity of staffing at our elder care facilities and programs. How can others include Openhouse in their estate plans? Hadley: It’s so easy. If you think about Openhouse as an heir, it will naturally fit into your planning activities, whether through your will, a trust of some sort, or directly from a retirement account.

Please contact Joel Evans at (415) 728-0196 to talk about Openhouse in your estate plans, or simply to let us know we’re already included in your plans. We can also refer you to a specialized estate planner.

Do you have special hopes for your intended gift or for Openhouse’s financial future? Hadley: As the past director of a social service agency, I know the value of unrestricted funds. On the other hand, for growth and stability, an organization needs facilities and financial reserves. I see Openhouse’s assets in permanent facilities, plus cash reserve to guarantee operations and independence, especially in lean times. photo at left: Warde (standing) and Hadley (seated) on the patio of their San Francisco home (staff photo).

The Gift of Strategic Vision The Gift of Strategic Vision Openhouse recently received word thatthat longtime supporter passedaway awayininJuly, July, Openhouse recently received word longtime supporterArch Arch Wilson, Wilson, who who passed designated designated Openhouse as the beneficiary of avalue residual from his estate. Openhouse as the beneficiary of a residual fromvalue his estate. Executive Director Seth Kilbourn determined that the funds should be put to very special use, with long-lastin Executive Director Kilbourn determined thatSothe funds should begift putwill to very special use,Seth withcalls “mis impact on the Seth community members we serve. a portion of Arch’s be used for what sion critical” planning. “Arch’s energy enthusiasm are sorely missed. Butwill hebe leftused a legacy to help long-lasting impactstrategic on the community members weand serve. So a portion of Arch’s gift steer ourcalls long-term strategies well into the planning. future. I’m“Arch’s sure he energy would beand very proud and pleased.” for what Seth “mission critical” strategic enthusiasm are sorely missed. But he left a legacy to help steer our long-term strategies well into the future. I’m sure he would be very proud and pleased.”


COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY

Openhouse recognizes and affirms that LGBT older adults live at intersections of race, ethnicity, class, culture, HIV status, sexual orientation, gender, gender identity and expression, spirituality and ability. Openhouse is committed to creating a safe environment to encourage and support participants to share our diverse perspectives and identities to foster dynamic community engagement. Join us in creating a vibrant, healthy and secure future for LGBT seniors in San Francisco and the Bay Area!

photo on this page:

PROFILE: VOLUNTEER, EVA LILY

Greetings from Games Day! One recent sunny morning, from left to right: Eva Lilly (fourth from left) with, from left, Ken, Steve, Linda, Chris, Doug, Daphne, Shessa, Maggie, Jasmine, Pam and Ed (staff photo).

Eva Lilly, 71, has had multiple sclerosis since 1988, but you’d never know it! Eva dedicates her time to Openhouse’s Community Council, Kaleidoscope Program at Laguna Honda Hospital, and weekly Games Day. An active volunteer with the San Francisco Pride Parade and a devoted member of Metropolitan Community Church, Eva is a glowing example of commitment to the community.

photos on opposite page: left: Openhouse’s Director of Programs Michelle Alcedo conducting a training at The Carlisle (staff photo). right: Nicky Frausto participated in the Openhouse men’s support group when he first came to San Francisco, five years ago. “I discovered I wasn’t alone. It was fantastic, sharing our stories and feelings. I was also grieving the loss of my partner of 35 years. It was hard for me to accept that he was gone, and I realized my outlook had to change. Hearing the viewpoints of both men and women in the group was a wonderful experience. We became a family. While you can’t change the past, you can adapt to the present, and feel a lot better about yourself, too.” (staff photo).

A San Francisco native, Eva was born to a working class family and left Washington High School before graduation. At 16, she became a wife and mother, living what she describes as “a traditional life.” But by age 19 she chose to divorce her husband. “I needed to move on. As a single mother without a high school diploma, poverty was a real struggle during the 1960’s, but I didn’t let my daughter know I was having any hardship.” Today, Eva is the lead volunteer for our Kaleidoscope Program, where she organizes monthly visits and socials for hospital-bound LGBT elders. “Providing company and cookies may be all we can do,” says Eva. “But we know that the patients look to our visits to brighten their day and stay connected to the community.” Eva is an inspiring example of the dedication, resiliency and generosity of so many LGBT seniors who are determined to build a bright future for themselves and their communities. – Story drawn from a larger profile by Emerald O’Leary. Bring your friends to Games Day, every Saturday at The LGBT Center, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Each Saturday at The LGBT Center, seniors come to play cards, dominoes and board games. Eva sets up games and refreshments, and welcomes new people to the fun-loving group. “I love volunteering with Openhouse,” she says. “I get as much as I give. I love spending time with other people and would feel lonely myself without these connections.”

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PROFILE: PARTNERS IN SERVICE, THE CARLISLE

PROFILE: SUPPORT GROUPS

Openhouse is proud to partner with The Carlisle (a continuing care retirement community) and its parent company, Sunrise Senior Living. They sponsor the annual Spring Fling and retain Openhouse to provide staff training on LGBT aging issues. We interviewed The Carlisle’s executive director, Tom Berry, about this partnership.

With so many LGBT seniors dealing with issues of grief and loss, Openhouse partners with Access Institute for Psychological Services to offer the 12-week series, “Understanding Grief as a Human Process.”

Why does The Carlisle support and partner with Openhouse? Our company is guided by our Principles of Service. Among them is preserving dignity and celebrating individuality.

In a society where LGBT relationships are not universally recognized or valued, the group is a valuable space where members can support one another and reflect on how loss impacts their lives. “The facilitators are amazing,” said one participant. “They create a space where we can really connect and learn from our grief. It’s hard work, but so gratifying. I feel less alone and stronger.” Caregivers Need Support Too

Why do you engage Openhouse to train your staff? The Carlisle is proud to support and work with Openhouse to help ensure our residents feel comfortable being who they truly are in our community. The training helps us meet those important values.

The LGBT community is no stranger to the challenges of providing care to loved ones and the physical, mental, spiritual, and emotional toll it can take. That’s why Openhouse partners with AgeSong to offer a Caregivers Support Group (for caregivers who are 50+).

What would you like to say to other employers in the elder-care industry? In a city as diverse as San Francisco, it’s important to ensure that your team is trained to ensure that everyone is treated with respect. Openhouse can help you ensure that you have a warm and welcoming community or business.

many older adults, LGBT caregivers often lack support from children or biological family members,” said Openhouse Activities Manager Fairley Parson. “A support system that includes fellow caregivers, community services and skilled facilitators is especially critical for our community.”

The group helps crucial caregivers take care of themselves. “Like WE’VE MOVED!

“My ability to care for my partner depends on my own health and well-being,” said one group member. “The group sustains me when I need recharging.” To participate in future groups, please call Fairley Parson at (415) 728-0193. Find about upcoming groups by visiting the Openhouse website, www.openhouse-sf.org

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Photos from the 2012 Spring Fling: NCLR Executive Director Kate Kendell with Trailblazer Award recipient Joyce Pierson; Dr. Marcy Adelman with Adelman-Gurevitch Founders Award recipients Robert Holgate (L) and Al Baum (R); and luncheon guests (photos by Rink).

SAVE THE DATE FOR THE NEXT SPRING FLING Sunday, April 21, 2013 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

OUR 2012 SPRING FLING SPONSORS TITLE SPONSOR

BENEFACTOR SPONSORS

PARTNER SPONSORS

FRIEND SPONSORS

The Carlisle Donna Wickham Furth Episcopal Senior Communities Horizons Foundation Jewish Home of San Francisco – Jewish Senior Living Group Paul Hastings LLC U.S. Bank Vintage Coventry and Vintage Golden Gate

AARP California Aegis Living Bethany Center Senior Housing, Inc. DLK Law Group Living Well Assisted Living at Home National Center for Lesbian Rights Northern California Presbyterian Homes & Services On Lok Lifeways Paragon Real Estate Group SilverRide Target The Broadmoor David Werdegar Wood Partners Zephyr Real Estate

I LOVE OPENHOUSE BECAUSE... “Openhouse is changing the world for thousands of LGBT elders, making sure that they can age with dignity, with support, and in community. Many of these people – including so many who worked bravely and at great personal risk for LGBT rights - would have nowhere else to turn were it not for Openhouse. That’s why Horizons Foundation has been a steadfast supporter of Openhouse since its very earliest days.” — Roger Doughty, Executive Director, Horizons Foundation “Wells Fargo is proud to support Openhouse and the senior citizens of the LGBT community. We congratulate Openhouse for the milestones it has achieved in its goal to develop affordable housing in San Francisco. The hard work, vision and perseverance of Openhouse’s staff and Board of Directors will continue to drive results in developing safe and affordable housing.” — Katy Johnson, VP and Community Development Officer, Wells Fargo 10


THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS circle of friends

Supporters with gifts of at least $1,000 in the past 18 months. $100,000+ Human Services Agency of San Francisco (DAAS) $25,000 - $99,000 Horizons Foundation Arthur Hurwith The San Francisco Foundation

$5,000 - $9,999 Anonymous (1) Excelerate Foundation Hadley Dale Hall & Warde Laidman James Hormel & Michael Nguyen Marla Jurosek Deborah Schmall & Peggy Garner Martin Skea & Christopher Mondini

$10,000 - $24,999 Alvin Baum & Robert Holgate Genentech, Inc. Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) Neil Sims & Tim Lucas Sonni Zambino

$1,000 - $4,999 Marcy Adelman Warren Anderson David Black Steven A. Coulter & Greg McIntyre John Paul De Cecco Jeffrey Ellis

$500 - $999 Edgar Brenninkmeyer Emery Bushong Gloria Cavanaugh Patricia Chambers & Loretta Harris Kevin Cheng & Todd Mavis Janell Cook & Cindy Truelove Susan Fahey Jeanne L. Gardner Paula Gold Nocella Raul Gorospe Noe Gutierrez Pan Haskins Ladi Hong-Markham & Carol Rudisill Steven Kariker & Ian Hackett Ellen Klutznick Kathleen Madden Mercy Housing California Kent Noyes & Thomas Burke Ralph Patricelli Martin Rabbett Rachel Robasciotti James (Robbie) Robinson Matile Rothschild & Joan Zimmerman Robert W. Sass Roy L. Sauer Janet Sims & Betsy Allen The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence Inc. Larry Stebbins Harry Turner & Brian Keil Carol Yaggy & Mary Twomey

$250 - $499 Dominick Albano Patrick Arbore John Bare & Ignatius Bau John Barnaby Victor Bonfilio Jeffrey Braff Nancy and James Brundy John Burke & Jeannie LaChapelle Barbara Carlson Jim Carroll & Scott Romesburg Otis Charles & Felipe Paris Debra Chaw Laurence Colton & John McCoy Pamela David & Cheryl Lazar Bill Denebeim & Mark Vogel Bob Dockendorff Linda Edelstein & Marion Gillen Beth Edwards John Feather Jason Fenske & Chris Dordell Charles Forester & John Cadle David Gary & Kipp Leyser

Randi Gerson Joe Gillach & Reynaldo Zertuche Jerome Goldstein & Tom Taylor Sheldon and Judy Greene Bret Guenther Ivan Hamilton Byron Hancock & Len Handeland Francoise Herrmann Alec Hughes Alex Ingersoll & Martin Tannenbaum Arnie Jackson Lynn Jordan Andre Kingsley Daniel Langford Darrin Lim Jon Mayo & Glenn Pineda Crisco & Margaret McCullough Rev. Peter McGrath & Han Wang Virginia Merrifield & Cathy Davis Nancy Meyer B.H. Nettle Tom Nolan & Larry Friesen Thomas Ortenzi Sue Parsell Saralie Pennington & Tom Herz Kevin Poloncarz & Jason Walthall Dennis Reno Rudolph Reyes & Brody Lee Sue Ann Rosser & Patricia Miller Kirby Sack & Pamela Merchant San Francisco Federal Credit Union Rodrigo Santos Beverly Scott Sean SeLegue Jay Shaffer Charles W. Springfield Steven Wiesner Jeff Wiggins & Joe Olivo Timothy Wolfred Ronald Wong & Mike Tekulsky

$100 - $249 Anonymous (SEVERAL) Steve & Cynthia Adelman UCSF Alliance Health Project Laura Mae Alpert & Kate Reber Rabbi Camille Angel Jane Ariel Marianne Balfe Terry J. Baum Dr. Lee Bender Rick Bidgood & Ken Poole Ruth Borenstein & Karen Strauss Michael Breyer Timothy Bridge

$1,000 - $4,999 (continued) Tom & Myrna Frankel Derek Gordon & Arturo Fernandez Mary Edna Harrell & Bonnie Kates Marilyn Hayward Joseph Hittinger Julie Ann Hogan & Allison Leach Institute on Aging Jewish Community Federation and Endowment Fund Daniel Johnson Patrick Leary Jeff Lewy & Ed Eishen Dennis Markus & Howard DeBow Cynthia Martin & Selisse Berry Cathy Maupin

Steven Brown Kenneth Caldwell & Paul Crabtree Boone Callaway & David Helbraun Alonso Carrillo Anne Casscells & Susan Ketcham Jim Chappell Sylvia Chu Misha R. Cohen & Carla Wilson Chuck Cole & David Beers Jody & Katharine Cole Paul Connolly & Chaz Nol Michael Costa Christine Daniel & Cecily Peterson Nancy L. Davis & Donna Hitchens Kathleen and Jack Devlin Suzanne Dike Ralph E. Dilisio Tim DuBois & Steve Smith Marge Duggins & Susan Sunderland Diane Ehrensaft & Jim Hawley Delia Ehrlich Robert J. Erickson Daniel Ewald Wayne Friday James Gazaway Margo George & Catherine Karrass Tovey Giezentanner Kathryn Gilsen Robert Glavin Lois Gordon Judy Graboyes & Rachel Carroll Mary Ann Greenwood James W. Haas Eric Hall & Sean McMahon Erik Hansen Hunter Harris George Laurie Hatch Paul (Tony) & Carol Henning Ruth Herring & Pamela Peniston Patrick Hoctel & Edward Elhauge Kate Hoepke Jill D. Hollander Thomas B. Holt Signa and Joseph Houghteling Paula Hundley Clara E. Jaeckel Stephanie Jaeger Carla Javits & Margaret Cecchetti David Kessler Terri Knight Sue Kramer Georg Krammer Tom Lauderbach Law Office of Callaway & Wolf Mike Learned

$1,000 - $4,999 (continued) Marshall Kirk McKusick & Eric Allman Shireen McSpadden PG & E Stephen Perreault Wai Poc & Jerry Cacciotti Ken Prag & Steve Collins Reliable Caregivers, Inc. Debra Resnick & Kathryn Werhane Bill Scherer Sam & Julia Thoron Cheryl Traverse Edward Van Egri LÊonie Walker & Kate O’Hanlan Stanley Watson & Manny Anes Jan Zivic & Lisa Schoonerman

Hon. Mark Leno Kerry Lobel & Marta Drury Lauren Maddock Jim Maloney Rafael Mandelman Brett Mangels Clare Cooper Marcus Lester Marks David Matchett & Carol Snow John Maull Aaron Minnis Kelley Mullin Ragnar Naess Thomas Nicoll Patricia Inga Olson Eleanor Palacios David Palmer Dean Palompo Nathalie Paven Pamela Peniston David Perry & Alfredo Casuso Andrew Petrazzuoli & Hsien Chen Bruce Prescott Ernesto Quintanilla Rainbow Grocery Cooperative John Reamer Betsy Reiss Rebecca Rolfe & Susan Mooney Jenna Rudo-Stern Lara Sallee & Shadow Moyer Robby Scalise Nicole Schapiro Karen Schiller Seven Ponds Cindy Shamban Nicole Shapiro Robert Shultz Alex Sloan Richard Smoke Shane Snowdon & Toni Littlestone Anthony Turney & David Condie Valorie and Leopoldo Villela Linda Wells Sylvia Wharton Jeff White Patrick Wilken & David Dickson Uncheedah Wilson Kimball Worcester & Margarite Rhodes Roz Wright & Micki Cianciosi Jonathan Zimman Jan Zobel

Please alert us of any misspellings, omissions, or other listing preferences.


housing, services, and

community for LGBT seniors

1800 MARKET STREET, PMB 93 THIRD FLOOR SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94102 (415) 296-8995 info@openhouse-sf.org www.openhouse-sf.org photos, clockwise from top left: Seth Kilbourn with LGBT Community Center Executive Director, Rebecca Rolfe, outside the new offices. “We are delighted that Openhouse has moved into the Center,” said Rebecca. “We look forward to working closely on joint programming. Openhouse makes the Center even more of a central hub for the entire LGBT community.” (staff photo); Ken Jones and Ted Lyles (staff photo); Jack Pyne, Nicky Frausto, Eva Lilly and Pam Quiton (Stephanie Jaeger photo); Dion Wong (Stephanie Jaeger photo); Felicia Elizondo and Andre Kingsley (Stephanie Jaeger photo).

FINDING US

By moving into the San Francisco LGBT Community Center, Openhouse is responding to growing community demand. “Our programs now top 100 hours every month,” said Director of Programs Michelle Alcedo. “Our new space will provide a central location for expanded programming and ample drop-in space for seniors to gather.” Stop by to say hello!

NEW OFFICES @ THE LGBT COMMUNITY CENTER!

See what’s new and sign up for our mailing list: www.openhouse-sf.org facebook.com/openhousesf flickr.com/photos/openhouse-sf/ youtube.com/user/openhousehousing

the official 2012 openhouse newsletter  

The official 2012 Openhouse newsletter.

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