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June 2014

Magazine

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Magazine

Vol. 1- Issue 1 V.P. OF SALES

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GROUP PUBLISHER

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EDITOR/ DIGITAL DIRECTOR CREATIVE DIRECTOR

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ADMIN. COORDINATOR

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LEAD COORDINATOR

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CEO

PRESIDENT

Christy Hobson

Glen Hobson

Executive and Advertising Offices 951 1st Ave. W. Alabaster, AL 35007 phone: 205-441-5591 fax: 205-624-3354 www.goneoutdoorsmag.com glen@goneoutdoorsmag.com

Gone Outdoors Magazine™ is published twelve times a year on a monthly basis by H&F Media Group, Inc., 951 1st Ave. W. Alabaster, AL 35007 USA. Gone Outdoors Magazine™ is distributed free to qualified subscribers. Non-qualified subscription rates are $57.00 per year in the U.S. and Canada and $84.00 per year for foreign subscribers (surface mail). U.S. Postage paid at Birmingham, Alabama and additional mailing offices. Gone Outdoors Magazine™ is distributed to to qualified owners and managers in the industrial industry. Publisher is not liable for all content (including editorial and illustrations provided by advertisers) of advertisements published and does not accept responsibility for any claims made against the publisher. It is the advertiser’s or agency’s responsibility to obtain appropriate releases on any item or individuals pictured in an advertisement. Reproduction of this magazine in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission from the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to H&F Media Group, Inc., P.O. Box 1568 Pelham, Al 35124 PRINTED IN THE USA

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The Escape

The Gam

P4

Choosing the Right Tent for Family Camping

P12 Catching Blue Smallmouth B Bait and Lures

P8

Camping with KidsStart Early

P16 Bow Hunting Whitetails- Sco Now, Score Ea

Call us kids but We just co

Pr


The Rush

The Roar

The Usual

egill and Bass on s

P20 7 Reasons Why Abseiling is the Best Adventure Sport

P28 Overland Lifestyle: 4x4 Camping and Touring Obsessed

P34 New Product Spotlight

out arly

P24 3 Reasons Why Surfers Should Try Stand-Up Paddle Boarding

P32 The Modern Jeep and Off Road Enthusiasts

P36 The Editor’s Post P38 Ad Index

remiering July 2014!

The Escape

ouldn’t handle waiting! Enjoy this taste of whats to come.

Contents

me

The Game The Rush The Roar Ad Index


Choosin for Fa 4

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Contents

The Escape The Game

The Rush

Ad Index

By Andrew Milner

The Roar

ng the Right Tent amily Camping


There are, at a rough guess over 500 different styles and sizes of tents available in the UK. Each offer various different features, benefits, layouts and brands that determine which is the right tent for you to choose. Size Does Matter... It’s obviously no good choosing a tent that only sleeps 2 people when there are 6 of you, but there are other aspects that you should consider when determining what berth tent to choose. Generally speaking the number of people a tent can sleep also determines the size of the living and lounging area/s. A good rule of thumb particularly for family camping is to go two up from the number you actually require. This in lamens terms would simply mean looking for two more heads in the kindly provided line drawing that you should always be presented with if you’re buying a tent from a reputable brand. The line drawings tell you the dimensions of the tent and also indicate how many people the tent can sleep. Bear in mind though that the actual physical space manufacturers often allow each of the occupants of the bedroom is quite on the stingy side so make sure you measure up any accessories like camp beds or airbeds you might want to stuff in there before you make your purchase. Choosing the right berth will also generally give more living space for things like food preparation, letting the kids play on the floor or an evening meal. Make sure you choose the right berth tent.

Add-on Accessories... The more experienced brands on the market realise that a quality tent should have add-on accessories that provide their customers with the choice to further enhance their tent if desired. A quality family tent brand will at a minimum permit you to buy three additional add-on accessories: 1.

A front or side canopy/extension or awning

2.

A footprint groundsheet to further protect the base of your tent from damage and dirt.

3.

A living area carpet (precisioned rug) to add a little insulation and comfort. Therefore consider if you need will need to add any of these to your purchase now or in the future and factor this in.

Materials... Flysheet Mainstream family tent flysheets come in two variants - polyester and polycotton. Polyester is more popular due to its lesser weight and price when compared with Polycotton. Polycotton however whilst being heavier than Polyester does bring benefits to the consumer that you just don’t get with Polyester, namely better breathability and insulation. Polyester tents can become quite hot inside when exposed to warm sunny days and so many more experienced campers are now turning to polycotton to reap the comfort

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benefits this material has to offer. Polycotton is however generally a lot more expansive than polyester - often double the price of a similarly sized polyester tent. Good advice would be to start with a polyester tent if you are new to camping, test the water and work your way up. Choose the right flysheet for the type of camping you will be doing.

Poles or Air When browsing the latest tent catalogue, you should also pay attention to the type of poles the tent has. The majority of tents in the UK have fibreglass poles that are more affordable than their higher end counterparts such as steel poles, alloy poles, or air chambers. If you only plan to camp for long weekends then going to the trouble of carting heavy steel or alloy poles to and from the campsite may not be necessary but if you are planning a week or two further from home then you want to be sure that you have the best and strongest poles to ensure you’re holiday isn’t cut short by the pesky winds of mother nature. If steel or alloy is out of your price range then be sure to check that the fibreglass poles have a sheath wrapping, sometimes referred to as durawrap or proshield. This sheath is an extra coating around the fibreglass that gives it added strength. Again though this can often come at a slight price increase over standard fibreglass so it’s a case of working within your budget and getting the best you can. Make sure you factor in the above when choosing your tent.

Hydrostatic Head If you are looking to purchase a polyester tent then you should be informed of the hydrostatic head rating of the material which tells you how permeable the material is, or how much water the flysheet can withstand. Hydrostatic head is measured in millimeters. The best way to imagine this is if you were to place a cylindrical tube full of water 1cm²on top of the material so that the depth was let’s say 2000mm then the flysheet has been tested to withstand this amount of water. The British standard for a flysheet to be classed as ‘waterproof’ is 1500mm so be sure your new tent meets at a minimum this rating. Most quality family tents on the market will be anything from 2000mm up to 6000mm. Make sure you choose a flysheet that offers 2000mm minimum or more if you expect to be camping in rainy locations.


Features Be sure to check for things like air vents to keep condensation to a minimum, no-see-um-mesh to keep the pesky mosquitoes out of your tent in the evenings. No-see-um mesh on tents at the lower price bracket of the market will normally only be present on the doors to the bedroom but conversely at the higher end you should see this on the outer tent doors as well. Do you need a cable entry point (small zipper) to get power into your tent for all your home from home electricals? If so then many family tents now provide this around the main door entry.

Groundsheets Most family tents come with either a totally flat detachable groundsheet that you simply peg down in the corners, a “bath-tub” style groundsheet that raises up at the edges and clips onto the sides of the inside of the flysheet (handy for keeping out the eve-

ning breeze) or a fully sewn-in groundsheet - handy to also keep out any insects. This will be a major factor in the price of the tent due to the increased manufacturing costs of providing it. Want ultimate luxury? Then look out for a zip-in (or out)-groundsheets that are generally made from a heavier duty material and provide the added benefit of being easily detachable from the tent and thus more easily cleanable whilst still providing all the benefits of a fully sewn-in. Ensure you consider these points when making your purchase.

Packsize / Weight Last but not least make sure the tent you are buying will fit in whatever car/van/trailer you will be using to get to and from the campsite. Also be sure to check the weight so that whoever will be pitching the tent can first remove it from the car. For more great tips on tents visit Yeomans.


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The Game

The Rush

The Roar

Ad Index

By Brent A Carey

The Escape

- Start Early

Contents

Camping With Kids


The first hike our oldest daughter experienced was at four months old. She was strapped to my wife’s chest covered in layers of Down and Gore Tex. The hike lasted somewhere in the range of 3 hours and it snowed the entire time. In fact, it was a Colorado blizzard complete with howling winds and zero visibility. Fast forward nine years later and my two daughters, ages nine and six - join us in the backcountry every chance we get. They are content to sleep in a tent night after night with torrential storms engulfing our camp. They are able to start a fire, filter water, know where and how to go to the “restroom”. They know what plants to watch out for, they can sneak up on grazing deer. They will hike literally miles as they do not realize that not hiking all day could be an option. When staring down a hundred foot cliff, they will both rappel off without a second take. Our two precious little daughters are likely more seasoned and better acclimatized to the wilderness experience than most adults. You might ask how they got that way? They certainly are regular elementary school aged girls. They like all the things their friends do and spend much of their time riding bikes and scooters around our neighborhood. Yet, given the chance they’ll go camping, hiking or backpacking any chance they get. I believe the reason they are the way they are is due to our insistence, very early in their lives, that they join us on each and every outing. We haven’t let cranky kids, colds, sore muscles or tired feet stop us. Pre-kids, my wife and I both worked in the outdoor industry. We spent every available day away from work backpacking, hiking, climbing. We enjoyed a very active Colorado life. We were both determined that when our children finally arrived our lifestyle would not change. Our family and friends insisted otherwise. We were told that reality would smack us in the face and we would soon conform to a more sedentary existence. Well, our first child eventually came and to some degree people were right. We were

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no longer able to go out as much as we did. That is reality. However, while we slowed down a bit, we really didn’t slow down all that much. We have continued through two kids, multiple jobs, houses and experiences - to get outside. Weather never stopped us and it still doesn’t. We’re just as happy to winter camp (yes - in tents) as we are to enjoy summer nights under the stars. Walking long distances hasn’t stopped us either. Our kids are accustomed to walking all day. Whether that be in the late Spring heat of the desert or gaining and losing elevation throughout the day in the Rockies - they’re in. Granted, walking that far occasionally takes bribery, candy and trail games to take their minds off the drudgery, but we don’t cater our trips to them. Rather, we have our kids adjust to the trip. Canyoning is an activity we really enjoy. Rather than put our trips on hold until the kids were older or curtail our planned excursion for something simpler, we have included them from a very early age. Before they were even able to walk. We have fond memories of their first canyon. Both of them were strapped into kids-backpacks and they were shuttled down each canyon obstacle, by hand or rope. Today, both of the girls enjoy canyons and really they are fearless. I believe both our girls are quickly developing an intense love of the outdoors. Rather than wanting to play video games or watch T.V. - they would prefer we take hike, ride a trail or look for animal tracks. I can only hope their love affair with our natural world continues to grow. The bonding our family has experienced on our many trips is nothing short of magical. We have created a site dedicated to all things outdoors. We have the products we feel work best. We have a section for the latest outdoor news we think is of value, articles, trip reports and more. Check it out at: http://www.gearcollect.com


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Bluegill

Bluegill fight well for their size but just do not get very big. A 1 lb-er is pretty decent fish, over 2 lb is a trophy and anything over 3 lb is approaching “fish of a lifetime” status. They taste OK but are kind of a pain to prepare unless you have some bigger ones.

The Rush

Bluegill are often pretty easy to catch if you use small hooks that fit in their small mouths. However, just like any other fish they can stop biting. I was once fishing off of a floating dock in Southern California and catching Bluegill one after another. I probably caught over 30 in a short time. The bite eventually tapered off and then I couldn’t get a bite despite trying everything in the tackle box. I said out loud that I thought the fish had moved on, but the park ranger overheard me and said it wasn’t so. He took out an underwater video camera with a monitor, let down the camera on a cable, and showed me the screen. Bluegill were stacked like cordwood from the bottom of the lake all the way to right under the surface. There were over 1,000 of them under that dock, but for whatever reason they stopped eating and I couldn’t get them to eat the rest of the day.

The Game

If you grew up in the United States and went fishing as a kid, chances are good that the first fish you ever caught was a Bluegill. These feisty panfish are found throughout the country in bodies of water big and small. In some areas, especially during spawn the males are strikingly colored with bright blue, yellow, purple, and orange. They often come up shallow, especially in the spring and summer, and can be observed from shore if the water is clear enough. They are a great fish to get kids into fishing.

The Escape

By Dan Y Smith

Contents

Catching Bluegill and Smallmouth Bass on Bait and Lures

Tackle

The Roar

You should be able to catch pretty much any Bluegill on 2 lb test line, and in fact that is the most fun way to go. You might go up to 4 lb or 6 lb if you are fishing heavy cover. Make sure you use a small hook as even the large ones have small mouths. My ideal setup would be a Daiwa Certate spinning reel in the 1000 or 1500 size and an ultra light spinning rod. Techniques

Ad Index

Bluegill are most easily caught on bait but will often bite lures as well. I have caught several on a plain shiny gold treble hook. They are a curious fish and will put things in their mouth just to check them out.


mouth. They tend to hit many of the same lures although often you will have more success if you downsize a bit. Smallmouth Bass do not attain the same large potential size as the Largemouth. A 5lber is a very big one and they top out around twice that. They are scrappier than Largemouth pound for pound and their fight is usually noticeably better. I have never eaten one, so I don’t know how they taste. I always release them. Tackle I have never fished for Smallmouth with anything heavier than a light spinning rod and 6lb test line. A Daiwa Certate spinning reel is an excellent choice for these.

Lures My most successful Bluegill lure has been a plastic mini jig. I have never found them to be that picky on the color, but green and gold or clear with glitter are what I usually start with. I like to fish the jig very slowly, suspending it at the depth I think the fish are at and then just twitching it occasionally with the line taught to detect their nibbling bites. Some people like to target them with tiny poppers, either with fly fishing gear or spinning gear. I have caught a few that way but I can’t say it’s been a go-to technique for me. Bluegill will sometimes bite small spinners and minnow plugs, although generally this just works for the bigger ones. Although it is not a good way to target large numbers, all of my biggest Bluegill have been caught while I was fishing for Largemouth Bass with plastic worms or drop shotted plastic lures. Baits It’s hard to beat a piece of worm fished under a bobber. If they are not biting a worm then good luck catching them on anything else. Don’t use too much worm or they will just grab the end and pull it off the hook. Crickets and mealworms supposedly work well although I have never used them. Where To Get The Big Ones Large Bluegill are found in so many lakes and rivers throughout the country it’s hard to pinpoint one or two trophy locations. In general, because of the longer growing season, they get bigger in the southern half of the US. My largest ones have mostly come out of Lake Barrett, near San Diego, California. Smallmouth Bass Smallmouth bass are slightly less widespread than their cousins, the Largemouth Bass. I have caught a few hundred of them in various places but I don’t feel I know nearly as much about them as the Largemouth. They tend to frequent colder waters than the Largemouth although in many places the same lake will hold both species. Smallmouth also tend to spawn and generally hang out in deeper water, so perhaps that makes them feel less familiar than the Large-

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Techniques Smallmouth hit both bait and lures. They are often found near week edges or sunken timber. Beaver houses are a good bet if they are present.


Lures The number one lure for me has been the Senko. Colors that have worked for me include Green Pumpkin and Watermellon. I like the 4� version for Smallmouth. Small jigs with a Gulp Craw or similar crayfish imitation trailer work well in many places. The Bitsy Bug is a great jig in natural crayfish colors. I have also had some success fishing tube jigs in Green Pumpkin or Watermellon. I like the Strike King Kevin Van Dam Pro Tube. I like to cast these out and let them sink slowly, occasionally twitching on the way down. Most bites happen on the sink so you have to pay a lot of attention to how your jig is falling. If something stops it, reel in the slack and set the hook. If it sinks and you get no hits then twitch it while reeling a foot or two and then let it drop and repeat all the way to the boat. Another common lure for Smallmouth is a crayfish imitation

crankbait such as the Rebel Craw but I have not really fished those much. When they are hitting topwaters (typically early morning and in the evening) the Heddon Baby Torpedo can be good. Baits Minnows and leeches are supposed to be good baits, but I have not fished for Smallmouth much with baits. I’m guessing crayfish work well given how much Smallmouth like them. Where to get the big ones The two biggest Smallmouth ever caught were in Dale Hollow, Tennessee so that seems like a good place to try. For numbers there are many lakes in Ontario, Canada that have tons of small to medium size ones.


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Low-Impact Scouting

Ad Index

Many hunters make the mistake of tromping blindly through prime whitetail habitat in search of the ultimate stand site. Whitetails are extremely sensitive to human intrusion, making it very difficult to conceal one’s movements. This is especially true of big bucks. If not careful, you will unwittingly announce your future intentions to the resident deer herd. And, once a mature whitetail feels threatened, he will move to a totally different locale or become primarily nocturnal. I don’t have to tell you what that will do to your odds of

The Roar

The turn of the seasons sparks a desire in many bowhunters to head for the nearest hills in search of the elusive whitetail. As the heat of summer surrenders its stranglehold on the deer woods, whitetail bucks become highly visible creatures. A short drive down any country road during the month of August should produce the sighting of at least one decent set of antlers. The trouble is finding that set of antlers after the bow season opens. Therein lies the dilemma of bowhunting early-season whitetails. Let’s take a look at a few tactics that can increase your chances of scoring.

The Rush

The temperatures in summer are hot and humid. Biting bugs swarm. Clothes stick. Sweat beads. Why would bowhunting whitetails be on your mind, you ask? Well, if you’re like me, hunting whitetails with archery gear is a way of life. And, part of my living depends on the discussion of hunting. So, bear with me and before long, you just may find yourself daydreaming of thickracked bucks and the heart-pounding magic of a crisp fall morning.

The Game

By Steve D. Peters

The Escape

Scout Now, Score Early

Contents

Bow Hunting Whitetails


arrowing such an animal. Then, what’s the answer, you ask? That’s simple. Get yourself a good set of high-quality binoculars or a spotting scope and do your scouting from a safe distance. Crop fields should be your main focus at this time. Lush rows of alfalfa, soybeans and corn draw deer for miles. But before making a mad dash to the nearest “Back 40,” take heed of a few ground rules. Keep disturbance to a minimum. Set up in a row of trees or along a brushy fence line to screen your silhouette. Also, be sure to keep the wind direction in mind when investigating an area of interest. Always set up with the wind in your face, or downwind, so not to contaminate the area with human scent. A few afternoons spent along a verdant field edge should prove beneficial when pinpointing a location for your stand. By careful and persistent observation, you will begin to learn the travel behavior of several bucks. Once you have established the daily routine of each buck, you will be able to plan a strategy. Start your reconnaissance by skirting the edges of fields during midday. Look for trails that receive a high amount of traffic if you are interested in tagging smaller deer. A large set of tracks found along a less-noticeable trail normally indicates that a trophy buck is frequenting the area. A sharp eye and a basic sense of deer behavior can lead you to these types of trails. Concentrate your efforts in a location that will afford the best chance of taking the class of animal you desire. There are other low-impact methods of scouting that can produce results as well. Incorporating topographical maps, aerial photographs and computer-mapping programs into your scouting repertoire can lead you to areas that you otherwise might overlook. Feeding Trails and Funnels Setting a stand along a trail linking a bedding area to a crop field or other food source can be deadly in the first few days of the early archery season. In fact, the very first week of the season is usually an opportune time to arrow a cruising animal. During the latter stages of summer and into early fall, big bucks routinely

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travel between these two areas. If you are interested in seeing a lot of deer around your stand, find a “funnel.” This is any type of natural or man-made structure that consistently forces deer to move through the same section of woods. The operative word here is “forces.” Deer become susceptible to death by broadhead whenever their movement is restricted to a certain part of the woods. It can be as simple as noticing a missing or broken strand of barbed wire where deer cross a fence from one piece of property to another. Or, it can be a fallen tree that forces movement to one side of the trail or the other. Man also plays a significant role in the creation of funnels. Development is a common cause of funnel production. A new home, road or drainage ditch are all factors that can alter deer movement in some way or another. Basically, deer are lazy by nature. They will seek out the path of least resistance when traveling through an area. Keying on these habits can spell early-season success. Here’s the Rub If you set your sights on a buster buck, it would be in your best interest to locate as many fresh rubs as possible. Only antlered animals make rubs, and usually the bigger the rub, the bigger the deer. No other type of sign is more conclusive that a buck is visiting your stand site than a rub. Locating fresh rubs isn’t as difficult as you might think. The edges of crop fields are a good bet. Deer that visit a field at night will usually leave a rub on the edge of the woods when exiting the field in the morning. Rubs typically face the direction of travel. The best scenario is finding several rubs along a trail system. Several trees will be clearly marked and will receive similar damage if the same buck is doing the majority of the rubbing. This is a relatively easy way of keeping tabs on an individual buck. Set your stand within 15 to 20 yards of the rub line and on the downwind side of the trail. Observation Stands If all of your attempts at locating deer fail during the open season, I suggest

choosing another effective method of scouting -- placing a stand in a promising area simply to observe deer movement. You can opt to exchange your bow and arrows with a set of binoculars and a notebook for spotting and documenting your findings. If the spot looks promising, bring your bow just in case. Remember you are on a serious fact-finding mission, so exercise as much caution as you normally would practice when bowhunting active stand sites. Take a shower, sneak into the stand location, only hunt when the wind is favorable, wear rubber-bottomed boots, etc. You do not want to alert the deer to your intentions. It should only take a few sittings to record and identify the travel habits of the deer in the immediate area. Be sure to choose a location where visibility is unobstructed. You need to be able to see a great distance in order to cover as much ground as possible. Pay close attention to how and where the deer move when passing through the area. Your observations will assist you in future stand placement. OK, I’ll admit it. Getting fired-up about scouring the countryside in search of deer sign when the season is a few months away is difficult. It’s even worse when the thought of staying at home in front of the television in air-conditioned comfort enters your mind. But, no one ever said bowhunting was easy. So remember, in order to achieve success at bowhunting early-season whitetails, you will have to put in your time long before the season opens. Steve Peters is the founder and President of the United Outfitters Association. You can find out more information on selecting a quality hunting outfitter by going to http://www.unitedoutfittersassociation.com If you are looking for a guided or outfitted hunt be sure to check out FORAHUNT.com at: http://www. forahunt.com


7

Reasons Why Abseiling is the Best Adventure Sport By Adrian Barton

A call out to all adrenaline junkies is heard as Abseiling rapidly becomes one of the most popular extreme sports in the world! Thrill seekers, extreme weekenders and the like are rapidly discovering why abseiling is a perfect excuse to test one’s collective sanity. Abseiling, the practice of scaling a vertical surface is an element in climbing, one of the 18 land adventure / extreme sports. On its own abseiling is regarded more dangerous than climbing itself. Enthusiasts and hobbyists alike have developed a fixation for this land sport for what it has to offer. So why do people find abseiling to be the best adventure sport ever!

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Contents The Escape

The Game

The Rush

The Roar

Ad Index


1. Tremendous Heights - A component of climbing, abseiling completely shows you how high you have gone through a totally different method. Using familiar climbing equipment, you then take your nerve racking first step over a vertical edge that utterly brings you to a whole new dimension. With the vertical surface fronting you, it’s just vast space that only a soaring animal would regularly view. 2. High Risk Element - A primary criteria in all adventure sports, abseiling fills you up with the euphoria of one of the greatest adrenaline surges as you scale down vertical terrain 60 to 500 feet high, with only a harness and rope to support your full weight. 3. High Level of Physical Exertion - It›s not just all about dangling off, clinging onto rope and waiting till your feet touch the ground. Abseiling requires a lot of physical and mental coordination. As you are suspended, much effort is needed to avoid uncontrollable spiralling, or body slamming on the vertical surface. Abseiling uses a lot of lower body strength, during the descent, you use your feet and legs as support and balance. 4. Highly Specialized Gear - An underlying determinant of an adventure support, highly specialised gear is utilised for the participant’s survival during an abseil. Ropes, descender, delay-devices, carabiners, climbing harness, climbing helmet, anchors, gloves, knee pads and elbow pads make up essential abseiling equipment. 5. Pushing your Limits - Abseiling is an absolute activity to rediscover thresholds and break human physical and mental boundaries. Want absolute madness? Diversify and do a Aussie Style Rappel! 6. Less Beaten Track - The possibilities are endless! Not limited to mountain terrain, scores of abseil venues are abundant, complemented by spectacular vistas. Being such an accommodating sport, abseiling can have a venue as accustomed to a mountain or canyon or as typical as an old bridge, the tallest skyscraper or even colossal waterfalls. Every abseiling experience is entirely different from another, which makes each abseil something to look forward to. 7. Fear Factor - Adventure sports are perceived as being designed to impress people with the ability to do things that aren›t normally or should not even be done. This understanding is set to be derived from one main source of all human limitation - Fear. Abseiling has the capital «F» all over it. All the more reason to expect the ultimate adrenalin surge. Abseiling is a fun and exciting extreme sport. As with any adventure sport; the euphoric high of an achievement is addictive. Abseiling is an activity that tolerates this craving. Abseil 100 feet higher or a venue wilder. The options are endless, all of which are high-wired and adrenaline packed! So why not give abseiling a go! Hi, I’m Adrian Barton and every spare minute of my day is spent planning abseiling trips, going abseiling, taking abseiling lessons, talking about abseiling and writing about abseiling. Its safe to say I’m a little obsessed! However, if you’ve ever thought about going abseiling, I highly recommend it for the ultimate adventure day out!

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3

Reason

Why Surfers Should Try Stand-Up Paddle B 24

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Contents The Escape

ns

The Game

The Rush

The Roar

Ad Index

Boarding

By Michael W Gibson


standing position. This gives her an excellent vantage point when sizing up an oncoming wave. The knees-bent standing position also allows her to rotate her entire body easing the strain on her neck.

standing, which allows you to paddle with your entire upper body. The specially designed paddle, which should be 7-8 inches longer than you are tall, offers plenty of resistance resulting in a great core workout.

Versatility Another great thing about Stand-Up Paddle Boarding is that it can be enjoyed regardless of wave conditions. In fact, waves aren’t even necessary so you can paddle wherever and whenever you like!

If you’re looking for a better way to surf or just a fun water sport that provides a workout, then I suggest Stand-Up Paddle Boarding. Nowhere else will you have an unbeatable vantage point for sizing up swells, the ability to stand in calm water, and the advantage of a great core workout!

All surfers should add a StandUp Board to their wave-riding arsenal and there are three good reasons why: visibility, versatility and workout.

You can enjoy Stand-Up Paddle Boarding on any body of water including harbors, bays, rivers, inland lakes, reservoirs and ponds. I have even seen photos of people Paddle Boarding in swampy areas!

Michael W Gibson is a webmaster with a Bachelor of Science in Wildlife Management from Texas A&M University - Kingsville and a Master of Business Administration from Stephen F. Austin State University.

Visibility

Workout

In traditional surfing, the surfer begins his ride lying on the board, which gives him a poor vantage point while monitoring the approaching wave. He must also look back over his shoulder which can really be a pain in the neck, quite literally!

Paddle Boarding also provides a more thorough core workout than traditional surfing. In traditional surfing, you’re mainly exercising your arms, and that part ends once you actually catch a wave. It’s a free ride from that point on.

He is an avid outdoor enthusiast and has been surfing since 1995. He currently manages several websites including Campfire Zen [http://www.campfirezen.com], an up-and-coming website dedicated to all things camping and outdoor-related.

A stand-up Paddler is always in a

When you Paddle Surf, you’re

Stand-Up Paddle Boarding is a form of surfing originating in the 60s with Hawaiian surf instructors who wanted to get a better view of their pupils as they surfed. This unique watersport is currently experiencing a boom in popularity, finding its way into surfing and non-surfing communities across the planet. Soon, Stand-Up Paddle Boarding could even surpass traditional surfing in popularity. That’s because this up-and-coming water sport can be enjoyed everywhere, offering both a broader and more consistent experience over traditional surfing.

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Check out Campfire Zen at [http://www.campfirezen.com]


Overland Lifestyle: 4x4 Camping and Touring Obsessed By Kyle Fowers You know that you are obsessed with 4x4 camping and touring when you are constantly on the lookout for that new trail to drive down. Every trail on the side of the highway is a new starting point for your next adventure. The magazines and the trip guides begin to stack up and you can’t seem to stay away from your favorite gear websites. You dream of your next trip when you should be doing something else and those around you begin to notice you aren’t quite with it anymore. While everyone else drops their jaw at the new Ferrari going down the street you do the same with a nicely equipped 80 Series Landcruiser. There is nothing wrong with you but there are some simple steps for overcoming the chaos in your head. 1. Write down your plans. Write them all down. This will help you to not forget that trail you wanted to explore. The best laid plan can always come unraveled due to the lack of planning. Organize your plans on paper can help calm a chaotic mind and get you ready for the next big adventure. 2. Check your equipment. Keep your vehicle and all of your other 4x4 camping gear in tip-top shape to make it easier and quicker to hit the next trail. This will help avoid surprises and help give you something to do in between camping trips. Besides, it’s fun. 3. Get new gear. Nothing like learning how to use and install a new awning or air compressor. 4. Last of all, talk about it constantly with everyone around you, even if they don’t care. That way people will want you to take the trip just so you can stop talking about it. They may even chip in money for gas. If you find yourself obsessed with 4x4 camping, touring, and overland travel there is hope. Follow these simple steps and you will find relief in the pain you experience by knowing there is so much out there to see. The best advise is to take that trip and overcome this anxiety. Just think of how relaxed you will fill as you set up camp and sit down without another soul around for miles (except for those that came with you) and just you connecting with nature, your 4x4 and those who you actually want to be with. Leave it all behind and find peace within your obsession. So until next time Get Out, Explore. Kyle Fowers is Co-Owner and Operations Manager for Get Out, Explore LLC, a place for the Best Gear, Friends, Guides and Plans for your next 4x4 camping, overland, and 4x4 touring adventure. Prepare for the road less traveled. Additional info and articles can be found at the Overland Lifestyle section of our site. So if you have a sense of adventure and want to get out and see this beautiful world of ours come on by and see what we have to offer. Visit us today at Get Out, Explore.

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Contents The Escape

The Game

The Rush

The Roar

Ad Index


We’re on the hunt for new advertisers! 2-Page Spreads Starting at $5100/month Contact our publisher for special multi- issue pricing.

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Brandon Greenhill 205-733-4343 brandon@goneoutdoorsmag.com


&

The Modern Jeep Off Road Enthusiasts

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After the War: Commercializing the Jeep Industry After the Second World War, Willys-Overland saw an opportunity to trademark the Jeep and repackage it to appeal to a wider market.

It wasn’t until Kaiser-Jeep was acquired by the American Motor Company or AMC that the Jeep brand really took off. The Jeep brand complemented AMC’s passenger car business and AMC took advantage of Jeep’s international and government background. The French automobile manufacturer, Renault began investing in the AMC but eventually ran into financial trouble.

The commercial Jeep now uses a 7-slot grille design which is also in use by the General Motors Hummer. The Hummer was first developed by a division of the American Motor Company which was acquired by General Motors. Chrysler Jeep division claimed exclusive rights for the 7-slot grille since they are now the sole owner of the Jeep trademark. Courts ultimately decided to let the Hummer brand use the 7-slot grille and the company compromised by slapping the “Hummer” name in front of the grille. The last Hummer was produced in 2009. Jeeps, on the other hand, are still going strong.

Jeep Enthusiasts and Off Road Clubs There is a fanaticism with Jeeps that runs deeper than that of most other vehicles. Many Jeep owners have chosen to share their love with fellow owners by joining local clubs devoted to them. These clubs often get together for weekend trips; driving their Jeeps off road for shared adventures as well as helping each other with custom modifications. Many groups have chosen to signify their membership with unique Jeep club shirts or stickers featuring customized pictures of their own vehicles. What may be surprising to some Americans, is that some of the biggest Jeep fans in the world come not from the United States, but South America. The rugged country of Columbia is the perfect stomping ground for these hardy 4x4s. In this region, Jeeps are more than just a hobby, they are a way of life. The washed out dirt roads of coffee country are impassible to standard cars. They are true workhorses, carrying supplies to remote areas as well as providing reliable transportation to people living in small towns.

Ad Index

The American Motor Company was bought out by the Chrysler Corporation that eventually merged with Daimler-Benz and formed the DaimlerChrylser. During this time the original Jeep CJ-17 was replaced by the Jeep Wrangler. The current majority owner of the Jeep brand

Willys-Overland’s first design for the Jeep included a slat-grille made up of an arrangement of flat bars. This was redesigned by Ford into a 9-slot grille which was more light weight and better suited for the World War II jeeps.

The Roar

Willys-Overland produced the first civilian Jeep or CJ in 1945 and trademarked the Jeep brand in 1950. However, Willys-Overland struggled in terms of production and sales which enabled them to be taken over by the Kaiser Motors three years after they were granted the trademark of the Jeep brand. Kaiser Motors also underwent repackaging and became the Kaiser-Jeep company in 1963.

The Jeep vs. General Motor’s Hummer

The Rush

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) opposed this move as the company had not come up with the name “Jeep” originally; however, they chose not to pursue this claim further, enabling Willys-Overland to take ownership of the brand.

Many variations of the Jeep have been manufactured under special license all over the world. The Jeep Cherokee (XJ), for example, was manufactured by the Beijing Jeep Company, Ltd. in partnership with the Beijing Automobile Industry Corporation.

The Game

It is a testament to the Jeep’s staying power that it has successfully crossed military and civilian lines and appeals to both markets. With the rising interest in off-road vehicles, the many incarnations of the Jeep are traversing both desert and icy tundra and continue to dominate the 4x4 world.

Jeeps All Around the World

The Escape

The modern day Jeep is known as an all-terrain vehicle that can brave the most rugged of environments but is also considered road-worthy or street legal. The modern day Jeep brand has undergone a lot of changes in design and ownership throughout the years but has retained its claim to fame as one of the most recognizable and influential vehicles in the world. Love for them has only grown over years, with many owners getting together to form clubs to share their love of the vehicle.

is a private equity company that placed the Chrysler and Jeep divisions under the all-encompassing arm of the Chrysler Group LLC.

Contents

By John Battista


The first all fat-tire, bullfrog trike is here. Juggernaut’s long wheel base design and three fat (4.7″) tires improve float on sand and snow over fat bikes by 50%. The 26” fat tire front wheels with over 29” in projected diameter overcome obstacles up to 6” tall at crawl speed.

Toyota 1.25” Thick Wheel Spacers

These 1.25” thick, 5 on 150mm 6061T6 aluminum spacers are an easy way of spacing out front and rear 2007-Up Toyota Tundra axles that run OE wheels. Each kit comes with 2 wheel spacers, 10 metric M14x1.5 wheel studs (pre-installed), 10 M14x1.5 lugnuts, and thread locker. These wheel spacers are anodized in dark blue, which is a double anodizing process for twice the corrosion resistance. In addition, each wheel spacer is both wheel & hub centric for a perfect OE fit. Proudly manufactured in the United States of America. More Info at www.riderungu.com/juggernaut/

Zippo Rugged Lantern™ Only the switch puts this light out. This Zippo Rugged Lantern™ can withstand a 5-foot drop and stay out all night in the rain. Through every condition, the Lantern shines with the brightest light of any LED lantern made. You can even make the lithium-ion battery last longer by adjusting the brightness from 100% to 50% to 10%. In case of an emergency, the Rugged Lantern™ has an emergency S-O-S setting too. More Info at http://www.zippo.com/product. aspx?id=1025704&cid=1240

More Info at www.spidertrax.com

JakJaw Multi Use Recovery Tool Dangerous farm type jacks can be unstable in off-road conditions. Why not eliminate dangerous situations and cut down chances of operator injury or vehicle damage? The JakJaw creates a much wider and deeper cradle to provide a safer way to join jack and vehicle. Not only does the JakJaw create a safer working environment on the trail, but it also relocates the jack itself further away from the body of the vehicle preventing damage to the sheet metal, fenders or body cladding. Made in the USA, engineered from heavy duty laser cut steel and able to withstand more force than your jack, so you’ll be much safer than ever before. The JakJaw is completely machined formed for precision, it creates a tight fit and with it’s compact size it fits naturally into your nearest recovery bag.

YOLO Day Pack • Yoked-style padded shoulder straps with built in sternum strap and carry handle • Back padded mesh • Roomy main compartment with padded laptop carrier • Secondary compartment with zipper closure • Small top pocket with zipper closure • Front pocket with advanced organizer and removable key fob • Two exterior side pockets with zipper closures • Two compression straps • Multiple accessory loops

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More Info at www.jakjaw.com


Browning Strike Force Camera

NEW PRODUCT SPOTLIGHT

The new Strike Force camera is the smallest camera in the hunting industry and has the same high performance features found in the rest of the Browning trail camera line. The Strike Force cameras feature 10MP picture quality, HD video clips with sound, and “Zero Blur” Night IR photos. If you are looking for lightning fast 0.67 second trigger speeds and night time Infrared flash ranges of 100 ft., then the Browning Strike Force camera is for you. - See more at: http://browningtrailcameras.com/our-products/ trail-cameras/strike-force/#sthash.50W0L4w3.dpuf

Elite-4 HDI Fishfinder/Chartplotter All-NEW easy-to-use 4.3-inch fishfinder/chartplotter with Hybrid Dual Imaging™ that combines Broadband Sounder™ with DownScan Imaging™ technology, a super-bright, LED-backlit color display, built-in GPS antenna and support for high-definition mapping. The compact Elite-4 HDI combines a super-bright, LED-backlit color display and a built-in GPS antenna with a full selection of today’s top-selling fishfinder and chartplotter features that are easy to access and operate -- all at a surprisingly affordable price.


The Editor’s Post: Welcome to the special Preview Issue of Gone Outdoors magazine! Launching a new magazine is always an exciting and anxious time. When the magazine is on a topic you are passionate about, it is especially exciting and anxious. Many of us here at H&F Media Group are avid outdoor enthusiasts of one stripe or another. Whether it’s hunting and fishing, or backpacking or off-roading, each of us has come to see this book as a labor of love. Once you’ve fussed over the pictures and the words and the layout and graphics as much as you can, and there is nothing left to do but hold your breath and send it out into the world. That’s where we stand today. Proud of what we’ve accomplished in a very short time and hopeful that it is received well by the audience we created it for. We’re pretty confident, because when it’s all said and done, we are that audience. While we put the book together, at heart, we’re also always on the lookout for tools and information that will let us get out there more often (wherever “there” is), and make the most of the time we spend when we’re out there. In that vein, we’ve worked to create the magazine we want to read. It is my sincere hope, and the hope of the entire Gone Outdoors team, that you feel the same way. Welcome to the journey, Danny Thompson Editor / Digital Director

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Contents The Escape

Pg.

Website

Dee Zee

BC

www.deezee.com

Freedom Hunters

11

www.freedomhunters.org

Golight

IFC

www.golight.com

Kahr Firearms

1 27

www.onspot.com

Ram Mount

40

www.ram-mount.com

Safety Seal

41

www.safetyseal.com

Timber Wolf Hand Cleaner

23

www.timberwolf.com

World Deer Expo

19

www.worlddeerexpo.com

The Roar

Ad Index

www.kahr.com

Onspot Automatic Tire Chains

The Rush

The Game

Company

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ADVERTISE HERE


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Gone Outdoors - June 2014 Sneak Peek Issue!