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architecture

PORT FOLIO

HAMZA J. SALIM


HAMZ A J. SALIM GRADUATE PORTFOLIO MASTERS IN ARCHITECTURE UNIVERSIT Y OF ILLINOIS AT CHICAGO 2009 - 2012


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.1 Landscape

pg. 07

.2 Iraq: Modern Architecture in Excile pg.21

.1 Architectural Re-enactment

.2 Rethinking Slums pg. 35

.1 Public Housing

pg. 25

pg. 37

.2 Chicago Public Housing 1960s pg. 45

.1 ARCH. AND THE CIT Y pg. 47

.2 Moving Cit y pg.59

.1 TAKE FIVE pg62

.2 Vagus pg.69

.1 CONTROL pg.7 3

.2 Thermal Selection pg.87


Welcome Back Shermer Class of ‘85 Instructor: Paul Andersen

Clinical Professor Director of !ndy Architecture

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Spring 2012


Iraq: Modern Architecture in Exile (1940- 80)

Grant Research / Publication

Iraq: Modern Architecture in Exile (1940 - 80)

The Middle East, with its diverse social, religious, and national histories has often been viewed by architects and academics as rich in traditional architecture, but poor as a resource for understanding the Modern period. The Middle East has been idealized almost as a timeless place; a region that stands in distinct and didactic contrast with the disruptive displacement and disillusionment that has resulted from its own industrialization. This research describes the unique ways in which Middle Eastern countries have invented their own versions of modernism, sometimes aliened and sometimes at odds with the more familiar European version, and in varying relations with larger patterns of imperialism and colonialism. The goal of the research is to recognize the contribution that local Iraqi architects made to discourses in international modernism and to build into the study of transnational architecture an exchange for input by examining a wide range of cultural encounters in terms of institutionalization of relationships, dynamic interactions of bureaucratic structures, and patterns of patronage and amid debates over design and urban planning. Even local histories are multiples, often disputed in their formation and inevitably shift over time. Taken together, these transnational and cultural encounters illustrate the various strategies that set national policies and decide who is forgotten, who is housed, who goes wanting, who is remembered, and who is empowered to remake the built landscape. 21


Gropius gazing through the Minarets of Baghdad

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Architectural Re-enactment Instructor: Sam Jacob

Clinical Professor Unit Master at Architectural Association Director at Fashion Architecture Taste (FAT)

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FALL 2011


LOOKING AT PRUITT IGOE Re-enacting Segregation 26


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Rethinking Slums A globalized world has no doubt brought forth countless opportunities for humanity. However, it is important to remember that these benefits are not necessarily being enjoyed by all. At a time when globalization is occurring almost too fast for the human mind to keep up, the rural populations of the world are disappearing while the urban populations are ballooning. With this urban overflow comes the birth of an increasingly important segment of global society—that of the slum. In his politically charged book World of Slums, Mike Davis refers to slums as “the hot zones of globalization.” This is not an understatement. The U.N. Human Settlements Program’s Report estimated that as of October 2009 nearly 1 billion people reside in slums and that, astoundingly, by 2030 this figure could double. The same U.N. report went on to assert that “the growth of cities will be the single largest influence on development in the 21th century.” Aside from the humanitarian aspect of slums, architects are obliged to concern themselves with what is now the habitation of one-sixth of the world’s population. In the face of these powerful truths the traditional goal of the “slum-less” city needs to be rethought, and with this, the role of the architect naturally needs to be redefined.

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Public Housing Instructor : Grant Gibson

Associate Professor

Spring 2011


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ARCH. AND THE CIT Y CHICAGO EDUCATORIUM Instructor : David Brown

Associate Director, School of Architecture UIC Associate Professor

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FALL 2010


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TAKE FIVE Instructor : Associate Professors Penelope Dean Andrew Moddrell Ryan Palider

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SPRING 2010


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CONTROL Instructors : Associate Professors Paul Preissner Laura Fehlberg Julie Flohr

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FALL 2009


Line Study The studio employed the computer as a tool to generate novel forms and compositions. Explorations began with studies of curve geometry which exploited the operations of scale, rotation, and repetition to manipulate simple forms into unique configurations. 75


The concept of surface was expanded to generate closed forms which merge and diverge. These forms were then deformed to produce vertical displacement and to create unique articulations. 76


____The project is based on the newly gained raw technical prowess to compositional and cultural use through the design of two variations of the same program: boutique retail for Benetton in Tehran, Iran. While each building will have slight have a slight variation in program and specific differences in sitting, the issue raised to importance will be the ability to produce variation on theme via adjustment to form, rather than alteration of type. Each project should be considered a single project that allows for incremental variation to offer an ability to accommodate difference without necessitating substitution of alternate models of design. Project Benetton comprises two sites in downtown Teheran of roughly 1500 m2 each to be built out to two twelve floor buildings (including four below ground level). Each site must accommodate a total of 12,000 m2 of retail, office, residential, and underground parking.

BENETTON RETAIL, TAHRAN PROJECT 77


The logic of the proposed idea is based on a simple premise. The idea of a ribbon undulates (continues surface) from side to side as it climbs vertically from the street. The floor becomes wall, turns into floor, turns into wall, etc. With each change of direction, the ribbon enfolds a commercial space or an office space or a residential space. The combing of programs also combs together two diverse populations: the building’s residents and the building’s visitors. The alternating programs require each population to pass through the space of the other while moving between successive levels.


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Hamza J. Salim- Architecture Portfolio  

The Architecture Work of Hamza J. Salim