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ARCH 5505 - Craft Studio Compendium

Hamza Adenali Professor: Tammy Gaber


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I’d like to thank everyone that helped in the creation of this book. I’d like to thank my amazing studio members for constantly being a source of inspiration and relief in times of stress. Most importantly I’d like to thank my professor, Dr. Tammy Gaber, for what one could only describe as both being the most insane yet enjoyable four month studio.


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Table of Contents Chapter 1

Pg 07

Chapter 2

Pg 29

Chapter 3

Pg 51

Chapter 4

Pg 63

Chapter 5

Pg 75

An Analysis of Buddhism

Finnish Case Studies

Site Analysis

Liturgical Item

Temple Design


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Chapter 01 An Analysis on Buddhism


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Buddhism

The religion of Buddhism is one of the largest in the world, however, unlike other major world religions that have a God, Buddhism does not1. Although within the classification of religions created by Ninian Smart, it can be said to be one.2 It maintains a practical and ritual dimension, an experiential and emotional dimension, a narrative or mythic dimension, a doctrinal and philosophical dimension, an ethical and legal dimension, a social and institutional dimension, as well as a material dimension.2 That being said, at the centre of Buddhism is not a godly figure, but the Buddha himself.3 The word Buddha is not a name but rather a tittle that means “honored one�, with the actual name of the Buddha being Siddhartha Gotama.3 The Buddha’s story begins with him being raised in a life of comfort in a palace, but after four different trips outside of his sheltered upbringing, begins to question the meaning of life.4 In each of his four excursions, he learned something new about the world that made him ponder his comfortable life.4 On his first trip he met an old man and pondered the concept of aging.4 On his second trip he met a sick man and began thinking of illness.4 His third trip had him witnessing a corpse, opening his eyes to the finality

of life.4 On his fourth and final trip he met a beggar who was happier than all the other people he had met.4 What the Buddha took away from this was that all people age, get sick, and die, however, true happiness is attainable .4 It is said that shortly after his fourth trip, the Buddha left the palace

old age

sickness

death

poverty he was raised in and set out on a journey to unravel the true meaning of life.4 It was only after many days of contemplation and meditation that he gained an understanding of the world, otherwise known as enlightenment.5 For a brief moment, the Buddha considered simply keeping this information to himself, but ultimately decided to share the knowledge with the world.5 The knowledge of his enlightenment would go on to become the basis of Buddhist


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teachings, also known as the four noble truths.6 These truths were that life is suffering (dukkha), suffering caused craving (samudaya), suffering can end (nirodha), and that there is a method in which to end the suffering (magga). It is only when someone embodies these four truths that one may gain enlightenment (nirvana) and accomplish the goal of Buddhism, which is to end the cycle of rebirth and suffering.6 These teachings and others of Buddhism where at first shared orally, and it was not until some 100 years after the Buddha’s death that these teachings were recorded in scripture known as canons.7 The oldest canon that is still preserved is the Pali Canon, although it only is held highly in the Theravada sect as the Mahayana’s compiled their own canons.7 Meditation is a very important part of the Buddhist religion, however,

Dukkha

(suffering)

Samudaya (craving)

NIRVANA Nirodha

(suffering is not permanent)

magga

(end of suffering)

in the past it was reserved only for a few monks and nuns. It has now become more sought after by common practitioners in recent decades.8 In acquiring the four sacred truth, Buddha discovers what is known as the eightfold path or middle way, a way of being to reach enlightenment.9 The first three parts of this practice are energizing qualities requiring one to have the right view, resolve and speech.10 The later three are calming qualities, focusing on one practicing the right actions, livelihood and effort.10 The first six work together in the seventh step to become mindfulness, and these seven are all acquired through the eight step of Meditation.10 Although positioned as steps here, all parts of the eightfold path hold significance and must be continuously sought after through mediation in order to reach enlightenment.11 After his death, the Buddha made it apparent to not appoint anyone as a successor, as he never saw himself as a leader of the Buddhist following.12 In doing so, no central authority on the religion was formed, and disputes between practitioners often resulted in splitting of groups.13 Today, Buddhism can be classified into two main sects formed by a major division in the way it is practiced. The more conservative of the two sects is the Theravada (Doctrine of Elders) sect.13 Practitioners of this sect are commonly found in Sri Lanka, Burma, and Thailand.13 The more innovative sect is known the Mahayana (Great Vehicle) and can be found in Tibet, Central Asia, China and Japan.13 Buddhism was a missionary religion to begin with, so its spread was


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only natural.14 Beginning in India through the sermons of the Buddha himself, it quickly amassed thousands of followers. 14 The spread of the religion also gained momentum in the 3rd century BC after Emperor Ashoka became a practitioner and missionary of Buddhism. Ashoka then sent his missionaries to the south to help spread Buddhism to Sri Lanka in 250BCE.15 From Sri Lanka and India, Buddhism made its way around Asia, going to China between 100BCE-100CE, Cambodia in 100CE, Vietnam in 150CE, Burma in 400CE, Korea in 400CE, Japan between 500-600CE, Tibet between 600-700CE, and Thailand in 1000CE.16

<1,000,000

1,000,000 - 10,000,000

Currently Buddhism has close to 470 million followers around the world, with Mahayana sect holding some 185 million people and the Theravada sect having 125 million followers.17 More specifically, as of 2017, within Finlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current population of 5,513,130 people, only 1,814 people identify as Buddhist Practitioners.18

10,000,000 - 100,000,000

Above: Buddist Practitioners by Country Drawing by author After Pew Research Center,

Washington DC,

>200,000,000


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1 Keown, Damien. 2013. Buddhism: A Very Short

Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 3

2 Keown, 5-6 3 Keown, 17 4 Keown, 22-24 5 Keown, 25 6 Keown, 49 7 Keown, 19 8 Keown, 96 9 Keown, 59 10 Barrie, Thomas. 2010. The Sacred In-Between:

The Mediating Roles of Architecture. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 33

11 Keown, Damien. 2013. Buddhism: A Very Short

Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 59

12 Keown, 30 13 Keown, 13 14 Kozak, Arnie. 2010. The Everything Buddhism

Book: A complete introduction to the history, traditions, and beliefs of Buddhism, past and present. Avon, MA: Simon and Schuster, 118

15 Kozak, 120 16 Keown, Damien. 2013. Buddhism: A Very Short

Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 146-148

17 Georgetown University. n.d. Berkley Center

for Religion, Peace & World Affairs. Accessed September 2018. https://berkleycenter. georgetown.edu/essays/demographics-ofbuddhism/#!english.

18 2018. Key figures on population by region

in 1990 to 2017. Helsinki, June 20. Accessed September 2018. http://pxnet2.stat.fi/ PXWeb/pxweb/en/StatFin/StatFin__vrm__ vaerak/?tablelist=true.


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The Stupa

Of the first three main Buddhist buildings, the residence hall (vihara), the hall of worship (chaitya), and the stupa, the latter became the most important and symbolic of them.1 The stupa was influenced by the Hindu burial mound as a housing of sacredness not meant to be entered but circumambulated.2 It was covered an intricate mix of images, divinities and objects; as early Buddhist architecture did not symbolize Buddha in a human form but rather symbolically with empty thrones, trees or stupas themselves.3 It was not until the end of the third century that the image of the Buddha in meditation began to appear.3

The purposes of Stupas can be classified into 5 main groups: relic, object, commemorative, symbolic and votive stupas.4 Relic stupas were meant to case the remains of important figures like the Buddha or his disciples, while object stupas contained important belongings of these people.4 Unlike the previous two that housed items, commemorative stupas where meant to recognize significant moments in the Buddha or his disciples lives.4 Symbolic stupas had less of a cause and effect relationship as they were built as reminders of the Buddha and Nirvana.4 Lastly, votive stupas were established at important points of a pilgrimage or monasteries for good karma.4 As time progressed and Buddhism spread, the form of the Stupa began to slowly change and its name was referred to differently. Some of the other names of the stupa were also caitya (Nepal), dagba (Sri Lanka), candi (Indonesia), zedi/chedi (southeast Asia), chorten (Tibet), & the tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;a or pagoda (east Asia).4

Above: 250BCE to 100BCE Sanchi Stupa

Phuoc, Le Huu. 2010. Buddhist Architecture. Grafikol, 161

In India, stupas usually had a hemispherical dome surrounded by ornate railings and gateways.4 In other countries, the dome part of the stupa began to be emphasized through a vertical stretching or a rising on plinths


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Above: 670 CE Pagoda in Japan

Phuoc, Le Huu. 2010. Buddhist Architecture. Grafikol, 200

as seen in Pakistan.4 In eastern Asia, the native building styles influences the stupa into becoming the pagoda, removing the dome completely in order to focus on height. 4 In the south eastern parts of Asia such as Indonesia, Myanmar and Tibet, a multi-terraced and galleried stupa become prevalent.4 Although different in style, other than the Tibetan chorten and Asian pagoda, stupas were not meant to be entered.5

Above: 792-842 CE Multi-terraced Candi in Indonesia

Phuoc, Le Huu. 2010. Buddhist Architecture. Grafikol, 215

1 Fisher, Robert E. 2015. Buddhist Art and

Architecture. London: Thames & Hudson, 29

2 Fisher, 31 3

Fisher, 41-42

4 Phuoc, Le Huu. 2010. Buddhist Architecture.

Grafikol, 149

5 Phuoc 150


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Sanchi Stupa

The great Stupa at Sanchi dates back from 250BCE to 100BCE1 as one of the oldest religious and Buddhist pieces of architecture in India.2 It was originally part of a huge monastery comprised of multiple stupas, of which only three remain.3 The art of the stupa focused on the pillars and gateways (toranas) found

at cardinal points portraying important Buddhist events.3 A pillar was erected in the mid third century by emperor Ashoka after a visit.4 Buddhist missionaries and pilgrims would likely have entered the enclosed railings through the south

0m Above: Floor plan of Sanchi Stupa 1:500 Drawing by author After Phuoc, Le Huu.

10m


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Below: Elevation of Sanchi Stupa 1:500 Drawing by author After Phuoc, Le Huu.

torana, circulating around the stupa in a clockwise direction as they contemplated the four holy truths and the eightfold path.5 Although not the first Stupa ever built, the Sanchi Stupa shows a maturing of the stupa architecture.6 Borrowing from wood joinery, the stone pillars were skillfully connected with mortises tenon joints.6 After its discovery by the western world, the monastery that the Great Stupa of Sanchi was in was plundered by explorers in the hopes of finding treasure, resulting in the deterioration and collapse of many of the buildings.6 That being said, restoration have taken place since then and the once collapsed south and west toranas have been reconstructed.6

1 Barrie, Thomas. 2010. The Sacred In-Between:

The Mediating Roles of Architecture. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 111

2 Phuoc, Le Huu. 2010. Buddhist Architecture.

Grafikol, 156

3 Barrie, Thomas. 2010. The Sacred In-Between:

The Mediating Roles of Architecture. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 112

4 Phuoc, Le Huu. 2010. Buddhist Architecture.

Grafikol, 156

5 Barrie, Thomas. 2010. The Sacred In-Between:

The Mediating Roles of Architecture. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge, 112

6 Phuoc, Le Huu. 2010. Buddhist Architecture.

Grafikol, 157


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Ihaidō for Kōrin-ji Temple

ancestreal tablet room

storage

ancestreal tablet room

storage

ancestreal tablet room

storage

ancestreal tablet room

temple

0m

storage

toilet

10m

Above: Section of the Ihaidō for Kōrin-ji Temple 1:250 Drawing by author After Takashi Okuno & Associates

Designed by Takashi Okuno office, Takashi Okuno & Associates, the Ihaido (hall for Buddhist memorial tablets) for the Korin Ji temple in the mountains of tamaga-cho is a contemporary piece of Buddhist architecture.1 The buildings materiality focuses on readily available materials and simple construction methods as to warrant the maintenance of the building with local craftsman.1 Symbolism takes shape in the 88 glass fitted windows on the skin of the building. 1 This number is meant to represent the amount of stops visited on an Ohenro pilgrimage route around shikoku island.1 The interior space of the building thusly becomes a place for calming ones spirit wrapped within a corridor of lights that changes throughout the different times of day and the year. This light filled corridor allows for circulations of the space on the lower floors.


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Left: Floor Plans of the Ihaidō for Kōrin-ji Temple 1:500 Drawing by author After Takashi Okuno & Associates

5th Floor

4th Floor

3rd Floor

2nd Floor

0m Above: Photograph of Interior Circulation

1st Floor 1 Design Boom. 2018. takashi okuno builds the

10m

‘temple of the future’ on japanese mountain. July 30. Accessed September 2018. https:// www.designboom.com/architecture/takashiokuno-ihaido-temple-japan-07-30-2018/.


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A Phenomenological Analysis I make my was to you through the peaking buds of mother earth, as i see your blissful enlightenment holding you high. I have followed veins of concrete through hills and valleys to bring me to your feet, simply to be dwarfed by your grandeur. Clad in the essence of humility and coarseness, your callous exterior only allows a tiny glimpse as to who you are. Yet you embrace me without hesitation, brushing me ever so gently with your rays. Allowed to wonder through your soul, you do not beckon for me to reach your center but I am there all the same. In silence and serenity, I find peace at your deepest center, while in thought and contemplation I explore the levels of your soul. Now at your top, you have given me your all and have nothing more to bare, allowing the earth to embrace me just as you once had.


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Waterside Buddist Shrine

Designed by ARCHSTUDIO, the waterside Buddhist shrine pays homage to Buddhism as a place for meditation and contemplation. 1 The buildings design is one focused on landscape as the design team used the mound and trees already on the site to help create a connection between building and nature.1

All these aspects come together to create a harmony in the sequencing of the space and its emphasis of the natural environment it is built in.

The shrine is built directly under the mound, with the main entrance being an elongated walkway that makes one feel a slow descent into the earth. 1 The entryway is also focused on building around the existing trees on the site, creating a network of 5 branched areas. 1 Each of the five spaces have different functions with the entrance to the south, a meditation room to the north west, a tea room directly opposite the meditation room, a living room to the north and a washroom directly west.1 Light is allowed to filter into the shrine room through an overhead window along a curved wall, emphasizing the light on the Buddha statue in the room.1 Directly opposite the space of meditation is the tea room with a curtain wall opening the view towards the serene water. 1

0m

10m

Above: Floor Plan of Waterside Buddhist Shrine 1:500 Drawing by author After Takashi Okuno & Associates


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Below: Section of Waterside Buddhist Shrine 1:250 Drawing by author After Takashi Okuno & Associates

0m

1 Designboom.

10m

2017. archstudio embeds buddhist shrine within the riparian landscape of hebei, china. May 09. Accessed September 2018. https://www.designboom.com/ architecture/archstudio-waterside-buddhistshrine-china-05-09-2017/.


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A Phenomenological Analysis Glimpses of you catch my eye from the distance, as your ever so subtle glow invites me in. Shrouded under the earth that you simultaneously shape and find shape from. Your arms reach out in a haunting beauty to invite me in. Intrigue wins an inner conflict with fear, as you guide me under to a place that as much as I struggle, I will not influence. Silence begins to flood you slowly till there is nothing left but a tranquil stream. While you become ever more silent, my thoughts begin to thunder ever so violent. And just as the sea of silence takes my last breath, so too does the storm calm to find serenity . I know I am here, within the earth, experiencing the earth. I may go, but would rather this silence drown me in peace.


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Annotated Bibliography

ARCHSTUDIO. n.d. ARCHSTUDIO: Buddha Tea House. Accessed September 2018. http:// www.archstudio.cn/case/0_0_263/. Barrie, Thomas. 2010. The Sacred In-Between: The Mediating Roles of Architecture. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. Two of the section that focus on Buddhism, in a spiritual and architectural sense, were used. The first contains a brief overview on the contemplative practices of Buddhism. Specifically, the 7 factors of enlightenment, investigation, effort, rapture, tranquility, concentration and equanimity, that come together to create mindfulness. Many of the major sects of Buddhism practice mindfulness, as it creates an active awareness with the mind and environment. The second relating to the archetypal stupa located at Sanchi. It states that the architectural Buddhist temple was a place for circulation in devotion. It goes on to briefly describe the Great Stupa of Sanchi, the monastery it was a part of, as well as the artistic and architectural details around the Stupa. Cheng, Aaron. n.d. Google Map Customizer. Accessed September 2018. http:// www.chengfolio.com/google_map_customizer#administrative/labels/444444/off/ administrative.country/geometry.stroke/444444/off/administrative.province/ geometry.stroke/444444/off/landscape/geometry/e3e3e3/on/landscape.natural/ labels/bbbbbb/on/poi/all/4. Design Boom. 2018. Takashi Okuno builds the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;temple of the futureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on japanese mountain. July 30. Accessed September 2018. https://www.designboom.com/architecture/ takashi-okuno-ihaido-temple-japan-07-30-2018/. Designboom. 2017. archstudio embeds buddhist shrine within the riparian landscape of hebei, china. May 09. Accessed September 2018. https://www.designboom.com/ architecture/archstudio-waterside-buddhist-shrine-china-05-09-2017/. Fisher, Robert E. 2015. Buddhist Art and Architecture. London: Thames & Hudson. The book focuses on the creation, growth and evolution of Buddhist Art and


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Architecture. The introductory chapter explains Buddhist art as a mix of images, divinities and objects. The author goes on to discuss Buddhist architecture in select regions, with relevant black and white photos for visualisation. He discusses early Buddhist art in India, the influences of its Architecture, and the iconography used to depict the Buddha himself. Georgetown University. n.d. Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs. Accessed September 2018. https://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu/essays/demographics-of buddhism/#!english. Keown, Damien. 2013. Buddhism: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press. The book contains a brief overview on multiple aspects of the Buddhist Religion. The first chapter deals with rectifying Buddhism as a Religion. It then proceeds to discuss the life of the Buddha, from his birth to his Enlightenment and death. The section on the four noble truths describe the goals of the religion and the eightfold path to attain enlightenment. The section on the spread of Buddhism explains how and when Buddhism spreads. The final section referenced describes the how and why of meditation in the Buddhist Religion. Maps are included in the begging of the book to help visual the spread of the religion. 2018. Key figures on population by region in 1990 to 2017. Helsinki, June 20. Accessed September 2018. http://pxnet2.stat.fi/PXWeb/pxweb/en/StatFin/StatFin__vrm__ vaerak/?tablelist=true. Kozak, Arnie. 2010. The Everything Buddhism Book: A complete introduction to the history, traditions, and beliefs of Buddhism, past and present. Avon, MA: Simon and Schuster. Chapter 10 of this book goes on to discuss the Spread of Buddhism through the world. It begins in India with the Buddha and spreads greatly through the influence of Emperor Ashoka. It then travels all around Asia through the help of missionaries. Theravada Buddhism travels south to Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos and Indonesia; while Mahayana Buddhism travels north to spreading to China with the help of the Silk Road, Japan, Tibet, and Korea. The Chapter ends stating the top ten countries with the highest number of Buddhist practitioners, and stating that although prevalent on the eastern hemisphere, Buddhism has grown greatly in the last 50 years in the West. Okuno, Takashi. n.d. Takashi Okuno & Associates: Works. Accessed September 2018. http:// okunotakashi.jp/s/%E7%9C%9F%E8%A8%80%E5%AE%97%E5%85%89%E6%9E%97%E 5%AF%BA%e3%80%80%E4%BD%8D%E7%89%8C%E5%A0%82/. Pew Research Center. 2010. Table: Religious Composition by Country, in Numbers. Accessed


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September 2018. http://www.pewforum.org/2012/12/18/table-religious-composition-bycountry-in-numbers/. Phuoc, Le Huu. 2010. Buddhist Architecture. Grafikol. Chapter 6 of this book discusses the stupa Architecturally, and contains many examples with drawings. It states that the stupa is the most important type aspect of Buddhist architecture as well as five classifications of stupas. These include relic, object, commemorative, symbolic, and votive types of stupas. It includes an overview of how stupas changed from region to region over time. The chapter also includes a section on the great Stupa at Sanchi, including diagrams and a history of its discovery to the western world.


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Chapter 02 Finnish Case Studies


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Löyly Sauna

Löyly is an intricate piece of architecture that sits along the Southern coast line of the city of Helsinki. The sauna is an indispensable part of the Finnish lifestyle, with the population of Finland having only 5.4million people but 3.3 million recorded sauna’s.1 Public sauna’s, although popular in the past in major cities, have become less prevalent.2 With that in mind, Avanto architects set out to create a new public sauna for the city of Helsinki. Designed by Avanto Architects as their second project as a firm,3 the building houses a multitude of programs. In the northern portion of the building is the Sauna space housing three different sauna types. A public steam sauna, a public smoke sauna, and a private smoke sauna that can be rented out by groups. Balancing what has been said to be a spiritual moment of solace that is the sauna, are the more social elements of the building to the south. With a restaurant operated by Royal Restaurants and an outdoor auditorium for the future marine sports centre.4

Set in a formerly industrial area that is being transformed into a residential one,5 it can be said that the building is a marker of what us to come. The faceted form of the sauna also hints to a future coastal park, with layered wooden strips of heattreated pine both keeping privacy for those inside while still allowing for views to the water and surrounding site from the inside.6

1 Löyly. n.d. The Löyly Story. Accessed October

2018. http://www.loylyhelsinki.fi/en/loyly-en/.

2 Löyly. The Löyly Story 3 Hara, Ville, interview by Hamza Adenali. 2018.

(October 08).

4 Löyly. The Löyly Story 5 Avanto. n.d. Löyly. Accessed October 2018.

https://avan.to/works/loyly/.

6 Löyly. The Löyly Story


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Open rooftop approachable from steps integrated with the undulating wood on the southern side.

Public outdoor auditorium

Restaurant seating space

0m

5m

10m

A section of the building through the restaurant showcasing the undulating timber form and how it connects with the water Drawing by author After AVANTO Architects

20m


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public outdoor auditorium

steps to rooftop

restaurant


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private sauna

changing rooms

steam sauna

smoke sauna

As one approaches the building, they see it humbly sitting within the site, evocative yet not screaming for attention. Inside an invigorating process of what one can only describe as spiritual takes place as one begins the process of both heating their bodies in the sauna and cooling it rapidly within the water.

0m

5m

10m

20m

Drawing by author After AVANTO Architects


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Photograph of exterior by Author


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A Phenomenological Analysis


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Kuokkala Church

The Kuokkala church designed by OOPEAA (Office for peripheral architecture) is an exquisite piece of architecture located in the Kuokkala neighborhood in the city of Jyvaskyla.1 Designed for a competition that asked for a church that looks like a church, the previously 20 year empty site now houses a church that is both a beacon and a community space.2 The building is situated in the middle of a barren square, showcasing itself as a focal point standing tall in is vast space. Nestle thoughtfully within the site, it takes advantage of the elevation differences, creating two different level entrances at grade. The exterior is clad in slate tiles, giving it a very strong and almost harsh presence within the white square and the winter seasons of Helsinki. However, once entered, the atmosphere is completely change. The warm glow of timber embraces you within the prayer space, as light pears through a skylight and weaved timber lattices that cover the roof of the building. Sculptural carved wooded circles find themselves placed upon the back wall, alluding both metaphorically to the symbol of the cross, and literally with the etched gold symbols that glow as light reflects of them.

The program of the building is separated throughout the three levels. The bottom floor houses the offices that have the option of spilling onto the square.3 The middle floor houses both the church hall and parish hall that may be combined into one open space. Lastly, the top floor contains the organ as well as the cantorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office.4

1 OOPEAA Office for Peripheral Architecture.

2014. OOPEAA Office for Peripheral Architecture. Edited by Julie Cirelli. Stockholm: Arvinius + Orfeus Publishing AB.

2 OOPEAA Office for Peripheral Architecture.

OOPEAA Office for Peripheral Architecture.

3 Archdaily. 2010. Kuokkala Church / OOPEAA.

August 12. Accessed October 2018. https:// www.archdaily.com/72755/kuokkala-churchlassila-hirvilammi.

4 Archdaily. Kuokkala Church / OOPEAA.


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0m

5m

10m

20m

Drawing by author After OOPEAA


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bell tower

office spaces

parish hall

0m

5m

church hall

10m

20m

Drawing by author After OOPEAA


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cantorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office

organ

o.t.b

0m

o.t.b

5m

10m

20m

Drawing by author After OOPEAA


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removable partition wall

parish hall

0m

5m

10m

main church hall

20m

Drawing by author After OOPEAA


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office spaces

0m

5m

10m

20m

Drawing by author After OOPEAA


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Photograph of interior by Author


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Photograph of exterior by Author


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A Phenomenological Analysis


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Bibliography

Archdaily. 2010. Kuokkala Church / OOPEAA. August 12. Accessed October 2018. https:// www.archdaily.com/72755/kuokkala-church-lassila-hirvilammi. Avanto. n.d. Lรถyly. Accessed October 2018. https://avan.to/works/loyly/. Hara, Ville, interview by Hamza Adenali. 2018. (October 08). Lรถyly. n.d. The Lรถyly Story. Accessed October 2018. http://www.loylyhelsinki.fi/en/loylyen/. OOPEAA Office for Peripheral Architecture. 2014. OOPEAA Office for Peripheral Architecture. Edited by Julie Cirelli. Stockholm: Arvinius + Orfeus Publishing AB.


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Chapter 03 Site Analysis


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Meripuisto City Park & Kaivopuisto Park

Located in the southern portion of the southern capital, Helsinki; Meripuisto City Park and Kaivopuisto park are the location chosen for the project site. With its vast greenery and amazing view, its promise for a beautiful building is apparent.

0m 10m

25m

50m

Meripuisto City Park 1:5000: Drawing by Jacob Riehl


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0m 10m

25m

50m

Kaivopuisto Park 1:5000: Drawing by author


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Meripuisto City Park Section: Drawing by Alexander Klein Gunnewiek


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Kaivopuisto Park Section: Drawing by Raâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;anaa Brown


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Longitudinal Site Section: Drawing by Lisa Hoshowsky and Marie Jankovich


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Meripuisto City Park & Kaivopuisto Park Model 1:1000: Built by Matthew Hunter, Muhammad Khan, Keegan McGowan, Marina Schwellnus


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Chapter 04 Liturgical Item


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The Meditation Block

As meditation is on of the most crucial parts of Buddhism, an item used to improve this ritual process was analyzed for a liturgical piece. Early sketches of the piece focused on three aspects; creating a seating piece that was modular, comfortable and

showed homage to significance of the number 8 in Buddhism. These drawings also analyzed the footprint of a human body in lotus pose, and began designing for that.


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Developmental drawing rose issues as the seating found itself at an awkward angle. A re design was configured for a smaller block.


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1:1 mock ups of a possible seating block were developed through the use of cardboard to better understand dimensions and comfort.


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A test piece was created out of a laminated maple block to test practicality and comfort.


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Revised designs took place to address the issue of weight made apparent in the wooden version striving for a lighter form that did not sacrifice comfort.. 3/4 inch thick ultra high performance concrete is cast in a form to create this concrete.


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3D printed 1to5 models of the seat were created to address the harsh curve cuts in the previous iteration


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Final representation of the completed meditation block, made with black concrete.


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Chapter 05 Temple Design


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Design Through Collage

The design process of the final sacred space, a Buddhist temple, for the studio began with an exploration of collage. Avoiding thinking in the typical architectural models of plans and sections, the focus was put on creating expressive spaces through collage.

These would then be interpreted and reinterpreted by both the viewers and the creator of the collages. In the hopes of pushing the designs to their utmost potential.

Meditation Space Collage


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The Initial collages focused on the meditation space and the transitional space into the temple. With simple iconography to represent a possible Buddhist statue for the meditation space and simple cutouts to represent a corridor lined with the mediation block

Transitional Space Collage


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Meditation Space Layered Acrylic Collage

Moving forward, the collages were improved upon by using layered acrylic. This was to add a layer of dept into the collages, and in doing so aspects of the designs were greatly in improved upon.


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Transitional Space Layered Acrylic Collage

Ideas like a terraced meditation space with a tree like structure in the middle and a meandering transitional space were discussed in order to replace homogeneous elements out of the design to more intricate ones.


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Meditation Space Layered Acrylic Collage

The final step in this collage process involved merging the digital with the haptic. The spaces were remade in Photoshop with layers, then printed and glued to layered acrylic sheets to create a semi-final image of the spaces.


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Transitional Corridor Layered Acrylic Collage


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Not only the meditation space and transitional space, but many different portions of the building were explored through this digital collage process. These later iteration were however printed onto acetate sheets in order to more efficiently process.


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Washroom, Office Corridor, Transitional Space & Community Space Layered Acrylic Collage


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Tyyni Temppeli

After compiling all of the previous research and processes, a final design was created on the site. Designed for the city of Helsinki in Kaivopuisto park, Tyyni Temppeli finds itself following its name sake in the hopes of being a serene temple. Placed a top of the highest point, the temple both uses the site to help itself be displayed while integrating the fairly drastic topography into the design. Subtlety clad in black aluminum, the building aims to address both the strong message and humility practiced in Buddhism. As one circumambulation through the space, the eight-fold path central to Buddhist teachings is manifested in the design through its geometric shapes and within the narrow windows placed within the exterior. A centralized meditation space is found at the center of the building, with concrete beams that both represent the Bodhi tree, the location in which the Buddha gained enlightenment, and act as the structure that supports the majority of the building.

0m

10m

25m

50m


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Southern Site Approach Render


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Northern Approach to Building with conrete guiding walls

Programatic elemements nestled close to core

Public seating landscaped withing building

Southern Approach to Building with conrete guiding walls

Southern main entrance Northern lower level entrance and MPU Stair case to MPU and north exit Circulation of building around central program


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Programatic elemements nestled close to core

Southern main entrance Northern lower level entrance and MPU Central meditation space Stair case to MPU and north exit Circulation of building around central program


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WC

Stairs to MPU

WC

Meditation Space

Office

Office

Office

1m

5m

10m

Main Level Floor Plan 1:200


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Outdoor Seating/Steps

Multi-Purpose Space

Kitchen

Storage/Maintanence

Storage/Maintanence

Stair Case

Lower Level Floor Plan 1:200


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Transitional Corridor Render


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93

1m

5m

10m

North Section 1:200

East Section 1:200


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Meditation Space Render 1:200


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Sheathing 1:10 Wall Detail

Cross Bracing

1 roof tile vapor barrier 15mm strand board 38/89mm battens w/ mineral wool insulation 15 mm strand board 15 mm boarding 114/286mm gluelam beam 2 4mm aluminum composite panel 40/45mm timber batten w/ mineral wood insulation vapor barrier 45/50mm timber batten w/ air cavity 75mm steel batten w/ air cavity 15 mm strand board 15 mm gypsum 3 triple glazing in aluminum frame 4 concrete

Concrete Columns

CLT Meditation Space


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1

2

3

2 4


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1:250 Paper Model in Concrete


Thank you.


@artdenali

ARCH 5505 (Craft) - Compendium  
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