__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

What were you made for?


You were made to make progress. To make connections. To build up, tear down, reconstruct, and make something altogether new. That’s what we were made for, too.


4, 5, 14, 15

Agents of change We’re looking for the type of student who can’t imagine waiting to be told what to do. Our community of self-starters is resilient, resourceful, and committed enough to do the deep work of understanding

6 –11

The Hampshire Way

complex problems.

Hampshire College was founded in 1965 to radically reimagine liberal arts education. Today, we’re more unconventional than ever, and we’re organized in a way that’s different from any other college in the world.

16–23

Learning collaboratives Our curriculum is organized around four Learning Collaboratives. Through these collaboratives, we bring disciplines together to address the pressing issues facing society today. And as global challenges shift, so do the topics of our collaboratives. We evolve and change to reflect the world around us.

1


We won’t be able to create a better world by doing the same things that got us here. Hampshire is a place for fresh ideas, inventive thinking, and actions that definitely don’t look like what everyone else is doing.

2


This is the opposite of you. 3


Daniel Schmidt 18F

4

Daniel Schmidt is a social organizer rallying a global community of creators. His monthly e-journal, the Public Wave, was created as a way to stay connected with fellow artists during the pandemic and showcase the creative endeavors of his friends around the world. Although each artist works independently, Daniel finds similar themes in everyone’s work— the economy, social existence during the pandemic, concern about loved ones, spirituality—and recognizes the power of so many individuals simultaneously questioning the state of our society.

Many of my friends were finding their own way to question the status quo. I am learning that it is ok to make art with the same message as my neighbor and my friend, because there is power in numbers: as Gayle Rubin said in ‘The Traffic in Women,’ ‘organization gives power.’”


AGENTS OF CHANGE

Darleane Torres 17F

When I was applying and talking about my goals and what I wanted to study, Hampshire was the one school to tell me ‘Yes.’”

To build the skills she’d need as an entrepreneur, Darleane Torres wanted an education that focused on both engineering and business management. Hampshire was the only place where she’d be able to get that. Taking full advantage of the freedom, resources, and support the Hampshire experience provides, Darleane started her

own business as a Div I student. Her startup, Painter Printer, is developing robot technology to paint houses better and more efficiently than professional painters. The company has already won $5,500 funding in a competition for female-founded startups, which will be used to create prototypes.

5


Your college experience here will be unlike anywhere else— and unlike anyone else’s.

6


THE HAMPSHIR E WAY

No majors or departments

NO GRADES

No first-years or seniors

ONLY THE COLLECTIVE PURSUIT OF KNOWLEDGE

JUST A BETTER MEASURE OF YOUR PROGRESS

ONLY VARYING STAGES OF LEARNING

At Hampshire, you’ll work across, between, and without disciplines—and you’ll combine fields to curate your own original course of study. You’ll be challenged with the freedom to formulate questions never asked before.

Instead of grades, your performance is assessed with constructive, written feedback from faculty members, based on reviews of your projects, your engagement in classes and community, your writings, your art, and more.

We have three divisions, from exploratory, foundational, and advanced. Your studies culminate in an in-depth Division III project similar to a graduate-level thesis, where you’ll prove your mastery and defend your work in front of a faculty committee.

7


You will not come to Hampshire to pursue a major.

8


THE HAMPSHIR E WAY

You’ll take part in a curriculum that reflects the world around us—ever-changing, fluid, and never contained within a single discipline. Our Learning Collaborative-based curriculum is experimental and radical. It extends beyond conventional ways of teaching, learning, and living.

Each Learning Collaborative consists of a cluster of courses, events, projects, and public forums for sharing work in progress. You’ll focus on working with your peers and faculty members to directly tackle 21st-century challenges and enact real change in the world.

And since we’re actively committed to advancing racial justice, you’ll see this topic woven into everything we do. Learning Collaboratives are organized around today’s most pressing problems and questions, and they evolve as the world’s critical issues shift.

2020–2022 COLLABORATIVES: ENVIRONMENTS AND CHANGE IN/JUSTICE MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY TIME AND NARR ATIVE

LEARNING C O L L A B O R AT I V E S

YOU

S TUDE NT- DE S IGNE D CURRICULUM

DIVERSE F A C U LT Y EXPERTISE

ADEMIC FOCUS

PASSIONS

AC

URGENT QUESTIONS

YOUR UNIQUE HAMPSHIRE DEGREE

9


You’re the entrepreneur of your own education. 001

002

003

Studentdesigned curriculum

Divisional structure

Narrative evaluation

You advance through a Divisional structure rather than the traditional school years. Each Division requires a portfolio review, including narrative feedback from each course, final papers or projects, community-engaged learning, other meaningful work, and a retrospective, capped off by a yearlong Div III project of your own design.

We don’t think grades are an accurate or effective measurement. You’re evaluated through narrative feedback and evaluation provided by peers and faculty members.

You choose the faculty advisors you’ll work with to create your own curriculum to address the big question, challenge, or issue you’re most interested in.

10


THE HAMPSHIR E WAY

At Hampshire, you’ll learn multiple ways to identify a challenge, ask the right questions, mobilize resources, and incorporate diverse points of view as you creatively propose solutions. You’ll take your passion projects beyond the conceptual, and make them real.

THESE SIX KEY ELEMENTS OF THE HAMPSHIRE EXPERIENCE MAKE IT WORK:

004

005

006

urgent questions

Learning Collaboratives

CommunityEngaged Learning

You’ll have the chance to work with other students and faculty to determine which urgent, global challenges should be addressed as a unifying area of study at Hampshire. You can pursue these challenges, questions, or problems within an existing Learning Collaborative or help propose a new one.

Learning Collaboratives are the resources aligned to key themes and urgent questions. Faculty, staff, and students bring their own perspectives and expertise, mixing ideas, skills, and passions among a community of others pursuing the similar questions and projects.

A requirement for Div I and II, Community-Engaged Learning deepens your engagement on campus and in the world. You’ll design opportunities to build community and seek innovative ways to address critical community and organizational needs.

11


At Hampshire, you’ll learn to tackle the urgent issues of our time by exploring the topics you’re most passionate about.

12


Start by being a provoker of big questions. 13


Chynna Aming 17F

Hampshire has not only allowed me to become innovative and involved with my community, it has also allowed me to meet some of the most important people in my life.

Chynna Aming is a scientist and advocate who studies the role of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) on reproductive health through a neuroscience and public health lens. As a Div III student, she conducted research on the effectiveness of support groups

14

My friends have created this idea of community for me during my time at Hampshire, and they represent the people who I want to show up for in the world.

for survivors of childhood sexual assault. She credits Hampshire for not only giving her the chance to develop and refine her leadership and research skills, but also for helping her see the unique beauty in every community.


AGENTS OF CHANGE

For me, I’m a futurist. When I think about what the future holds, I know it’s limitless as far as technology. I want to be a pioneer of the advancements that are coming.” Jahmique Robinson 18F

As a podcaster studying mechanical engineering, Jahmique focuses on social culture, the life experiences of his generation—and what effects technology will have on both in the future. Jahmique’s podcast, Talking Mad Shit, gives him a way to express his creativity and a platform to encourage his peers to express themselves as well. It’s also an avenue for him to think critically about what technological advancements are coming and what should be developed to make life better. 15


How do we repair our environment? Inside our Environments and Change Learning Collaborative, you’ll dig into the challenge of creating a just future in the face of climate change while living a sustainable life. You’ll study how we can care for each other and our planet, explore how we adapt, and examine how we define a sense of home and embody our place in the world.

FACE THE EARTH’S REVOLUTION WITH AN EVOLUTION ALL OUR OWN In the fall of 2020, first-year students and faculty came together to address the question: Why haven’t we as individuals, governments, and societies begun to act as though our very lives and cultures were threatened by climate change? Led by an animal behaviorist, a product designer, and a poet, this group explored solutions to current local and global environmental and related social problems.

16

The R. W. Kern Center at Hampshire is a Living Building designed to meet multiple disciplinary perspectives. Students, faculty, and staff use the building as a laboratory for the study of art and architecture, environmental studies, the cognitive sciences, and critical social inquiry.


ENVIRONMENTS AND CHANGE

17


How can we dismantle white supremacy? You’ll take a critical look at racism, classism, and other forms of systemic oppression within the In/Justice Learning Collaborative. You’ll explore how to make anti-racist practices a part of our everyday lives, actions, and decisions. You’ll examine the future of reproductive justice and ponder the issue of who or what has rights. And you’ll take a deep look at restorative justice for local and global communities.

EXAMINE THE AMERICAN NARRATIVE TO CREATE A MORE JUST EXPERIENCE FOR ALL Each year, all members of the Hampshire community read a piece to prepare for discussions and events that take place over the course of the academic year. We call it the Common Read. In 2020, we selected The New York Times Magazine’s 1619 Project, a wide array of articles, literary pieces, and podcasts that explore the profound impact that the institution of chattel slavery had on the United States.

18


IN/JUSTICE

The S.O.U.R.C.E. Wall of Resilience is a mural project facilitated by Mikaela Gonzålez 13F, and co-created with members of Hampshire College’s S.O.U.R.C.E. (Students of Under-Represented Cultures & Ethnicities) community as a way to claim space and build resilience on campus.

19


While quarantined at home, Hampshire professor John Slepian entered GPS locations of famous landscape photographs into Google Earth, captured them with his iPhone and a computer, and printed them with a Polaroid Lab printer. The results are images that express the insufficiency of technology to replace what we experience in the real world.

20


MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY

How do technologies shape our relationships to the world? Tools, books, computers, videos, and gene-editing techniques are just a few of the influences that have radically changed the way we live. Inside the Media and Technology Learning Collaborative, you’ll study the ways in which media and technology act as agents of positive change, and question how to address the ethical, political, social, and economic problems they pose.

DISCERN THE WHOLE TRUTH FROM A FRACTION OF THE FACTS Taught by a composer, a philosopher, and an ecologist, one first-year seminar addressed the question: What can a part of the world (a sample) tell us about a larger whole (a population, a musical genre, an ecosystem)? More broadly: How can we grasp the truth when all we ever have are fragments of (or perspectives on) it? This course explored the ways artists, scientists, and others employ sampling techniques to grasp, reflect, and alter the world.

21


Part of Hampshire’s art collection, The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters by Francisco de Goya is an etching and aquatint that has been analyzed for centuries. Scientists study its chemical makeup to reveal its date, historians study it for evidence of political strife, and artists might look at the work for inspiration on their own place in a tumultuous era.

22


TIME AND NARR ATIVE

Whose histories get told? Study how we author time, mark time, and measure space and time within the Time and Narrative Collaborative. You’ll look at how the multimillion-year history of the earth affects how we think about human evolution, history, knowledge, and the future. You’ll examine who decides whose memories matter. And you’ll explore what lies ahead, and how to plan for and reimagine a different world.

CREATE THE SKILL SET TO HANDLE A ONCE-IN-A-LIFETIME EVENT How do people, communities, and cultures understand, make sense of, and react to pandemics, both historically and now, given COVID-19? Hampshire students and faculty explored this question through research, hands-on investigation, and creative expression. The course was taught by a molecular biologist, a journalist and ethnomusicology professor, a sports writer, and a historian.

23


It’s our most practiced tradition: ringing the Division-Free bell after your Div III project is complete. It’s a sign that you’ve completed an advanced, intensive independent study and passed the last degree requirements. And it marks the beginning of your post-Hampshire journey, where you’ll head out into the world to take insight and take action, disrupt what is and always has been, and continue your work as a formidable force for change.

24


This is your chime of the times 25


THIS IS YOUR ROOM TO GROW

Our Dining Commons serves local, sustainably raised produce and meat, straight from the Hampshire College Farm.

Pick up a latte and a pastry at Kern Kafe, Hampshire’s own independently run coffee shop.

Meet up with friends at The Bridge to argue the implications of falafel on gender and culture, or to just play euchre.

26


CAMPUS LIVING

After your first year, live in one of our three apartment-style spaces we call mods.

Pick your own peppers, tomatoes, beans, herbs, flowers, and more from our Community Supported Agriculture garden.

27


THIS IS YOUR ZONE TO GET OUT

Intentional housing communities are living spaces where students choose to come together around a particular area of interest. They range from mindfulness to kosher living—and even Ultimate Frisbee.

Play on one of our six varsity teams or three club teams.

Spread your love of circus with fellow jugglers, acrobats, unicyclers, poi-spinners, staff-twirlers, stilt walkers, fire spinners, clowns, and musicians in our Circus Club.

28


CAMPUS WELLNESS

Iaidō ( Japanese Swordsmanship) is just one of the skills you can master through Hampshire’s Outdoor Programs, Recreation, and Athletics classes.

There are hundreds of miles of gorgeous hiking and biking trails accessible directly from Hampshire’s campus. Dancers interpret poetry and language to choreograph their movements.

29


THIS IS YOUR SPACE TO EXPLORE

Compete as a climber in our Climber’s Coalition, one of Hampshire’s club sports.

Designed and constructed in 1993 as a group independent study project, the Yurt currently houses the on-campus radio station. Students practice art as an exercise in self-reflection and investigate how it can be used as a tool for activism.

30


CAMPUS ACTIVITIES

The group of student artisans known as the Blacksmith’s Guild meet up once a week to practice artistic and practical metalworking.

Infinity Productions supports students with video and film needs, and documents Hampshire student performances. They’re always recruiting talent to work on either side of the camera.

Pick up supplies from local and fair trade producers at the Mixed Nuts Food Co-Op, our student-run, volunteer-based collective.

31


You’ll never learn alone. HERE ARE JUST A FEW OF THE WAYS YOU MIGHT COLLABORATE WITH PEERS AND FACULTY TO GO DEEP ON A TOPIC

Inside the Collaborative Modeling Center, students form collaborative partnerships with faculty and staff to conduct interdisciplinary research involving mathematical, computational, visual, and physical models.

32

Students are encouraged to coauthor articles with professors. As the first authors, these students take the lead in conducting the research and writing the paper—a rare accomplishment for an undergraduate.

Chemistry professor Dula Amarasiriwardena and his students wanted to solve the mystery of what killed the ancient Chinchorro mummies of Chile. By performing laser analysis on hair and teeth samples taken from village residents, they discovered indications that the area’s drinking water contains dangerously high levels of heavy metals, particularly arsenic.

Students work alongside Dr. Laela Sayigh, assistant professor of animal behavior, as she studies social behavior and communication of cetaceans (whales and dolphins), and even take dive trips to places such as Chilean Patagonia to perform up-close observation.


% TOP 20

Fulbright

Twenty-three Fulbright Scholarships in the last nine years

One of the top 20 colleges for entrepreneurs

TOP 50

2/3

of graduates earn an advanced degree within ten years of commencement

Highest percentage of graduates who earn a Ph.D. in history

One of the top 100 schools for studying animation

One of the top 50 schools whose graduates went on to receive a Ph.D. in science or engineering

Hampshire alums have won Pulitzer and Hillman Prizes and Emmy, Academy, Peabody, and Grammy Awards. 33


The world looks to Hampshire graduates for leadership in hundreds of fields.

HOW WILL THE WORLD LOOK TO YOU?

FIND MORE NOTABLE ALUMNI AT H A M P. I T / C H A N G E M A K E R S

MANNY CASTRO Manny Castro 02F, executive director of the New Immigrant Community Empowerment (NICE) organization in Queens, NY, was recently recognized with a $200,000 grant from the David Prize, which supports New Yorkers with the plans and vision to make a difference in the lives of the city’s residents.

IAN SPALTER Ian Spalter 94F has been named one of Forbes’s most creative people, and has held UX and design positions at tech giants such as Foursquare and YouTube. Currently, he’s head of Instagram Japan.

34


ALUMNI

MARIANA VALENCIA Brooklyn-based dance artist Mariana Valencia 02F won a Bessie Award for Outstanding Breakthrough Choreographer, one of the industry’s highest honors.

LUCY MCFADDEN A retired senior scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Lucy McFadden 70F, investigated the surface composition of the solar system’s small bodies.

JAMIE CITRON

LUPITA NYONG’O

Former Obama White House staff member and longtime Director of Development Strategy at the Obama Foundation, Jamie Citron 01F now serves as Chief of Staff for Adler University.

Actress Lupita Nyong’o 03F won an Oscar for 12 Years a Slave. Other credits include Black Panther, Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Us, and the Broadway play Eclipsed.

JOSE FUENTES Jose Fuentes 05F is a partner at HwC Ventures and was a cofounder of Duolingo, a crowdsourced languagelearning and translation platform.

35


Take this as a sign Your Hampshire horoscope and highlight

LEO J U LY 2 3 – AU G U S T 2 2

You have a gift for the dramatic and are naturally drawn to stand in the spotlight. Use your lion’s roar to speak out about your passions and to amplify unheard voices. Be wary of letting your royal status as ruler of the jungle go to your head. Presenting your Div III project and basking in the committee’s congratulations

ARIES MARCH 21–APRIL 19

You’re the first to sign up to volunteer for a cause, and you never hesitate to jump right into a challenge. Aries is the first sign of the Zodiac, after all. Remember to make room for those who are more reserved than you. Be the force that brings them along instead of leaving them behind. Grabbing a bike and hitting the mountain trails

TAURUS APRIL 20 –MAY 20

Chilling out is one of your best-ats, especially when you’re surrounded by the kind of natural beauty at Hampshire. As an earth sign, you’ll feel right at home here in our lush mountain home. Be an inspiration to others as you demonstrate how to care for our planet. Picking your own vegetables in our sunny CSA garden

VIRGO AUGUST 23–SEPTEMBER 22

Your methodical and rational approach will serve you well at Hampshire as you immerse yourself in the pursuit of answers. Encourage others with your patience and diligence when solutions seem too complex and they get frustrated. Your Div II independent study

LIBRA SEPTEMBER 23–OCTOBER 22

Represented by the scales, you’re obviously a force for equality, balance, and harmony. You’re an ideal champion for Hampshire’s commitment to racial justice. And since that theme is present in all our studies, you’ll have the chance to speak out for it often. Remember that you don’t always have to have total agreement to get along. Making your intentional housing community a peaceful place to live

GEMINI MAY 21–JUNE 20

You do so much, sometimes people think there must be two of you. Good thing there is, celestially speaking, because you’re into everything. Take advantage of the many options at Hampshire to explore all your interests. Attending not only all the events on campus, but also a few at the other four colleges in our Five College consortium

CANCER

SCORPIO OCTOBER 23–NOVEMBER 21

One of the most resourceful signs, Scorpios like you thrive in an environment that rewards outside-the-box thinking (like Hampshire of course). Your love for truth will drive you to seek answers to big questions. Guide your peers to see the things hiding in plain sight. Mobilizing the peoplepower and collecting the physical resources required to complete your first community-engaged learning project

J U N E 2 1– J U LY 2 2

Empathy is your superpower. People are drawn to your intuitive nature. Harness these innate capabilities to bring people together while you show the upside to—and motivations behind—everyone’s different perspectives. Rallying your peers around a key theme, then attacking it from every angle

36

SAGITTARIUS NOVEMBER 22–DECEMBER 21

You, the archer, shoot arrows in many directions, chase after them, and find adventures waiting along the way. Your intense curiosity will take you to several


places, not just geographical, but also intellectual and spiritual. Share your delight of the unknown with everyone you meet. Studying abroad in Madrid

CAPRICORN DECEMBER 22–JANUARY 19

You have a mythical, mystic quality about you, like the sea goat that represents your celestial sign. A lover of music and craft, you excel in artistic expression and often find your viewpoint is best expressed through your art. Your abstract way of thinking complements and enhances those whose minds are concrete. Every minute spent inside the Music and Dance Building in the Longsworth Art Village

AQUARIUS JANUARY 20–FEBRUARY 18

You are represented by the water bearer, a healer who brings life. Through your empathy, commitment, and affinity for humanitarian causes, you, too, heal those around you. You have a tendency to absorb the feelings of others. Don’t forget your feelings are important too. Collaborating with faculty to solve real problems

PISCES FEBRUARY 19–MARCH 20

You are wise beyond your years. Use your intuitive knowing, along with your selfless nature, to root out injustice and bring it to light. Help shoulder the burdens of others, but use care not to fall into the victim role when what you need is better boundaries. Time spent with friends at The Bridge

YOUR FUTURE AT HAMPSHIRE Apply Now Hampshire College is entirely test blind in our admissions process. We never required SATs or ACTs, and now, we won’t accept them. Instead, we take a holistic look at your application, to see what makes you who you are.

First-year students R E QU IR E D A PPLIC ATION M ATE R I A L S

C  ompleted Common Application M  id-Year Report (if currently attending high school) C  urrent or completed high school transcript(s) S  chool report and college counselor recommendation O  ne (1) teacher letter of recommendation

International Students See our English proficiency requirement online, or request a waiver by contacting our Coordinator of International Recruitment at admissions@hampshire.edu.

Transfer Students (must have completed at least 15 college credits)

ANURA

We accept transfer credits for comparable courses taken at a regionally accredited college or university.

JANUARY 1–DECEMBER 31

You hold the collective Hampshire consciousness—the desire to rebel, to change, to right wrongs, to run naked at midnight. You channel the energy of every Hampshire student and faculty member who has ever existed, and transform it into ongoing contributions that are uniquely your own. Choosing your Div III topic

Homeschool/Unschool Students Through your Hampshire Application, we will gain a better understanding of your learning experiences and help you continue to shape your curriculum.

SEE FULL DETAILS AT: A P P LY. H A M P S H I R E . E D U


AS A HAMPSHIRE GRADUATE , YOU’LL HEAL AND UNITE , ACT WITH KNOWLEDGE AND UNDERSTANDING , AND CONTINUE TO CHAMPION AND ADVANCE THE CHANGE THAT MAKES A BETTER WORLD .

A P P LY T O D AY AT ADMISSIONS.HAMPSHIRE.EDU

Profile for Hampshire College

What Were You Made For? Hampshire College Viewbook 2020  

Hampshire College was founded in 1965 to radically reimagine liberal arts education. Today, we’re more unconventional than ever, and we’re o...

What Were You Made For? Hampshire College Viewbook 2020  

Hampshire College was founded in 1965 to radically reimagine liberal arts education. Today, we’re more unconventional than ever, and we’re o...